Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 3, 1919

Reception to Major Barker

Major W.G. Barker, V.C., D.S.., M.C., has been granted three months leave of absence to visit his home and is expected to arrive within the next two weeks. Winnipeg will tender him a civic reception.
Dauphin will also tender Major Baker a right royal reception, the details of which will be announced later.

Winnipegosis

At a meeting of the Dramatic Society held at the home of Mr. F.G. Shears, the profit and loss statement of the play, “The Arrival of Kitty,” was discussed. It was agreed that of the surplus from the play $25 should be given to the Red Cross, the balance, $5.58 being held as a working fund for future productions. The society then dissolved, with a view to reorganization on a wider and more democratic basis. Discussion resulted in the following findings: Mr. Shears was appointed president, Mr. Ketcheson vice and Mr. Campbell, sec.-treasurer. It was further decided to open the society to all persons interested in the drama, such persons to become members on payment of an annual membership fee of 50 cents. Mr. T. Needham, Mr. Jack Denby, Miss McMartin, Mrs. Giggins and Mr. Ketcheson were formed into a committee to obtain new members. A committee to search for suitable plays and people to act them, was formed of Mr. Wills, Mrs. Shears, Mr. Campbell, Mrs. St. Amour and Mrs. Giggins. Some further detail business was transacted and the new society well and very favorably launched. The first production will be put in hand immediately and produced in about two months.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 16, 1919

Dauphin Flour in Belgium

Our readers will remember that shortly after the first reports of the suffering among the Belgian people, due to the Hun invasion in 1914, reached Canada, the Dauphin Milling and Creamery Co. Limited, ground a carload of flour from wheat donated by farmers and others in Dauphin and adjoining municipalities. This carload was duly shipped to Belgium but no official record was ever received of its having reached its destination. The following letter received a few days ago by the company makes very interesting reading, and it is gratifying to note that at least part of the donation reached the people for whom it was intended:
“52 Rue De Mondigny,
“Charleroi, Belgium.
“Dec. 1, 1918.
“Dear Sir,—You will no doubt be greatly surprised to receive this letter from a person that you have never seen nor heard of before, and your surprise will be still greater when you hear that it is written at your request.
“One day, early in 1915, I was present at the opening of a bag of flour which, with several others, had just arrived from Canada. At the bottom of the sack was a strip of paper bearing these words, ‘Whoever gets this bag of flour write and let us know if it is good.’ I would have written at once only the Germans, with their usual kindheartedness, made things so easy for us that letter writing was out of the question. I hope never to see a German again as long as I live. ‘The best of them are bad.’
“Your flour was excellent; it has not been our luck to have such good quality since. For the last three years our bread—it really doesn’t deserve the name of bread—was composed of everything except flour, thanks to Fritz.
“You would not recognize your flour sack. It has been transferred into a beautiful sofa cushion and occupies a prominent place in our drawing-room It is the admiration of all visitors.
“Last week the Canadian troops came to Charleroi; they received a warm welcome on all sides. Everyone here speaks highly of your compatriots, many English regiments passed two or three days in this town before entering Boschland. With every good wish for Xmas and with kindest regards.
“Believe me, yours sincerely,
(Signed) Andree McDonnell.”

Mossey River Council

The first meeting of the council of 1919 took place at Fork River on Jan. 7th.
The clerk swore in the newly elected members – T.B. Venables, reeve; J. Yakavanka, councilor for Ward 1; E.A. Marcroft for Ward 3, and J. Namaka for Ward 5.
Bylaws were passed making the councilors’ fees $4 per day and appointing D.F. Wilson sec.-treasurer at a salary of $875.
The bylaws of 1918 appointing the solicitors and health officer were confirmed for 1919.

COMMITTEES
Finance – Hunt, Marcroft and Paddock.
Bridges – Coun. Reid and Hunt.
Public Works – Coun. Marcroft, Paddock and Namaka be public works committee for Wards 3, 4 and 5, and Coun. Yakavanka, Hunt and Reid be public works committee for Wards 1, 2 and 6.
Paddock-Marcroft – That the bridge committee examine the bridges that are needing repairs and make an estimate of the material that will be required for the season’s bridge work and report to the clerk who is instructed to purchase same.
Hunt-Namaka – That the assistance which has been given to the family of the late Peter Smith be discontinued.
Hunt-Marcroft – That each councilor make a diagram showing the work in his ward which he would prefer to come under the working of the Good Roads Act for the yea 1919, and forward said diagrams to the sec.-treasurer, who is instructed to make a diagram from them showing the whole municipality, which diagram is to be forwarded to the Good Roads board.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the clerk instruct the solicitors to prepare a bill legalizing the assessment roll of 1918, and that the member for the constituency be asked to bring it before the legislature at the coming session.
Marcroft-Hunt – That a grant of $50 be made to ex-Reeve Lacey for miscellaneous expenses.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the assessment roll for the year 1919 is hereby adopted for the years 1919 and 1920.
Reid-Namaka – That Reeve Venables be a delegate to the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and that the delegates receive $25 for expenses.
Council adjourned to meet at the call of the reeve.

Fork River

Mrs. James Rice, of Northlake School, has returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Mrs. R. McEachren and daughter Helen were recent visitors to Dauphin.
A car of young fat stock was shipped out last train. Good prices were realized by the sellers.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Little have returned from a short visit south.
H. Swartwood, International Implement Co., general agent, was at Fork River last week to hook up the orders of the local agent, W. King, for the coming season. Agent Billy K. is most optimistic as to the coming season’s business and to show his faith, has placed liberal orders.
Sunday school in All Saints Church every Sunday at 2 p.m.
Mr. Jarvis is now teacher of the Mowat School.
The continued fine weather is very favorable to stock and they are in fine condition.
Grain and cordwood are coming to market in considerable quantities every day.
The following are the officers of Purple Star Lodge, L.O.L., No. 1765, for the ensuing term:
W.M., Bro. C.E. Bailey; D.M., W.J. King; chaplain, Edwin King; rec. secretary, Wm. King; fin. Secretary, A. Hunt; D. of O., F. Cooper; treasurer, Sam Bailey; lecturer, F.F. Hanfebrak; dep. lecturer, Sam Reid. Committeemen – M. Cooper, H. Hunter, W. Russell, Ed. Morris, S. King, Jos. Bickel.

Sifton

A crowded schoolroom showed the appreciation of the residents of Sifton district of the Wycliff School Xmas concert. The hit of the evening was a three-piece sketch called “Santa and the Fairies.” Joe Reid acted as Santa, Miss Tilly Farion as Queen of the Fairies, and Witch Doubletongue was impersonated by Mary Braschuk. Patriotic songs opened the program, while several part-song contributed much to the enjoyment of the evening. An effective item was a serenade by the school children, clustering in a semicircle on the platform, with a flashlight playing on them for the darkened auditorium. Mrs. J.A. Campbell contributed the piano and violin accompaniments.
A good old-time dance, at which there was a large attendance, followed the concert. The dance music was given by Mrs. Campbell and Messrs. Marcott, Potoski, Kuczma, Halinski, and others.
The proceeds of the evening, totaling $56.75, have been placed in the bank as the Wycliff School Children’s Amusement fund. Part of it is to be applied at once to the repair of the school toboggan slide, a new concert platform, and ropes for the swings.
The teachers of the school, Mr. Bousfield and Miss Trew, and the children are grateful to the friends who gave the ample and excellent refreshments; to Mr. Paul Wood for the loan of his piano and for the willing assistance given by friends before and during the evening.
The fudge and taffy were provided by the children from their own lunch as a treat to adults, enjoying the Christmas spirit. The artists responsible for the blackboard scenes of the stage were Leslie Kennedy and Tilly Farion.

Winnipegosis

Old Josey Campbell, who resides near Water Hen, had his house and content totally destroyed by fire last Friday. The house was a new frame building, and the loss is ruinous to old Josey.
The council of the Village of Winnipegosis held its regular meeting last Tuesday. The council has been shorthanded for several months but is now complete, being reinforced by the addition of two new councilors, J. Willis and Chas. Denby. The council donated $400 to the Red Cross and discussed the building of a hospital and giving the town better fire protection. These last two matters will come up again at next council meeting.
The interment of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy, Ochre River, formerly of this town, took place on Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Hook conducted the service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 24 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 24 – Typhoid Fever Outbreak

Typhoid fever has broken out among the school children at Winnipegosis and the school has been closed.

1912 Oct 24 – Fork River

J.H. Martinson, of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, real estate agent, was here on business last week.
Alex. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, was a visitor to Dauphin on business a few days ago.
Mr. Sturdy, who has been all summer at the A.T. Co. store at Winnipegosis, is assisting Mr. Kennedy in the store here now.
Samuel Reid, returned home after a week’s holiday with friends at Brandon.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family spent a few days in Dauphin lately with friends.
J. Parker, of the Stark farm, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Captain Russell, of Sifton, was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s lately.
Miss Comber returned home after spending the summer at Selkirk.
Mr. Silverwood, of Dauphin, was in town for a short stay the guest of Wm. Williams, lumber merchant.
George Sumpton, of Dauphin, is here for a short stay with Mr. Snelgrove.
The railway traffic is getting so heavy on this line that it takes two locomotives to handle a train, especially when they take the side track for it.
The Press of October 17th refers to Macdonald election as a “Howling Farce” and has not got sand enough to print the exact majority.
F. Champion, of Cleveland, England, was here a few days ago in connection with a business transactions.
Harvest festival service at All Saints’ will be held in the church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 27th.

1918 Oct 24 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Lloyd Winters, Ashville, killed in action. (Lloyd Levi Winters, 1896, 2129348)
Lieut. Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, killed. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Arthur Day, Dauphin, gassed and wounded. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
Pte. J.W. Lane, Dauphin, wounded. (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
Pte. Go.F. King, Dauphin, wounded. (George Francis King, 1891, 151775)
Pte. W.K. Goodman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Wilbert Karl Goodman, 1894, 294203)
Pte. W.J. Bothwell, Makinak, wounded. (Wilfred James Bothwell, 1899, 2184456)
Pte. L. Ward, Grandview, wounded. (Lewis Ward, 1896, 2129152)
Pte. J. Lahaie, Makinak, wounded. (Joseph Lahaie, 1889, 291727)
Lance Corp. D. Stewart, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. E.L. Abrey, Dauphin, wounded. (Ernest Lincoln Abrey, 1889, 865837)
Pte. C.A. Blackmon, Ochre River, wounded. (Charles Alexander Blackmon, 1897, 1001157)

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair was held on Oct. 10th. The weather was perfect but this militated against the attendance for threshing was going on. The attendance of children was good, still some of the schools were very poorly represented owing to the rush of work on the farms. The lack of teachers for some of the schools and the many changes in teachers in others, was a serious handicap to the welfare of the club during the past years.
Lawrence Rowe won the Bank of Commerce prize for the vest pair of pigs at either the Fork River or Winnipegosis fairs, with a very creditable pair of Yorkshires.
It is to be hoped that the club will receive greeter interest from the parents in the coming year and so encourage the children in this work.

PRIZE LIST.
The following is a list of prize winners at the fair:
Grain growing:
Wheat sheaf – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Wheat, 20 lbs – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Rye sheaf – Albert Janowski 1st.

Stock, Calves:
Dairy – Donald McEachern 1st, Arthur Jamieson 2nd, Dave Nowosad 3rd.

Calves:
Beef – Bob Williams 1st, Kate Williams 2nd, Steve Beyko 3rd, Bill Williams 4th.

Pigs:
Pair – Lawrie Rowe 1st, Alice Nowosad 2nd.

Poultry:
Pen of Barred Rocks (3) – Kate Williams 1st, Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Pen Buff Orpingtons – Dave Nowosad 1st, Stanley Lundy 2nd.
Pen White Leghorns – Stanley Benner.
Pen Black Minorcas – Mike Borowski 1st, Bob Williams 2nd.
Pen Brown Leghorns – Bill Williams 1st.
Pen White Rocks – Arthur Jamieson 1st.

Gardening: Half bushel potatoes – Rosie Sowenski 1st, Alex. Zaplitney 2nd, Nicola Poctylo 3rd, Annie Sowinski 4th.
Six carrots – Charlie Jager 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Lawrie Rowe 3rd.
Six turnips – Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Six beets – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Two cabbages – Annie Beyko 1st, Mike Borowski 2nd, Charlie Jager 3rd.
Pumpkins – Nellie Kolokicvk 1st.
Onions – Alice Nowosad 1st, Charlie Jager 2nd.

Cooker:
Loaf of bread – Viola Rower 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Buns – Viola Rowe 1st.

Sewing – Viola Rowe 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Patching – Viola Rowe 1st, Emily Strasdin 2nd.
Fancy work – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Canning – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Longest ??? thistle root – Peter Zaplitney 1st, Fred Jager 2nd.
Woodwork – Bob Williams 1st, Dave Nowosad 2nd, Belle Williams 3rd.
Ducks – Sophie Beyko 1st.
Butter – Rosie Sowskine 1st, Mary Mieke 2nd.
Knitting – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Scribblers – Yumtaska 1st, Annie Chornoboy 2nd, Nellie Karwstski 3rd.

Writing:
Grade I – Horace Thompson 1st, Clara Dewberry 2nd.
Grade II – Ivor Humphreys 1st, Alley Dewberry 2nd.
Grade III – Bernard Hunt 1st, Lulu Thompson 2nd, Golkie Schuchett 3rd.
Map of Manitoba – Dave Nowosad 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Arthur Jamieson 3rd.

Handwork:
Grade I – Mossey School.
Grade II – Mossey School.
Nature Book – Beatrice Rowe 1st.
Collection of butterflies – Irene Bailey 1st.

1918 Oct 24 – Winnipegosis Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Boys’ and Girls’ Cub Fair was held at Winnipegosis on Friday, Oct. 11th. This was the fist event of the kind ever held in this locality and thanks to the efforts of the public school teachers, was a decided success. Keen interest was displayed by the residents of South Bay, and a large number were on hand to view the fair.
The judges were Miss Speechley and Mr. Murray, of the Extension Department of the M.A.C.
The sewing exhibit, largely due to the efforts of Miss M. McMartin, was a credit to Winnipegosis schools. The chickens were good, as were also the display of vegetables. With a greater interest taken by the surrounding schools we hope to double or treble our entries another year.
The secretary and organizer was Mr. H.L. Williams, public school principal.

PRIZE LIST.
Class I: Pair of pigs – Harry Whale 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Single pig – Wallie Pouliet 1st, Evelyn Groff 2nd, Harry Whale 3rd, Gordon Rognvaldson 4th.
Class II, Chicken Raising: Pen of 3 Barred Rocks – Walter Keen, South Bay, 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd, Wilfred Moyer, South Bay, 3rd, Ignace Bobinsky, South Bay, 4th, Mike Samimski, South Bay, 5th, Anthony Bobinsky, South Bay, 6th.
Pen of 3, any other breed – Daisy Walmsley 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Class III, Gardening: One dozen potatoes – Beverly Schaldemose 1st, Elizabeth Moyer, South Bay, 2nd, Ruth Groff 3rd, Evelyn Groff 4th, Mike Verchaski 5th, Gladys Cartwright 6th.
Dozen large onions or 3 large turnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, Elizabeth Moyer 4th.
Dozen parsnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd.
Dozen carrots or beets – Mary Marchenski 1st, Mike Samimski 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, John Moodry 4th, Elizabeth Moyer 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Class IV, Cooking: Two loaves of bread – Lottie Moore 1st, Attie Hechter 2nd.
Dozen oatmeal cookies – Margaret McAuley 1st, Lottie Moore 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd, Alice Hechter 4th.
Dozen cornmeal muffins – Ruth Groff 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Lottie Moore 3rd.
Class V, Sewing: Work bag – Mary Magnuson 1st, Ester Hechter 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd.
Knitted article – Cecil Paddock 1st, Mary Marchinski 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Evolda Whale 4th.
Sewing apron – Mary Magnuson 1st, Verna Denby 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Esther Hechter 4th, Evolda Whale 5th, Charlotte Adam 6th.
Red Cross Collection – Evolda Whale 1st, Mary Magnuson 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Charlotte Adam 4th, Addie Ketcheson 5th.
Night gown or tea apron – Charlotte Adam 1st, Addie Ketcheson 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Amelia Adam 4th.
Table runner – Helen Macaulay 1st, Lenore Denby 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Dust cap and work apron – Lenore Denby 1st, Tina Marchenski 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Piece of crochet work – Attie Hechter 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Lenore Sehaldemose 4th, Mary Marchenski 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Two Red Cross articles – Lenore Sehaldemose 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Ruth Groff 4th.
Middy suit – Lottie Moore 1st, Lenore Sehaldemose 2nd.
Class VII, Weed Contest: Collection of seeds of 10 noxious weeds – Ignace Bobinsky 1st, Mary Fleming 2nd, Ella Martin 3rd, Arthur McLellan 4th.
Class VIII, Woodwork Contest – Stanley Miket 1st, John Wallace 2nd, Nieh Rudiak 3rd, Alec. Ogryzlo 4th.

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the week-end with his parents.
There was a very good turnout to the Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Mr. Fred Tilt is building a house next to the Orange Hall. He has retired from farming and will reside in town.
Dunc Kennedy and party from Ochre River passed through the town on Sunday on their way to Winnipegosis.
Pte. Venables, who has just returned from overseas, is visiting his brother, T.B. Venables.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ Church and the attendance was good. It is hopeful sign when interest is taken in our young people.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 8 – 1914

1914 Oct 8 – Boy Found

The four-year-old son of Joseph Lareche, of McCreary, who was lost for four days, was found on Saturday alive, but nearly exhausted. He has since recovered entirely.
Twenty-five of the boy scouts from here, under direction of Scoutmaster D.S. Woods, participated in the hunt.

1914 Oct 8 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Davis and Mrs Grenon have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
Professor Robinson and several young folks took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Friday night. They report a good time.
All will be pleased to hear that Andy Rowe is getting around again after his two weeks’ illness.
Mr. Bradley, of Saskatchewan, has disposed of a car load of horses while here and is returning with a car of stock.
School has commenced again and the “pimple scare” is about over. What will we have next? We seem to be catching something all the time since the telephone arrived.
Miss Eva Storrar has returned from Rainy River, Ont., and intends living on the homestead for the present.
Children’s day will be on Sunday, Oct., 18th. There will be a special children’s service and singing in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock. All are invited to come and help to make this a rally day for the children to remember.
The rain of Sunday was the means of putting out the running fires.

1914 Oct 8 – Winnipegosis

The finishing touches are being put on the school by the painter this week. Contractor Neely finished his work and left on Saturday for Dauphin. The school is a credit to the town.
Our new police magistrate, Mr. J. Seiffert, has tried several cases of late and his decisions go to show he has good judgement. It is a good idea to mix common sense with judicial decisions sometimes. Some of the cases brought before the P.M. would test the ability of the historic “Philadelphia lawyer.”
The fishermen have commenced to prepare for the winter camp. The steamer Manitou went north with a cargo of supplies this week.
The P.M. has laid a charge against a local official and Wm. King, J.P., of Fork River, will try the case.
Mr. Wallace Dudley and Miss Phoebe Denby were married on Monday, the 5th, by the Rev. D. Flemming, of Dauphin. The young people are popular and their many friends wish them every happiness.
Mrs. John Denby is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Mrs. Kenneth McAuley is visiting at Dauphin.
Fred. McDonald has returned to spend the winter months with us. The great question the boys now ask is, will Freddy repeat his curling stunts this winter.
Rev. B. Thorensson, of Winnipeg, united Miss Toby Oddsson and Mr. John Goodman in the holy bonds of matrimony on the 7th inst.
Watch the Herald for more marriage notices. We have more coming, but “mum’s the word just now.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 11 – 1914

1914 Jun 11 – Bad Fire at Ochre River

A disastrous fire occurred at Ochre River on Sunday morning last about 2 o’clock, when the store of the Ochre River Trading Co., together with most of the stock, was destroyed. The fire, when discovered had made considerable headway and the building being a frame one, was soon consumed. Willing hands did what they could to save the contents of the store and keep the fire from spreading.
The building was valued at $4000 and was insured for $2000.
The stock was insured for $12000 and its value placed at a sum in the neighbourhood of $15000 or $16000.
The origin of the fire is a mystery. It is probably that an investigation will be made.

1914 Jun 11 – House Burned

For the second time Mr. Gillies’ house at Sifton, was burned on Saturday night. The structure was a two-story frame building and nearly finished. Some time ago Mr. Gillies’ partly constructed dwelling was burned also. Incendiarism is suspected and the cause of the fire will be investigated.

1914 Jun 11 – Three Killed in Collision

One of the worst accidents that has happened for some time past on the C.N.R. took place just east of Cote, a small station six miles from Kamsack, on Friday night last. It was a head-on collision between No. 2 eastbound and No. 201, speed freight. There is a curve at this point in the road and the two trains were running at a good rate of speed and were right together before the engineers had time to reverse. No. 2 was in charge of Engineer J.H. Arnold and No. 201 Engineer R.T. Perkins, Jas. Clyde was firing for No. 2. and F.J. Smith for No. 201. All four were from this point. Perkins, Clyde and Smith all managed to jump and not one of them received any serious injury. Arnold stuck to his post and was so badly scalded and otherwise inured that he dead a few hours afterwards at the Kamsack Hospital.
F.J. Faiji, mail clerk, and Ross Donaldson, express messenger, were instantly killed. Both ran out of Winnipeg.
Geo. Gougeon, brakeman, of Dauphin was slightly injured.
W.H. Messier and J.A. McVicar were the conductors of the respective trains, the passage and freight. Both escaped unhurt.
None of the passengers on the train were injured, but nearly all received a bad shaking up.

1914 Jun 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Winnipegosis on May 30th.
The minutes of the previous meeting were adopted as read.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now sit as a court of revision.
The clerk reported that no protests had been filled since the court of revision had adjourned.
Hechter-Toye – That the court of revision new adjourn.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now take up the usual municipal matters.
Communications were then read from Prof. Black, the Deputy Minister of Public Works; the Land Commissioner of the Hudson’s Bay Co,; Judge Ryan; J. Irwin; the solicitors for the C.N.R.; the Municipal Solicitor; H. Rustad and a petition from certain ratepayers asking for a bridge.
Hechter-Bickle – That the plan of subdivision of block G and part of block F, village of Winnipegosis, plan being numbered 251, submitted by Munson & Allan, be approved.
Hunt-Bickle – That the secretary write the superintendent of the C.N.R. Dauphin, regarding the putting in of a culvert through the railway at pole No. 22, north of mile board No. 12.
Toye-Hunt – That W. Vincent be paid $13 for his service in securing the title to the roadway through the Champion farm.
Toye-Hechter – That plank be supplied to cover a bridge 20 feet long over Icelandic Creek, on the township line, between 29 and 30, the settlers agreeing to do the work.
Hunt-Bickle – in amendment – That Coun. Robertson and Toye deal with the matter of a bridge across Icelandic Creek and that the coasts be borne by ward 5 and 6. Amendment carried.
Messrs. Macneill and Reid, the delegates from Dauphin, were head regarding the building of a road from Winnipegosis to Dauphin.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks be tendered the delegates from Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the council now decide to come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act, a road from Fork River south to the boundary of the municipality and connecting with the proposed road to be built by the Dauphin municipality, between section 35 and 36 in township 28, range 19.
Bickle-Richardson – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter and Hunt be a committee to select the main roads and prepare the preliminary steps required t come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act.
Hechter-Richardson – That a grant of ten bags of flour be made to Seifat Michtka and that the flour by bought from whoever will supply it at the lowest price.
Hunt-Bickle – That in the matter of a petition of certain ratepayers of ward 6 regarding statute labour, the reeve by authorized to ??? in the absence of Coun. Robertson.
Robinson-Hechter – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and see the Minister of Public Works with a view to getting a grant for the biding of public roads in the municipality.
Hechter-Hunt – That the public works committee be authorized to begin work and if the weather permits complete the Fork River and Winnipegosis road; the work to be done in accordance with the profile of the Government engineer.
Richardson-Hechter – That on complaint to the clerk and the production of the necessary proof by the complainant, the clerk is hereby instructed to prosecute the owners of animals running at large contrary to the provision of the by laws.
Richardson-Hechter – That the clerk notify parties who have had interments made in the municipal cemeteries to apply at the office of the municipality for their cemetery deeds.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye-Bickle – That Coun. Hechter be authorized to rent two tents to be used by the men on road constructions.
A by-law was passed making an appropriation to the wards on a basis of six mills in the assessment.
Bickle-Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jun 11 – Fork River

Mrs. Chas. Denby, of Winnipegosis, returned home, having spent a week among friends.
Mrs. Kennedy and family have returned from Winnipegosis having spent the weekend there.
W. Williams’ planning mill is running full blast these days and “Billy” is busy shipping lumber.
W. Howiston spent a few days at Winnipegosis and while away we are informed, invested in a schooner. That’s all right “Scotty.”
Mr. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days inspecting work performed by homesteaders.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is visiting here.
Jack Robson and Harry Hunter have returned from a two months trapping and hunting trip and they report a good catch.
E. Williams, lay reader, has returned from attending the Synod at Winnipeg last week. He reports a very busy time.
The mail these days contains many copies of the speech on free wheat by our friend “Bob” Cruise, member for Dauphin. The wheat question does not cut any ice here at present. Its roads and bridges we went. We would be delighted to hear our friend “Bob” converting the Senate and his friends to vote for Borden’s good roads policy which was thrown out last session.
The seeding is over and the crop has been put in good shape, it being one of the finest seasons we have seen for years.
The captain of our fire brigade has prophesized a dry season and is seriously thinking of going into growing watermelons in case of fire. The only thing we can do is to keep smiling as the crops are looking good.
Feming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor here between trains the latter end of the week.
“Joe” Lockhart is filling a car with settlers’ effects and is off for the banana belt. Ta, ta, “Joe” we wish you good luck.
There will be a court of revision at Ethelbert on June 17th. It’s the last chance for getting on the list for the electoral division of Gilbert Plains.
W. King has returned after a two weeks’ trip north. He had a good time, tanks to his two Liberal friends who stuck to him closer than a brother, and “Billy” always appreciates a good thing.
Mrs. Curtis and Mrs. Morrisain, of Texas, U.S., are visiting their friend, Mrs. Nat Little, for a few weeks.
Miss F. Sanderson left for Winnipegosis to take charge of a large diary business started by G. Sanderson, of that burgh.
W. Hunkins and “Jimmy” Bickle passed through here recently at a 2-40 gait.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 1 – 1911

1911 Jun 1 – Winnipegosis

Chas. Denby has lately arrived from Delphi, Missouri. Though he seems a little fatigued after the long journey, he will no doubt be able to come back. They will have to show Charlie. The “Heavy hitting Daney” played with the White Soxs of Gruber last season and is a strong acquisition to the team. Dudley has been imported all the way from Piccadilly Alley, London, England, to play 2nd base. The pitching staff is well known to fandom, Medd and Perrault have been secured at great cost. They are both slab artists with a reputation. The club after a hard flight have secured the release of McDonald. He easily fills the gap behind the bat. Bill Mullin, who is a brother to the Mullin now playing with the Detroit Tigers, is easily the biggest find of the season, weighs 250 lbw. Marcroft who plays centre field is farmed out to the locals by the South Bay team. He says he is some pitcher too. Hodgins is a local boy, having extensive interests at Fork River. Bennie Hechter is the run getter of the team. He can steal anything from home plate to fish for Friday.
Capt. Medd will no doubt be sending challenges out in a short time as he must get this costly arrogation into shape for the tour he intend making this summer to South Bay, Fork River and possibly Sifton or Dauphin. We wish the team success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 30 – 1912

1912 May 30 – Fork River News

The Fork River boys journeyed to the Lake Town on Victoria Day and played football, losing by one goal. Score Winnipegosis 2; Fork River 1; Better luck on 3rd June boys.
Theo. Johnston and J.H. Robinson left here Tuesday for Selkirk for the summer fishing.
Seeding is rushing along now we are getting something like weather.
Don’t forget the picnic on 3rd June, also the concert at night in and of the new parsonage. Everyone come and have a good time.
W.J. Williams is shipping a car of lumber to Winnipegosis.
Cream is coming in faster new and farmers are taking advantage of prepaid express to Winnipegosis by the Armstrong Creamery.
W. Williams was a visitor to Sifton Monday and took in Ashmore’s sale.

1912 May 30 – Winnipegosis Breezes

The boating season is now in full swing and Sunday saw a gull turn out. Langlots’ schooner took a party for a trip on the lake and motor boats belonging to Dr. Medd, H. Parker, Conrad Adams and Dad Denby ware fully loaded with visitors to Snake Island. The day was glorious and everyone had a good time. The hatchery has now ceased operations until next fall; the whitefish fry were weaned about two weeks ago and turned out in the lake by Hughie McKellar, the Government hatchery expert. Hughie has no trade secrets and visitors will always find him ready to impart full information on all matters appertaining to fish culture. Some days he is very interesting.
There was a large turnout for the picnic on Monday, the weather was ideal and everyone spent a happy time. The sports lasted from 2 o’clock until 9 and great rivalry and excitement was shown right to the last. The baseball match between the Fishermen and Town was worse than any dog fight. Doc. Medd turned renegade and pitched for the Fishermen and with a good wind behind him pitched so fast a all that the Town never saw it; the Fishermen also had the umpire bribed (so the Town say). However all were friends again five minutes after the game and in charity to the Town we suppress the score. The football match between Winnipegosis and Fork River was a hard fought game, but the farmer boys are very poor marksmen and the locals won comfortably by two goals to one. The following is a list of the winners of the other events:

EVENTS FOR ADULTS
100 yards – J.E. Mossington
Sack – W. Denby
220 yards – J. Denby
Hop, step, and jump – W. Grearson
Pipe race – Baptiste McLeod
Broad jump – W. Grearson
High jump – W. Grearson
Putting shot – W. Grearson

LADIES’ RACES.
Needle – K. Parker
Skipping – E. Paddock
Egg and spoon – Edna Grenon

BOYS’ RACES.
Age 13 to 16 – C. Burrell
Age 11 to 13 – A. Richard

GIRLS’ RACES.
Age 13 to 16 – E. Paddock
Age 11 to 13 – G. Eggartson
Tots – Leonore Denby

Several summer cottages are about to be built on the new pleasure beach. It is proposed to erect a small pier on the beach and have motor and row boats as livery.
George Cunliffe, of Whale & Cunliffe, left on Tuesday for Winnipeg where he will await the arrival from England, of his future bride, Laura Barkess of Bradford. They will return on Saturday and Mr. and Mrs. Cunliffe will receive a right royal welcome.