Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 18 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 18 – Ethelbert

Postmaster Skaite is still confined to his home by illness. Mrs. S. is attending to the duties of the office during her husband’s absence.
The deer season is over and quite a few people here are dining on venison.
Sleighing is needed to give an impetus to the wood business.
Clerk K.F. Slipetz was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
A branch of the Grain Growers’ Association was organized here last week under favourable auspices. The branch starts of with a membership of 60 and the members are all enthusiastic. The following are the officers: President, M. Pacholok; vice, J. Pachkowski; sec.-treas., K.F. Slipetz.

1913 Dec 18 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon returned from a few days visit to Dauphin.
W. Williams has left with his outfit to take out lumber on his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Miss Bessy Wilson returned from a few weeks visit among friends in Sifton and Dauphin.
D. Kennedy has purchased a handsome pair well-bred colts for drivers.
Mrs. J. Parker and daughter left for Winnipeg for a short visit.
Mrs. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is having a week’s visit with her sister, D. Kennedy.
The Orangemen of Fork River appreciate very much the kindness shown them by the ladies in coming out and cleaning out their large hall gratis. The brethren wish to tender them a hearty vote of thanks for same.
D. Briggs, of Brandon, and Mr. Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, had the good luck to get a moose each.
Those who shot large game are, Harold Shannon, a fine elk; Fred King, moose; Frank Hafenbrak, moose; S. Munro, elk; J. Richardson, moose.
On Friday night the ladies of Fork River gave a ball in the Orange Hall. The ladies supplied the refreshments and paid a fee of 25 cents. The gentlemen were free. There was a large turnout and a most enjoyable evening.

1919 Dec 18 – Fork River

The Unity Christmas tree of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River will be held in the Orange Hall on the evening of Monday, 22nd inst. This promises to be the event of the season. A large attendance is requested as Santa is bringing Mrs. Santa. Admission, gentlemen 50 cents; ladies and children free.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 12 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 12 – Fork River

Miss E. French, of Grandview, is staying with Mrs. John Clemens.
Mrs. I. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor of Mr. Duncan Kennedy’s.
Some persons have been kind enough to visit the storehouse of one of our citizens and help themselves to meat, and he takes this means of advising them that he has laid in a stock of ammunition and is ready for target practice.
S. Reid returned from a short visit to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is spending a week among her numerous friends in Dauphin.
A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the home of Mrs. Nat Little on Dec. 4th. A few braved the snow storm and after business was done an enjoyable time was spent. It was arranged that the next meeting be held at the home of the vice-president, Mrs. Lacey, of Oak Brae, in January at the call of the president, Mrs. W. King.
Jack Richardson has been elected by acclamation councillor for Ward 1 and we believe he will be all right. No doubt we will miss the usual display of fireworks when we ask for anything. We’ll get used to it in time I guess. Say, it’s nice to be able to bind and stack your crop in good time, while others have to flounder around in mud and snow and yet we are all expected to cash up. What for? “Keep Smiling.”
Dear “Freddy” asked for another term to finish what he didn’t do last year? He reminds us of “Sir Wilfy” and the Hudson Bay Railway. It’s the same old chestnut at election time. Nuff said.
The annual public Xmas tree under auspices of the W.A. and All Saints; Sunday School will be held in the Orange Hall Xmas eve. A programme provided. Everybody come, bring the kiddies and have some fun.

1912 Dec 12 – Winnipegosis

The Women’s Auxiliary held a meeting last week at Mrs. Kitcheson’s that was very encouraging to its members, who, without any graves to tend can say “we are seven,” though they have the problem to solve of the “how” and “why” they are to raise funds to build a church. The proceeds to be realized from the concert to be held on the 20th will be allocated to the mission debt contacted last summer. Regret is felt that we have not a residing minister here. We know Mr. King deserves credit for the faithful way he succeeds in bring us a Sunday supply. Mr. Noble is constant to his duties and taking circumstances into consideration we do not fare so badly.
The Roman Catholics held mass last Sunday morning, Father Derome officiating.
The C. League last week entertained a fair number (not withstanding the storm) at their months social evening.
The Card Circle the last two evening was of indifferent issue, the prizes being won by draw. In future admission is free.
Mrs. Cunliffe has suffered from a fall down the step of her home. We trust she has not sustained any serious injury.
Miss Parker, of Valley River, came in on Saturday to visit her sister, Mrs. Hippisley.
The late storm, which was of the blizzard kind, has greatly subsided though drifts are forming. The hunters will be delighting in the advantage it affords them.
Mr. Thompson, of Portage la Prairie succeeded in securing a moose on Saturday last. Messrs. Starling and Lunn arrived on Saturday from Portage to join his party. Dr. Medd is recalled from his outing to attend Miss Whale, who is ill from the effects of a bad cold.
Mr. Newell’s moving pictures were of an edifying character as well as amusing. He has left town for Fork River.
Mr. McNichol is very low at present.
The late H.B. Stand has the appearance, from a new coat of paint, of possibly being an attractive centre of business.

1918 Dec 12 – Fork River

Two cars of horses were brought in to the district lately. Horses equally as good as can be bought locally, but strange to say the farmers prefer over their hard earned ducats for animals that are backed up, not with a pedigree, but with a plausible story.
How is it that the minutes of the council have not been published lately? He only opportunity the ratepayers have of knowing what is going on is what they read in the columns of the Herald. Let us have light.
A cablegram received from Lorne Lacey states that he has arrived safely in England. Lorne has been a prisoner of war in Germany for a considerable time, and it is a great relief to his friends to know that he is safe on British soil once more.
Sid Frost left last week in the best of health to spend the winter with his parents in Rathwell. He stopped over in Winnipeg, where he took sick and died. Decreased was of a quiet disposition and was liked by all who knew him. He was a member of L.O.L. No. 1765.
Corporal Stanley King is spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. King. He will resume his duties as section foreman at Togo. Mr. and Mrs. King contributed four sons to the defence of the Empire, which is a record to be proud of.
The contest for the reeveship is proving interesting. All three candidates appear to be confident of election. The counting of the ballots on Tuesday night will solve the mystery.

1918 Dec 12 – Winnipegosis

The first carload of fish this season was shipped out on Tuesday by the Armstrong Independent Fisheries, Limited.
J.G. Hamilton has arrived in town to take over the departmental management of the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store.
Mr. Bradley has raised a porker which tips the scale at 490lbs.
H. Johnson, who was fishing on Lake Winnipegosis for the Armstrong Trading Co., lost his life early this week by falling through the ice. The deceased was returning home to his camp and trod on thin ice which broke and threw him into the water. He was carried away by a strong current before help could arrive. The deceased leaves a wife to mourn his loss.
The collectors’ report shows over $300 collected for the Sailor’s fund from the town alone.
Last Saturday there was a lively scene at the C.N. railway station to welcome home two returned soldiers – Neily McCaulay and Alex Chartrand. Flags were in abundance and the whole town turned out to welcome the heroes home. The soldiers were heartily cheered and the school children led the singing of patriotic songs. Both men were escorted in an auto driven by Mayor Whale to their homes. The school children and townspeople formed a procession on either side of the auto and enlivened the way singing, cheering and waving flags. The reception of the soldiers was conducted under the superintendence of the Returned Soldiers’ League.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Dec 7 – Municipal Nominations

Reeve
Nominations for rural Municipalities throughout the province took place on Tuesday. In these municipalities two weeks elapse before election day.

MOSSEY RIVER.
Reeve – F.B. Lacey, acclamation.

COUNCILLORS.
Ward 2 – A. Hunt, acclamation.
Ward 4- J.S. Seiffert, acclamation.
Ward 6 – No nomination.

1911 Dec 7 – Fork River

An ice gang left here for the put up ice for the Armstrong Trading Co., Winnipegosis, composed of Messrs. Munro, Johnston, Gower and others.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis is to be opened for summer fishing again. It will be a great blunder if it is. As it is winter fishing is of great benefit to the resident fisherman and farmer, where as summer fishing is for the benefit of the 102 American companies and means clearing out the lake in about two seasons.
George Tilt left last week for Dauphin on a business trip.
Rev. Mr. Cruikshank held a service in the Methodist Church on Tuesday evening assisted by Mr. Malley, of Winnipegosis. A business meeting was held after service.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Breiver, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Armstrong.
Our trains here have not been on time more than twice for the last month. We were informed by a traveller from Winnipeg that instead of the train leaving Dauphin on time they had to wait while they manufactured a conductor and when he was manufactured they had to wait while he got some breakfast and then it did not matter when they started. Farmers wait hours for their mail and freight. Of course we sympathized with the traveller as we are used to waiting in Dauphin while they manufacture an engine to take a train out, but this is our first experience in making conductors. What’s next?
The office of the municipality will be closed from the 12th to 14th of the month. The Sec.-treasurer will be at the council chamber, Winnipegosis, during this period.

1911 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sec-treasurer of the municipality will be here at the council chamber Winnipegosis, from the 12th to the 14th of this month.

1916 Dec 7 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. J.L. Godkin, Minitonas, died of wounds. (John Laurence Godkin, 1897, 2382826 ??? (not found on virtual memorial))
Pte. J.T. Taylor, Winnipegosis, wounds. (???)

1916 Dec 7 – Death of Pte. Harold Curtis

Private Harold Curtis succumbed to his wounds last week. By his death Mrs. Curtis has sacrificed her tow and only sons on the alter of her country. The loss is inestimable, but the Empire must be saved, and many more such sacrifices will have to be made by mothers, fathers and some before the war is brought to a successful completion. Our deep sympathy goes out to the grief-stricken mother.

1916 Dec 7 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Northam has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin.
Metro Boyko has purchased he old ???.
W. Stonehouse, of Oak River, is in town.
Miss Leone Stonehouse has returned to Dauphin, after having spent the week-end with her mother.
F.F. and V. Hafenbrak, Fred and A. King and Jack Richardson, have returned from the deer chase with a bull moose each.
David Briggs has returned to Rathwell after a week’s visit to T.N. Briggs.
Thos. Barnard contractor of Dauphin, is busy plastering Will Northam’s new residence.
Mr. Kasmir has purchased a car of fat cattle for S.B. Levins, of Winnipeg.
The ladies of the Home Economics Society have sent a number of Xmas boxes to gladden the hearts of our soldier laddies at the front.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, and J.P. Grenon, of Winnipegosis, paid a short visit to W. King, P.M., when passing through Fork River to Dauphin.
The municipal nominations took place on Tuesday, Reeve Lacey is opposed by F.B. Venables. Mr. Venables is also running against G.E. Nicholson in Ward 1. Archie McDonnell was elected by acclamation in Ward 3, as also was John Namaka for Ward 5.

1916 Dec 7 – Sifton

We much regret the illness of our popular station agent, Mr. Oulette, who was removed to the Dauphin Hospital by special on Sunday morning. Mrs. Oulette returned, however, Monday with more reassuring news of her husband’s speedy recovery.
News from Lance-Corp. Walters this week informs us that he is fast recovering from his wounds, but the shock of the shell, which buried him, has in a great measure robbed him of hearing in his right ear.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore entertained this evening (4th) at their residence a large number of old friends on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of their marriage. Mrs. Ashmore decorated her table with the top tier of her wedding cake, which she hopes to have an evidence for her 25th. After Mr. Paul Wood had made the presentation of a cut glass service in ??? evening was spent in music and song, Mrs. Campbell presiding at the piano with her usual brilliancy.
Look out for Wycliffe School concert and dance Wednesday, 20th.

1916 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sunday school Christmas tree and concert will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 20th. This annual event has, in the past always been held in the Presbyterian Church but on the present occasion will be given in the Rex Hall. This change will given room for more stage effect and also better accommodation for the parents and friends, who have always filled the church to its utmost capacity. The programme will be a good one including a representation by the children of the famous Christmas story of Charles Dickens, entitled “The Christmas Carol.” The message of the carol is of universal interest Under the touch of the spirit of Christmas the selfish man is rid of his selfishness, plum pudding and roast beef are found to be indigestible without kindness, charity mercy, and forbearance. The story will be given in the form of a three-act play and several tableaux.
We ask everybody to reserve his evening and appreciate the efforts of the children by giving them a full house. This year the Christmas presents ??? Sunday school without the aid of gifts from the parents and friends. This is partly to save time and also to avoid the inequality in the gifts received by the children.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 26 – 1914

1914 Nov 26 – Ethelbert Children Do Well

To the Editor of the Herald:
Please allow me some room in your paper to state how well the boys and girls in my room have done towards helping to relieve the suffering of the Belgium children. A little over a week ago I mentioned the subject to them and they immediately decided to try and do something. The result is that they have collected in the neighbourhood of $25. This, I think, is a credit to them and I am writing this to show how the boys and girls are willing to help if they are given the chance and how they will make good.
W.H. WHITE.
Principal Ethelbert School.

1914 Nov 26 – Soldiers Return Thanks

To the Editor of the Herald:
Sir – On behalf of the boys allow me, through the medium of your paper to thank all those very kind townspeople who have in such substantial and many ways subscribed to their welfare.
During the time of our enforced visit to Berlin or Constantinople we hope the town will prosper and so afford us some chance of again taking up a more peaceable occupation on our return.
Orders will be taken for scalps and other trophies.
ARTHUR C. GOODALL.
Reg. Serg. Maj., 32nd M.H.

1914 Nov 26 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Oct. 29th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Good Roads Association, the health officer, G.A. Warringon, C.E., the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and St. Joseph’s Orphanage.
Hechter-Lacey – That the clerk write Mr. McGilvray and ask him to come to this municipality and lecture on the Good Roads Act.
Lacey-Hunt – That in all cases where a contractor calls for inspection of work that is found incomplete, according to the terms of the contract, the contractor shall be charged with the cost of the inspection fees and mileage.
Lacy-Richardson – That the health officer’s livery account in connection with the diphtheria cases be certified to by Dr. Medd and paid, the said expense to be charged in the tax accounts of the parties involved.
Hechter-Lacey – That each councillor be authorized to collect voluntary subscriptions for the patriotic fund. All money so collected to be sent in to the treasurer of the municipality.
Toye-Bickle – That the clerk be instructed to credit Ward 1 with 23 pieces of tamarac pilling and charge the same to the public works account, the piles having been expended n the Bailey Bridge.
Hunt-Richardson – That all road commissioners’ certificates issued after this date be payable only to the parties to whom they are issued.
Lacey-Richardson – That any representatives of the council attending the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities be allowed $15.00 for expenses.
Bickle-Toye – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter be representatives to the Convention.
Hunt-Richardson – That Coun. Lacey take the place of J.D. Robertson, resigned, on the public works committee.
Lacey-Richardson – That the council suggest to the Minister of Public Works that in future all grants to the municipality be paid through the office of the municipality and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to our member, Mr. Hughes.
Toye-Lacey – That the clerk write the Minister of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to inspect the bridges recently completed over German Creek.
Hunt-Hechter – That the municipal collectors be bonded to the extent of $500 each.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hechter-Richardson – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work, T. Toye $25.30, C.H. Bickle $39.10 and A. Hunt $28.70, be passed.
Toye-Lacey – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Nov 26 – Fork River

Reeve W. King and D.F. Wilson are attending the convention of the Union Municipalities at St. Boniface this week. Coun. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, is also attending the convention.
The company’s auditor, assisted by Messrs. John Sieffert and Jas. Campbell, is taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co. store here this week.
A pie social was held at the home of Mrs. W. King for the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on the 18th inst. All report a pleasant time and the disposal of much pie.
Mr. Thomas, our grain buyer, is kept busy pretty much all the time. The quantity of what being marketed here this season is surprising considering the adverse conditions prevailing during part of the year.
Wood has started to come in since the snow arrived. It is expected that there will be considerable quantities brought in for shipment here this winter.
All old acquaintances hereabouts learned with regret of the misfortune which befell Thos. Glendenning last week in the burning of his barn last week. He had doors, windows and other material with which to erect a new house stored in the buildings when the fire occurred and all was burned. He also had about $1500 worth of grain burned. No insurance was carried on the building or the contents. With the true spirit of the pioneer he is starting to rebuild.
Many have taken out big game hunting licences and it looks as if the fleet-footed deer will have a warm time this season.
There is some talk of a contest for the reeveship. It seems only fair that the present reeve should have another term.
Mrs. Wm. Williams has just undergone a serious operation in the Dauphin Hospital.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 2 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 2 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River, on Wednesday, 17th inst. Councillors Richardson and Seiffert absent. The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Union of Manitoba Municipalities, Dauphin Hospital, Heaton’s Agency Co., N.R., the solicitor, Dominion Lands Office, the Minister of Interior, the Department of Education, Standard Lumber Co., T.A. Burrows Lumber Co. and land commissioner of Hudson Co.
Hunt – Bickle – That the clerk investigate the Dauphin Hospital accounts and pay all claims for which the municipality is liable.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk make the necessary entry with the Dominion government, paying the fees, for two acres of the S.E. 4-29-17 for cemetery purposes.
Hunt – Toye – That the reeve and clerk inspect ditch between sections 2 and 11, tp. 30, rge. 19, with a view to having it cleared out.
Bickle – Robertson – That the account for lumber of the Standard Lumber Co. amounting to $29.71 be paid and charged to ward 4.
Robertson – Toye – That the account authorized by Road Commissioner Bailey for deepening the Lockhart ditch and due J.W. Lockhart be paid.
Toye – Robertson – That the following resolution be forwarded to the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities to be brought before the annual Convention:
“That section 644, sub-section of the Municipal Act be amended by striking out the words “or any ward or any portion of a ward thereof” in the second and third lines thereof.”
Hunt – Bickle – That the following resolution be forwarded to Union of Manitoba Municipalities for consideration at the annual convention.
“That section 148 of the Municipal Assessment Act be amended by adding the words, “during the past two years” after the ‘taxes’ in the eighth line ??? ???.”
Toye – Robertson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye – Robertson – That the clerk put up notices that all arrears of taxes must be paid before the first day of November, 1913, or proceedings will be taken to collect.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk order one twenty-four inch corrugated culvert eighteen feet long for the Cooper crossing.
Hunt – Toye – That the clerk be authorized to have the pile driver repaired as soon as possible.
A by-law authorizing the purchase of a roadway along the south side of the N.W. 26 and a portion of the N.E. 27-29-19 was passed; also a by-law striking the rate for 1913 as follows: municipal rate 10 mills, municipal commissioner’s rate ½ mill and general school rate 5 mills.
Toye – Bickle – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1913 Oct 2 – Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from Weyburn, where he has been for the summer months. He reports good crops there.
Geo. Tilt paid the Lake Town a visit on important business lately.
Willie Johnston returned from the summer fishing up the lake and reports a fair catch.
E. Williams, of Liverpool, England, has arrived to take up the work of the Anglican mission here.
F.B. Lacey returned from a trip south.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys.
Miss Pearl Wood has left for Winnipeg for a short stay with friends.
Mrs. O’Neill has arrived from Rainy River and is visiting her sister, Mrs. F.B. Lacey, of Mowat.
One of our Winnipegosis friends is of the opinion that the fishing at Fork River is ahead of Winnipegosis. We agree with him every time.
Mr. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, visited our burgh between trains.
Wm. Stonehouse left for Winnipegosis to follow his occupation as inspector for the A.T. Co.
Bert Cooper has returned from Winnipegosis, having spent the summer on the government dredge.
Mrs. Paul Pugon, of Lake Dauphin, while milking a cow was badly hurt, the cow having turned on her. Dr. Medd was sent for but could not go and by the time other assistance arrived it was too late, the woman died. She leaves a family of twelve children.
T.A. Worsey preached his farewell sermon on Sunday evening, the 28th, in All Saints’ Church. There was a good turnout. Mr. Worsey is leaving for St. John’s College to resume his studies. His many friends appreciate the good work he has done here this summer and all wish him prosperity.

1913 Oct 2 – Winnipegosis

The fishing season closes on Oct. 1st. The catch has been good. Fifty cars have been shipped out.
A monster jackfish, weighing 35 lbs., was caught in one of the hauls in Dawson Bay.
A Galician is in the lock-up having stabbed his wife in the arm with a knife. His mind is supposed to be unbalanced.
Ducks are numerous and the shooting is good.
Jos. Grenon is having the grounds around his fine new residence laid out by Mr. Sadler, of Dauphin. The grounds will be planted with hardy perennials this fall which will bloom early in the spring and summer.
Theo. Johnston returned on Wednesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1919 Oct 2 – Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

1919 Oct 2 – Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork Rive did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

1919 Oct 2 – Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Craighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.