Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 16 – 1914

1914 Apr 16 – Chas. Best Hanged Himself

Charles Best, aged 47, and one of the first settlers on the Gilbert Plains, committed suicide on Friday by hanging himself to a brace in the granary. Deceased has been of unsound mind for the past two years, only having come home from the asylum about two weeks ago. He leaves a wife, six sons and three daughters, the eldest about 18 years old.
Deceased was well-known in Dauphin, having hauled grain to the market for several years in the early days.

1914 Apr 16 – Fork River

C. Clark of Paswegan, Sask., after spending a few days among his numerous friends at this point left for home. He was one of the old-timers, living here for ten years. He says he would rather live in Manitoba.
Professor Robinson is busy these days and intends trying farming for a little recreation as he states the bottom has fallen out of the fishing “biz”. The other fellow, he says, gets the wad. Try mushrooms, Jack.
J.G. Lockhart has returned from a trip to the east and intends investing heavily in real estate, etc.
Our Scotch friends seem to be taking alternate trips to the Lake Town. What will be the outcome we are not sure, as it’s neither sleighing or wheeling and there is too much wind for wings. Still, where there is a will there is always a way.
The Rev. Canon Jeffery, of Winnipeg, will hold Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, April 10th at 3 p.m.
Mrs. J.D. McAulay, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, arrived with his bride and is spending the Easter holidays with his parents on the Mossey. Frank is one of the boys we are always pleased to see and we with him much happiness and prosperity.
At a meeting of the Horse Breeders’ Association on the 7th it was decided to disband the majority being of the opinion it was cheaper to breed scrubs for another year. We don’t hesitate to say the farmers have made the mistake of their lives. It takes backbone and money, sure, but it has to be undertaken sooner or later. We will have to let the groomers set back if we ever intend raising saleable horses, or, for that matter, any other kind of good stock.
Mrs. J. Rice is off to Dauphin for a few days holidays.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending the Easter holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mrs. Humphreys has returned from a visit to Dauphin.

1914 Apr 16 – Winnipegosis

We are all turning our thought to spring when the lake will be open and the beats skinning the water.
The river is open.
R. Burrell has opened a restaurant in the Cohen block.
Dwellings are scarce and rooming quarters hard to get. This would indicate our little burgh is fording ahead.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley are spending a few days in Dauphin this week.
Sid Coffey, our moving picture man, visited Dauphin this week. Once Sid completes his new hall the moving picture business will become a permanent feature of the town.
Thorn Johnson has broken his arm again. This is the fourth fracture he has suffered.
John Rogelson is busy overhauling boats.
A number of mink have been added to the animal ranch here.
There was a large delegation from here on Monday to attend the Conservative convention at Gilbert Plains. Among the party were J.P. Grenon, C.I. White, J. Denby, J. Dewhurst, Ed. Morris, Thos. Toye, W. Hunkings, K. McAulay, W. Ketcheson, F.H. Hjaluarson, R. Harrison, Rod Burrell.
Four delegates were also along from Pine River: J. Klyne, W. Gobson, G. Pangman, and W. Campbell.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s