Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 29, 1920

G.W.V.A.

We regret to learn that Comrade Roy Armstrong has resigned the secretaryship of the association. His work with the soldier settlement board as supervisor takes him away from town so much he could not attend to the duties.
Comrade Bates was in the city last attending a meeting of the executive of the provincial command when a lot of routine work was put through.
A number of returned boys are looking for homestead and soldier grant lands these days and the country south of Dauphin Lake will be well taken up this spring and a large amount of breaking will be done if we only get the right weather from now on. The rooms are proving of great service to these men.
We are sorry to learn that a great number of the soldier settlers lost a large amount of stock on account of the hard winter and the shortage of feed.
At a meeting of the executive Comrade E.C. Batty was asked to act as secretary-treasurer for the local branch of the association to fill in the term of Comrade R. Armstrong, who has resigned. Comrade Batty has agreed to fill the breach.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary held a very successful dance on Friday last. The ladies are doing good work and same is appreciated by the association.
Returned men should note that school lands are now open for soldier settlement, and any returned man may apply for an examination and estimation on any particular parcel.
Capt. Scrase has gone to Banff to take treatment and it is hoped by all the comrades that he will greatly benefit and will return to Dauphin fully restored to good heath.
Comrades Lys and Armstrong are waiting on the roads to dry up till they try out their Henry Fords. Watch for smoke when Hugh gets at the wheel.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 12th inst., all members being present. He minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Bank of Nova Scotia, re line of credit; The C.N. Town Properties, re roadway; the Dept. of Education; the H.B. Co.’s, re road divergence, 3-3-16, and the Provincial Board of Health, re district nurse.
Yakavanka-Panageika — That the clerk write the municipalities of Ethelbert and Winnipegosis and ask if they will cooperate with this municipality in the matter of a district nurse.
Marcroft-Thorsteinson — That the discount and penalty, amounting to $9.14 against the s.w. 13-41-19, be cancelled.
Hunt-Yakavanka — That the account of Peter Drainian for delivering [pilng] at Fork River, $11.40, be paid.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the action of the committee on seed grain in securing wheat, barley and flax be endorsed, and that the two samples of oats now sown are satisfactory.
Hunt-Marcroft — That the gravel which will be required for the foundation of the soldiers’ monument be procured at once and that the matter be placed in the hands of the reeve.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the secretary write the returned soldiers’ committee thanking the organization for its kind appreciation of the council’s action regarding the mater of a monument in memory of the fallen soldiers.
Hunt-Marcoft — That the services of an engineer be procured to lay out certain roads throughput the municipality and giving an estimate of the cost. This with a view to borrowing money by the issue of debentures for the building of such roads.
Marcroft-Yakavanka — That the clerk ask for tenders for the peeling of the timber now in the municipal yard. Tenders to be received up to April 30th, and that the reeve and clerk be a committee to deal with the matter.
Hunt-Marcroft – That Robert Allen be employed to run the road engine for the season of 1920, and that his remuneration be $1 an hour.
Marcroft-Hunt — That the clerk ask for applications for man to run grader for the season of 1920.
Yakavanka-Namaka — That the declaration of the reeve $23.60, and Coun. Marcroft, $12.70, for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Hunt-Yakavanka — That Coun. Marcroft be authorized to call for tenders for the building of a bridge, 20 feet, on road allowance east of 34-31-19.
Panageika-Yakavanka — That a grant of $25 be made to the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ club for the year 1919.
The accounts as recommended by the finance committee were ordered paid.
Marcorft-Thorsteinson — hat the reeve, clerk and Coun. Hunt be a committee to look for suitable sites for the soldiers’ memorial.
By-laws were passed authorizing the purchase of seed grain and cancelling soldiers’ taxes.

Ethelbert

The meetings took place on Thursday evening of Mr. William S. K[illegible], of Dauphin and Miss Florence J. [illegible], of Ethelbert.
[illegible] Adams, of Winnipegosis, has been appointed registration clerk for the east half of the Ethelbert constituency, and [illegible] Skaife, of Ethelbert, has been appointed registration clerk for the west half.

Winnipegosis

The Dramatic society have two performances of “The Private Secretary” last week. Mr. Shears in the title part was very good indeed. We did not know he could be so funny. Mr. Lamont as the Uncle from India was excellent; his acting was perfectly smooth and full of life. A new addition to the society was r. D.C. Brown, of the Bank of Nova Scotia here. He had an easy stage presence on the whole and a good voice. Our old friend Mr. Wilis is getting into a habit of trotting about too much. He is an old favorite and we don’t want to see him acquiring bad habits. The ladies all did well. Mrs. Shears’ voice was all it should have been in calling upon the spirits for a sign. Miss McMartin, as the daughter of the house and Miss Leith McMartin, as the widowed landlady, were both good. Miss Woodiow, who possess a striking beauty, was a most charming little girl on the stage n her flame colored dress. The make-ups were all good, some of them exceptionally so. Mr. Ketcheson, as the tailor, was very good indeed also Mr. Roberts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 22, 1920

G.W.V.A. Notes

We wish all comrades to note that before they can make entry on Dominion Lands, both homestead and soldiers grant, they must have attestation certificates. If they will look after this matter before time of making entry, it will save them a lot of trouble and delay.
We note that Comrade Roy Armstrong is now with the Soldier Settlement Board as supervisor and takes in the district of Winnipegosis, Ochre River and Makinak.
At the last meeting of the Association we had a very fair attendance to hear Comrade Batty give his report of Montreal convention. He gave a general outline of the work done at the convention. We hope to see an increased interest in the meetings. Come out to them. The matter of the War Veterans’ home was up before the meeting and some discussion took place. We are still waiting on the results of the work of the Memorial Committee before making any public campaign for funds for our building. In the meantime we are getting all the money we can gather toward our building fund.
Comrade Herman, of Ashville, who has been in the hospital, is convalescent.
Comrade Garth Johnston has gone to Prairie River to start operations on his farm.
Hugh Lys and E.R. Bewell, supervisors for the S.S.B., are out on soldier settlement work.
We have had a number of men make use of the rooms this month while passing through and who appreciate same very much.

Bicton Health

Winnipegosis, April 20.
The rain Tuesday was welcome. Warmer weather is now assured. Don’t let us be impatient; you know we are promised seedtime and harvest as long as the world lasts.
The United Famers of the district held a meeting on the 17th at the home of Mr. Dumas. Important business was transacted. A resolution was passed requesting the Grain Growers to build an elevator at Winnipegosis the coming summer. The question of taking political action was brought up and discussed. A vote showed the meeting to be in favor of such a move.
The corduroy road leading to the school is nearly complete.
James Laidlaw is drawing his house and stable over to the homestead.
Frank Sharp has purchased a fine team of horses from Mr. Pruder.
A meeting will be held in the Orange Hall, Fork River, on the 27th inst. and it is expected that delegates from every local in the Ethelbert constituency will be present and it will then be decided whether a farmers’ candidate will be placed in the field.

Fork River

Father and Son Banquet—Boys’ work has come right into the limelight in Fork River with the introduction of the Canadian standard efficiency training under a local advisory council composed of Messrs. W. King, J. Williamson, A.J. Little, Fred. Cooper, C.E. Bailey and Milton Cooper.
A Trail Rangers’ camp has been formed with E.V. Lockwood as mentor, Robt. Williams chief ranger; Arthur Jameson, sub ranger Nathan Schucett, tally, and Ben Schucett, cache.
So interested are the boys that the ladies of the district, to encourage them, supplied a splendid banquet on Friday night last at which some 43 fathers and sons sat down and enjoyed the substantial repast. When the eating was finished the chief ranger bade them toast “The King,” which was done with musical honors.
The following toasts were enthusiastically honored: “Canada,” proposed by Arthur Jameson; “Tuxis Boys,” by N. Schuchett; “Our Dads,” by B. Schuchett; “Our Sons,” by W. King. A very nice little speech by D. Robertson on the “Kind of Dad I Like,” was responded to with excellent advice to boys on the “Kind of Son I Like,” by D.F. Wilson. “Our Homes” was given by Mr. Lockwood, and this was followed by three sort addresses by Prof. Williamson on the advantages of an education; Tuxis boys at large by Rev. H.P. Barrett and the boy and the church by Rev. E. Roberts. Votes of thanks to boys, ladies, speakers and officers were proposed by W. King, D. Lockwood, E.V. Lockwood and Rev. H.P. Barrett. The national anthem brought to a close an evening long to be remembered in the annuals of Fork River.

CORRESPONDENT CRITICIZED.
To the Editor of the Dauphin Herald:

SIR:—
O’wad some power the giftie gie us
To see ourselves as others see us.
So wrote the poet long years ago and we hope the writer of the article in your last issue entitled, “Fork River,” will be given that blessed gift, it may reach him sometime that it is very bad form to wash his dirty linen in public and still worse to do it in such a way as to convey the impression that it is editorial news.
Have very good first hand information as to all that happened at the returned soldiers “get together” in Fork River on a recent Saturday night and I suggest that the moralist who penned the account in the paper would be better employed in taking an active and religious interest in the welfare of the young folk of the district than in writing scurrilous articles under the cover of anonymity.
I am dear sir, yours faithfully,
HARRY P. BARRETT,
Priest in charge of Fork River.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held on Friday evening, April 16th, in the Union Church. A large number of the members were present. After the business was finished. Dr. Medd gave an interesting and most instructive address on “Child Welfare,” which was greatly appreciated by all present. The social part of the evening consisted in songs and a recitation, which were much enjoyed. Tea was served by the refreshment committee. The proceeds of the evening were placed to the credit of the Library fund.
The Fisherman’s ball, held last Thursday at the Rex Hall, was a great success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 15, 1920

Fork River

We are spending a great deal of time and money in these days for the education and general moral uplift of the rising generations and we look with pride on what as a rule is being accomplished by the large majority of our teachers and we are expecting great results when those girls and boys who are now being trained shall have reached womanhood and manhood, but one is led to wonder what chance these girls and boys have of becoming any more than just the ordinary careless going, complaining class that we are accustomed to meet at this time, when they are witnessing and hearing about the daily and nightly revels that often take place in some our little villages in Manitoba. The demoralizing influence of the pool table, dice, cards and whiskey is destroying and damning the lives of those who are growing and grown-up; we are hoping that there will be no more exhibitions such as reported from the famous village on the river out north last Saturday night and Sunday morning. We boast of our freedom and civilization let us when we get the opportunity vote for a “bone dry” province and show that our desire is to free those who are slaves to whiskey; le us save them from the greatest curse to civilization. It is not so much the high cost of living that is the cause of the unrest of to day, but the greater part of it is caused by the wanton, careless and extravagant habits of people who are living only for pleasure and not seeking to make the world any better. Let us do less talking, and do more thinking, and we will understand more about the true reason for the unsettled conditions of today, before we have better conditions, we must improve our habits of life, the love of pleasure, is equally as bad as the love of money in its effect on the mind, and a great deal worse for the pocket.

Fork River

The regular meeting of the Mossey River U.F.M. took place on Friday evening, April 9th. There was a good attendance and several questions of importance were discussed. President Hafenbrak tendered his resignation, and it was accepted on condition that be accept the vice-presidency. The new officers are, president, J. Williamson; first vice, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd vice, D.F. Wilson; auditor, T.B. Venables. The two directors elected were Mrs. J.W. Williamson and Mrs. D.F. Wilson, jr. The meeting was a decided success and it is hoped that the next one will be even better. After the business of the association was finished the ladies served a lunch, after which dancing was the order until the “we sma’ hours.” At the next meeting, which takes place on May 9th, the site of the Soldiers’ Memorial will be discussed. It is hoped that those interested will turn out and let the public see that they are interested in such questions. Every one is welcome to these meetings but only members are entitled to vote.
At the last social evening of the Literary club of the season, Prof. Williamson was tendered a vote of thanks and Mr. Wm. King presented with a valuable fountain pen.
The postponed father and son banquet will be held in the Orange Hall on April 16.
The Rev. H.P. Barrett will hold communion in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 18th inst.
Mr. T.B. Venables has received two nice yearling pure bred Hereford bulls from Mitchell Bros., of Norton, Ont. One of the animals is for W. Craighill.
Mr. Paulin, of the International Harvester Co., spent a few days here lately putting up power machinery for W. King, agent, who has a large stock of Titans, engines and other machinery and farm implements for the season’s trade.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 8, 1920

Fork River

Miss Ina Briggs and Miss Hess, teachers of the Fork River school, are spending the Easter holidays at their respective homes.
The father and son banquet has been postponed.
Several of our farmers are investing in the better breeds of cattle, pigs and poultry this spring. Among the purchasers are F. Hafenbrak a pure bred sow and Rhode Island Red poultry, and H. Little a bull.
Tenders are being called through the columns of the Herald for our proposed new brick school. The new building should be worthy of our growing village and district.
W. King has disposed of all his barred rock cockerels, but still has a few white rock cockerels left.

Winnipegosis

The question of the day, “is the cold weather ever going to let up?”
On Saturday, April 3rd, the Ladies’ Sewing Circle of the United Church held a sale of homemade cooking at Mrs. Houchin’s ice cream parlor, was kindly pleased at their disposal for the occasion. Tea was served from 3 to 5 p.m., and the total amount realized was $31.70.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 1, 1920

Fork River
Death of Nat Little

Nathan Little, one of our best known residents, passed away suddenly on the 18th ult. Deceased was 63 years of age, and was born in Bowmanville, Ont. He came west to Cyprus River in 1879. After remaining there for a time he moved to Monticello, Minnesota. After spending a few years there he returned to Canada and located at Fork River 19 years ago and carried on a general store. He is survived by Mrs. Little, two daughters and a son. The daughters are Mrs. Robert Rowe and Mrs. Ed Cameron, Neepawa, and Mr. Harry Little, Fork River. The body was interned in the local cemetery.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 25, 1920

Bicton Heath

The work of corduroying is in full swing. It looks at present as if the road to the school is going to be covered this year.
The Grain Growers next meeting will be held on April 2nd, at 7.30. There should be a full attendance.
Capt. McCaughey, of the Salvation Army, Dauphin, was a visitor to this district recently. Magic lantern views were given by the captain in the school during his visit.
W. Cooper has purchased a tractor. This is a sign of development.
Mr. Gourlay, in his letter in the Herald, made some important points. We are quite interested in the controversy between Mr. Nicholson and Mr. Gourlay.
Capt. Russell will give his report of the convention held at Brandon at the G.G. meeting on April 2nd.

Mossey River Council

Council met on March 18th, Coun. Thorsteinson and Namaka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Dept. of Education re read to Bicton Heath school; Mrs. Demeris and the Women’s Institute, pf Winnipegosis.
Yakavanka-Marcroft – That a refund of full amount of taxes be made to Mrs. Demeris.
Marcroft-Yakavanka – That the council chambers at Winnipegosis be sold to the Women’s Institute of Winnipegosis for the some of $600, the terms to be $200 cash and two annual instalments of $200 each, with interest at 8 percent per annum, and that the reeve and clerk be authorized to carry out the business connected with the sale.
Marcroft-Hunt – That the council having examined a number of prints of monuments now order one at an approximate cost of $1000 to be erected in the memory of the soldiers of Mossey River municipality who fell in the great war.
Marcroft-Hunt – That the clerk write the Hudson’s Bay Co. regarding obtaining a road divergence on the n.w. 8-31-18.
Marcroft-Hunt – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to find where seed grain can be obtained and, if necessary, give orders for it.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the clerk communicate with the Board of Health and obtain full particulars as to securing the work of and cost of a district nurse for the municipality.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the clerk write the C.N. Town Properties Ltd. re the purchase of a roadway along Fork River, south from the village.
Hunt-Marcroft – That in the matter of the road leading westerly across the swamp to Bicton Heath school, 50 percent to be charged to the Dept. of Education, 25 percent to ward 2 and 25 percent to public works account. Motion lost.
The council adjourned to meet again at the call of the reeve.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 18, 1920

Death of Joseph P. Grenon

There passed away at Winnipegosis on the 11th inst. one of the most widely known men in northern Manitoba in the person of Joseph P. Grenon. Deceased contracted influenza and developed pneumonia. He was in his forty-second year. The Grenon family moved from Fort William, Ontario, to Winnipegosis almost a quarter of a century ago. The railroad reached Winnipegosis in 1897, and from that date the development of the village and the district commenced. At that period Lake Winnipegosis teamed with fish and with the facilities afforded of transportation by rail and the fishing industry soon developed. One of the first outside companies to become interested was the Armstrong Trading Company, which represented at that time the Booth interests of Chicago. Young “Josey” Grenon was appointed manager of the company and was not long in displaying business qualities of much more than the ordinary standard. The company carried on a general store in connection with the fish and for years the Armstrong Trading Company was a household word in the north. As can be readily understood a man of Mr. Grenon’s ability was note allowed to confine his efforts entirely to private business interests. When the municipality of Mossey River was organized some years ago he had the honour of being its first reeve, and a few years later when the village of Winnipegosis was incorporated he was chosen to fill the mayor’s chair.
In politics he was a Conservative and wielded considerable influence at election times. When Winnipegosis became part of the provincial constituency of Gilbert Plains he was one of those placed in nomination at the Conservative convention.
In an aggressive, though short short career, it could not but be expected that he had met with, in some cases, strenuous opposition, and, at times, relations became somewhat strained, but it would be hard to find one who had more friends and whose passing caused more real sorrow.
He is survived by a widow, two daughters and two sons.
The funeral took place on Saturday and was largely attended. About fifty went from Dauphin and others were in attendance from Portage la Prairie and Winnipeg.
The service was conducted by the Rev. Father Brachet, of Pine Creek, in the Roman Catholic Church.
Many beautiful wreaths covered the casket.