Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 9, 1919

Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Fork River Fair Prize Winners

The following is a list of the prizes awarded at the Fork River fair, held on the 26th ult.:
HORSES.
Draft stallion, A. Rudkanvitch. Pair draft mares or geldings, P. Toperasky. Draft filly or gelding, Fred King. Pair agricultural, mares or geldings, Fred King; J. Bodnarchuk 2nd. Brood mare, J. Bodnarchuk. Agricultural, 2-year-old, mare or gelding, M. Bayko; T.B. Venables, 2nd. One-year-old, mare or gelding, Chas. Pereski. Foal, John Bodnarchuk. T.B. Venables’ special, foal by Baron Regal, W. Williams. Pair of drivers, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
Beef cattle (pure-bred), bull over 1 year, 1 and 2, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
T.B. Venables took first prize for cow 3 years and over, 2 year-old heifer, bull calf, and heifer calf.
Grade cattle (beef type), heifer, 1 year old, S. Narvasod; W. Williams 2.
Dairy cattle (pure-bred), bull, 1 year old and over, F.F. Hafenbrak. Grade dairy cattle, cow 3 years old, 1 and 2, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
Fat cattle, yearling steer, W. Williams.
Sheep—Ram, 1 year and over, D.F. Wilson and Sons; T.B. Venables 2nd. Pair of ewes D.F. Wilson and Sons; T.B. Venables 2nd. D.F. Wilson and Sons took first and 2nd prizes for pair shearling ewes, pair ewe lambs and pair fat sheep. Ram, any age, P. Soloman.
Pigs, bacon types—Boar under 1 year, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Sow, under 1 year, D.F. Wilson and Sons, 1st and 2nd. Pair pigs, under 6 months, F.F. Hafenbrak. Lard type—Boar under 1 year, F.F. Hafenbrak. Pair pigs, under 6 months, F.H. Richardson; F.F. Hafenbrak, pair pigs by boar Gladstone, J.H. Richardson.

POULTRY
Wyandottes, white. D.F. Wilson, jr. Buff, 1st and 2nd, D.F. Wilson, sr. Plymouth Rocks, barred, W. King. White, W. King. Leghorns, white, F.H. Benner. Brown, T.B. Venables. Rhode Island Reds, F.F. Hafenbrak. Any other variety, W. King; 2nd, S. Narvasod. Pair spring chickens, any variety, D.F. Wilson, jr; 2nd, W. King. Pair geese, D.F. Wilson; 2nd, T.B. Venables. Pair ducks, S. Narvasod; 2nd, M.A. Munroe. Best collection of poultry, W. King.

DOMESTIC AND DAIRYY PRODUCE.
Homemade bread, Mrs. Pruden; 2nd Mrs. Rawson. Twelve buns, Mrs. A. Rowe. Homemade pickles, Mrs. Rawson; 2nd, Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak. Collection of preserved and canned fruit, Mrs. Brunsden; 2nd, Mrs. King. 5lbs butter, Mrs. Shiels; 2nd, Mrs. King. Home cured bacon, D.F. Wilson; home cured ham, D.F. Wilson.

GARDEN PRODUCE.
Potatoes, white, G.H. Tilt; 2nd F.H. Benner. Colored, W.H. Johnson; 2nd, T.B. Venables. Turnips, P. Solomon; 3rd W. King. Carrots, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Beets, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd G.H. Tilt. Mangels, T.B. Venables; 2nd, N.H. Johnston, Cabbage, R. Senieuk; 2nd G.H. Tilt; Cauliflowers, Charles Pereski; 2nd, G.H. Tilt. Pumpkins or squash, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd W. King. Cucmbers, W. King; 2nd, R. Senieuk. Corn, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd W. King. Tomatoes, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd W. King. Parsnips, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Celery, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd G.H. Tilt. Onions, G.H. Tilt. Rhubarb, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Lettuce, S. Narvasod. Beans, T.B. Venables 2nd W. King. Peas, W. King.
Grain and Grana—Sheaf of barley—H. Harrineuk; 2 nd J. Smiduke. Sheaf of oats, L.V. Hafenbrak. Sheaf of rye, F.H. Bennes. Sheaf of flax. H. Herrineuk.

LADIES’ WORK.
Tray cloth, Mrs. Rowe; 2nd Mrs. Eales. Tea cosy, Mrs. McEcheran; 2nd, Ms. A. Rowe. Table centre, Mrs. McEcheran; 2nd Miss K.E. Briggs. Table mats, Miss S. Briggs; 2nd, Mrs. A. Rowe. Eyelet embroidery, Mrs. A. Rowe; 2nd Miss K. E. Briggs. Punch work, Mrs. A. Rowe. Handmade pillow cases, Miss S. Briggs. Homemade towels, Miss S. Briggs. Handmade bedspread, Miss K.E. Briggs. Homemade ladies’ underwear, Miss K. Briggs. Homemade corset cover, Mrs. Pruden; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Sofa cushion, Miss K.E. Briggs; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Fancy workbag, Miss K.E. Briggs; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Knitted stockings, Mrs. Venables; 2nd Miss Lacey.

The baby show brought out 12 entries, Mrs. A. Rowe taking first honors and Mrs. Garnet Lacey second.

Winnipegosis

The Anglican church held a successful entertainment at the Rex hall last week. The programme consisted of a whist drive, musical entertainment and a tombola. Mrs. Paddock won the lady’s prize at whist and Mr. T. Johnason the gentleman’s. Miss E McArthur and Mr. J Campbell’s songs were especially good. Mrs. Campbell’s playing of the violin was greatly applauded. A large crowd was present and the church netted $125. After paying the church debts there is a balance of $75.00 left, which will form a nucleus for a building fund.
The fishermen have pulled up their nets a few days ago on account of the fish being dropped in price. The men subsequently promised that the price would be raised and returned to work and the companies obtained a week’s extension of the fishing period from the Government.
An epidemic of broken legs and arms is going around. Three children and an adult have met with such accidents in the past month.
Hechter Bros. have sold their store to M. Popenski.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 27, 1919

$20,000 Damage Suit

Suit for $20,000 against the Canadian National Railways has been filed in the Court of King’s Bench at Saskatoon by Evelyn Haley, widow of Joseph Haley, of Dauphin, a brakeman, who was crushed to death between a freight car and a loading platform on the C.N.R. at Hawkes Spur, near Hudson Bay Junction, last fall. The action will be heard at the next sitting of the court.

THE ACCIDENT
The fatal accident occurred early in the morning of October 18, 1918. According to the statement of claim which has been filed at the court house by Messrs. McCraney, McKenzie & Hutchison, solicitors for the plaintiff; Joseph Haley was a brakeman on an extra train, under Conductor B.L. Haley, of Dauphin. The conductor was instructed to proceed with his train from the junction to Hawkes Spur, one mile west, for the purpose of picking up two freight cars which were on the spur track. This was done, and after attending to his duties as brakeman, which included fixing switches and couplings, Haley gave the engineer the signal to go ahead. He then climbed on to the step of the last car on the train. It was dark at the time.
The train started and Haley was crushed between the side of the car and a loading platform that was placed alongside the tracks. He received injuries from which he died shortly after.

G.W.V.A.

Members of the above association please note that a general meeting will be held to night (Thursday) in association headquarters at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is requested.

Plebiscite Advocated

Increase interest is being taken in the matter of a memorial for our soldiers who made the supreme sacrifice. The residents of the rural municipality of Dauphin must be taken into consideration as well as the tow in the proposed memorial. It is suggested that a plebiscite should be taken. The matter however, should be thoroughly discussed in the columns of the Herald before it is submitted to a vote.

War and Repatriation

A lecture was given in the town hall on Monday evening on the above subject by Lieut.-Col. (Rev.) Woods, secretary of the Repatriation committee. Mayor Bowman presided and introduced the speaker.
Lieut.-Col. Woods said he did not think the people of Canada realized what was at stake during the four years of strife nor what was at stake today and proceeded to enlighten his audience as to the aims of Germany which fell nothing short, in his opinion, of the conquest of France, Belgium and Britain, and then the United States and Canada. The cruelty practiced and the devastation wrought by the Germans was spoken of and denounced. By the use of a diagram on a blackboard the speaker described the part taken by “The Little Black Devils” in the action of April 22nd, 1915, and paid a glowing tribute to their conduct on that memorable occasion. Referring to the conditions necessary to the reconstruction of the Empire he outlined the course to be adopted, his great plea being for unity and purity in all matters. Coming to the repatriation side of his subject, he described the scheme proposed for the settlement of returned men on the land. In the event of a man being able to prove hi ability to farm properly the government would purchase a quarter section of land, at a cost not exceeding $5000 and resell to the applicant at cost price, no commission being charged or allowed. An additional sum of $3000 may be borrowed for the purchase of stock and machinery. In this capital sum no interest will be charged for the first two yeas; at the end of that period 5 per cent per annum would be charged. Coming to the men who were not farmers Col. Woods said that vocational training would be given and all reasonable means employed to help the men to resume their places in the community and home life of the nation. The lecturer laid emphasis on the fact that many of “our boys” were coming back to us with their nervous system shattered, and he bespoke for them kindly sympathy and and consideration.
At the conclusion of his lecture Col. Woods invited those present to ask questions, which he would be pleased to answer.
Replying to the question, “Would returned men get a rebate on their taxes,” the answer was in the affirmative, it being explained that the provincial government would recoup the municipalities.
The Land Settlement Board, Post Office Building, Winnipeg, was the answer given to a question as to where returned men should apply for any and all information in connection with this scheme.
Col. Woods nominated a committee of ladies and gentlemen, Mr. F.T. Wright being mentioned as chairman.
A verse of the National Anthem brought the proceedings to a close.

Fork River

Geo. Tilt has bought from Jack Chipley his house and lots, and intends residing in town.
Wm. King has purchased the north half of 31/2 29 19, the Haryey farm and adjoining quarter.
Wm. Bollen, of Dauphin, is visiting this district selling medicines.
Fred Cooper has finished his contract for the gravel for the new schoolhouse and is now busy hauling gravel for the foundation for the new elevator which is to be built this summer.
On the 14th inst. a concert, box social and dance were held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the baseball club. Each event was a distinct success and reflected great credit on the members of the dramatic society who was responsible for the entertainment. The sale of the boxes realized the sum of $146.

Fork River Criticism

To the Editor of the Herald
Sir, Some two weeks ago a box social was held at Fork River and at the beginning of the proceeding a statement was made on the platform that the proceeds were to be used by a baseball outfit and the balance was to go to the return soldiers fund. The bidding for the boxes was spirited, good prices obtained and some $135.00 over expenses realized. It now transpires that some of those interested in baseball intend to use the money not only to buy bats, balls, etc. but also baseball uniforms for the players. Should this be carried out how much will be left for the return soldiers fund. There is not a doubt that the free bidding was due to the majority of those present believing that the greater portion of the money they were giving was going to the return soldiers fund and it has been remarked that this fund should get the even one hundred. For the past four years the government has been supplying free uniforms and should there be any return soldiers on the baseball team no one will object to their being supplied with a baseball uniform but then again there will be no doubt the others who did not accept a government uniform and presumably being on a baseball team they are sound wind and limb and there is no doubt that the people who payed their money would object to it being used to supply them with free suits to play baseball in when they refuse to accept uniforms to serve their country in.
A contributor,
Fork River, March 24.

Fork River Agricultural Society

The first meeting of this society was held in the municipal office at Fork River on Saturday March 22nd and was well attended. T.B. Venables was in the chair and E.F. Wilson acted as secretary. The chairman spoke of the advantages that would be accrued to the district through a good live agricultural society and those present showed considerable enthusiasm over the prospect. D.F. Wilson provisional secretary also spoke and read portions of the agricultural society’s act. The officers elected were T.B. Venables president, J.H. Richardson vice and as directors J.D. Robertson, W. King, F.F. Halfinbrak, W. Greghill, J. Yakavanka, Panko Solomon, S.J. Perepeluk, D.F. Wilson, Mike A. Moyer. A discussion then took place as the advantages of purchasing grounds and it was the unanimous opinion that the society should join the Mossey River School District in securing grounds large enough for an agricultural show. A meeting of the members is called to [unknown] purchase of the grounds Tuesday April 22nd.

Sifton

Subscriptions to the Great War Veteran Association of Dauphin from the Ruthenian citizens in the Sifton district. The subscriptions were given after a public meeting held on the 9th under the auspice of the Canadian Patriotic Association.
W. Mazuryk, 5, S. Stichishon 5, M. Litowetz 50 cents, K. Choloweky 4, H. Konowalchuk 5, Kostesky 5, J. Stifanuk 5, F. Guiazdowsky 5, A. Stifanuk 5, N. Dudar 5, P. Sawchyn 10, P. Trach 5, O. Burawkyo 5, N. Ogryalo 10, J. Korolyk 5, M. Nakonechny 5, A. Herman 1.50, G. Nikikchuk 2, M. Kuzyk 2, J. Kuyk 1, H. Dundar 1, O. Hrimak 5, W. Blenduk 25 cents, J. Feduk 5, D. Wasilishen 4, J. Wasilyshen , F. Kostur 5, T. Mostowy 5, T. Belesky 5, E. Pankiw 5, W. Jarema 5, M. Hafichuk 5, T. Bayduza 10, W. Kuzyk 1, N. Popelta 5, C. Bayduza 2, N. Zubreaky 1, N. Hnatuk 1, A. Atamanchuk 2, P. Brazchul 2, S. Harema 1, P. Hrushowy 75 cents, PO. Nakonechny 2, D. Heschuk 2, M. Kolcun 1.25, P. Lukenko 1, P. Swerbyos 15, W. Shimansky 5, F. Farion 15, Sopunik 5, D. Kindrat 6, H. Kindrat 5, J. Atamanchuk 1, H. Sokal 2, P. Kuzyk 5, Hryhorchuk 10, J. Rola 10, J. Burtniak 10, S. Lozinesky 5, S. Lusko 5, N. Xabiaka 5, A. Basurba 5, S. Halinsky 5, W. Brazchuk 5, S. Atamanchuk 5, H. Stasiuk 5, W. Paulak 5, H. Kopychuk 5, J. Zarusky 5, Miss P Xarusky 5, N Dozinsky 1, M. Pasieka 1, Mrs. A. Dolhun 1, S. Marsenuk 2, Pulak 5, S. Pulak 5, S. Jasentuk 2, P. Burtnial 5, W. Lilik 1, L. Waly 1, N. Jasentuk 5, C. Atamachuk 5, G. Shimanszy 2, S. Nabozak 1, Mrs. Merenchuk 2; Mrs. Shimansky 1, Mrs. A. Basaraba 2, Miss C. Basaraba 1, A. Weselowsky 2, J. Weselowsky 2, F. Bunka 1, P. Nabozniak 5, M. Komarnisky 2, B. Komarnisky 2, S. Weselowsky 1, H. Lysak 3, Mrs. Potosky 5, W. Lulashni 3, S. Dowbush 5, M. Lulashnik 2, J. Rafalsky 5, H. Shmigarowsky 5, M. Harasym 1, W. Kalita 5, M. Kwolik 5, J. Kwolik 5, N. Rokush 4, N. Pawlowsky 10, A. Jakamisky 5, S. Ganchar 2, K. Horodnisky 5, J. Ganchar 5, J. Lucharawy 4, S. Stadnyk 5, J. Zagrodny 2, P. Spoel 5, F. Kalychak 1, S. Jakamisky 1, N. Dirkach 1, A. Ganchar 5, J. Zagrodny 5, J. Ganchar 1, J. Jakilashek 2, A. Kruk 5, A. Kruk 5, N. Lukowich 2, Ganchar 2, Werbisky 1, Werbisky 2, J.A. Polowy 3, R.T. Edwards 1, M. Shachinger 7, S. Antoski 2, N. Uskowsky 2, O. Dirhak 2, N. Martinuk 4, S. Jasentuk 5, M. Jarema 1, N. Rizok 1, Z. Plawusky 1, J. Shmenduk 1, F. Burtniak 1, M. Saruk 2, W. Kinzersky 1, N . Brezdin 1, S. Brezdin 1, M.P. Berezyuski 5. Total $548.25.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society, held Friday, March 21st, took the form of a social evening. Owing to our regular club room being burned down some short time ago the meeting was held in the Union Church. An excellent address was given by Dr. Medd, touching on skin diseases and the hospital question, but the main question was “Infant Feeding.” The subject is a practical one and we feel that by having our local physician speak to us we are getting deeper into community life, which is the real aim of the society.
Mr. CH. Dixon, our local lawyer, gave a very interesting talk on law, and la-making and we feel very grateful to Mr. Dixon for having so favored us. Then followed a musical programme of choruses, duet, reading and a pleasing solo by Miss Ida Rintoal. Tea was served at the close by the ladies, and we felt that our social evening’s quarterly would prove a success not only to our members but to all interested in the town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 13, 1919

Flogging Advocated

The problem of dealing with the small boy who smokes is troubling many of the teachers, the members of the school board and even the members of the town council, which body, at its last meeting appointed Coun. Houston and Katz to cooperate with the trustees as to the best means of remedying this undesirable sate of affairs.

Flogging Advocated
A correspondent writes: “We hear a great deal about the small boy who goes to school smoking and having tobacco on his person and the regrets expressed that the trouble can’t be remedied. If these boys attended school in England they would soon be disciplined, and in no namby-pamby style either. They would simply be flogged, and if one application was not sufficient the second strapping would effect the cure. But, after all is the small boy to blame when he sees the bigger boys parading the streets smoking both pipe and cigarette? Perhaps now that we have a committee to investigate they will bring in a report which will offer suggestions concerning the big boy as well as the small boy as to the bad effects of tobacco on the developing youth.”

Memorial Committee Busy

Chairman W. Rintoul, of the memorial committee, states that progress is being made. No definite plans have been considered as yet. A suggestion that an up to date skating and curing rink be built as a “memorial” is meeting with much favor in some quarters. Some favor a “community building,” others a monument, and so forth.

Opening G.W.V. Club Rooms

The new club rooms of the Great War Veterans will be opened on Tuesday evening next, the 18th inst. There will be a short musical program at which Mayor Bowman will preside. Later there will be dancing and cards. Refreshments will be served. The McMurray orchestra will furnish the music. The public are invited to attend.

“Still” Operators Fined

For some time past there has been an increasing supply of what is known as “domestic’ manufactured liquor. The manufacture was exclusively in the hands of the foreign element. Almost any tin vessel from a teapot to a ten gallon can was improvised as a “still.” And despite the crudeness of the particles used to manufacture the “liquor” a fairly good brand is said, by those who sampled it, to have ben produced in some cases. But the promoters’ dreams of accumulating wealth in an easy manner, were destined to failure. Collector Ball was soon wise to the operation of the “stills” and with the assistance of the local police, rounded up three parties who were either operating or connected with the enterprises.
The parties were Mike Torharczuk, Fred Moranczuk and M. Silverman. Informations were laid under the Inland Revenue act, and they appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday and were found guilty. Torharczuk and Moranczuk were each $200 and costs, and Silverman $250 and costs.

War Bride to Arrive

The first war bride that is to come to Dauphin is expected to arrive about the first of next week. During the month of December Sergt. Harold Crowe was married to a young lady in London. The young couple sailed on the Grampian, which was due to arrive at Halifax on Wednesday.

Fork River

Pte. Eales and his war bride have arrived from overseas. They are visiting at the home of H. Pearson.
The manager of the Northern Lumber Co. was a recent visitor to our town. The company may open a lumber yard here.
Mr. Osborne, municipal auditor, is auditing the books of the municipality. When he is through we shall expect the council to have the report printed. This is the only way the ratepayers have of knowing how their money is being spent and the law directs that the report be published.
Mr. Martin, homestead inspector, was here last week in connection with the applications of returned soldiers for land.
The stork visited the home of H. Little last week and left a wee girlie.
Wm. King is visiting Dauphin and Winnipeg this week.
Jack Richardson has purchased a registered Holstein bull, having sold his old sire to Thos. Toye, of Bicton Heath.
The committee which is looking after the interests of the returned soldiers has been organized and is now composed as follows: Owen Pruder, S.L. Gower, A. Hunt, J. Shuchett, J.D. Robertson, Thos. Briggs, F. Cooper, and W. King, sec.-treasurer.

Ethelbert

At a well attended meeting of the Ukrainian farmers held at Ethelbert on March 1st, the following resolution were unanimously passed. Over $100 was collected at the gathering which will be devoted to assisting the returned men.

RESOLUTION NO. 1
1. Having experienced the hardship of the newcomer, we therefore wish to help the returned men to settle with their families on the land. We are ready to volunteer at any time to graciously help any returned soldier settling in our district on the land by offering at least one day’s work on his farm in plowing or doing any required improvements, and will also arrange to have his family and luggage brought from the station to his respective land.
2. We also wish to assure such newcomers that friendly and neighborly assistance will always be at their disposal and that such returned men shall not suffer an want or hardship of a beginner. Carried.

RESOLUTION NO. 2
That we, as one of the Dominion Communities of Canada, do express our belief and faith in the principle of the League of Nations which has recently come into being at the Peace Conference at Paris.
That while believing in the self interim nation of nationalities, we cordially support the idea of human brotherhood and the new international order expressed in its terms.
That we look to the League as the ultimate solvent of the barriers which have hitherto divided mankind and plunged them in recurring strife.
That we also believe the protection of customs tariff the most potent and evil of all the barriers against the unity of mankind must be broken down to insure the permanence of political peace and the continued effectiveness of the League.
That we hold the Farmers’ platform as adopted by the Grain Growers’ conventions recently held in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, to be a welcome step in the direction of that universal free trade which must be chief buttress of a stable international order.
And also that we cordially support the other reforms contained in the same platform.

RESOLUTION NO. 3
That we wish that a committee be appointed whose duty it will be to help the returned men coming into our midst. Carried.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 18 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 18 – Ethelbert

Postmaster Skaite is still confined to his home by illness. Mrs. S. is attending to the duties of the office during her husband’s absence.
The deer season is over and quite a few people here are dining on venison.
Sleighing is needed to give an impetus to the wood business.
Clerk K.F. Slipetz was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
A branch of the Grain Growers’ Association was organized here last week under favourable auspices. The branch starts of with a membership of 60 and the members are all enthusiastic. The following are the officers: President, M. Pacholok; vice, J. Pachkowski; sec.-treas., K.F. Slipetz.

1913 Dec 18 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon returned from a few days visit to Dauphin.
W. Williams has left with his outfit to take out lumber on his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Miss Bessy Wilson returned from a few weeks visit among friends in Sifton and Dauphin.
D. Kennedy has purchased a handsome pair well-bred colts for drivers.
Mrs. J. Parker and daughter left for Winnipeg for a short visit.
Mrs. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is having a week’s visit with her sister, D. Kennedy.
The Orangemen of Fork River appreciate very much the kindness shown them by the ladies in coming out and cleaning out their large hall gratis. The brethren wish to tender them a hearty vote of thanks for same.
D. Briggs, of Brandon, and Mr. Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, had the good luck to get a moose each.
Those who shot large game are, Harold Shannon, a fine elk; Fred King, moose; Frank Hafenbrak, moose; S. Munro, elk; J. Richardson, moose.
On Friday night the ladies of Fork River gave a ball in the Orange Hall. The ladies supplied the refreshments and paid a fee of 25 cents. The gentlemen were free. There was a large turnout and a most enjoyable evening.

1919 Dec 18 – Fork River

The Unity Christmas tree of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River will be held in the Orange Hall on the evening of Monday, 22nd inst. This promises to be the event of the season. A large attendance is requested as Santa is bringing Mrs. Santa. Admission, gentlemen 50 cents; ladies and children free.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 12 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 12 – Fork River

Miss E. French, of Grandview, is staying with Mrs. John Clemens.
Mrs. I. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor of Mr. Duncan Kennedy’s.
Some persons have been kind enough to visit the storehouse of one of our citizens and help themselves to meat, and he takes this means of advising them that he has laid in a stock of ammunition and is ready for target practice.
S. Reid returned from a short visit to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is spending a week among her numerous friends in Dauphin.
A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the home of Mrs. Nat Little on Dec. 4th. A few braved the snow storm and after business was done an enjoyable time was spent. It was arranged that the next meeting be held at the home of the vice-president, Mrs. Lacey, of Oak Brae, in January at the call of the president, Mrs. W. King.
Jack Richardson has been elected by acclamation councillor for Ward 1 and we believe he will be all right. No doubt we will miss the usual display of fireworks when we ask for anything. We’ll get used to it in time I guess. Say, it’s nice to be able to bind and stack your crop in good time, while others have to flounder around in mud and snow and yet we are all expected to cash up. What for? “Keep Smiling.”
Dear “Freddy” asked for another term to finish what he didn’t do last year? He reminds us of “Sir Wilfy” and the Hudson Bay Railway. It’s the same old chestnut at election time. Nuff said.
The annual public Xmas tree under auspices of the W.A. and All Saints; Sunday School will be held in the Orange Hall Xmas eve. A programme provided. Everybody come, bring the kiddies and have some fun.

1912 Dec 12 – Winnipegosis

The Women’s Auxiliary held a meeting last week at Mrs. Kitcheson’s that was very encouraging to its members, who, without any graves to tend can say “we are seven,” though they have the problem to solve of the “how” and “why” they are to raise funds to build a church. The proceeds to be realized from the concert to be held on the 20th will be allocated to the mission debt contacted last summer. Regret is felt that we have not a residing minister here. We know Mr. King deserves credit for the faithful way he succeeds in bring us a Sunday supply. Mr. Noble is constant to his duties and taking circumstances into consideration we do not fare so badly.
The Roman Catholics held mass last Sunday morning, Father Derome officiating.
The C. League last week entertained a fair number (not withstanding the storm) at their months social evening.
The Card Circle the last two evening was of indifferent issue, the prizes being won by draw. In future admission is free.
Mrs. Cunliffe has suffered from a fall down the step of her home. We trust she has not sustained any serious injury.
Miss Parker, of Valley River, came in on Saturday to visit her sister, Mrs. Hippisley.
The late storm, which was of the blizzard kind, has greatly subsided though drifts are forming. The hunters will be delighting in the advantage it affords them.
Mr. Thompson, of Portage la Prairie succeeded in securing a moose on Saturday last. Messrs. Starling and Lunn arrived on Saturday from Portage to join his party. Dr. Medd is recalled from his outing to attend Miss Whale, who is ill from the effects of a bad cold.
Mr. Newell’s moving pictures were of an edifying character as well as amusing. He has left town for Fork River.
Mr. McNichol is very low at present.
The late H.B. Stand has the appearance, from a new coat of paint, of possibly being an attractive centre of business.

1918 Dec 12 – Fork River

Two cars of horses were brought in to the district lately. Horses equally as good as can be bought locally, but strange to say the farmers prefer over their hard earned ducats for animals that are backed up, not with a pedigree, but with a plausible story.
How is it that the minutes of the council have not been published lately? He only opportunity the ratepayers have of knowing what is going on is what they read in the columns of the Herald. Let us have light.
A cablegram received from Lorne Lacey states that he has arrived safely in England. Lorne has been a prisoner of war in Germany for a considerable time, and it is a great relief to his friends to know that he is safe on British soil once more.
Sid Frost left last week in the best of health to spend the winter with his parents in Rathwell. He stopped over in Winnipeg, where he took sick and died. Decreased was of a quiet disposition and was liked by all who knew him. He was a member of L.O.L. No. 1765.
Corporal Stanley King is spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. King. He will resume his duties as section foreman at Togo. Mr. and Mrs. King contributed four sons to the defence of the Empire, which is a record to be proud of.
The contest for the reeveship is proving interesting. All three candidates appear to be confident of election. The counting of the ballots on Tuesday night will solve the mystery.

1918 Dec 12 – Winnipegosis

The first carload of fish this season was shipped out on Tuesday by the Armstrong Independent Fisheries, Limited.
J.G. Hamilton has arrived in town to take over the departmental management of the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store.
Mr. Bradley has raised a porker which tips the scale at 490lbs.
H. Johnson, who was fishing on Lake Winnipegosis for the Armstrong Trading Co., lost his life early this week by falling through the ice. The deceased was returning home to his camp and trod on thin ice which broke and threw him into the water. He was carried away by a strong current before help could arrive. The deceased leaves a wife to mourn his loss.
The collectors’ report shows over $300 collected for the Sailor’s fund from the town alone.
Last Saturday there was a lively scene at the C.N. railway station to welcome home two returned soldiers – Neily McCaulay and Alex Chartrand. Flags were in abundance and the whole town turned out to welcome the heroes home. The soldiers were heartily cheered and the school children led the singing of patriotic songs. Both men were escorted in an auto driven by Mayor Whale to their homes. The school children and townspeople formed a procession on either side of the auto and enlivened the way singing, cheering and waving flags. The reception of the soldiers was conducted under the superintendence of the Returned Soldiers’ League.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Dec 7 – Municipal Nominations

Reeve
Nominations for rural Municipalities throughout the province took place on Tuesday. In these municipalities two weeks elapse before election day.

MOSSEY RIVER.
Reeve – F.B. Lacey, acclamation.

COUNCILLORS.
Ward 2 – A. Hunt, acclamation.
Ward 4- J.S. Seiffert, acclamation.
Ward 6 – No nomination.

1911 Dec 7 – Fork River

An ice gang left here for the put up ice for the Armstrong Trading Co., Winnipegosis, composed of Messrs. Munro, Johnston, Gower and others.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis is to be opened for summer fishing again. It will be a great blunder if it is. As it is winter fishing is of great benefit to the resident fisherman and farmer, where as summer fishing is for the benefit of the 102 American companies and means clearing out the lake in about two seasons.
George Tilt left last week for Dauphin on a business trip.
Rev. Mr. Cruikshank held a service in the Methodist Church on Tuesday evening assisted by Mr. Malley, of Winnipegosis. A business meeting was held after service.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Breiver, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Armstrong.
Our trains here have not been on time more than twice for the last month. We were informed by a traveller from Winnipeg that instead of the train leaving Dauphin on time they had to wait while they manufactured a conductor and when he was manufactured they had to wait while he got some breakfast and then it did not matter when they started. Farmers wait hours for their mail and freight. Of course we sympathized with the traveller as we are used to waiting in Dauphin while they manufacture an engine to take a train out, but this is our first experience in making conductors. What’s next?
The office of the municipality will be closed from the 12th to 14th of the month. The Sec.-treasurer will be at the council chamber, Winnipegosis, during this period.

1911 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sec-treasurer of the municipality will be here at the council chamber Winnipegosis, from the 12th to the 14th of this month.

1916 Dec 7 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. J.L. Godkin, Minitonas, died of wounds. (John Laurence Godkin, 1897, 2382826 ??? (not found on virtual memorial))
Pte. J.T. Taylor, Winnipegosis, wounds. (???)

1916 Dec 7 – Death of Pte. Harold Curtis

Private Harold Curtis succumbed to his wounds last week. By his death Mrs. Curtis has sacrificed her tow and only sons on the alter of her country. The loss is inestimable, but the Empire must be saved, and many more such sacrifices will have to be made by mothers, fathers and some before the war is brought to a successful completion. Our deep sympathy goes out to the grief-stricken mother.

1916 Dec 7 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Northam has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin.
Metro Boyko has purchased he old ???.
W. Stonehouse, of Oak River, is in town.
Miss Leone Stonehouse has returned to Dauphin, after having spent the week-end with her mother.
F.F. and V. Hafenbrak, Fred and A. King and Jack Richardson, have returned from the deer chase with a bull moose each.
David Briggs has returned to Rathwell after a week’s visit to T.N. Briggs.
Thos. Barnard contractor of Dauphin, is busy plastering Will Northam’s new residence.
Mr. Kasmir has purchased a car of fat cattle for S.B. Levins, of Winnipeg.
The ladies of the Home Economics Society have sent a number of Xmas boxes to gladden the hearts of our soldier laddies at the front.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, and J.P. Grenon, of Winnipegosis, paid a short visit to W. King, P.M., when passing through Fork River to Dauphin.
The municipal nominations took place on Tuesday, Reeve Lacey is opposed by F.B. Venables. Mr. Venables is also running against G.E. Nicholson in Ward 1. Archie McDonnell was elected by acclamation in Ward 3, as also was John Namaka for Ward 5.

1916 Dec 7 – Sifton

We much regret the illness of our popular station agent, Mr. Oulette, who was removed to the Dauphin Hospital by special on Sunday morning. Mrs. Oulette returned, however, Monday with more reassuring news of her husband’s speedy recovery.
News from Lance-Corp. Walters this week informs us that he is fast recovering from his wounds, but the shock of the shell, which buried him, has in a great measure robbed him of hearing in his right ear.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore entertained this evening (4th) at their residence a large number of old friends on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of their marriage. Mrs. Ashmore decorated her table with the top tier of her wedding cake, which she hopes to have an evidence for her 25th. After Mr. Paul Wood had made the presentation of a cut glass service in ??? evening was spent in music and song, Mrs. Campbell presiding at the piano with her usual brilliancy.
Look out for Wycliffe School concert and dance Wednesday, 20th.

1916 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sunday school Christmas tree and concert will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 20th. This annual event has, in the past always been held in the Presbyterian Church but on the present occasion will be given in the Rex Hall. This change will given room for more stage effect and also better accommodation for the parents and friends, who have always filled the church to its utmost capacity. The programme will be a good one including a representation by the children of the famous Christmas story of Charles Dickens, entitled “The Christmas Carol.” The message of the carol is of universal interest Under the touch of the spirit of Christmas the selfish man is rid of his selfishness, plum pudding and roast beef are found to be indigestible without kindness, charity mercy, and forbearance. The story will be given in the form of a three-act play and several tableaux.
We ask everybody to reserve his evening and appreciate the efforts of the children by giving them a full house. This year the Christmas presents ??? Sunday school without the aid of gifts from the parents and friends. This is partly to save time and also to avoid the inequality in the gifts received by the children.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 26 – 1914

1914 Nov 26 – Ethelbert Children Do Well

To the Editor of the Herald:
Please allow me some room in your paper to state how well the boys and girls in my room have done towards helping to relieve the suffering of the Belgium children. A little over a week ago I mentioned the subject to them and they immediately decided to try and do something. The result is that they have collected in the neighbourhood of $25. This, I think, is a credit to them and I am writing this to show how the boys and girls are willing to help if they are given the chance and how they will make good.
W.H. WHITE.
Principal Ethelbert School.

1914 Nov 26 – Soldiers Return Thanks

To the Editor of the Herald:
Sir – On behalf of the boys allow me, through the medium of your paper to thank all those very kind townspeople who have in such substantial and many ways subscribed to their welfare.
During the time of our enforced visit to Berlin or Constantinople we hope the town will prosper and so afford us some chance of again taking up a more peaceable occupation on our return.
Orders will be taken for scalps and other trophies.
ARTHUR C. GOODALL.
Reg. Serg. Maj., 32nd M.H.

1914 Nov 26 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Oct. 29th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Good Roads Association, the health officer, G.A. Warringon, C.E., the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and St. Joseph’s Orphanage.
Hechter-Lacey – That the clerk write Mr. McGilvray and ask him to come to this municipality and lecture on the Good Roads Act.
Lacey-Hunt – That in all cases where a contractor calls for inspection of work that is found incomplete, according to the terms of the contract, the contractor shall be charged with the cost of the inspection fees and mileage.
Lacy-Richardson – That the health officer’s livery account in connection with the diphtheria cases be certified to by Dr. Medd and paid, the said expense to be charged in the tax accounts of the parties involved.
Hechter-Lacey – That each councillor be authorized to collect voluntary subscriptions for the patriotic fund. All money so collected to be sent in to the treasurer of the municipality.
Toye-Bickle – That the clerk be instructed to credit Ward 1 with 23 pieces of tamarac pilling and charge the same to the public works account, the piles having been expended n the Bailey Bridge.
Hunt-Richardson – That all road commissioners’ certificates issued after this date be payable only to the parties to whom they are issued.
Lacey-Richardson – That any representatives of the council attending the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities be allowed $15.00 for expenses.
Bickle-Toye – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter be representatives to the Convention.
Hunt-Richardson – That Coun. Lacey take the place of J.D. Robertson, resigned, on the public works committee.
Lacey-Richardson – That the council suggest to the Minister of Public Works that in future all grants to the municipality be paid through the office of the municipality and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to our member, Mr. Hughes.
Toye-Lacey – That the clerk write the Minister of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to inspect the bridges recently completed over German Creek.
Hunt-Hechter – That the municipal collectors be bonded to the extent of $500 each.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hechter-Richardson – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work, T. Toye $25.30, C.H. Bickle $39.10 and A. Hunt $28.70, be passed.
Toye-Lacey – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Nov 26 – Fork River

Reeve W. King and D.F. Wilson are attending the convention of the Union Municipalities at St. Boniface this week. Coun. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, is also attending the convention.
The company’s auditor, assisted by Messrs. John Sieffert and Jas. Campbell, is taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co. store here this week.
A pie social was held at the home of Mrs. W. King for the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on the 18th inst. All report a pleasant time and the disposal of much pie.
Mr. Thomas, our grain buyer, is kept busy pretty much all the time. The quantity of what being marketed here this season is surprising considering the adverse conditions prevailing during part of the year.
Wood has started to come in since the snow arrived. It is expected that there will be considerable quantities brought in for shipment here this winter.
All old acquaintances hereabouts learned with regret of the misfortune which befell Thos. Glendenning last week in the burning of his barn last week. He had doors, windows and other material with which to erect a new house stored in the buildings when the fire occurred and all was burned. He also had about $1500 worth of grain burned. No insurance was carried on the building or the contents. With the true spirit of the pioneer he is starting to rebuild.
Many have taken out big game hunting licences and it looks as if the fleet-footed deer will have a warm time this season.
There is some talk of a contest for the reeveship. It seems only fair that the present reeve should have another term.
Mrs. Wm. Williams has just undergone a serious operation in the Dauphin Hospital.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 25 – 1913

1913 Sep 25 – Fork River

John Robinson spent a few days here among his friends after returning from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Weaver left for Winnipegosis, where Mr. W. intends residing having taken a position in the A.T. Co.
Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak and family returned from a week’s visit to her sister, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis.
Miss Buie and Miss Weatherhead, of Dauphin, spent the week-end here the guests of Miss Weatherhead, teacher.
Miss M. Millidge, ravelling organizer of the Woman’s Auxiliary for the English church, will address the members of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on Monday, September 29th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon in the church.
W. Williams has received another separator, which makes four threshing outfits working within a radius of two miles and all are busy these days, the trouble is to get men to run the machines to their full capacity.
John Richardson is going around with a broad smile. It’s a bouncing boy.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Coomber of Selkirk, are visiting R. Coomber, on the Fork River for a few days.
The Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on the 21st. The church was very tastefully decorated with grain, leaves, fruit and flowers by the ladies and the congregation was the largest on such an occasion. T.A. Worsey, of St. John’s College, preached a very appropriate sermon. There was a good offertory to the Home Mission Fund.
Miss Ena Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, has taken a position at the A.T. Co. store here.
The C.N.R. telegraph gang are repairing old poles and putting up new ones between here and Winnipegosis.
The members of All Saints’ W.A. are holding an ice cream social in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 26th. Everybody welcome.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 17 – 1914

1914 Sep 17 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, Sept. 4th. Coun. Richardson absent. The minutes of last meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from Mr. P. McArthur, the Bank of Ottawa, Winnipeg Industrial Bureau, Highway Commissioner, Western Municipal News, the Solicitors, the Land Patent branch of the Department of Interior, Dauphin Press, A.H. Corbett, and the Municipal Commissioner.
Lacey – Bickle – That the clerk look up the accounts of money expended on the boundary line between Mossey River and Dauphin municipalities and then notify the Dauphin municipality of a claim for 50 percent of the amount.
Lacey – Toye – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt – Hechter – That the clerk prepare a list of the lands liable to be sold for taxes.
Bickle – Hechter – That the accounts presented for the building of the Fork River – Winnipegosis road and the corduroy between wards 2 and 3 be passed.
Lacey – Bickle – That road commissioner Toye supply the clerk with a description of the work done on the Fork River – Winnipegosis road giving starting and finishing points and number of miles constructed.
Bickle – Lacey – That the clerk have notices posted in all the schools in the municipality notifying the ratepayers to pay arrears of taxes within two weeks after which time action will be taken to collect.
Toye – Bickle – That the clerk write the Dept. of Public Works and ask that steps to taken to inspect the work done under the government grant and that a cheque for the amount of the grant to send to the office of the municipality.
Bickle – Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the Reeve.

1914 Sep 17 – Fork River

The official national prayer service for this mission was held in All Saints church on Wednesday evening. Mr. Wilson gave an address on the present national crisis and prayers were offered up for the restoration of peace. Very few turned out. It was not a dance or a picture show. Further comment is unnecessary from a patriotic point of view.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 30 – 1914

1914 Jul 30 – Mossey River Council

Council met in the municipal office, July 18th. Coun. Richardson absent.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from W. Murray, re Children’s Aid society of Dauphin, and Davidson & McRae, re continuation of 3rd Ave., Fork River.
Hunt-Hechter – That’s grant of $25 be made to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the offer of the townsite department of the C.N.R., of the continuation of 3rd Ave. to the northwest corner of the Fork River townsite for the consideration of $1 be accepted.
Toye-Robertson – That the accounts of T. Burns, $24 and D. Stephenson $11.25, for work on the German Bridge be paid.
Bickle-Hunt – That the Public Works committee inspect the Williams Bridge and if satisfactory to report to the clerk who is then authorized to pay the contractor.
Toye-Robertson – The W. King be allowed to do his statue labour between sections 34 and 35, tp. 29, rge. 19, for the year 1914.
Hunt-Bickle – That the accounts of the reeve, $27.30; Coun. Hunt, $22.90; Coun. Toye $22.90, and Coun. Robertson $25.65 for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Coun. Robertson being about to leave the municipality for an indefinite time tendered his resignation as councillor to ward 6.
Hunt-Bickle – That Coun. Robertson resignation be accepted and that it take effect July 22nd, 1914.
Hunt-Toye – That the council tender Mr. J.D. Robertson a vote of thanks for the manner in which he has handled the affairs of the municipality while councillor for ward 6.
Robertson-Toye – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee passed.
A by-law was passed placing the standard width of the road grades at 21 feet.
Toye-Bickle – That the council now adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jul 30 – Fork River

Sam Bailey has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. Frank Chase and family returned to Dauphin after spending a week with friends on the Mossey.
Mrs. John Phycola is building a dwelling house south of the Fork River.
Nat Little is putting in a foundation for a livery stable.
Mrs. Sam Reid and family have returned from a week’s holiday in Winnipeg with friends.
One of our Mowat farmers stated it was ninety-one in the shade, which no doubt accounts for ravings of Fork River and Oak Brae Ex.-P.M.’s in the Press, which have been disgusting and not worthy of further notice on our part.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a short visit lately.
Robert Hunt, of Dauphin, Government timber inspector, was here in connection with the Williams Lumber Co.
A band of horses got into a garden the other night and the owner of the garden asked the horsemen to after his stock and was told they would get nothing as they were only squatters thereby adding insult to injury. While, the said party, at the same time, has his fence and gates and part of his buildings on the road, and has been a squatter for years; he must not kick if he gets a dose of his own medicine for unneighbourly actions.
Can the ex-p.m. of Oak Brae, show where the present p.m. of Fork River ever received anything at an election campaign, and can he tell us whose bills the money he received at an election a few years ago went to pay. If he cannot, ask the ex-p.m. of Fork River, who told us at the time where this money went. The present p.m. at Fork River can speak the Ruthenian language and his many customers come to him and ask explanations around election time regarding the political questions and I am sure he does his best to explain them to them.
When the time comes for the present p.m. at Fork River to sign the papers answering the questions asked, he will be right there, Mr. Lacey, and will be able to decide whether to sign or not.
Billy King and his friends are still looking after the Conservative interests here and do not require imported assistance from Saskatchewan and Alberta. We have opinions of our own and are able to express same.

1914 Jul 30 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. Cunliffe left Monday for the Pas, where they will take up their residence.
The Manitou started out on her first trip of the season this week. She will stop at various points to make docks prior to the opening of the fishing season.
The fishermen are making active preparation for the opening of the summer fishing season.
The Rex Theatre is now completed and was formally opened with a dance on Friday night. The theatre is one of the best in northern Manitoba. Manager Coffey is up-to-date and is installing an electric dynamic and waterworks.
The municipal officers have given 20 days’ notice that persons keeping pigs in town will have to remove them outside of the village limited it is time but why 20 days’ notice? One man was heard to remark that it was to give the little pigs a chance to grow.
Miss Hazel Coffey, of Dauphin, is visiting with friends in town.
Miss Woodard, a recent graduate nurse of the Dauphin General Hospital, spent a few days in town the guest of nurse Marcroft. She left for her home at Neepawa on Monday.
Mrs. W.D. King and Nurse Cummings, of Dauphin, where guests at the home of the former’s mother, Mrs. Theo. Johnson. They returned to Dauphin on Monday’s local.
Mrs. Hall Burrell returned the latter end of the week, from spending a few days in Dauphin, the guest of Mrs. A.V. Benoit.
The dredgemen completed the work of making a channel at Snake Island on Saturday and leave this week to commence dredging at Pine Creek.
Mrs. Cranage and two daughters, left Monday for Prince Albert, where they will spend a few days visiting with friends.
Mrs. Schaldemose, who was visiting at the home of Mrs. J.W. McAulay, Dauphin, returned to town Monday.
Frank Hechter left for the Pas on Saturday. It wouldn’t do for Frank not to be in the swim when an election is on.
J.P. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Tuesday. He reports that he and Capt. Coffey had a breakdown in the Cap.’s automobile after they had left Dauphin to make the trip by road.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 25 – 1912

1912 Jul 25 – Fork River

Mrs. Richardson who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. S. Bailey on the Mossey, has returned to her home in Ontario.
C. Cameron and daughter of Neepawa, are spending their holidays with his brother, A. Cameron, of Mowat.
Max and Edwin King have received a six horse power gasoline farm engine from the Grey Motor Co., of Detroit.
Robert Hunt, timber inspector, paid a trip to Fork River between trains on business lately.
Stanley A. King, of Togo, and Ern Munroe of Brandon, left for their respective homes after spending the holidays here with friends.
R. Cruise M.P. and Wm. Sifton, are visiting up north looking for the “missing link.”
Miss Bessie Wilson returned from Winnipeg fair after a week’s stay and enjoyed the outing very much.
William Fraser, formerly of Winnipegosis, has accepted a position here with the Armstrong Trading Co. “Bill” is a hustler.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Snelgrove have left for a trip to Brandon fair.
Stanley A. King, of Togo, and Ern Munroe of Brandon, left for their respective homes after spending the holidays here with friends.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 4 – 1912

1912 Jul 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Richardson, of Ontario, is visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sam Bailey, on the Mossey River.
Miss Pearl Cooper returned home from a visit to her numerous friends in Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Wood are visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Bert Cooper on the Fork River for a few days.
Mrs. C. Clark returned ohm from Dauphin, where she has been attending her daughter. We are pleased to hear that Miss Olive is improving and will soon return home.
S.W. Swannerton was a visitor with Mr. Kennedy, manager of the Armstrong Trading Co., in connection with business for the Rapid City Flour Milling Co.
Miss A. Snelgrove is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Kennedy and Mrs. Williams are taking a trip to the Lake Town.
Mrs. Paul Wood and family, who have been visiting at Mrs. D.F. Wilson’s, having returned to Sifton.
Fred B. Lacey of Oak Brae, and D.F. Wilson, are visitors to Winnipegosis, the summer resort, on business.
Take care Bay Centre as we respect the one mentioned and he can kick both ends and unless you know the ropes you might get hurt. No offence meant.
The Government Agricultural special train was here on the 27th. There was a large turnout. The ladies
car was full and great interest was taken in the lectures on home culture given by the ladies in charge. A great number of famers turned out and listened to the able addresses delivered on cattle, horses and grain and weeds. As the train was late arriving the time was short to deal with so many subjects properly. We hope o see them back again at an early date and that our council will go in for roads instead of rabbit paths after hearing the road lecture given on good roads. The professors took two epecimros spector, which were returned safely and as soon as classified will be reported on and that’s the long and the short of it.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, expect for the Sawyer & Massey Co., is spending a few days with is parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bailey. We are alway pleased to meet Frank.
Several took in the Oddfellow’s excursion to Winnipegosis and and brought back a good dose of mosquitoes as souvenirs.
Nurse Johnston, of Dauphin Hospital, and Mrs Johnston are visitors at Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Whew, but its not. Just a sheet of paper between here and the place we hear on Sunday. Looking for a cool place is the order of the day. The river is well patronized.
W. King shipped two Berkshire sows to Robert McGregor, from this herd. There is a bargain for some on in “McNair,” the head of this herd, who is for sale.
A meeting of the Mossey River council will be held at Fork River on Tuesday, July 9.

1912 Jul 4 – Winnipegosis

E.R. Black was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.
The first excursion of the season, was by the Oddfellows of Grandview on Friday. The train brought a large crowd and all spent a pleasant day in boating and other amusements. A notable piece of enterprise on this occasion was the business acumen shown by a number of the ladies of the town by the erecting of booths, and selling of ice cream and refreshments. We are glad to say the young ladies did a good business and realized a nice profit.
Boating is the popular pastime with our citizens just now. At anytime on the river and law the small craft may be seen dodging and darting about.
Mrs. Coffey and her son Ted, returned to Dauphin Saturday, after a short visit with her daughter, Mrs. J.N. McAuley.
Capt. Coffey is here this week making repairs to his boat.
It is rumoured about that the Masonic and Oddfellows lodges of Dauphin will shortly hold an excursion to this place. We hope the report is true and promise the visitors an enjoyable outing.
Nurse Johnston of the Dauphin Hospital staff spent a few days visiting at the home of her mother last week. She returned to Dauphin on Saturday’s train.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 11 – 1914

1914 Jun 11 – Bad Fire at Ochre River

A disastrous fire occurred at Ochre River on Sunday morning last about 2 o’clock, when the store of the Ochre River Trading Co., together with most of the stock, was destroyed. The fire, when discovered had made considerable headway and the building being a frame one, was soon consumed. Willing hands did what they could to save the contents of the store and keep the fire from spreading.
The building was valued at $4000 and was insured for $2000.
The stock was insured for $12000 and its value placed at a sum in the neighbourhood of $15000 or $16000.
The origin of the fire is a mystery. It is probably that an investigation will be made.

1914 Jun 11 – House Burned

For the second time Mr. Gillies’ house at Sifton, was burned on Saturday night. The structure was a two-story frame building and nearly finished. Some time ago Mr. Gillies’ partly constructed dwelling was burned also. Incendiarism is suspected and the cause of the fire will be investigated.

1914 Jun 11 – Three Killed in Collision

One of the worst accidents that has happened for some time past on the C.N.R. took place just east of Cote, a small station six miles from Kamsack, on Friday night last. It was a head-on collision between No. 2 eastbound and No. 201, speed freight. There is a curve at this point in the road and the two trains were running at a good rate of speed and were right together before the engineers had time to reverse. No. 2 was in charge of Engineer J.H. Arnold and No. 201 Engineer R.T. Perkins, Jas. Clyde was firing for No. 2. and F.J. Smith for No. 201. All four were from this point. Perkins, Clyde and Smith all managed to jump and not one of them received any serious injury. Arnold stuck to his post and was so badly scalded and otherwise inured that he dead a few hours afterwards at the Kamsack Hospital.
F.J. Faiji, mail clerk, and Ross Donaldson, express messenger, were instantly killed. Both ran out of Winnipeg.
Geo. Gougeon, brakeman, of Dauphin was slightly injured.
W.H. Messier and J.A. McVicar were the conductors of the respective trains, the passage and freight. Both escaped unhurt.
None of the passengers on the train were injured, but nearly all received a bad shaking up.

1914 Jun 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Winnipegosis on May 30th.
The minutes of the previous meeting were adopted as read.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now sit as a court of revision.
The clerk reported that no protests had been filled since the court of revision had adjourned.
Hechter-Toye – That the court of revision new adjourn.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now take up the usual municipal matters.
Communications were then read from Prof. Black, the Deputy Minister of Public Works; the Land Commissioner of the Hudson’s Bay Co,; Judge Ryan; J. Irwin; the solicitors for the C.N.R.; the Municipal Solicitor; H. Rustad and a petition from certain ratepayers asking for a bridge.
Hechter-Bickle – That the plan of subdivision of block G and part of block F, village of Winnipegosis, plan being numbered 251, submitted by Munson & Allan, be approved.
Hunt-Bickle – That the secretary write the superintendent of the C.N.R. Dauphin, regarding the putting in of a culvert through the railway at pole No. 22, north of mile board No. 12.
Toye-Hunt – That W. Vincent be paid $13 for his service in securing the title to the roadway through the Champion farm.
Toye-Hechter – That plank be supplied to cover a bridge 20 feet long over Icelandic Creek, on the township line, between 29 and 30, the settlers agreeing to do the work.
Hunt-Bickle – in amendment – That Coun. Robertson and Toye deal with the matter of a bridge across Icelandic Creek and that the coasts be borne by ward 5 and 6. Amendment carried.
Messrs. Macneill and Reid, the delegates from Dauphin, were head regarding the building of a road from Winnipegosis to Dauphin.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks be tendered the delegates from Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the council now decide to come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act, a road from Fork River south to the boundary of the municipality and connecting with the proposed road to be built by the Dauphin municipality, between section 35 and 36 in township 28, range 19.
Bickle-Richardson – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter and Hunt be a committee to select the main roads and prepare the preliminary steps required t come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act.
Hechter-Richardson – That a grant of ten bags of flour be made to Seifat Michtka and that the flour by bought from whoever will supply it at the lowest price.
Hunt-Bickle – That in the matter of a petition of certain ratepayers of ward 6 regarding statute labour, the reeve by authorized to ??? in the absence of Coun. Robertson.
Robinson-Hechter – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and see the Minister of Public Works with a view to getting a grant for the biding of public roads in the municipality.
Hechter-Hunt – That the public works committee be authorized to begin work and if the weather permits complete the Fork River and Winnipegosis road; the work to be done in accordance with the profile of the Government engineer.
Richardson-Hechter – That on complaint to the clerk and the production of the necessary proof by the complainant, the clerk is hereby instructed to prosecute the owners of animals running at large contrary to the provision of the by laws.
Richardson-Hechter – That the clerk notify parties who have had interments made in the municipal cemeteries to apply at the office of the municipality for their cemetery deeds.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye-Bickle – That Coun. Hechter be authorized to rent two tents to be used by the men on road constructions.
A by-law was passed making an appropriation to the wards on a basis of six mills in the assessment.
Bickle-Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jun 11 – Fork River

Mrs. Chas. Denby, of Winnipegosis, returned home, having spent a week among friends.
Mrs. Kennedy and family have returned from Winnipegosis having spent the weekend there.
W. Williams’ planning mill is running full blast these days and “Billy” is busy shipping lumber.
W. Howiston spent a few days at Winnipegosis and while away we are informed, invested in a schooner. That’s all right “Scotty.”
Mr. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days inspecting work performed by homesteaders.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is visiting here.
Jack Robson and Harry Hunter have returned from a two months trapping and hunting trip and they report a good catch.
E. Williams, lay reader, has returned from attending the Synod at Winnipeg last week. He reports a very busy time.
The mail these days contains many copies of the speech on free wheat by our friend “Bob” Cruise, member for Dauphin. The wheat question does not cut any ice here at present. Its roads and bridges we went. We would be delighted to hear our friend “Bob” converting the Senate and his friends to vote for Borden’s good roads policy which was thrown out last session.
The seeding is over and the crop has been put in good shape, it being one of the finest seasons we have seen for years.
The captain of our fire brigade has prophesized a dry season and is seriously thinking of going into growing watermelons in case of fire. The only thing we can do is to keep smiling as the crops are looking good.
Feming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor here between trains the latter end of the week.
“Joe” Lockhart is filling a car with settlers’ effects and is off for the banana belt. Ta, ta, “Joe” we wish you good luck.
There will be a court of revision at Ethelbert on June 17th. It’s the last chance for getting on the list for the electoral division of Gilbert Plains.
W. King has returned after a two weeks’ trip north. He had a good time, tanks to his two Liberal friends who stuck to him closer than a brother, and “Billy” always appreciates a good thing.
Mrs. Curtis and Mrs. Morrisain, of Texas, U.S., are visiting their friend, Mrs. Nat Little, for a few weeks.
Miss F. Sanderson left for Winnipegosis to take charge of a large diary business started by G. Sanderson, of that burgh.
W. Hunkins and “Jimmy” Bickle passed through here recently at a 2-40 gait.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 23 – 1912

1912 May 23 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 23 – Mail Robbery
Mail Bag Disappears Between Fork River and Sifton
Contains Much Money

A few days ago the postmaster at Fork River, D. Kennedy, gave the mail bag from that point to one of the C.N.R. brakeman on the train on that particular day. This man acknowledges receipt of the bag and states that he placed it in the car in the usual way. It may be stated that there is no mail clerk on the Dauphin-Winnipegosis trains and the mail pouches along the line are taken in charge by the railway employees. This necessarily involves much risk to the bags as the employees are engaged at each station for a considerable time in switching and performing other duties.
The bag in question was not missed until Dauphin was reached and a search made for it when it was found to have disappeared. The postoffice authorities at Winnipeg were at once apprised of the matter and Inspector Hicks sent to investigate. He was here on Tuesday and looked into the matter without being able to solve it. Later, however, two special service men were put on the case and developments are expected.
The theory advanced is that the bad disappeared at Sifton.
The registered mail was particularly heavy on this day and besides cheques and money orders there were several hundred dollars in cash.

1912 May 23 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 23 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 23 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 16 – 1912

1912 May 16 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 16 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 16 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 16 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 14 – 1914

1914 May 14 – Bailiff Reported to Judge

The Fork River council has a grievance against the county court bailiff, and passed the following resolution at its last meeting:
Moved by Coun. Richardson, seconded by Coun. Toye. “That the clerk write to Judge Ryan as to the way in which Bailiff McLean handled the seizure made by him in the interests of the municipality, making a full explanation.”

1914 May 14 – Bullet in Head

A lamentable accident occurred at Ethelbert on Tuesday which may be attended with fatal results. Mary Bolinski, aged nine years, and her brother, aged 7, were about to start for school when the boy picked up a .22 rifle and accidentally discharged it, the bullet entering the back of the girl’s head. The girl was at once brought to the hospital here and is still alive with a possible chance of recovery.

1914 May 14 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred on Tuesday three miles north of Sclater by which Joseph Slobodigian lost his life. It appears that Slobodigian took his gun out for the purpose of shooting a dog. When the dog saw Slobodigian approaching he ran away and the man followed the animal. Shortly after this his wife heard the report of a gun, but paid no attention to it, thinking that her husband had fired at the dog. The man not returning after the lapse of a short time the woman went to hunt for him. She discovered him about 200 yards from the house lying helpless, with his right leg shattered from the contents of the gun, which had been accidentally discharged. The woman immediately went for help, but when she returned with a neighbour her husband was expiring, having bled to death.
The poor woman is left with two small children and without any means of support. Here is a case worthy of assistance. Any contributions sent to Mr. W.P. Hrusgowy, Sclater, will be duty, acknowledged, and the woman and children provided for.

1914 May 14 – Thrilling Rescue from River

One Thursday of last week a young man named LaCharite and Archie McDonald, son of John McDonald, livery stable keeper of Ochre River, had a thrilling experience and a narrow escape from drowning. The boys had gone to the river for a barrel of water with a team and desmocrat, which was one of their daily duties, and on account of the high water in the river, occasioned by the recent heavy rains they either mistook the place where they usually drove in or else the bank caved in, and let the horses into the deep water. The horses and rig were swept down the river and the animals in their struggle soon got entangled in the harness. In the meantime the two men were struggling in the torrent and were carried down the stream and would undoubtedly have been drowned but for some men who happened to be on the town bridge with pike poles, keeping the brushwood from the bridge, and who caught the boys as they came along and held them until help arrived and they were rescued.
The horses were carried downs stream about half a mile and caught up on a tree in the river. The rig and harness were recovered some days after.
Mr. McDonald was away at Plumes when the accident occurred and was appalled of his loss by telephone.

1914 May 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Theodore Miles, of Kamsack, was a visitor for a few days at the home of Mrs. Fred Cooper, on the Fork River.
Joe Lockhart and Commodore F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
F. Cooper was a visitor to Dauphin for a few days last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor to the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River on Friday.
Nurse Tilt was a visitor at the homestead on the Mossey for a few days lately.
Professor Brown, who was a slave for 23 years, gave a very interesting lecture lately in the Methodist Church on “Slavery.”
The wet weather last week put a stop to seeding for a few days. Work will go a head now with a rush.
Mrs. McEachern has returned from a visit to Winnipeg.
The annual vestry meeting was held in All Saints’ Church with E. Williams, lay reader, in the chair. The annual report was read by W. King, secretary and adopted as read. The following officers were elected for the coming year: W. King, minister’s warden; C.E. Bailey, people’s warden of Fork River; C. Bradley, warden, Winnipegosis; W. King, secretary-treasurer for the missions; John Reid, warden, Sifton. Delegate to Synod, W. King, organist, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Sam Hughes, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, passed through here from a trip to Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and son spent the weekend with Mrs. W.D. King at Dauphin.

1914 May 14 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Lawson and Mr. Pilgrim, of Dauphin, were here last week doing some cement work on the fox ranch.
The school by-law, voted on last week, was carried by a substantial majority. We should be glad of this, for no money can be spent by the people to better advantage than that which we put into schools. More than a few of us are of the opinion that more money should have been voted and a better class of school built. It is now up to us to make the best of it.
With the continued cool weather the ice in the lake is liable to remain firm for some time to come. The late rain pelted into it considerably, however.
Chas. Denby returned from Dauphin on Monday. He has been to Kamsack helping some of the government officials to stock the lake there with ???. They took about 150 fish from here in tanks. Charlie, you know is quite a ???, and [1 line missing] each fist cost the government $3. If they live and thrive even this sum is not too much.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 9 – 1912

1912 May 9 – Girl Made Good Escape

A young Galician girl who has been employed in several Dauphin homes lately, seems to have a kleptomania habit of purloining articles which takes her fancy. From one home she carried off a suitcase, from another a couple of dresses and at her last place of employment a roll of bills. Her home is in the Valley River district and the police have been watching trains for her to come back. Tuesday morning night police Levins captured her, though not without considerable resistance as she got off the Prince Albert flyer. Steel cells are being innovated at the station and for the time being the firemen’s bathroom was used for the accommodation of the prisoner. About an hour after Levins and another young man had occasion to go to the proviso cell, only to find that the bird had vanished. It did not take long to find out her mode of escape. The young woman had broken a pane of glass out of the fanlight and crawled through the aperture. She evidently cut herself in doing so from evidence of blood left.
It has since been learned that she was met two miles from town and driven to her home at Valley River. A constable will be sent up to bring her back.

1912 May 9 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon one of out enterprising farmers is taking a trip west to Saskatchewan on business.
Nat Little is a busy man on train days shipping cream for a Winnipeg firm.
Wm. King is on a trip north posting registration posters. registration commences on May 21st at Winnipegosis.
Frank Merritt one of Winnipegosis old-timers, passed through here on his way west. He bid his numerous friends here good-bye. We are sorry to see Fran go as he was a good sport. We wish him and his family the best of luck in their new home.
John Seale, Dominion timber inspector, was here last week on business at the mill.
The new chairs arrived for the council chamber without cushions. Some one will get concussion of the brain if the sittings are anyway lengthy. Get cushions boys.
Roland King left for Togo, Sask., on a visit to his brother at that point. He intends having a look around this summer.
Rev. S. Wilkinson of the Methodist Church, Dauphin, held communion service in the church on Sunday. He was assisted by Mr. Malley of Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and Mrs. C. Clark, returned from a trip to the Lake Town Saturday.
Mrs. John Richardson and family of Winnipegosis, are visiting for a few days at her brothers, Mr. F.F. Hafenbrak.
Professor Robinson, a prominent leader of the town band, is contemplating a visit to his old home at Pittsburg, U.S.A.
The rainy weather last week seems to have put on the usual display of fireworks in the Press. The scribe is still doing business at the old stand.

1912 May 9 – Reply to Fork River Scribe

In reply to the scribe’s thrust in the Herald of May 2nd, the “Parrot” (unwisely so-called by the scribe) wishes to state that he now sees his mistake and regrets it, though no detriment was meant to the church. The leaders referred to should, as he says, be allowed to manage their own affairs also to fight their own battles.
To “Wellwisher” the Parrot has nothing whatsoever to say, for in him he recognizes one of the flock and is proud to own him as such. “Wellwisher” is to be complimented on his masterly representation of facts, and the “Management” (which in this instance has apparently developed itself to a membership of one) may justly feel proud in the possession of a bird of such excellent qualities and one that has so aptly learned the virtue of obedience.
THE PARROT.
Fork River, May 7th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 7 – 1914

1914 May 7 – Escaped in Male Attire

Woman at station on Tuesday Night Dressed in a Man’s Suit – Who was the Woman?
When court was called on Wednesday morning there was a surprise when Chief Bridle gave out that Mrs. Murphy had left town and would not appear to answer the charge of attempting to commit suicide.
How the woman managed to get away is now what is puzzling the police as she was supposed to be in bed at home sick and the trains were being closely watched.
But there is a possible explanation of how the escape was effected. On Tuesday night a woman dressed in a man’s suit was observed on the station platform by several who were there. So sure was the conductor of the train that the supposed man was a woman that he offered to be the cigars with an acquaintance that such was the case. The disguise was very good but the woman, whoever she was, evidently forgot one essential in her make-up, which was a source of much amusement to the bystanders.

MRS. MURPHY HEARD FROM.

This (Thursdays) morning the Herald received a little from Mrs. Murphy, the postmark being Winnipeg, May 6th. In this letter she says that “she has to thank the liars of Dauphin for the trouble they have caused her.” She further remarks that after it is too late she has had her eyes opened and warms other women to beware and not believe liars as she did until it is too late to mend the damage done.

1914 May 7 – Met Instant Death

Maurice Frobisher and his brother arrived a short time ago from St. Norbert, Man., and took up homesteads at Asham Point, in the Ste. Rose district. On Saturday last the two brothers were going by ox team to Ste. Rose. Maurice was sitting in the back end of the wagon holding a rifle, when it accidently discharged, the bullet entering his arm, passing to his jaw and came out at the back of his head. Death was instantaneous.
Dr. Harrington was telephoned for and went to Ste. Rose. After learning the circumstances be decided that an inquest was not necessary.
Deceased was 40 years of age and unmarried.

1914 May 7 – Prairie Fire Does Damage

Prairie fires were running southwest of the town in the Mayflower and Spruce Bluff districts on Friday and Saturday. A dwelling on the farm of Arthur Bule, near the Mayflower School, was burned. A. Maynard lost a quantity of hay and other settlers suffered minor losses.

1914 May 7 – Ethelbert

Seeding has been going ahead actively and much of the wheat has been ???. The recent rain held things up for sure.
Very little wood is now being shipped out, still there are always a few cars moving.
Business is a little on the quiet side of late. Our burgh is becoming quite an egg expecting centre, many cases being shipped out weekly.
Wm. Morray, truancy officer, is visiting schools in our municipality. He is very busy going from one farmer to another making them send their children to school. On account of his visit the school trustees of Ethelbert S.D. have to provide more accommodation for the children that are of school age and who must attend. The people are satisfied with the action of the government in this move and will assist the officer in every way in enforcing the law.

1914 May 7 – Fork River

R. Corbett and his assistant returned to Winnipeg after taking the levels for draining a township and a half and laying out the road to Winnipegosis.
The English Church concert held in the Orange Hall, May 1st, was a very successful one. Our critic here admits it the best. A large number came from Sifton and put on a dialogue, which, to say the least was a laugh maker from start to finish. It pleased everyone. Our Winnipegosis friends were out in force and helped materially and that with the help of Fork River contingent a good evening’s entertainment was enjoyed. An excellent super was provided by the ladies. After supper several hired the hall for a dance and splendid music was supplied by Mr. Russell and sons.
Contractor Briggs is busy these days trying to make Main Street passable. Next thing we know Councilor Richardson will be putting down the balance of the sidewalk and all will be rosy.
John Clemens and family have left for McCreary, where they will reside in the future.
W. King has been appointed registration clerk for the northern portion of Gilbert Plains constituency. He starts in on the 12th of May at Winnipegosis.
Richard Harrison and E. Bickle, of South Bay, were visitors here at the council meeting during court of revision.
The dwelling house of J. McDonald caught fire last week. Captain Wilson and the fire brigade were soon on the ground. There was very little damage done.
Mr. McMillian, of Cyprus River, is a visitor at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat.
Our Mowat friend states they have put a bell and tower on the Mowat School house and yet they forgot to put a foundation under it. Of course, our friend usually does things different from others, which accounts for his being in a kicking frame of mind. He goes on to state the folks he sends to take his mail out, take all the way from one day to a week and the sometimes longer before he gets his mail back. What a shame. We trust he got the paper which contained the write up of how his pet government let the contractors mulet the people out of forty million dollars in building the Transcontinental Railway. Say, F.B. don’t get sore over our convention at Gilbert Plains. Have you forgotten the fuss you made with your friends here and up north because they wanted a share of the swag when you carried the chequebook and had to take a holiday for a few weeks in Winnipeg. You were not missed a bit. Have the common decency to keep in your own backyard, as we believe the glass in our house is of better material than yours and as in the past you can’t afford to indulge in stone throwing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 23 – 1914

1914 Apr 23 – Strange Accident

An unusual accident occurred at Gilbert Plains when Howard Bobcock, aged 13, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Bobcock, who reside about 4 miles out, hanged himself. The youth had been playing with his little sister and had asked her to come to the barn with him, where he would show her how Charles Best, who committed suicide last week, had hanged himself. The girl started toward the barn, but was called to the home by her mothers. When she retuned to the barn 15 minutes later she found Howard hanging from a rafter with a strap around his neck.

1914 Apr 23 – Fork River

Mrs. J. Rice, having spent the holidays at Dauphin, has returned to her duties at North Lake School.
E. Humphreys, Geo. Briggs, and Capt. F. Storrar spent Easter week in Dauphin.
Mr. Corbett, government engineer, arrived from Winnipeg a few days ago.
D. Kennedy and W. King have returned from attending the Conservative convention at Gilbert Plains. They report a large gathering rom all parts of the constituency.
T.N. Briggs has left for Hartney to bring in a card-load of horses for his farm.
F.F. Hafenbrak and J. Richardson, of Mowat, were recent visitors to Dauphin.
T. Lockhart arrived from the west and is spending a few days with his brother, Joe, on the Mossey River.
W. Williams has started sawing in town and is busy making lumber for the farmers.
The Methodist “at home” in the Orange hall on Friday was well attended. A large number from Winnipegosis were at the dance.
We notice our Mowat friend is sore as ever over his defeat and wants to know where the drainage agitators are. He was told, he says, that on the advent of “new blood” into the council.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 9 – 1914

1914 Apr 9 – Mossey River Council

The Council met at Fork River on March 24th, all the members present. The clerk having read the minutes of the last meeting they were adopted as read on motion of Coun. Toye and Robertson.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner, the rural municipality of Dauphin, the solicitors and the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union.
Petitions were presented by Bicton Heath School district re improvement of road to school; the settlers in the north-eastern corner of the municipality praying for a bridge across German Creek and from ratepayers in the south-eastern portion of the municipality asking for the completion of the boundary bridge.
Robertson-Hunt – That all bridges under construction be completed as soon as possible.
Hunt-Bickle – That T.N. Briggs’ tender for the completion of the Basham Bridge be accepted.
Hunt-Toye – That the public works committee take steps to have piles driven for a bridge across German Creek, between section 9 and 16, tp. 30, rge. 17, he settlers having agreed to furnish piles and caps and also to assist with the works.
Richardson-Hunt – That T.N. Briggs be engaged to oversee the driving of the piles for the bridge over German Creek and that he be paid $3.00 per day while engaged in the work.
Hunt-Bickle – That Geo. O’Neil be paid for his work on the boundary bridge as soon as the public works committee report to the clerk that the work is complete according to contract.
Bickle-Hechter – That the plan prepared by G.A. Warrington, M.L.S., of a roadway through the S.E. 4-31-18, be approved.
Hunt-Richardson – That the clerk procure a carload of three inch tamarac plank as soon as possible; all plank to be 16. Ft. long and six thousand to be 10 inches wide, delivered at Fork River.
Hunt-Richardson – That the corduroy, on the township line between townships 30 and 31, rge. 19, be covered with earth and that the municipality pay fifty percent of the cost, the other fifty percent to be paid for equally by wards 2 and 3.
Toye-Robertson – That Coun. Hunt and Bickle be authorized to let the work mentioned in the previous resolution.
Bickle-Hechter – That the clerk be instructed to pay C.E. Bailey balance of account, which was presented at last meeting.
Hunt-Richardson – That the clerk write the C.N.R. re the putting of culvert through the railway half a mile north of Mossey River School.
Hechter-Toye – That any member of the council wishing to attend Good Roads convention, at Dauphin, shall be considered a delegate from this municipality.
Toye-Hunt – That the accounts presented and recommended by the finance committee for the meeting of Feb. 12th and March 24th be paid.
A by-law re roadway through S.E. 4-31-18, was passed; also a by-law authorizing the taking of a vote in the school district of Winnipegosis, on a by-law of that district to borrow $20000 for the purpose of building a new school.
Toye-Robertson. That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River on April 20th.

1914 Apr 9 – Fork River

Mr. T. Burns, government inspector, was here looking over the ground and getting particulars re placing a stallion. This is the right move. Let us improve our stock.
Mr. D.F. Wilson has returned from attending the Hood Roads convention at Dauphin last week. He reports a fine gathering and excellent address. Mossey River will help push the good work along.
The Conservatives of Fork River met in the municipal officer on March 30th for organization purposes. President King called the meeting to order and D. Kennedy acted as secretary. Considerable business was transacted, after which the following officers were elected. President, W. King; vice, A. Hunt; secretary, D.F. Wilson, A strong committee was also appointed.
Mr. Alex Reader, of Saskatchewan, is visiting with friends at Mowat Centre. Alex is of the opinion that all work and no rest is hard on a fellow. We agree with him providing a fellow can get time to take a holiday.
We are sorry to learn our old friend George Tilt is under the weather. We trust he will soon be able to be around again.
Rev. Canon Jeffery, of Winnipeg, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican Church at 3 o’clock in the afternoon of April the 19th. Holy Communion and Baptismal service will be held.
Mr. Thomas Whale, merchant of Winnipegosis, was a visitor here for a short time.
Mrs. C. Beck, who was ill with pneumonia, died on Monday. Mr. Williams, of All Saints’, held the burial service in the church. There was a large number present.
We are pleased to hear Mr. Leo Beck will soon be around again after his illness.
Mrs. D. Wilson, has returned from a month’s visit at Dauphin.
The annual meeting of the Woman’s Auxiliary was held in All Saints’ Church on the 25th. After the general business the treasurer’s report was read. The following officers were elected: president, Mrs. W. King; vice, Mrs. A. Rowe; secretary, Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak; treasurer, Mr. King. The Auxiliary is making progress and the finances are in good shape. The next meeting will be held at the president’s home.
We noticed Mr. F.B. Lacey, ex-p.m. of Oak Brae, was in town last week.
Mrs. Wm. Ashmore, of Sifton, was a visitor here and attended the funeral of Mrs. Beck.
Mr. Robert Brewer, of Ashville, has purchased W. King’s registered Berkshire hog, “MacNair” which was shipped to Valley River on Friday’s train. There is still some more nice young stock left for sale. It pays to keep and breed stock.