Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 5, 1920

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Feb. 2.
The political committee of the United Grain Growers met at Winnipegosis on Jan. 19th to transact business.
The G.G. held their annual meeting on Jan. 23rd, when officers for the present year were elected. There was a good turnout and prospects for the year look good. A committee of three was appointed to interview Mr. Bickle re threshing outfit. The next meeting will be held at Winnipegosis on Feb. 7th. This change has been made for the purpose of giving the members who reside at Winnipegosis a chance to attend the meetings. After the regular business was finished nominations were called for. The following were elected: President, Thos. Toye; vice, Duncan Crerar; sec.-treasurer, Frank Sharp. Directors – James Laidlaw, J. Haywood, A. Dumas, F. Girling, C. Bradley, G. Godkin. At this meeting the ladies’ section was well represented and refreshments were served.
By the way, what about the corduroy road leading to Bicton Heath school? There are fourteen children on the east side of the muskeg who will be compelled to go without any education another year if this work is not done immediately. It is high time that some of our worthy councillors should be getting busy?

Fork River

Miss McIntyre, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of Mr. Cooper.
E.V. Lockwood is spending the week in Dauphin.
The question is frequently asked, what has become of the Member for Gilbert Plains. The people here never see him.
Donnie McEachern is spending the week in Dauphin with his mother, who is in the hospital at Dauphin.
Feed is scarce and all available will be needed for the stock at home.
The mid-week meeting in All Saints’ Church, January 28th, was in charge of the school teachers. The program was commenced with a solo from Mrs. A.J. Little and a story by Miss G. Cooper. The Fork River School debate, “Resolved, that a horse is better than a cow,” in charge of the teacher, Miss Ian Briggs followed. The members of the affirmative side were David Nowasod, Percy and Mildred Carlson, and the negative side Ben Schuckett, Bob Williams and Betty Williamson. Judges, Mrs. Lockwood, Miss Cooper and Miss Hess. Critic Professor J. Williamson. Decision was given in favour of the affirmative side. The debate was a lively one and a credit for school boys and girls, and was greatly appreciated by the large audience present. The evening was brought to a close with a piano solo by Mrs. A.J. Little, reading by Miss Cooper and the singing of the National Anthem.
The Debating Society is preparing something lively for Wednesday, February 11th. W. King, chairman.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 30, 1919

Can a Doctor Sell Liquor?

Dr. Wilmot, of Roblin, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, on several charges preferred by the inspector for selling liquor contrary to the provisions of the act. One charge was dismissed and decision reserved in the others.

Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

Daughters of Empire Rally

The rally of the Daughters of the Empire here on Tuesday, the 28th inst., was largely attended, every Chapter being represented, which included the Pas, Grandview and Gilbert Plains. The meeting was held in the town hall and was presided over by the Rev. J.A. Cormie.
Mrs. Aldridge was the first speaker and she spoke in the interest of the establishment of a hospital for the people of Servia. She related in a pathetic and impressive manner the great sufferings of these people and the heroic way in which they had faced and overcome every difficulty. Mrs. Aldridge spent much time in Servia during the war and incidents she related were from personal experience.

Details of War Memorial

In explaining the war memorial, Mrs. G.H. Smith, National Educational secretary of the order, told the meeting that in detail the plan of the I.O.D.E. is to establish ideals of patriotism and give the children in the schools a truly British education by acquainting them with the ideals, the traditions and the institutions of Britain. Illustrated lectures on the history and geography of the Empire will be given in schools. All non-English will be supplied with one of I.O.D.E. British historical libraries within the next few years. A lecture fund for the teaching and study of British history will be established and some eminent lecturer brought to Canada at least once a year. Pictures of Canada’s part in the war will be given to 1000 schools, 100 schools in Manitoba to be among the number. Travelling scholarships to the extent of $1200 to university graduates in history will be awarded to each province. A second scholarship of greater value may then be established for these nine scholarship winners. An endowment fund of $500,000 is being collected for this purpose.
On rising to speak, Ms. Colin H. Campbell, provincial president, was warmly greeted. After expressing her great pleasure at having the privilege of again speaking to a Dauphin audience, se made a strong appeal on behalf of the Victory Loan. She pointed out that it was the duty of everyone to the best of their ability to assist the country at this time by subscribing what they could. Mrs. Campbell also spoke for a few minutes on the war memorial.
During the evening Mrs. Rogers sang a solo and miss Pear M. Tucker and Miss Irma Struthers contributed instrumentals.
At the conclusion of the meeting the visitors and the members of the chapter repaired to the rest room, where refreshments were served, and a couple of hours spent in social intercourse.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has bot been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavor.
An October cold dip is not common, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 25, 1919

Dauphin Industry Checked

(From The Winnipeg Free Press.)
Some districts are dogged by misfortune. Here we have a proposal in the House of Commons to abolish hanging just as Dauphin was coming to the fore as a good place to grow help.

Farms Sold for Big Prizes

Frick brothers, from Illinois, purchased the Hambleton and Puchalski farms this week. Both are half sections and close to town. The price paid for the former was $30,500 and the latter $35,000.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Sept. 23.
Duncan Crerar has returned home from Winnipeg after interviewing Hon. Dr. Thornton in regard to our school affair.
The Coffey and Grenon farm here was sold the other day to two American farmers for the sum of $7000.
Mrs. Sharp is leaving soon for England. Her absence will be regretted sincerely by her numerous friends.
The second lawsuit between Cooper and Russell will be heard before J.P. Tilt, of Fork River, on the 24th inst.
The Grain Growers’ of this district will hold a meeting at the house of Jas. Laidlaw on Friday, Oct. 2nd. Members are requested to be present.
Thos. Toye has purchased from Jas. Costello, of Alberta, the famous Clydesdale stallion “Gay Lad.”
Pte. John Heywad, of Virden, has taken up land in this district and has brought in his stock. He is busy securing a supply of hay for the winter.
Vacant land in this district is nearly all being taken up by returned soldiers.
Capt. Wm. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has gone to Brandon. He has been holding meetings here at different points.
The weather of the past week has been unfavorable for haying and harvesting operations.
The municipal grader working between Winnipegosis and Fork River does not seem to be making as good progress as we would like, but, before offering criticism, we will bide our time.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held in the Union church Friday evening, Sept. 10th. A goodly number of the members were present and the programme proved a very interesting one. Misses Ruth McCauley and Lottie Black gave a very pleasing duet. Miss Kathleen Dempsey delighted the audience with a recitation, Mrs. Houchin gave a splendid and well prepared paper on the subject, “Why Women Should be on the School Board.” Miss M. McMartin gave a talk, and illustrated the difficult subject, “Chilling of Childhood.” She explained in her usual intelligent manner what helps to make a beautiful life. Ten cent tea in aid of the library fund was served at the close by Misses Falconer and MacDougall, when the meeting closed with “God Save the King.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 13, 1919

Flogging Advocated

The problem of dealing with the small boy who smokes is troubling many of the teachers, the members of the school board and even the members of the town council, which body, at its last meeting appointed Coun. Houston and Katz to cooperate with the trustees as to the best means of remedying this undesirable sate of affairs.

Flogging Advocated
A correspondent writes: “We hear a great deal about the small boy who goes to school smoking and having tobacco on his person and the regrets expressed that the trouble can’t be remedied. If these boys attended school in England they would soon be disciplined, and in no namby-pamby style either. They would simply be flogged, and if one application was not sufficient the second strapping would effect the cure. But, after all is the small boy to blame when he sees the bigger boys parading the streets smoking both pipe and cigarette? Perhaps now that we have a committee to investigate they will bring in a report which will offer suggestions concerning the big boy as well as the small boy as to the bad effects of tobacco on the developing youth.”

Memorial Committee Busy

Chairman W. Rintoul, of the memorial committee, states that progress is being made. No definite plans have been considered as yet. A suggestion that an up to date skating and curing rink be built as a “memorial” is meeting with much favor in some quarters. Some favor a “community building,” others a monument, and so forth.

Opening G.W.V. Club Rooms

The new club rooms of the Great War Veterans will be opened on Tuesday evening next, the 18th inst. There will be a short musical program at which Mayor Bowman will preside. Later there will be dancing and cards. Refreshments will be served. The McMurray orchestra will furnish the music. The public are invited to attend.

“Still” Operators Fined

For some time past there has been an increasing supply of what is known as “domestic’ manufactured liquor. The manufacture was exclusively in the hands of the foreign element. Almost any tin vessel from a teapot to a ten gallon can was improvised as a “still.” And despite the crudeness of the particles used to manufacture the “liquor” a fairly good brand is said, by those who sampled it, to have ben produced in some cases. But the promoters’ dreams of accumulating wealth in an easy manner, were destined to failure. Collector Ball was soon wise to the operation of the “stills” and with the assistance of the local police, rounded up three parties who were either operating or connected with the enterprises.
The parties were Mike Torharczuk, Fred Moranczuk and M. Silverman. Informations were laid under the Inland Revenue act, and they appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday and were found guilty. Torharczuk and Moranczuk were each $200 and costs, and Silverman $250 and costs.

War Bride to Arrive

The first war bride that is to come to Dauphin is expected to arrive about the first of next week. During the month of December Sergt. Harold Crowe was married to a young lady in London. The young couple sailed on the Grampian, which was due to arrive at Halifax on Wednesday.

Fork River

Pte. Eales and his war bride have arrived from overseas. They are visiting at the home of H. Pearson.
The manager of the Northern Lumber Co. was a recent visitor to our town. The company may open a lumber yard here.
Mr. Osborne, municipal auditor, is auditing the books of the municipality. When he is through we shall expect the council to have the report printed. This is the only way the ratepayers have of knowing how their money is being spent and the law directs that the report be published.
Mr. Martin, homestead inspector, was here last week in connection with the applications of returned soldiers for land.
The stork visited the home of H. Little last week and left a wee girlie.
Wm. King is visiting Dauphin and Winnipeg this week.
Jack Richardson has purchased a registered Holstein bull, having sold his old sire to Thos. Toye, of Bicton Heath.
The committee which is looking after the interests of the returned soldiers has been organized and is now composed as follows: Owen Pruder, S.L. Gower, A. Hunt, J. Shuchett, J.D. Robertson, Thos. Briggs, F. Cooper, and W. King, sec.-treasurer.

Ethelbert

At a well attended meeting of the Ukrainian farmers held at Ethelbert on March 1st, the following resolution were unanimously passed. Over $100 was collected at the gathering which will be devoted to assisting the returned men.

RESOLUTION NO. 1
1. Having experienced the hardship of the newcomer, we therefore wish to help the returned men to settle with their families on the land. We are ready to volunteer at any time to graciously help any returned soldier settling in our district on the land by offering at least one day’s work on his farm in plowing or doing any required improvements, and will also arrange to have his family and luggage brought from the station to his respective land.
2. We also wish to assure such newcomers that friendly and neighborly assistance will always be at their disposal and that such returned men shall not suffer an want or hardship of a beginner. Carried.

RESOLUTION NO. 2
That we, as one of the Dominion Communities of Canada, do express our belief and faith in the principle of the League of Nations which has recently come into being at the Peace Conference at Paris.
That while believing in the self interim nation of nationalities, we cordially support the idea of human brotherhood and the new international order expressed in its terms.
That we look to the League as the ultimate solvent of the barriers which have hitherto divided mankind and plunged them in recurring strife.
That we also believe the protection of customs tariff the most potent and evil of all the barriers against the unity of mankind must be broken down to insure the permanence of political peace and the continued effectiveness of the League.
That we hold the Farmers’ platform as adopted by the Grain Growers’ conventions recently held in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, to be a welcome step in the direction of that universal free trade which must be chief buttress of a stable international order.
And also that we cordially support the other reforms contained in the same platform.

RESOLUTION NO. 3
That we wish that a committee be appointed whose duty it will be to help the returned men coming into our midst. Carried.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 20, 1919

Given Three Months

Wm. Utbanowich and Stephen Negrycz appeared before P.M. Hawkins last week charged with shooting a neighbor’s cattle found in their field last August. They were found guilty. Urbanowich was sentenced to three months in jail with hard labour. Negrycz was let off on suspended sentence. It should be explained., however, that Negrycz had already paid more than the value of the cattle to the owner.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Feb. 17.
The weather this winter is ideal. His cold enough to keep from thawing and bright enough to keep everyone in good humor.
Wm. Russell is engaged pressing hay. Why more hay is not pressed and shipped out from this part is a mystery as prices are remunerative.
Robert Toye has purchased Geo. Lyon’s pure bred Holstein stock.
Our municipal weed inspector Geo. Lyons condemned grain fields in the northern part of this district last summer. Now it is up to George to see that his instructions are carried out as it is impossible for a farmer to keep his farm clear of weeds when his neighbors are careless about attending to weeds growing on their farms.
Thos. Toye has bought a machine for making rope. Some of Tom’s neighbors are making enquires if this can be the machine that is going to make the rope that ex-Reeve Lacey hopes to see old Kaiser Bill dangling at the end of.

Fork River

The Pine View School has opened again with Miss S. Briggs, of Rathwell, wielding the rod of correction for the term.
Harry Little shipped a few head of his Galloways to a customer in the south last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Morris and family have returned from the winter fishing on Lake Winnipegosis and spent the weekend with Mrs. W. King on the homestead.
The farmers of the district are moving to secure the erection of another elevator. We need better grain handing facilities here.
Several of the boys have returned from the fishing camps. They report the catch light this winter.

Winnipegosis

UNION CHURCH
On Sunday next, Feb. 23 rd, the Rev. A.P. Lather, B.A., of Toronto, will preach in the above church in the morning at 11 a.m.; evening 7:30. The reverend gentlemen is travelling the west on behalf of Belgium refugees. Everybody is given a hearty welcome to the service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 23, 1919

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Jan. 20th.
William Little was a visitor at the home of Tom Toye. Seems like old times to see Bill around again.
Mr. Lonn has bought the Seiffert farm on the Mossey. He has also bought section 11, the Grenon farm, and has bought his seed from the Bicton Heath seed farm for the coming season.
James Playford is going to turn the land upside down on the Hudson Bay holding. This land has been waiting for just such treatment for a long time.
James Laidlaw is busy hauling logs on to his homestead to build. Jim is a hustler and we would like to see a few more of his kind come to this district.
What about the corduroy leading to the Bicton Heath School? Is has not yet been completed. Does this mean that the children living on the east of this swamp are going to have another summer holiday? It is about time that the government stepped in and saw the work done.
Co-operative Grain Growers’ meeting will be held at the Bicton Heath schoolhouse on Wednesday, January 29th, at 7. Every farmer should be present.
Mr. Dumas, from North Dakota, has bought John McAuley’s farm in this district, and will be here in the early spring.
George Lyons was through this district this week. George is a good fellow, but is not always welcome in his capacity as tax collector.
Frank Sharp will leave shortly for Winnipeg. Frank says that there will be no mistake this time.

Fork River

Miss Katie Robertson has left on a visit to Neepawa.
Reeve Venables and Coun. Hunt are attending the convention of the Union of Municipalities at Winnipeg this week. Mrs. Venables accompanied Mr. Venables to the city.
Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, was a recent visitor to our town.
F.F. Hafenbrak, M. Cooper and H. Hunter went to Dauphin to attend the degree meeting of Coronation lodge, L.O.L.
Mrs. D. McEachren and son Donnie are visiting in Winnipeg.
Ed. Humphreys has returned to town. He is still smiling.
Miss Nellie Briggs, of Hartney, is a visitor at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs.
Mr. D. McLean and Miss Birdie McLean have gone to Regina. Birdie intends to spend the rest of the winter with her aunt, Mrs. Vance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 9, 1919

Major Barker’s Great Record

Major W.G. Barker, Canada’s third air V.C. now holds the record for fighting decorations, according to the Canadian Daily Record. He holds, beside the V.C., the D.S.O., with two bars; the D.F.C.; the M.C., with two bars; the Croix de Guerre, and the Italian Cross of Honor. His record for enemy planes destroyed is 50.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Jan 4.
W.C. Cooper’s barley averaged 60 bushels to the acre. At present prices this proved a paying crop.
Mr. Waddell’s youngest son died from influenza. He has the sympathy of the neighborhood in his great loss.
Thos. Toye is just recovering from an attack of the Flu. Even King Flue had to retire from the ring when he tackled an old stager like Tom.
Willie Bennett, who has been very sick, is recovering.
Robt. Marshland will soon be on his rounds with his sawing and crushing outfit. Bob is back from the war, but before his return he helped knockout Kaiser Bill.
F. Sharp has left for Winnipeg. It is not expected he will return a one.
A Grain Growers association will be organized in this district shortly.
Tom Toye still swears by his muskrat story and maintains the weather so far has been correctly indicated by the little water rat.
A petition is being circulated praying that the council to pass a by-law permitting stock to run at large at nights.
I see that ex-Reeve Lacey wants to Kaiser shot. Fred is far being alone in his desire.

Winnipegosis

Orville McGinnis, whose leg was crushed by a block of ice falling upon it, and who had to have it amputated above the knee, is doing well.
John Dempsey was charged before Police Magistrate Whale with breaking open a fish shed belonging to Ben Hechter. The magistrate referred the case to Dauphin where the accused was committed to take his trial at the next assizes. In the meantime Dempsey is out on bail.
In spite of the loss of a number of nets through floating ice at the beginning of the season, and accidents in the nature of teams falling through the ice, the fishermen are making a large catch of fish.
There is a movement on foot in this vicinity to have a grain elevator established at Winnipegosis in the near future. The farmers have been hauling their grain to Fork River, but this proves too expensive and reduces the profits.
The flu epidemic has struck Winnipegosis. Four families have been down with it recently but are picking up again. There have been no deaths as yet.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 23 – 1915

1915 Dec 23 – News from War Front

Lieut. Denis Cockrill, who was recently wounded, has sufficiently recovered to return to the trenches. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
Private Jos. Gallant who enlisted at Dauphin last winter, has been recommended for the D.S. medal. He rescued two officers after they had been wounded by the Germans near their trenches. (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019)

1915 Dec 23 – Sixty now Enlisted

Recruiting for the battalion with headquarters at Dauphin is going on briskly. The officers and men here now total 60, and it is expected by the 1st of the New Year will be over 100 strong.
The officers state that the men enlisted are well suited for the service and are engaged drilling every day. Physical drill exercises are held in the town hall and platoon work at the agricultural grounds. The officers in command and privates are as follows:

OFFICERS
Lieut.-Col. R.A. Gillespie, O.C. (Robert Alexander Gillespie, 1881, xxx)
Capt. and paymaster, H. Hunter (Henry Cecil Hunter, 1888, 234232)
Lieut. V.N. Severn, keeper of records (Vernon Nicholl Severn, 1890, xxx)
Lieut. J.W. Skinner (Joseph Winstanley Sinner, 1875, xxx)
Sergt. M.A. Young (Martin Albert Young, 1880, 460218)
Sergt. A.C. Wade (Arthur Ca?ebourne Wade, 1871, 693015)

PRIVATES
F. Crowe (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
H.R. Tarzwell (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
R. Merrell (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Meader (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
J.C. Henwood (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
T.M. Jones (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
H.V. Cousans (Henry Victor Cousans, 1885, 1000003)
F. Kilborn (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
W. McClernon (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.E. Hooper (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
C.W. Elliott (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
H. Gardiner (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
C. Klyne (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
W.E. Demery (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
J. Gough (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
M. Jacobson (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
E. Sandgrew (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)
A. Douglas (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
J.W. Lane (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
R. Pollard (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
W. Hatt (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
J. Hickie (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
A.F. Tigg (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
T.G. Kirk (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
W. Greenshields (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
J.E. Donnelly (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
S. Hesson (Samuel Hesson, 1880, 1000071)
G. Montgomery (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W.J. Crittenden (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
J.F. Calder (???)
A.E. Taylor (Albert Edward Taylor, 1893, 1000063)
J.H. Codd (John Codd, ???, 1000064)
J. Love (John Love, 1877, 1000067)
A. Love (Andrew Love, 1883, 1000072)
J. Minnis (James Minnis, 1876, 1000073)
M.W. Primrose (Malberry Whittington Primrose, 1894, 1000077)
J. McLetchie (John McLetchie, 1885, 1000070)
F. Hicks (Fredrick Hicks, 1891, 1000080)
C. Benson (Christian Benson, 1887, 1000081)
J. Humphry (???)
W.F. Terrell (William Francis Terrell, 1890, 1000141)
M.J.T. Cathcart (William Joseph Tidmarsh Cathcart, 1898, 1000147)
G. Douglas (George Douglas, 1897, 1000148)
J.G. Cathcart (John George Cathcart, 1872, 1000146)
C. Wilkey (Charles Henry Wilkey, 1895, 1000149)
G. Wilkey (George Wilkey, ???, 1000155)

NOTES
Tuesday was pay day, and the bank tellers were given a heavy bombardment for an hour.
Marsh Cathcart has enlisted as regimental bugler.

1915 Dec 23 – Had Head Cut Off

Ochre River, Dec. 21 – A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, Dec. 21, about noon when Charlie Blackman, a farmer of this district was instantly killed by the bursting of a circular wood saw. Mr. Blackman had just returned from the poll where he had been recording his vote and was cutting wood
Deceased was an old resident of the district and leaves a wife and ten children, 5 sons and 5 daughters. The eldest being a son 17 years of age. The saw that Mr. Blackman was operating was known to be cracked, but had been working for some time in that condition.
Coroner Rogers, from Dauphin visiting the scene of the accident, and after learning the facts decided an inquest was not necessary.

1915 Dec 23 – Young Ruthenian Accidentally Shot

A young Ruthenian, 24 years of age, accidently shot himself at Ethelbert on Monday evening. He was hunting rabbits at the time, and pushed the butt end of the gun in a hole, discharging it, the contents entering his abdomen, making a bad wound. Drs. Culbertson and Bottomley were sent for and went to the northern town on Tuesday morning. They dressed the wound but have little hopes for the recovery for the young man.

1915 Dec 23 – Fork River

Mrs. N. Little and daughter, Grace have returned from two weeks’ trip south.
Mrs. A. Hunt and children left on Wednesday’s train for a two months’ vacation with her friends at Ottawa.
It seems to be the order of the day of late for the Dauphin train to arrive late and take a rest at Winnipegosis for from 4 to 3 hours while they catch a load of fish for the return ship. Passengers waiting to go to Dauphin have to hang around all day. How long will the suffering public have to put up with this kind of service?
Mrs. Craig, of Weyburn, is here on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Northam.
Mr. W. Williams, our lumber magnets, has a gang out on his Lake Dauphin limits preparing for the winter’s out of lumber.
The returned hunters report big game hard to get this year. They have not had the success of other years. In a few years, if the present slaughter goes on, there will be no big game left to hunt. To preserve these fine animals a close season of two or three years should be put in force at once by the government.
F.O. Murphy paid the burg a long visit between trains last week. Fred took a cargo of eggs with him as he says “Murphys” are not too bad an old time. The only thing that it takes the train so long to go to Dauphin the eggs might hatch out on the road and he would have to get a hen coop on his arrival.
The Orangemen of Fork River will [1 missing line] ball on December 31st in the Orange Hall. Admission, gents $1, ladies free. Good music and supper provided. An invitation is extended to all.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

A grand patriotic concert, including a ladies Indian Club display song tableaux, a dramatic dialogue and the orchestra will be held in the Rex Theatre, on Tuesday, Jan. 4th, 1915, at
Eddie Chermok’s new store is all ready for business now. His stock arrived last train.
Mrs. McEachern, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
The whist drive of the Cosmopolitan Club took place on Friday evening. The prize winners were Miss Margaret Goodman and Mr. Wiseman. The bobby prize went to Miss Bertha Magunson and Mr. J. Campbell.
The Xmas tree held n the Presbyterian Church was a great success and the turn out was the nest in the annals of the town. Miss Gracie Whale was presented with a prize for the best attendance at Sunday school for the yea and John Wallace won second prize. Santa Claus did not forget any of the children.
Jas. McInnes, Walter Grenon, Joe Mossington, and Capt. Buck, returned from their hunting ground and report a good time. They brought back some good specimens of the wild steers of the Northlands.
Settlers are still flocking into the vacant lands north of here. There is room for all comers yet.
The school is closed for the festive season and we regret to say that we are losing Miss Whitemore who will attend Normal at Winnipeg after holidays. Miss Whitore will be greatly missed as she has endeared herself to her pupils and her many friends alike in this town.
Miss McMartin left on Wednesday’s train for her home at Franklin to spend the holiday season.
D.S. Hatties’ rink beat E.R. Black’s rink by 9-7. The ladies are taking an active interest in curling this season and can throw as good a rock as many of the boys.
Harry Hunter, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
Mr. Goodman returned from a business trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday’s train.
Miss Augusta Crawford arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday’s train to spend Xmas at her home here.
If the mail gets any heavier Comf. will have to get a horse and rig. What price, Casey.
Mrs. Ben Hechter left on Wednesday’s train for Winnipeg on a visit.
F. Hechter left, for Waterhen on Tuesday afternoon.
We had a special train up for fish on Tuesday.
Don’t forget the Red Cross concert next week. Buy your ticket now.
The secretary treasurer of the village reports the taxes coming in very will and a great many took advantage of the discount up to the 15th Dec. The taxes are payable at par up to July 1st.
The Council of the Village meet in the Council Chambers at 2 p.m. on Monday, 3rd, of January.
Mrs. Ben Hechter and Miss Molly Hechter left on Wednesday for Winnipeg on a visit.
Ray Burley, Bert Arrowsmith, G. Johannason, A. Allan and Rev. Clixby are up from Brandon for the holidays.
On the night of the 21st inst. the Bicton Heath children were coming to Winnipegosis to the Xmas tree with Supt. Tom Toye as driver and on arriving inside the town limits a few of our children in happy spirits were singing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” which patriotic song so scared the wild quadrupeds that they bent it for the tall timbers leaving Supt. Toye and his whole school in the ditch singing “Will Ye Na Come Back Again?” However, nothing daunted by this little mishap Supt. Toye marched with his flock to the Presbyterian Church, where they enjoyed a most pleasant time.
Last week an old Frenchman at Waterhen left his nephew’s house to go to the house of a neighbour and got lost and froze to death.
Geo. Adam, of the Fishery spent Wednesday in town.
Jas. Alex and W. Walmeley returning from Waterhen Saturday and report fishing good.
Alex. Bickel arrived to town on Saturday with two loads of fish and returned from there Friday.
We are glad to report all well at Ed. Morris’ camp. The teams returned from there on Friday.
We regret to lose for a little while, and yet we are so proud to report that our worth citizen, Mr. Frank Hechter has enlisted for active service with the 107th Battalion and will be leaving us to join his regiment about the 10th of January. Frank will be badly missed but we hope to give him a royal welcome on his return. We understand he takes the rank of quarter-master sergeant. The business will be carried on by his brother, Ben Hechter until his return.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick returned last week from the hunting ground. Rev. Kirkpatrick got a nice elk.
The trains are very late in arriving and leaving lately.
Mr. Robertson, surveyor, is in town after inspecting the roads at Cowan and Camperville.
The snow low left for the north at the latter end of last week.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is spending a few days in town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 19 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 19 – Fork River

Herman Godkin, real estate agent of Dauphin, spent a few days with W. Williams.
We have been informed that Mr. Walter Clark was fortunate to get a moose. The head is said to be the finest seen in these parts with a spread of forty-four inches.
Sid. Gower, engineer, returned from Dauphin and intends working with W. Williams this winter.
We were pleased to meet Peter Robinson, an old-timer, in town. He is spending a short time with his parents on the Mossey River.
The C.N. telegraph gang is here renewing the poles, which work was needed.
The Newell moving picture show that was booked for Tuesday and Wednesday did not come off at the orange Hall for lack of accommodation. We need a good boarding house here for the travelling public.
There was not a very large turner to the masquerade ball in the Orange Hall on account of the farmers being busy threshing.
Mr. McIntosh, of Valley River, was here on business.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase will hold a Xmas service in the school house, Winnipegosis on Xmas morning at eleven o’clock, and in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, in the evening at eight o’clock.

1912 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Malley, from Brandon, arrived in town Tuesday. We trust the weather will be favourable for his trip up the lake.
The municipal elections are on now. May we hope that the wiser promises made by the candidates be fulfilled by the successful ones. We certainly need more passable roads, and here be it remarked that if our church wardens finds transportation between here and Fork River too difficult to accomplish in the future, the vision of the rectory, seen here, will have to materialize.
A Christmas morning service will be held in the school house 11 a.m. Come and help sing the carols insuring a “Merry Christmas.”
The Santa Claus fund seems to be a popular one. Perhaps it is because he is such an adept of minding his own business. He is remembering our bachelors with many plum puddings.
The Card Circle will be closed this week for the year. It is a matter of serious consideration if it should be reopened as so many lovers of the game do not enter before 9 p.m., which is near the time when wise and honest heads seek their rest; besides beige started to while pleasantly away a couple of hours, thus inviting congenial spirits, and finding ourselves entertained by a stranger proves a mental lack which should more advantagely be supplied at home, nevertheless we trust for a closing game this week that will reveal its true merit and may the winners of the prizes make good use of them. A certain Mr. Webber is to be thanked for the gentleman’s, which is a gun metal watch.
If we hurt ourselves as much by falling when climbing up hill, as we would so doing when running down hill, no one could be blamed for refusing to climb; but one of nature’s mercies is that we cannot.
The Christian League held a very successful meeting ask week.
The hunting season being closed may the stronger sex once more settle down to “the daily round.”
No moose, no heads, no tales.
Wm. Parker, of this Armstrong Trading Co. is up the lake or out to Pine Creek auditing books.
The young people of our town have a bond of sympathy with Dauphin ones in the difficulty (met here) of preparing a skating rink – see the lake.

1918 Dec 19 – Had Both Legs Crushed

Orval McInnes, a boy about 15 years of age, met with a bad accident at Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The boy was assisting to put ice in an ice house when the block that was being raised slipped from the grippers and fell on his legs, crushing them badly. He was brought to the hospital here the same afternoon.

1918 Dec 19 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Dec. 14.
Heath Officer Dr. Medd was through this district this week and has closed the school for the time being as some of the scholars are down with influenza.
D. Crerar has sold the Hudson’s Bay farm for a good figure. What about the herd law now?
Mr. Laidlaw has finished threshing. The cattle will have a chance to feed considerable land next spring.
Hechter Bros.’ gasoline tractor has arrived and they intend to turn over considerable land next spring.
W. Paddock has broke considerable land this year. Steam and gasoline engines materially aid in preparing the land for crop.
Mr. Winger has sold his flock of sheep to Mr. Venables for a good figure. There is no doubt but sheep pay well and in the future more will be kept in the district.
Mr. Waddell, from Missouri, is the new teacher engaged for the Bicton Heath School. It is up to us to “show Mr. Waddell.”
F. Sharp has completed his house and stable. The buildings are the right type for the farmers and we hope to see more of them erected.
Thos. Toye, our local weather prophet, says the winter will be a mild one. Tom, it may be said, does not make his observations from charts, but seeks his weather lore from wild animals, such as the muskrat, which he says you can depend on.

1918 Dec 19 – Fork River

Chas. Bugg, of Ochre River, was in town lately renewing acquaintances.
Pte. Arthur Shannon is home, having received his discharge.
The election is over and we are now already to shake hands and enter into the Christmas spirit, good will toward all men.

1918 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

The Dominion Government is making headway with the cutting of a canal at Meadow Portage which, when completed, will open up a waterway with Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Manitoba. The land through which the canal will run has already been cleared and boarded and in the spring about 600 men will be employed doing excavation work.
A card party, in aid of the Red Cross, is being held every Wednesday evening in the Rex theatre. A good musical program is provided and refreshments are served.
A special Xmas service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 22nd, in the Union Church. Special Xmas hymns and solos will help to make the service attractive. Subject will be “The Brotherhood of Man.” A hearty welcome is extended to all.
On the afternoon of Xmas day a Xmas tree entertainment will be held in the above church and a huge tree loaded with toys and decorations will be exhibited to delight the hearts of the children. Santa Claus has arranged to give every child a present from the tree.
A bank will shortly be established at Winnipegosis.
A recent traveller on the Dauphin and Winnipegosis express complains bitterly of having to have an extra washing day in the same week owning to the dirty condition of the train.
The Armstrong Independent Fisheries is sending ten teams up the lake this week to bring in fish. Other companies also have teams employed bringing down fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 3 – 1914

1914 Dec 3 – Shot in Hand

A Galician named Lazar was brought to the hospital on Tuesday from the mountain with a bullet in his hand. The wound is not a dangerous one.

1914 Dec 3 – Boy Died

Sam, the 9-year-old son of S.J. Buchanan, of McCreary, was brought to the hospital on Monday, having been shot in the stomach and arm by a man who was hunting rabbits. The wound was a bad one and the boy died on Monday night. The remains were taken to McCreary on Tuesday for interment.

1914 Dec 3 – Soldiers Given Send Off

The departing soldiers on Monday morning were given a great send off at the station. The citizens turned out in large numbers and the town band was also present. Bunting and flags were displayed from all sides, and the military spirit was contagious. The special train the boys were to go odd on was over an hour late and this gave everyone an opportunity for a hand shake and chance to say good-bye. As the train steamed in with its long line of coaches the band struck up a popular air, and cheer followed cheer. The scene was one that will long be remembered.
During the short stay here the soldier boys from the west mingled with the crowd and the time was spent in a jolly way singing patriotic songs, waving flags and cheering.
As the train left the station the band played and the crowd simply went wild. Women shed tears, hats were thrown into the air flags and handkerchiefs were waved and cheer followed cheer.
It was a great send off the boys got and one not soon forgotten.

1914 Dec 3 – Sifton

We are glad to learn that miss Rowe, head nurse of the Presbyterian mission, is now on the way to recovery from a long illness.
Owing to bad roads there has been very little business done in the district of late.
The town will was completed last week and there is every indication of there being an abundance of water.
A party composed of our prominent business men paid a visit to Ethelbert last week with the view of inspecting the Kennedy Mercantile Co,’s new grist mill. They report the mill is running smoothly and doing excellent work.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz celebrated on Tuesday the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ida, to Prof. Matoff, which was witnessed by their many friends and relations of the various ???.
Mr. Joe Clarke, late Sawyer-Massey salesman, paid us a visit on Monday. He reports thing quiet at present but he says business will be humming in the near future. Hoe is sure no pessimist.
The teacher and children of the Wycliffe School gave a fine entertainment in the schoolhouse on Friday evening. The one entitled “War Scenes,” consisting of four parts, namely part I, soldiers fighting; 2nd, arrival of Red Cross nurses dressing the wounded on the battlefield; 3rd, hospital scene; 4th, soldiers and Red Cross nurses tenting on the battlefield, was certainly good. The other part of the programme included solos, readings and plays, consisting of “Henry VIII” and “Britannia.” Several patriotic songs were sung during the programme. A dance concluded the evening. The whole thing proved a great success.

1914 Dec 3 – Winnipegosis

California weather.
F. Hechter arrived home on Monday’s train from Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. and Miss McArthur left this week for Winnipeg, where they will reside for the winter.
Messrs. Thompson and St. John arrived last week from Portage for their annual big game shoot. J. McInnis and Walter Grenon accompanied them on the shoot.
Capt. Coffey spent the weekend at home at Dauphin returning on Monday.
Our train service is to be changed slightly. Instead of the train arriving on Saturday as heretofore, it will arrive on Friday, starting on the 4th inst., otherwise the schedule remains the same.
The fish are beginning to come in. The first loads arrived on the 25th, for the A.T.Co. From all reports the fishing is good.
Miss Emblem and miss Burrell spent the weekend at Snake Isle.
Doc. Medd, who has been attending the assizes at Portage, returned on Monday’s train.
Wm. Walmsley has been confined to the house through sickness. Better hurry, Bill, they’ve started curling.
Mr. Foley lost his residence through fire, last week, over heated stovepipes being the cause. Mr. Foley lost everything that was in the house, as the fire had gained too much head way before being discovered.
The entertainment and bazaar in the Methodist Church last Friday afternoon and evening was a grand success. The programme, though not a lengthy one, was of a classical nature and was fully appreciated by the large crowd present.
The municipal elections promise to cause some excitement, especially in Ward 5, where it is understood, “Old Reliable,” Tom Toye and J. Namarko will be the contestants.
The rink opened for skating and curling on Monday night. It is not every town of our size that has a curling and skating rinks open this winter. It should be fully appreciated and patronized by old and young, both skaters and curlers.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 26 – 1914

1914 Nov 26 – Ethelbert Children Do Well

To the Editor of the Herald:
Please allow me some room in your paper to state how well the boys and girls in my room have done towards helping to relieve the suffering of the Belgium children. A little over a week ago I mentioned the subject to them and they immediately decided to try and do something. The result is that they have collected in the neighbourhood of $25. This, I think, is a credit to them and I am writing this to show how the boys and girls are willing to help if they are given the chance and how they will make good.
W.H. WHITE.
Principal Ethelbert School.

1914 Nov 26 – Soldiers Return Thanks

To the Editor of the Herald:
Sir – On behalf of the boys allow me, through the medium of your paper to thank all those very kind townspeople who have in such substantial and many ways subscribed to their welfare.
During the time of our enforced visit to Berlin or Constantinople we hope the town will prosper and so afford us some chance of again taking up a more peaceable occupation on our return.
Orders will be taken for scalps and other trophies.
ARTHUR C. GOODALL.
Reg. Serg. Maj., 32nd M.H.

1914 Nov 26 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Oct. 29th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Good Roads Association, the health officer, G.A. Warringon, C.E., the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and St. Joseph’s Orphanage.
Hechter-Lacey – That the clerk write Mr. McGilvray and ask him to come to this municipality and lecture on the Good Roads Act.
Lacey-Hunt – That in all cases where a contractor calls for inspection of work that is found incomplete, according to the terms of the contract, the contractor shall be charged with the cost of the inspection fees and mileage.
Lacy-Richardson – That the health officer’s livery account in connection with the diphtheria cases be certified to by Dr. Medd and paid, the said expense to be charged in the tax accounts of the parties involved.
Hechter-Lacey – That each councillor be authorized to collect voluntary subscriptions for the patriotic fund. All money so collected to be sent in to the treasurer of the municipality.
Toye-Bickle – That the clerk be instructed to credit Ward 1 with 23 pieces of tamarac pilling and charge the same to the public works account, the piles having been expended n the Bailey Bridge.
Hunt-Richardson – That all road commissioners’ certificates issued after this date be payable only to the parties to whom they are issued.
Lacey-Richardson – That any representatives of the council attending the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities be allowed $15.00 for expenses.
Bickle-Toye – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter be representatives to the Convention.
Hunt-Richardson – That Coun. Lacey take the place of J.D. Robertson, resigned, on the public works committee.
Lacey-Richardson – That the council suggest to the Minister of Public Works that in future all grants to the municipality be paid through the office of the municipality and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to our member, Mr. Hughes.
Toye-Lacey – That the clerk write the Minister of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to inspect the bridges recently completed over German Creek.
Hunt-Hechter – That the municipal collectors be bonded to the extent of $500 each.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hechter-Richardson – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work, T. Toye $25.30, C.H. Bickle $39.10 and A. Hunt $28.70, be passed.
Toye-Lacey – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Nov 26 – Fork River

Reeve W. King and D.F. Wilson are attending the convention of the Union Municipalities at St. Boniface this week. Coun. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, is also attending the convention.
The company’s auditor, assisted by Messrs. John Sieffert and Jas. Campbell, is taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co. store here this week.
A pie social was held at the home of Mrs. W. King for the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on the 18th inst. All report a pleasant time and the disposal of much pie.
Mr. Thomas, our grain buyer, is kept busy pretty much all the time. The quantity of what being marketed here this season is surprising considering the adverse conditions prevailing during part of the year.
Wood has started to come in since the snow arrived. It is expected that there will be considerable quantities brought in for shipment here this winter.
All old acquaintances hereabouts learned with regret of the misfortune which befell Thos. Glendenning last week in the burning of his barn last week. He had doors, windows and other material with which to erect a new house stored in the buildings when the fire occurred and all was burned. He also had about $1500 worth of grain burned. No insurance was carried on the building or the contents. With the true spirit of the pioneer he is starting to rebuild.
Many have taken out big game hunting licences and it looks as if the fleet-footed deer will have a warm time this season.
There is some talk of a contest for the reeveship. It seems only fair that the present reeve should have another term.
Mrs. Wm. Williams has just undergone a serious operation in the Dauphin Hospital.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 24 – 1910

1910 Nov 24 – Mossey River Council

A meeting of the Council was held in the Council Chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Nov. 11, Councillor Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Toye – Re Shannon Road – That this roadway be opened on payment by Thos. Shannon of $150. Motion list.
Lacey-Toye – That Thos. Shannon be notified to attended a special meeting of the Council, to settle the matter of the road, to be held at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 10 o’clock a.m.
Toye-Paddock – That any member of the Council who can attend the convection of Manitoba Municipalities be a delegate to the convention and that he be allowed $10 for expenses.
Hunt-Toye – That S. Bailey’s account for $75 as road commissioner be passed.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance Committee be passed; Dauphin Press Co., $10.50; Union Manitoba Municipalities, $20; Postage, $9; Dauphin Hospital, $100.
Paddock-Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Dec. 4th at 10 a.m.

1910 Nov 24 – Fork River

Tom Shannon was the unfortunate loser of a separator this week, by some unaccountable means it caught fire in the night and when the family got up in the morning they saw that the separator had been burnt.
Mr. Venables is now occupying this Dallas’ farm. Mr. Dallas and family have moved to Winnipegosis for the winter.
J. Lockhart and family spent Saturday in Winnipegosis.
Harry Little paid Dauphin a visit last week.
A stable 28×30 is now being built for the benefit of the congregation of the English Church, when completed it will be a credit to those who helped to put it up.
Wm. King is paying the Swan River Valley a visit this week, in the interest of the Orange Order.

1910 Nov 24 – To the editor of the Herald: –

SIR – Re “Fork Riverite’s” letter in your issue of Nov. 10th, which I presume he must have penned while suffering from an attack of whiskeyitis, otherwise he would surely not have been so careless in his statements. Re the establishment of post offices, I again invite him to examine documents at Oak Brae. Re irregularities and irresponsibility of mail carriers between Oak Brae and Fork River, I refer him to P.O. Inspector, Winnipeg feeling sure that if “Fork Riverite” will formulate his charges he will get the satisfaction he is no doubt looking for. “Fork Riverite’s” reference to the people being tankful to the government for building roads and bridges with the people’s own money, also as to the inability of the government to build and control elevators is too amusing to be taken seriously. If my previous letter was the cause of “Fork Riverite” stooping to utter falsehoods I am in a serious predicament, for I read somewhere “Was unto the sinner but we onto him that causeth him to sin.” So in future I shall refrain from replying to this individual who is “intoxicated with the exuberance of his own verbosity.” I have spoken.

Fred Lacey, P.M. Oak Brae

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

1919 Nov 20 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. John Dobson and family, of Winnipeg, are visiting at the home of Reeve Venables.
D.F. Wilson, sec. treasurer is attending the Union of Municipalities convention at Winnipeg this week.
Milton Cooper, who has been in the Dauphin Hospital, is improving.
F.F. Haffenbrak is on a visit to Ninette, Man.
With the milder weather the attendance at Sunday school has increased. 42 were in attendance last Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 30 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 30 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

The first accident to be reported from the north end of Lake Winnipegosis among the fishermen took place the latter end of last week when Ole Gelasson fell out of a boat and was drowned. Deceased was an able bodied man and a good swimmer. He was 28 years of age and leave a wife and two children. The body was recovered and brought to Winnipegosis village for interment.

1913 Oct 30 – Fork River

Peter Ellis, who is at Miles & Co.’s store at Kamsack, spent the week-end here with his family, and returned on Monday’s train.
Sidney F. Gower, who has been running a gasoline tractor at Morris all summer, returned, and is renewing old acquaintances in this vicinity for a few days.
Several teams are busy hauling timber from town to repair the Baily Bridge, which is in sad want of fixing the last 15 months.
T.N. Briggs returned from a trip to Dauphin on important business.
F. Cooper, who has been threshing south of the Fork River settlement, has returned home with his outfit.
J. Reid and a large number from Sifton, attended our annual children’s service here. There was a large turnout and the children’s choir sang, “Jesus Love Me” very nicely during the offertory, which was appreciated by all.
Nurse tilt, of Dauphin, is on a visit to her home on the Mossey River.

1913 Oct 30 – Winnipegosis

A cold blast from the northwest accompanied by a slight fall of snow dropped in on us Monday. It was a real taste of water.
The Manitou has left on her last trip to the north end of the late. The boat carried supplies.
I.H. Adams, one of the old-timers, arrived Saturday on a short visit with the intention he has here. Mr. Adams is now keeping store at Radville, Sask.
F. Hechter returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
Capt. Coffey went to Dauphin on Saturday.
Fred. McDonald has returned to our midst and is again in the employ of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co. He is the same old Fred and old friends are glad to welcome him back. At one time a report was about here that Fred. had made his “pile” in real estate and was in the millionaire class, but he says the rumour lacked confirmation, much to his regret.
Our thriving little burg is going to put aside its swaddling clothes and cut adrift from the rural municipality of Mossey River. And it is truly about time. About all we got now is the honour of paying in taxes. Besides, a rural council is not progressive enough. They do business on the “penny wise, pound foolish” basis. Any publicity Winnipegosis has received was entirely due to the efforts of the citizens. It would like to ask if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map?
Each train brings its quota of travellers. We like to see then as them are,
Peter McArthur and J.P. Grenon took the train on Monday for Dauphin and other points.
Ole Gelasson was drowned at the north end of the lake last week. The body was brought here for interment. Decreased was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.
Dick Richards and several others who went to the north end of the lake had quite a time of it, being unable to land for about three weeks. The party was about all in when they reached shore.

1919 Oct 30 – Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

1919 Oct 30 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has not been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavour.
An October cold dip is not uncommon, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

1919 Oct 30 – Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 7 – 1915

1915 Oct 7 – Fork River

Mr. Lorne Tilt has returned from the States and is visiting with his parents on the old homestead.
Mr. Ben Warshosky, horse and cattle buyer, left last week for Winnipeg with 2 carloads of fat cattle.
Fred Puluk, merchant of Oak Brae, was in town for a consignment of goods shipped here for his store.
Private F.J. Storrar is home from Sewell camp for a few days visiting his friends and looks quite spruce in his khaki.
Last winter the government officials advised the farmers to put in all the wheat they could and in many instances land was sown that should have been summer fallowed. Now the bad weather stops threshing and no plowing can be done. The government now comes out with the warning “Don’t thresh too soon.” Advice is cheap. It’s cheap money the farmer wants to be able to borrow. Interest at 8 to 12 percent, which is put up to us by the manufacturer when our crops are a failure by frost or otherwise are no good.
Mr. Shuchell, general merchant, is spending a few days at the Peg rustling bargains for his customers hereabouts.
Mr. John Chipley has returned from Hamiota, having spent a month harvesting.
Several men, who went out to harvest, are returning on account of the bad weather. Work is at a standstill lately.
Mr. Geo. Lyons, municipal tax collector, is busy these days. The job seems to agree with him.
W. King, J.P., received word that his appointment has been rescinded. “Billy” remarked with a smile, “that it knocked Doe Bryant’s yarn into a cocked hat when he (the doc) remarked that the Grits were always willing to wack up with a good Conversation.”
[1 line missing] Winnipegosis, was a visitor here inspecting the safe with the intention of moving it to Winnipegosis for the use in the clerk office.
Mr. A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned from a business trip to Dauphin at the week-end.

1915 Oct 7 – Sifton

Mr. Walters, of the Standard Lumber Co., joins the colours.
It was with regret that the young people of Sifton heard of the departure of Mr. Walters to join the colours. Mr. Walters has always identified himself with the best interests of the young people of the town, and has acted as scout master of the 1st Sifton patrol of Boy Scouts, which he was largely instrumental in forming. The patrol, in recognition of his kind work among them, met at his office in full dress uniform and presented him with a gold mounted cigarette holder. Mr. Bousfield, school principal, made the presentation and after a brief resume of the good work and happy reminiscences with the patrol, congratulated Mr. Walters and assured him of the party good [1 line missing] Sifton for his safe return among the heroes of a well-won fight.

1915 Oct 7 – Winnipegosis

The fishermen all arrived from their camps per the S.S. Manitou on Saturday morning, as the fall fishing is over. They will never get in shape for going up the lake for the winter.
We are glad to report Miss Pearl Paddock making rapid progress to recover.
Private Joe Johnston, Sid. King, Wm. Wright and Bert Arrowsmith are spending their leave of absence at their homes here. They are looking well and in uniform are a credit to the army.
Thomas Toye had a narrow escape from a serious accident Wednesday, when his horse took fright and bolted. A bunch of dogs got fighting under the horse and rig. These dogs want to be tied up before some one gets seriously hurt.
The council passed an early closing by-law at their last meeting; which comes into force on Oct. 8th.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. Whale was well attended and the proceeds amounted to $7.00.
Geo. Adams, of Waterhen, spent Sunday in town.
Mr. Derachers, of Pine Creek, is spending a few days in town.
A ten-cent tea will be held at the home of Mrs. White on Wednesday, Oct. 6th, in aid of a local family.
Frank Hechter spent a few days in Winnipeg on business last week, returning Monday.
We are getting three trains a week steady new and what is sill better news three mails also.
Mr. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is spending a few days in town at the home of her mother, Mrs. Theo. Johnston.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 3 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 3 – Fined $50 and Costs

Fred Buchij, a Galician, had a row over cattle with another Galician at Valley River. In the melee Buchij ran a pitchfork into the other man. The case was tried before P.M. Munson on Wednesday and Buchij fined $50 and costs. He paid up.

1912 Oct 3 – Killed at Kamsack

Thos. Powell, formerly of Dauphin, was killed at Kamsack on Monday. He was a car repairer. He was working under a car when a train shunted on the track and shoved the car over him. He was badly crushed. Powell was at one time an employee in the railway shops here.

1912 Oct 3 – Threshing Progress

Threshing commenced in several parts of the district this week and will be general if the fine weather continues. A great deal of the grain is being stacked this fall with the object of going ahead with the plowing.

1912 Oct 3 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 25th Sept. All members present.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Sarnia Bridge Co., Supt. Irwin, of C.N.R., the solicitors, the Highway Commissioner, J.P. Grenon and the Million for the Manitoba League.
A report of the public works committee condemning the Bailey Bridge unsafe for traffic was read.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Minster of Public Works be asked to send an engineer to examine the site of the Bailey Bridge and that government aid be asked for to construct it.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the clerk write Supt. Irwin, of the C.N.R., re ditch from Mossey River north to the Sanderson Creek and also re crossing on Cocker Road.
Seiffert – Nicholson – That the council pass a by-law to expropriate a roadway sixty six feet wide along the west side of the C.N. through the N.W. 18-30-18.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask that some of the members of its council meet Reeve Lacey and Coun. Robertson at the bridge across the Mossey River on the boundary line between the two municipalities to consider what is best to be done as the bridge is becoming unsafe.
Nicholson – Toye – That no action be taken towards collecting the price of the Shannon road from Thomas Shannon till Dec. 1st, 1913.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the declarations of Councillors McAuley, Toye and Nicholson for $13.80, $17.70 and $24.30 respectively for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Nicholson – Robertson – That no person be allowed to dump garbage within 200 yards of any residence, street or road in the village of Fork River, and that the Armstrong Trading Co., be notified to remove the refuse deposited by them behind the Orange Hall immediately.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the Minister of the Interior re memorialized to throw the swamp lands in the municipality open for the homesteads.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the C.N.R. be asked to place an agent at Fork River during the shipping season.
A by-law to establish the rate for 1912 was passed, the rates being municipal rate, 12 mills; municipal commissioner’s rate ½ a mill, and the general school rate 4 mills.
McAuley – Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on November 1st.

1912 Oct 3 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. Scrase visited Rural Dean Wiley and on his return visited Sifton on church business.
Thomas Shannon returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The northern Elevator Co., has a gang here putting up an elevator. An elevator is needed here and it will fill a long felt want.
Archie McKerchar and W. Clarkson of Winnipegosis, spent Wednesday evening with the boys at the Orange Hall and report things booming among the fishermen there.
The cattle buyers are getting busy. One shipped part of a car of sheep last week.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Donnie, visited Mrs. J.E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, last week.
Mrs. H. Scrase returned from Winnipegosis after spending a few days with her friends and while there attended the installation of officers of the W.A. at the point.
A large number attended the council meeting but no miracles have been performed so far to the satisfaction of the people as promised year ago.
Mrs. C.L. White, of Winnipegosis, is visiting at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Jim Parker is now living on the old Parker farm and keeps his gang moving. We are always glad to see new faces among us.
Rev. H. Scrase will hold divine service in All Saints’ Church every Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Fork River and Winnipegosis school house every Sunday at 7.30 p.m. and at Sifton on Mondays and Tuesdays evening as will be arranged there by next Sunday.
Nat Little arrived home on the special Saturday evening from his trip south. Specials seem to be the order of the day. Nothing like lots of train service, if they only come the same day as advertised. Nuff said.

1912 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

Fine weather is again with us and our people are wearing pleasant faces. Do you know, people are a good deal like the weather, they change quickly. When the sun is shining all have pleasant faces; when it is dull and overcast long dismal countenance surround us. Give us the man who smiles whether it rains or shines. He’s the one worth while.

Friend, life will frequently grow
Dreary: no fortunate isles
Lie where time’s dun water flow
Give me the fellow who smiles.

Peter McArthur returned to town on Saturday from Dauphin.
All Saints’ Church was the scene of a pretty wedding on Monday, when William Christensen was united in the holy bond of wedlock to Marie Louise Lebel. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Derome of Makinak.
The “old-timers” sketches running in the Herald are quite interesting. Winnipegosis has a few men who are well worth writing up. They have seen the country under all conditions, and what’s more, have made good. We’ll name just a few. peter McArthur, Jos. Grenon, Sr., Tom Whale, and Hughie McKellar, the fish expert. To have Hughie tell the history of the little fishes from the cradle to the table, would prove a mighty interesting chapter. In a future issue of the herald Hugie will be asked to tell what he knows.
Capt. Coffey has been here during the past week. The Capt. is nothing if not optimistic. He looks for a good season fishing.

1918 Oct 3 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. T. Grenier, Makinak, killed in action. (Telesphore Joseph Grenier, 1895, 291698)
Pte. Chas. W. Skinner, Dauphin, wounded and missing. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)
Pte. Harold Tomalin, Dauphin, killed in action. Pte. Tomalin was a fireman on the C.N.R. when he enlisted last January. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Tomalin, reside at Magnet, Man. (Harold Tomalin, 1896, 2129193)

1918 Oct 3 – Dramatic Meeting on Battle Front

One of the Dauphin boys writes the Herald of a dramatic meeting he had with another local boy at night. “We were,” he writes; “on the move and had come to a stop on account of the congestion of traffic. A fleet of Fritz’s planes came out and dropped about fifty bombs around us. Looking around by the light that the bombs made I saw another Dauphin boy about ten feet away. We only had time for a handshake and wish for “good luck” when the traffic moved on.

1918 Oct 3 – Fork River

Mr. Pettit, of Winnipeg, paid this burgh a visit in the interest of the new Victory War Bond campaign.
Mrs. Tait, of Indian Head, Sask., is visiting at her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Timewell.
Mr. Love has arrived from Lake Manitoba and has taken charge of the Salada School, west of town.
Max King was a visitor to Winnipeg for a few days on business with the Military branch.
We notice Dauphin merchants are closing their stores at 6.30 p.m. What a contrast to some of our stores in this burg which are kept open much longer hours and sometimes on Sundays. The latter should be stopped at once.
James McDonald has finished his residence and moved into it.
T.A. Briggs has received a shipment of horses for Bonanza farm. The man who is able to receive a bunch of horses these days must have a bonanza bank account.
Fork River farms are in demand a good prices. Several deals are likely to go through shorty.
A Herald subscriber tells your correspondent he is mistaken when he states that “King potato” has not been crowned. He sure is the crowned potentate of this part of the country at any rate.

1918 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

RED CROSS NOTICE.
The annual meeting of the Red Cross Society will be held on Tuesday evening, the 8th of October, at 8 o’clock, in Rex Hall. Every member is requested to be present. A report of work done during the year will be made by the secretary, and officers will be elected for the coming year. It is for the purpose of electing officers that a full attendance is requested.
Don’t forget that this work is for the wounded men of our army and navy, who have been winning the victories we are so jubilant about just now.

E.L. MACARTHUR,
Sec.-Treasurer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 29 – 1910

1910 Sep 29 – Buried in Well

Kamsack, Sask., Sept. 25 – A funeral service, attended by circumstances that are unique in the history of Canada, took place Saturday on the farm of John Bowes, sixteen miles south of here. At the top of a 73 foot shaft that had been sunk for a well and at the bottom of which lay the remains of Elwer Olson, aged 35, of Yorkton. Rev. J. Morrison conducted a service for the dead. The shaft has been closed up and the body will remain for ever in the deep and improvised grave. Hansen was overcome by gas in the well and attempts to recover the body were fruitless.

1910 Sep 29 – Died from Burns

Miss Mabel Gunn of Makinak, aged 28 years, died Tuesday from burns received last week through an accident in handling coal oil. The young lady was trying to squelch a blaze on the floor with a rug, when her clothing caught on fire, and before it was put out she received terrible burns.
The unfortunate lady lingered nearly a week and everything possible was done to relive her suffering.
The funeral to the Makinak cemetery took place Wednesday.
Miss Gunn was favourably known throughout the Dauphin district, being one of Makinak’s earliest residents and having, with her sister, run a boarding house there for years. Her demise is keenly felt by the citizens of that community.

1910 Sep 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Comber left here for her home in Selkirk last week.
Mr. Frame from Treherne has been visiting friends here.
On Sunday Sept. 18th, Mrs. E. Morris gave birth to a little girl.
Quite a large congregation attended the Harvest Festival Service at Winnipegosis last Sunday night when a special sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Car loads of wheat are being shipped from this point.
Tom Toye’s youngest child died last week and was buried at Winnipegosis. The burial service was taken by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Cattle buyers are busy in this district. Quite a number of cattle have been sold lately and shipped to Winnipeg.
Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Harvest Festival Service will be held at the English Church on Sunday evening, October 9th, at 7.30.

1910 Sep 29 – Sifton

Mr. F.E. Nex of Whitemouth, is visiting his father-in-law, Mr. Ludwig Zarowoney. Fred bicycled from Winnipeg to McCreary, where he boarded the train.
Rev. Sabourin was in Winnipeg last week on business.
School Inspector Walker of Dauphin, inspected the village school on Tuesday last.
Miss A. Griffith of Fishguard, Eng., is visiting her brother-in-law, Mr. W Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Barrie have just returned home, after a couple months visit to his parents in “ye auld Scottish hielands” near Aberdeen. Bill reports a vey pleasant trip.
Theo. Stefanik of Winnipeg, addressed a large open air gathering here on Wednesday of last week in the interest of the community. Mr. Rawson of Dauphin was noticed in the gathering.
Charl Holinski is about completing the building of his new home. A fireside gathering is expected to initiate the new house when finished, so no doubt Mr. Jordan of Dauphin will be likely called upon to send up the necessary for the occasion, which is usually quite in evidence at such times.
Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Kitt and son of Valley River, visited Sifton on Sunday.
Miss Bessie Wilson of Fork River, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Paul Wood.
Mr. W. Carr went to Winnipegosis on Saturday on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.