Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 19, 1920

Jail Sentences in Future

Jail sentences, with no option of a fine, will be imposed on all persons guilty of breach of the Manitoba Temperance Act in future, according to the amendment to the Act, which was brought before the legislature this week by the Hon. Thomas H. Johnson, Attorney-General.

Fork River

Mr. Maine is the new teacher at Fork River School and Miss U. Harlowe at Pine View. We’re forever changing teachers. “We’re forever changing teachers.”
Wm. King, Milton Cooper and H. Hunter attended the meeting of the Dauphin Country Orange lodge at Dauphin last week.
Fork River chicken fanciers were not represented at the recent poultry show at Dauphin. This is to be regretted as there are some good strains of stock in this district. Poultry raising should be developed to a much greater extent than it is.
Some of our farmers are drawing hay 25 miles. This illustrates the importance of conserving feed for the opening of spring work.
Wolves are fairly numerous this winter and some fine pelts are being brought to town. It pays to join in the fun of the chase when you can get $25 for a skin.
The debate on the night of the 11th inst., proved of more than ordinary interest. The topic was, “Resolved, That married life is preferable to single life.” The following championed the affirmative: Miss. E. Carlson, captain; L. Lacey, M. Shannon and Miss Carlson. Negative – Mr. C. Bailey, captain; Mrs. A.J. Little, F. Wilson, Jr., and Mrs. C. Bailey. The affirmative won. The critic was Mr. A. Hunt, and in his review he ably dealt with the arguments pro and con. The judges were Mrs. F. Cooper, Mr. Main and D.F. Wilson, Sr.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 12, 1920

Fined $200

On Tuesday, the 10th, Inland Revenue Officer J.A. Hall made a raid on certain parties at Winnipegosis suspected of illegal whiskey manufacturing. A quantity of mash and large still were discovered and as a result E.D. Philibelt appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday and was fined $200 and costs.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Comrade R.B. Maxwell, vice-president of the Dominion Command, was a visitor at last Thursday’s meeting. He came to Dauphin for the purpose of explaining some aspects of the reestablishment proposals, with which many members of the association and the general public are unfamiliar. Comrade Maxwell proved to be an instructive and entertaining speaker, and his address was very much appreciated.
At the next regular meeting, which will be held on Thursday, Feb. 19th, the course of action with regard to acquiring permanent quarters for the association will be decided upon.

Oil Boom

Oil has been discovered on the farm of Mr. McKay across Lake Dauphin, sec. 16, tp. 28, range 18, and for the past two or three days there has been a rush at the Dominion Lands office to enter claims.

Fork River

A very pleasant time was spent Friday evening, February 6th, in taking a trip around the world. All parties having gathered at the Union Station, Fork River, first special train left at 8 o’clock and each 20 minutes thereafter. First stop was made at China, where the guests were treated to all the dainties China can produce, also the costumes and customs of the people were a great treat to all. Next stop was made at India, where all were treated with the greatest courtesies by the natives and came away with a great impression of the people, also the fare they had to eat. Last stop was made at Japan where the tourists were feasted with all the delicacies of that wonderful nation. They were struck by the beauties of the quaint little people and advise that the missionaries have done a great work there. On arrival back in Canada the homesick people were given a grand reception by those at home and gave a pleasant account of their trip. The reception consisted of songs by Rev. Roberts, music by Mrs. Little, recitation by Mrs. Lockwood, also instrumentals by the Russell boys, and Miss Ina Briggs. The nice sum of $58 was made by the United Church of Canada.

Major Update

To keep my genealogy blog a bit easier to manage, I have now moved all of my work related to Marion Harland’s School for Housewives onto another blog.

All posts, comments, links related to the series have been imported onto the new site and removed from this one.

This should make reading Today in the Dauphin Herald and my other family posts a bit easier to search.

https://schoolforhousewives.fashion.blog/

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 5, 1920

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Feb. 2.
The political committee of the United Grain Growers met at Winnipegosis on Jan. 19th to transact business.
The G.G. held their annual meeting on Jan. 23rd, when officers for the present year were elected. There was a good turnout and prospects for the year look good. A committee of three was appointed to interview Mr. Bickle re threshing outfit. The next meeting will be held at Winnipegosis on Feb. 7th. This change has been made for the purpose of giving the members who reside at Winnipegosis a chance to attend the meetings. After the regular business was finished nominations were called for. The following were elected: President, Thos. Toye; vice, Duncan Crerar; sec.-treasurer, Frank Sharp. Directors – James Laidlaw, J. Haywood, A. Dumas, F. Girling, C. Bradley, G. Godkin. At this meeting the ladies’ section was well represented and refreshments were served.
By the way, what about the corduroy road leading to Bicton Heath school? There are fourteen children on the east side of the muskeg who will be compelled to go without any education another year if this work is not done immediately. It is high time that some of our worthy councillors should be getting busy?

Fork River

Miss McIntyre, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of Mr. Cooper.
E.V. Lockwood is spending the week in Dauphin.
The question is frequently asked, what has become of the Member for Gilbert Plains. The people here never see him.
Donnie McEachern is spending the week in Dauphin with his mother, who is in the hospital at Dauphin.
Feed is scarce and all available will be needed for the stock at home.
The mid-week meeting in All Saints’ Church, January 28th, was in charge of the school teachers. The program was commenced with a solo from Mrs. A.J. Little and a story by Miss G. Cooper. The Fork River School debate, “Resolved, that a horse is better than a cow,” in charge of the teacher, Miss Ian Briggs followed. The members of the affirmative side were David Nowasod, Percy and Mildred Carlson, and the negative side Ben Schuckett, Bob Williams and Betty Williamson. Judges, Mrs. Lockwood, Miss Cooper and Miss Hess. Critic Professor J. Williamson. Decision was given in favour of the affirmative side. The debate was a lively one and a credit for school boys and girls, and was greatly appreciated by the large audience present. The evening was brought to a close with a piano solo by Mrs. A.J. Little, reading by Miss Cooper and the singing of the National Anthem.
The Debating Society is preparing something lively for Wednesday, February 11th. W. King, chairman.

Robert P. Johnston (1885-1917)

Although a few months late, as I originally started this post in November of last year, I decided to finally post the work I’ve done related to one of my first cousins. I have collected the files of every WWI serviceman in my family that I have so far identified and this is but one of those stories.

Robert P. Johnston was born on December 15th, 1885 to parents William John Johnston (1861-) and Martha Ann Johnston (1854-1933) in Renfrew, Ontario, Canada. The medical history sheet from his war file reveals he was born in Forester Falls which makes perfect sense as this is where the Johnston clan settled in the area.

Robert can be found in the 1891 census living in the township of Ross with his parents and four siblings, James P. (1884-), John Samuel (1887-1978), William Andrew (1889-1971), and Noah Thomas (1890-). Interestingly enough, I believe his brother James was named after his maternal grandfather, James Patrick Johnston (1827-1905) and who is the first of the Johnston line to immigrate to Canada.

Another interesting tid-bit is that Robert’s middle initial is listed as ‘P’ in one census record while the other is listed as ‘B.’

1891censusrpjohnston

1891 Census.

I found the family in the 1901 census where they’ve made a substantial move west now living in Westbourne, Manitoba. This was a distance of over 1,600km. I’m curious as to whether or not the move was made so that Robert’s father could work and own a farm of his own rather than work as a labourer in Ontario. I was able to find a Western Land Grant for William Johnston Jr. which may be Robert’s brother but I am unable to confirm at this time.

1901censusrpjohnston

1901 Census.

There are some inaccuracies when it comes to birth years of the children between the census records and they are as follows:

Name Dates Difference
James P. 1884 vs. 1882 2 years
Robert P/B. 1885 vs. 1883 2 years
John Samuel 1887 vs. 1885 2 years
William Andrew 1889 vs. 1888 1 year
Noah Thomas 1890 vs. 1889 1 year

The children’s birthdates are a few years off, but I’m more inclined to believe the dates themselves are correct as Robert’s birthdate December 15th matches what is found on his attestation paper.

I’ve been stalling on writing this piece because I’ve had difficulty locating certain family member’s records. For instance, I don’t have James’ birth record; the same can be said of his younger brother John. This frustrates me as I’ve found the birth records for Robert, William, and Noah.

Furthermore, I’m unable to find the family in any census records for 1911 or 1916. I’ve located a few family members in the 1921 census, but a lot has happened in that 20 year period. For now, I will continue to focus on Robert, before I touch on some of the other family members.

Sometime between the 1901 census and the birth of his daughter, Grace Loretta Johnston (1915-2014), Robert married Eleanore Loretta Schneider (1895-1991).

Eleanore, also known as Ella, lived with her family in Edrans, where she is found with her parents and her six siblings in the 1911 census.

The date of their marriage can be narrowed to sometime between 1911 and 1915 yet I have not been able to locate it. The distance between the two communities is 40km, so I imagine the Johnstons might have moved closer to Edrans or the Schneiders towards Westbourne. I am leaning a bit more towards the latter since I found Eleanore’s parents and siblings living in Westbourne in the 1916 census.

I would like to search the census records a little closer to Edrans based on some other locations mentioned in other documents including Keyes, Wellwood, and Austin. These locations are mentioned as later residences for Robert’s wife and mother. All of these locations are further west than Westbourne.

On September 11th, 1915, Robert travelled south-west to Hughes Camp, previously known as Sewell Camp, and attested. He enlisted as a private and his regimental number was 623165. Robert is described as thirty years and nine months old, 5 foot 9 1/2 inches with brown hair and eyes. Some 48 days later, Robert arrived in England on October 30th, 1915, after travelling on the SS Lapland from Halifax.

The next of kin listed is Robert’s wife under a PO Box in Wellwood, Manitoba. There are some additional notations on the attestation paper which appear as though Robert original next-of-kin listed was going to be his mother but he apparently changed his mind. An “A” was originally written but was crossed out and replaced with an “R.” There is also the start of what I believe to be the word “mother” but was replaced with the word “wife.”

From Robert’s pay book, signed March 30th, 1916, he indicates in his Will that everything should go to his wife, Ella, living in Edrans. The time between when Robert attested and when he signed his Will was 6 months while it was some 15 days before he was sent to France.

Another address lists Robert’s wife living in Keyes dated August 12th, 1918. Additionally, Robert’s mother, Martha Ann, is listed as living in Keyes as well.

Yet another document list’s Ella as living in Austin with a stamp on the reverse dated October 25th, 1922. This same address is found on a second card.

After Robert landed in Europe in October, he contracted influenza which he sought treatment for on November 18th, 1915. He was treated at the Bramshott Military Hospital and discharged on November 30th, 1915. This would not be the last time Robert would seek treatment at a medical centre.

Robert was originally assigned to the 61st Battalion but was transferred to the 44th Battalion on October 16th, 1915. This information can be found on Robert’s casualty form which also states Robert embarked and arrived overseas with the 27th Battalion on April 15th, 1916. He left the Canadian Base Depot (CBD) with his unit on May 4th and arrived in the field on May 6th, 1916.

A month later, on the 6th of June, Robert was wounded in action at the battle of St. Eloi. He was thrown onto a stake hurting his ribs on the right pectoral region. Below are excerpts from the 27th Battalion war diaries.

F CAMP. JUNE 6, 1916.
Battalion in Brigade reserve at F Camp. Weather, heavy rain in early morning clearing towards noon. Wind fresh westerly. At 3:50PM received message to fall in and move at once to the Asylum past west of Ypres H12d central.

A CAMP. JUNE 6, 1916.
4:15PM. Battalion moved as ordered. [Diving] to shelling of road battalion moved by platoons at 100 yard intervals. Met by guides and proceeded at once to the Ramparts in Ypres at I14b24 ref sheet 28.

6:30PM. Arrived at Ramparts where Battalion headquarters were established along with Brigade headquarters. Brigade front was held by 28th Battalion in left sub-sector and 31st Battalion in right sub-sector. After an intense bombardment lasting some hours the enemy blew up four mines at Hooge covering a frontage of 200 yards and then attacked and made some ground. Sent “C” Company and 100 men of “D” boy to occupy Zillebeke Switch in I16 in support of 31st Battalion. Furnished carrying parties of 150 men for front line at night. Men not in trenches were quartered in Infantry Barracks in Ypres.

On June 23rd, 1916, Robert was transferred to the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre (CCAC) via the HS Newhaven and was admitted to the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in London. He was transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital at Bromley on July 5th, 1916, and later to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital at Epsom (also known as Woodcote Park) on July 7th, 1916.

It was during an exam on July 5th that the doctor recounts how Robert was injured and the severity of those injuries. Robert’s ribs had healed but with some irregularity on the third rib in addition to pain on coughing and breathing.

On August 21st, 1916, Robert was transferred from the CCAC to the 11th Reserve Battalion in Shroncliffe. He was taken on strength by the Battalion on August 22nd, 1916, where he remained until a little after 1917. In September 1916, Robert sought treatment for an ailment at the Military Hospital in Shorncliffe and was transferred to the special Canadian Hospital in Etchinghill.

Robert was transferred to the 27th Battalion overseas on March 6th, 1917. He landed and was taken on strength in France where he fought with his unit. Seven months later, on September 11th, 1917, Robert was awarded a good conduct badge during training exercises. Below is a copy of the training schedule from the war diaries.

ESTREE CAUCHIE. SEPTEMBER 11, 1917.
Battalion in rest ESTREE CAUCHIE. Weather fair. Wind S.W. Remainder of Battalion bathed. Training as per Syllabus.

Time Schedule 1 Schedule 2
9:10AM to 10:00AM Physical Training Section and Platoon Drill. Bayonet Fighting. Rifle exercises.
10:00AM to 10:30AM Interval. Interval.
10:30AM to 12:30PM Musketry. Company in Attack. Rifle Grenades. Bombing, Lewis Gun. Musketry.

Communication Section and Company Signallers 9:10AM to 10:00AM instructed by Bomb Officer. 10:30AM to 12:30PM – Signalling.

Company Scouts and Snipers will report to Scout Sgt. after C.Os. parade on days in which their Companies have Bombing.

Sixteen men per Coy. will report to wiring instructor during Bombing period.
All Companies will practice attack as well as Bombing and musketry with Gas Respirators on.

“A” and “B” Companies will follow Schedule 1, “C” and “D” Coys. will follow Schedule 2 September 11th and will alternate following days.

Company Officers will spend one hour each afternoon on map reading and Compass work. Opportunity should be given Senior N.C.Os. to take advantage of this work.

Nearly two months later, Robert is reported missing on Nov 6th, 1917. This date is particularly interesting as it appears he was likely killed by a shell during the Battalion’s assault on the village of Passchendaele.

I have transcribed the following page from the Battalion’s war diaries.

PASSCHENDAELE. NOVEMBER 6, 1917.
Battalion in front line in front of PASSCHENDAELE. Weather dull. Wind N.E. Battalion assembled for the assault and all in position at 4AM. Zero hour was at 6AM. Battalion attacked the village of PASSCHENDAELE with the 31st Battalion on the left and the 26th Battalion on the right. All objectives captured at 7:40AM.

Day spent in consolidating position. 9 Machine Guns and 76 prisoners were captured. Approximate casualties were: 13 Officers and 240 O.Rs. Operation Orders No. 197 for move from HILL 37 to Assembly Position attached.

There were two Victoria Cross recipients for this date and their participation in the fighting on Nov 6th, 1917. One of the recipients was James Peter Robertson who was part of the 27th Battalion and was awarded the cross posthumously. I wonder whether the two men knew each other, and how many of their friends died alongside them that day.

On June 28th, 1918, Robert is reported as having been killed in action and his name can be found on the Ypres Memorial. He was 31 years old.

casualtyrjohnston

An interesting remark on one of the forms in his file indicates that Robert’s wife married his brother, William, only 32 days after he was declared dead.

 

payform

War Service Gratuity Form.

 

On July 30th, 1918, Ella married William Andrew and on September 26th, 1918, Robert William Johnston (1918-2018) was born. Based on his date of birth, Robert William was likely conceived sometime in December 1917 or January 1918 only a few months after Robert went missing in France. I wonder then, whether anything was going on between Ella and William before Robert’s disappearance or if their relationship developed suddenly when it appeared Robert would not return.

Both explanations are plausible, but with a piece of information I received from two researchers in Ontario who work with WWI records I’m leaning more to the first scenario. If a soldier required treatment or hospitalization for venereal disease their pay home would be stopped for that period. In turn, this would lead to family questioning why pay was stopped which might serve as a catalyst for a new relationship. Robert was in hospital receiving treatment from October 11th to December 18th, 1016 which meant his pay would have been stopped for two months – a substantial amount of time.

Two more children would be born to Ella and William, Anne Louise Johnston (1920-2004) and Vernon Andrew Johnston (1923-1944).

Ella and her three children, Grace, Robert, and Anne can be found living with Ella’s brother, Albert Schneider in the 1921 census. I don’t know where William is, though I suspect he is working somewhere on another farm. The full family of William, Ella, Grace, Robert, Anne, and Vernon can be found in the 1926 census split between two pages.

1920censusejohnston

1921 Census.

 

1926census

1926 Census.

 

Both Robert and Vernon served in the second world war although only one would return home. Vernon rose to the rank of Corporal with the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) and was killed September 13, 1944. He was buried at the Calais Canadian Military Cemetery in St. Inglevert, France.

Robert was injured in 1942 and 1944, with the second injury being severe enough to have him sent back to Canada where he convalesced at Deer Lodge Hospital in Winnipeg.

Based on the information above, I believe the only child born to Robert and Ella was their daughter, Grace. Grace married Norman George Bowden Hay (1898-1958), who was 17 years her senior, on October 19, 1940. She had met him while working on the Hay family farm. They would have 7 children before Norman passed away on March 19, 1958.

Grace passed away in 2014 while her brother, Robert, passed away in 2018.

One of the reasons why I wanted to do a write-up of Robert is not because of anything specific to him, but because of the following doodle I found in his file. It amused me to see this little smiling pumpkin and I bet you the person who drew it likely never thought it would see the light of day.

 

doodle

Assigned Pay Sheet.

 

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 29, 1920

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members are requested to remember the meeting called for Thursday, Feb. 5th, in the rooms. Comrades Bowler and Wilton, of the Provincial Command, will address the meeting.
The association would be glad to receive any discarded magazines or books.

Fork River

Peter Ellis and son Ray, of Kamsack, spent last week here. He had Dun Hamilton sell his homestead effects. The goods off and sold well.
Robt. Hunt, homestead inspector, spent several days in the district last week. Bob is one of the old-timers and we are always glad to see him.
Max. King was a visitor to the Peg last week.
The funeral of the late John Basham took place on Sunday.
The Literary Society had the meeting in All Saints’ Church on the 20th inst. It was magazine night, Mrs. Ina Briggs, editor, had charge of the adult portion of the program. Mrs. A.J. Little gave a selection on the piano. The papers by the juveniles were very good. There were ??? by Prof. Williamson and his pupils, W. and A. Russell. Mrs. I. Briggs accompanied on the piano. There was a ten minute talk by Mr. Lockwood. There was a good ??? and all enjoyed the excellent program. W. King was chairman, Wednesday next, the 28th, the program will be in charge of the school teachers.
More snow has fallen of late. An abundance of snow always means sufficient moisture and good crops.
It seemed a little odd to be without the daily papers of late, but I suppose one has to get used to anything these days when the times are out of joint.

Sifton

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wood and family, who have gone to Florida, are greatly missed by their many friends and we wish them every success in their new home.
There is very little wheat coming to the elevator now. The most of it has been already marketed.
W.C. Wellborn was in town a few days ago and says the fishing on the lake is fairly good this winter.
The trains are running all hours these days.
Mike Poloski is in Winnipeg attending college this winter.
Ed. Woods, of Dubin Bay, is spending the winter with Mr. Willison.
The stock is wintering fairly well although feed is very scarce.
Mr. Fred Kitt spend a few days in Winnipeg lately.
Mr. Ramsey, who has been under the weather for some time, is improving in health.
The roads are good and the town is full of famers every day.
Brigham Young is again in our midst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 22, 1920

Ethelbert

We have been asked to publish a copy of telegram sent to the Acting Prime Minister at Ottawa by the Ruthenians of this vicinity. It is herewith:
“Canadians of Ukrainian descent, in mass meeting assembled at Ethelbert, unanimously protest against the brutal invasion of Ukrainian East Galicia by imperialistic Poland, against the decision of Peace conference of July 11th, sanctioning the invasion, and against the decision of Supreme Council of November 20th awarding to Polish invaders a mandate over Ukrainian East Galicia for twenty five years. We appeal through the Canadian Government to the Government of Great Britain and other allied governments and people to right great wrong done to four million Ukrainians of East Galicia. We urge governments to have polish invading armies withdrawn from Ukrainian East Galicia to have that territory occupied by inter-allied armies, and to compel Poland to make reparation for destruction of Ukrainian villages and towns, and to indemnify families of civilians murdered by Polish soldiery or robbed by Polish officials. We appeal to governments to settle East Galician question in accordance with wish of people concerned. We request the Canadian Government to convey this our appeal to the government of Great Britain and to British plenipotentiaries at Paris.”
The above protest shows clearly where the root of wrong is and what the Ukrainians demand.

Fork River

The first annual Grain Growers’ Masquerade Ball, which took place Friday evening, the 16th of January, was a huge success and the big event of the New Year. The costumes were varied and created a pretty color scheme. There were six prizes awarded. Miss Gertrude Cooper as a Japanese lady, and Mr. D. Briggs, as a soldier, were awarded the prize for the best dancers. Mrs. Charles Bailey, representing a Gypsy fortune teller, was awarded first prize for best lady’s costume; Miss Viola Rowe, representing a country maid with her quaint hat, dress and crook was awarded second prize. Dr. A.J. Little, representing a colored dude was awarded first prize for best gentleman’s costume. Mr. Milton Cooper as Pierrot, was awarded second prize. The prize for best comic costume was awarded to Mr. Norman Shannon, who represented a tramp. The judges were Mrs. T.B. Venables, Mrs. A.J. Little and Mr. Williamson. After the judging and unmasking at midnight refreshments were served.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rawson are moving to Winnipegosis.
Fork River Literary and Debating Society met at the home of Mrs. A.J. Little, Saturday evening last to discuss the next debate, which will be held Wednesday evening, Feb. 4.
Fork River Women’s Institute met at Mrs. Tuck’s Saturday afternoon for the election of officers and to appoint directors for Agricultural Society. Mrs. A.J. Little was elected Secretary to succeed Mrs. Ina Briggs, Mrs. T.B. Venables and Mrs. McEachern were elected directors.
Mr. Fleming Wilson, Mr. T.B. Venables, Mr. Duncan Briggs, delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention held at Brandon, gave their reports on Tuesday evening’s meeting.

Winnipegois

The Tennis Club is arranging to hold a masquerade ball on Friday, Feb, 18th. A ball is always popular and a masquerade ball doubly so. This dance promises to be the event of the season.
The fish catch has been exceptionally good this winter. The December catch was the largest in the history of the late. Many of the fishermen will return from the north early next month.