Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 20 – 1917

1917 Dec 20 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. W.R. Watson, Magnet, Man., killed in action. (Robert William Watson, 1891, 424075 ???)
Pte. W. Lee, Dauphin, killed in action. (Wilford Lee, 1897, 100095)

1917 Dec 20 – Fork River

W.R. Snelgrove has sold his farm on the Mossey River and is intending going east for the winter.
E. Hunter and Sid Frost have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
The C.N.R. bridge gang are driving piles for a new bridge over the Fork River at the town.
A pile bridge is being built over Mink Creek at P. Solomon’s. It appears to your correspondent that the time has arrived for the municipality to put in concrete abutments in new bridges it intends erecting.
T.N. Briggs has received word from Walter Clark, who is doing his bit in the trenches, that he is well.
Post office hours on Christmas Day, 10 to 12 a.m.
The train service, if you can dignify by such a name, is to say the least, erratic. The train may arrive, and then again, it may not. But I guess there is nothing to do but grin and bear it.
We wish the herald staff a merry Christmas.
We understand that our Pro-German resident now intends taking a trip south.

1917 Dec 20 – Winnipegosis

The shipping of fish is in full swing. Teams are hauling from every point and the catch seems to be good. Six cars were shipped out on Saturday the 15th, and as many more will likely go on Tuesday.
The memorial service on Sunday was well attended. The names of seven of our noble men who have died at the front were read out. Miss F. Grenon played “Consolation” as a voluntary, and Miss McArthur sang “Rock of Ages” by request.
The Red Cross entertainment of Wednesday, 12th, under the management of Mrs. Paddock’s committee, netted $42.
Owing to the general interest in Red Cross work and the lack of assistants the Presbyterian Sunday school will not give their usual concert. Instead he members of the school will take part in an entertainment, from 3 to 6 o’clock on the afternoon of Monday the 24th. A silver collection will be taken at the door, and a 10c fishpond will be arranged. The tree, of course, will be the chief attraction, and each child will receive a bag of candy.
Mrs. Theodore Johnston wishes to thank all friends and others who, by their presence at the memorial service held in honour of her son, showed their sympathy with her in her sad bereavement.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 19 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 19 – Fork River

Herman Godkin, real estate agent of Dauphin, spent a few days with W. Williams.
We have been informed that Mr. Walter Clark was fortunate to get a moose. The head is said to be the finest seen in these parts with a spread of forty-four inches.
Sid. Gower, engineer, returned from Dauphin and intends working with W. Williams this winter.
We were pleased to meet Peter Robinson, an old-timer, in town. He is spending a short time with his parents on the Mossey River.
The C.N. telegraph gang is here renewing the poles, which work was needed.
The Newell moving picture show that was booked for Tuesday and Wednesday did not come off at the orange Hall for lack of accommodation. We need a good boarding house here for the travelling public.
There was not a very large turner to the masquerade ball in the Orange Hall on account of the farmers being busy threshing.
Mr. McIntosh, of Valley River, was here on business.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase will hold a Xmas service in the school house, Winnipegosis on Xmas morning at eleven o’clock, and in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, in the evening at eight o’clock.

1912 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Malley, from Brandon, arrived in town Tuesday. We trust the weather will be favourable for his trip up the lake.
The municipal elections are on now. May we hope that the wiser promises made by the candidates be fulfilled by the successful ones. We certainly need more passable roads, and here be it remarked that if our church wardens finds transportation between here and Fork River too difficult to accomplish in the future, the vision of the rectory, seen here, will have to materialize.
A Christmas morning service will be held in the school house 11 a.m. Come and help sing the carols insuring a “Merry Christmas.”
The Santa Claus fund seems to be a popular one. Perhaps it is because he is such an adept of minding his own business. He is remembering our bachelors with many plum puddings.
The Card Circle will be closed this week for the year. It is a matter of serious consideration if it should be reopened as so many lovers of the game do not enter before 9 p.m., which is near the time when wise and honest heads seek their rest; besides beige started to while pleasantly away a couple of hours, thus inviting congenial spirits, and finding ourselves entertained by a stranger proves a mental lack which should more advantagely be supplied at home, nevertheless we trust for a closing game this week that will reveal its true merit and may the winners of the prizes make good use of them. A certain Mr. Webber is to be thanked for the gentleman’s, which is a gun metal watch.
If we hurt ourselves as much by falling when climbing up hill, as we would so doing when running down hill, no one could be blamed for refusing to climb; but one of nature’s mercies is that we cannot.
The Christian League held a very successful meeting ask week.
The hunting season being closed may the stronger sex once more settle down to “the daily round.”
No moose, no heads, no tales.
Wm. Parker, of this Armstrong Trading Co. is up the lake or out to Pine Creek auditing books.
The young people of our town have a bond of sympathy with Dauphin ones in the difficulty (met here) of preparing a skating rink – see the lake.

1918 Dec 19 – Had Both Legs Crushed

Orval McInnes, a boy about 15 years of age, met with a bad accident at Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The boy was assisting to put ice in an ice house when the block that was being raised slipped from the grippers and fell on his legs, crushing them badly. He was brought to the hospital here the same afternoon.

1918 Dec 19 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Dec. 14.
Heath Officer Dr. Medd was through this district this week and has closed the school for the time being as some of the scholars are down with influenza.
D. Crerar has sold the Hudson’s Bay farm for a good figure. What about the herd law now?
Mr. Laidlaw has finished threshing. The cattle will have a chance to feed considerable land next spring.
Hechter Bros.’ gasoline tractor has arrived and they intend to turn over considerable land next spring.
W. Paddock has broke considerable land this year. Steam and gasoline engines materially aid in preparing the land for crop.
Mr. Winger has sold his flock of sheep to Mr. Venables for a good figure. There is no doubt but sheep pay well and in the future more will be kept in the district.
Mr. Waddell, from Missouri, is the new teacher engaged for the Bicton Heath School. It is up to us to “show Mr. Waddell.”
F. Sharp has completed his house and stable. The buildings are the right type for the farmers and we hope to see more of them erected.
Thos. Toye, our local weather prophet, says the winter will be a mild one. Tom, it may be said, does not make his observations from charts, but seeks his weather lore from wild animals, such as the muskrat, which he says you can depend on.

1918 Dec 19 – Fork River

Chas. Bugg, of Ochre River, was in town lately renewing acquaintances.
Pte. Arthur Shannon is home, having received his discharge.
The election is over and we are now already to shake hands and enter into the Christmas spirit, good will toward all men.

1918 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

The Dominion Government is making headway with the cutting of a canal at Meadow Portage which, when completed, will open up a waterway with Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Manitoba. The land through which the canal will run has already been cleared and boarded and in the spring about 600 men will be employed doing excavation work.
A card party, in aid of the Red Cross, is being held every Wednesday evening in the Rex theatre. A good musical program is provided and refreshments are served.
A special Xmas service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 22nd, in the Union Church. Special Xmas hymns and solos will help to make the service attractive. Subject will be “The Brotherhood of Man.” A hearty welcome is extended to all.
On the afternoon of Xmas day a Xmas tree entertainment will be held in the above church and a huge tree loaded with toys and decorations will be exhibited to delight the hearts of the children. Santa Claus has arranged to give every child a present from the tree.
A bank will shortly be established at Winnipegosis.
A recent traveller on the Dauphin and Winnipegosis express complains bitterly of having to have an extra washing day in the same week owning to the dirty condition of the train.
The Armstrong Independent Fisheries is sending ten teams up the lake this week to bring in fish. Other companies also have teams employed bringing down fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 18 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 18 – Ethelbert

Postmaster Skaite is still confined to his home by illness. Mrs. S. is attending to the duties of the office during her husband’s absence.
The deer season is over and quite a few people here are dining on venison.
Sleighing is needed to give an impetus to the wood business.
Clerk K.F. Slipetz was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
A branch of the Grain Growers’ Association was organized here last week under favourable auspices. The branch starts of with a membership of 60 and the members are all enthusiastic. The following are the officers: President, M. Pacholok; vice, J. Pachkowski; sec.-treas., K.F. Slipetz.

1913 Dec 18 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon returned from a few days visit to Dauphin.
W. Williams has left with his outfit to take out lumber on his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Miss Bessy Wilson returned from a few weeks visit among friends in Sifton and Dauphin.
D. Kennedy has purchased a handsome pair well-bred colts for drivers.
Mrs. J. Parker and daughter left for Winnipeg for a short visit.
Mrs. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is having a week’s visit with her sister, D. Kennedy.
The Orangemen of Fork River appreciate very much the kindness shown them by the ladies in coming out and cleaning out their large hall gratis. The brethren wish to tender them a hearty vote of thanks for same.
D. Briggs, of Brandon, and Mr. Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, had the good luck to get a moose each.
Those who shot large game are, Harold Shannon, a fine elk; Fred King, moose; Frank Hafenbrak, moose; S. Munro, elk; J. Richardson, moose.
On Friday night the ladies of Fork River gave a ball in the Orange Hall. The ladies supplied the refreshments and paid a fee of 25 cents. The gentlemen were free. There was a large turnout and a most enjoyable evening.

1919 Dec 18 – Fork River

The Unity Christmas tree of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River will be held in the Orange Hall on the evening of Monday, 22nd inst. This promises to be the event of the season. A large attendance is requested as Santa is bringing Mrs. Santa. Admission, gentlemen 50 cents; ladies and children free.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 17 – 1914

1914 Dec 17 – Another 110 Men Wanted

Another large force for overseas service is to be raised in Canada at once. Major G.C.J. Walker received a wire this Thursday morning to this effect. The telegram read as follows:
“You are authorized to mobilize immediately one company of infantry a total 110 men for overseas service. Standard height, 5 feet 4 inches; age, 18 to 45; chest, 33 ½ inches.”

1914 Dec 17 – Injured Man Getting Better

Thos. Free, who was badly injured in a collision at Kamsack a couple of weeks ago and had to have one of his legs amputated, is making excellent progress towards recovery. It is probably he will be able to return o his home next week.

1914 Dec 17 – Jack Myers Shot in Leg

Jack Myers, a well-known resident of Gilbert Plains, was shot in the leg last week while hunting in the Riding Mountains by a young fellow named Coulter. Coulter saw the bushes move and before his companion, a man named Morran, could stop him, fired and dropped Myers.

1914 Dec 17 – Ruthenian Patriotism

An evidence of the patriotism of some of the Ruthenian settlers was given on Saturday when two of them. Panko Schnuyk and Peter Toporoski came to town to tender their mites for their country. Each gave a dollar towards the patriotic fund and also gave their promise to contribute a dollar a month each to the fund as long as the war lasted.

1914 Dec 17 – Fork River

Mr. W. Williams returned from a visit to Mrs. Williams who has been very sick for some time in the Dauphin Hospital. We are all pleased to hear that Mrs. Williams has recovered enough to be able to return home next week.
Mr. George O’Neill, of Mowat, returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and is delighted with the lake Town.
Mr. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, one of the candidates for the reeveship arrived in this burg in company with Mr. Steve Lytwyn, a representative of the Armstrong Trading Co. Mr. Lytwyn is assisting Mr. Hechter in his campaign to get control of the municipality.
Mr. Duncan Kennedy, late manager of the Armstrong Trading Company, has accepted a position with Mr. Hechter, of Winnipegosis. Mr. Kennedy has been here for the company for several years and attended strictly to business ear in year out. Although we are sorry to see Mr. Kennedy and his family leave, his friends wish him all kinds of good luck.
The box social under the auspices of All Saints’ Woman’s Auxiliary on the 11th, was fairly well attended. The boxes realized good prices in the hands of our friend, “Scotty,” who acted as auctioneer, and a nice sum was realized. It was, we believe, one of the most enjoyable times ever held in the hall. Credit us due the ladies for the nice display of boxes to tempt the boys. The social came to a close at 4.30 in the wee small hours.
There will be a public Christmas tree under the auspices of All Saints’ Sunday school on Wednesday evening, Dec. 23rd, to commence at 8.30 sharp. Everybody is invited to come and help give the kiddies a good time. Admission, adults 23 cents, children free. Proceeds to go towards maintaining the Sunday school.
Mr. Thomas, travelling Missionary of the Anglican Church, will preach in All Saints’ Church on Dec. 20th at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. Everyone invited.
Rev. Mr. Thomas will hold a meeting in All Saints’ Anglican Church on December the 19th, at 2.30 p.m. sharp. All members and those who are in sympathy


1914 Dec 17 – Sifton

The Grain Growers’ Patriotic concert held here last Friday met with great success. There was very good talent from Dauphin, also West Bay and Fairville. There was a very good attendance indeed from the outlying districts. The Sifton boys proved themselves very good in their little play, “Christmas night at the Front.”
Mr. Robt. Brewer shipped another car of stock on Monday. Quite a rustler is “Bobs.”
We all regret that Mr. William Birch, late station agent, has left town for good. We understand he is going to Invermay, Sask., and we all wish him the best of luck.
Mr. Caldwell, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town last week on business.
We understand that Mr. John Aller, of Fairville, is holding a social next Saturday in aid of the Red Cross Society. We trust it will be a success.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, are now busy canvassing orders as they expect their drilling outfit this week. They are deserving of success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 16 – 1915

1915 Dec 16 – Every Bone in Leg Broken

Tony, the 8-year-old son of Wm. Baylis, of Dublin Bay, had his left leg badly injured at the end of the week by a bolt, which was loaded with manure, going over it. When Dr. Culbertson examined it he found every bone in the leg broken.

1915 Dec 16 – Mossey River

Reeve – F.B. Lacey, re-elected.
Councillors – Ward 2 – Ab. Hunt, re-elected.
Ward 6 – Coun. S.B. Reid and John Bilinski.
Ward 4 – No nomination.

1915 Dec 16 – Sifton

The grand school concert at Wycliffe is on Dec. 23rd, when that delightful pastoral of Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” will be presented by the pupils of the school. The matter, scenery and music have been specially arranged and adopted by the principal. A Negro minstrel troupe is also a feature entertainment and many other pretty items will be given by the junior scholars. The evening will wind up with a dance. Light refreshments will be had from a buffet presided over by the ladies. The funds will be devoted to the wants of the Scouts of Sifton troupe, and the school children. Come in crowds and have a good time. Program holders will be given accommodation in the front seats, Price 25 cents. The program can be obtained through the school children. Return trains from Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 14 – 1916

1916 Dec 14 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. A.C. McPhee, Minitonas, killed. (Alexander Campbell McPhee, 1896, 425152)
Corp. H.A. Hickman, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. H.L. Pearson, Dauphin, missing. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)

1916 Dec 14 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little shipped a team of Shetland drivers to his daughter, Mrs. E. Cameron, at Neepawa.
The annual Christmas tree will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. on Friday night, Dec. 22nd. Everybody come and help the kiddies have a good time.
W. King, P.M., has received word from his son Edwin, who is a scout at headquarters in France, that he is well. Max, who is with the Scotch-Canadians, and was wounded at the Somme in September, is in the trenches again doing his bit. Aubrey the youngest son, is stationed in England, is reported getting on fine.
Mrs. Paul Wood has returned to her home at Sifton, after having spent a few days with Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. Birch, provincial constable, was here a week regarding the burning of A. Redurik’s stacks. P.M. Venables sentenced John Phycolo to $300 and to keep the peace for two years or six months in jail. John preferred the latter alternative.
Mr. Jasper, of Harding, Man., who has been visiting two weeks with Thos. Glendenning on his ranch, returned home on Thursday.
Messrs. Williams, Briggs, and Rowe, took a joy ride to Dauphin in “Billy’s automobilly.” They found the walking very good on the return trip from Valley River home.
Fred King and f. cooper are having a few days at Dauphin this week.
We are in the midst of a campaign for the reeveship. It is well to have our municipal affairs intelligently brought before the ratepayers every once in a while. It makes for a better condition of affairs.

1916 Dec 14 – Sifton

The Wycliffe School holds its Xmas concert and dance on Dec. 20th, Wednesday evening. The lunch will be in the form of a box social and promises to be a pleasing feature of the entertainment. The girls are busy making their boxes, so boys don’t forget the date. Everybody welcome. Program holders entitled to reserved seats. Come early and be prepared to revel in a good time. We present you with Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar tragedy, Red Riding Hood and all kinds of items suited to the varying hour.
Pte. Frank Mealing paid a flying visit to his home on Saturday to bid goodbye to his relations and friends here. At a previous visit his friends presented him with a handsome wristwatch, the time being visible in the dark. He carries with him our sincere best wishes for success at the front and a safe return.
Home Economic Society at the annual meeting five of the old officers with the addition of miss Munson were re-elected as follows:
Mrs. Paul Wood, president.
Miss Reid, vice.
Miss Baker, chairman of Red Cross committee.
Miss Munson, chairman program committee.
Mrs. J.A. Campbell, sec.-treasurer.
Mrs. Oulette kindly provided refreshments and she and Miss peal Ashmore gave musical selections.
The Society new has a membership of nineteen and regularly hold meetings for Red Cross work at different members’ homes. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. John Kennedy.
On Friday a social evening was given by the Society at the home of Mrs. Oulette, when the members have themselves up to unrestricted frivolities for one evening. The single ladies ran off with the prizes; the winners being Misses Munson, Baker and Wood.