Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 24 – 1914

1914 Dec 24 – Twenty-Seven Recruits Accepted

The following recruits have been accepted for the third contingent which is at present being recruited. Twenty-seven have already enlisted. There are openings for 110.
A. Day (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013), R.D. Reeve (Robert Drury Reeve, 1882, 74195), W. Coleman (William Coleman, 1876, 424688), W.F. Percy (???), J.E. Welch (John Edward Welch, 1891, 74199), J.D. Munson (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039), G. Prieur (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219), E. Burnett (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323), W.J. Wallace (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200), T.M. Ray (T.M. Ray, ???, 74206), Wm. Donaldson (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188), F. Clark (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009), R. Smith (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196), W.C. Mitchell (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202), B.A. Whitmore (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, ??? A74750), H. Lys (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.), H.L. Pearson (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194), C.W. Shaw (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875, 424037 or A24015), A.G. Sanderson (???), Dauphin; A. Grove (???), Swan River; P.E. Millard (Percy Edward Millard, 1878, 74190), McCreary; A.H.G. Whitaker (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891, 424077 or 424245), Grandview; J.S. Blundell (James Stuart Blundell, 1893, 74201), Winnipegosis; H. Gardiner (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894, 424020), Kelwood; J. Gallant (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019), Asheville; I. Zufelt (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518), Gilbert Plains; G. McDonald (???).

1914 Dec 24 – Ethelbert

Mr. K.F. Slipetz house caught fire from the chimney on Wednesday morning and the interior in the vicinity of the roof was damaged.
We are all waiting for snow. Until it comes there will be very little wood marketed.
The Presbyterian Christmas tree entertainment on Tuesday night was largely attended. The programme was a good one.
Mr. and Mrs. W.H. White went to Dauphin on Wednesday to spend the Christmas holidays.

1914 Dec 24 – Fork River

Several men have left here to put up ice for the A.T. Fish Co.
Mrs. Williams has returned home from Dauphin Hospital.
Mr. Jean Rosald and Miss Christina were visitors to Dauphin this week.
Mr. Joe Johnston left for Winnipegosis, where he intends to reside in future.
Reeve King, Councillors Hunt and Lacey were present at the council meeting at Winnipegosis on Friday.
D.F. Wilson, clerk, has returned from a three day visit to Winnipegosis collecting taxes. The council decided to leave the rebate for taxes open till Dec. 31st.
Professor J. Robinson has returned from visiting in the States and is now satisfied that there are worse places than Fork River to live in.
Paul Delcourt and several others from here visited Winnipegosis recently.
The members of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, at their annual meeting decided to hold their annual New Year’s ball on January 1st. Grand march at 9 o’clock. Admission $1.00 a couple. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time.
The following officers were elected for L.O.L., No. 1765 for the year 1915:
W.M. – C.E. Bailey
D.M. – W. King, re-elected.
Chaplain – W. Northam, re-elected.
Recording-Secretary – Wm. King, re-elected.
Financial-Secretary – A. Hunt.
Treasurer – S. Bailey, re-elected.
Director of Ceremonies – F. Cooper, re-elected.
Lecturer – F.F. Hafenbrak.
2nd Lecturer – S. Reid.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 11 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 11 – Fork River

Mr. Mornington, of Neepawa, is spending the hunting season with John Robinson, of Mowat.
Several cars are being loaded with bailed hay at this point. The hay is of good quality.
David Briggs, of Brandon, and Ed. Briggs, of Souris, are visiting their brother, T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey during the hunting seasons.
John Tidsberry of Dauphin, spent a few days here on business lately.
John Clemens was lucky enough to get a noose and is now busy shipping grain from the elevator as farmers are busy drawing in grain this nice weather.
The municipal election is in full blast and the candidates are busy as bees.
Fred Cooper and W. Williams have returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The mayor, aldermen and several others of Winnipegosis, attended the nomination at Fork River. Everything passed off quietly.
Wm. Foley and Mr. Elliot were visitors here on Sunday last.
Nat Little and son are buying up another shipment of cattle.
Fork River has a blacksmith now. Once as been wanted for some time badly. Another new industry is a laundry.
The annual school meeting for Mossey River S.D. was held in the municipal office on Dec. 1st. A. Hunt the retiring trustee, was returned for another term. A school in the village is needed very much as the majority of the scholars have to travel a mile and a half from the village and often farther.
Wm. Northam has returned from a visit to Weyburn, Sask.

1919 Dec 11 – Two Fatal Accidents

Two accidents occurred at the weekend which resulted fatally. Oliver Trann, who was employed by Evans & McEwen at their sawmill in the Riding Mountain, was killed on Friday by a falling tree. He was a resident of Crystal City, Man., and 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children.
Peter Terresdale, aged 22 years, received he contents of a shotgun in the left hand and abdomen at McPherson’s camp on Saturday afternoon. He was removing a shotgun from a sleigh when it accidentally discharged. He was taken to the hospital and died there on Sunday afternoon. Deceased’s home in in Indiana.

1919 Dec 11 – Fork River

The Christmas tree arranged for to be held in Orange Hall on Christmas eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ Church, has been cancelled. The S.S. will have their Xmas tree in the church on Xmas eve, and the staff hopes to have a pleasant time with the scholars.
Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 7th inst.
At the annual meeting of Purple Star L.O.L. No. 1765, the brethren decided to hold a ball on New Year’s Eve. Good music and supper. Admission, gents, $1.
The following officers of Purple Star, L.O.L., were elected: Bro. Fred. King, W.M.; H. Hunter, D.M.; M. Cooper, chaplain; W. King, R.S., reelected; A. Hunt, F.S. C.E. Bailey. Treas.; Edwin King, D of C.; F.F. Hafenbrak, lecturer; S. Reid, D.L.; F. Cooper, 1st com.; W. Russell, Fred. Armstrong, J. Bickel, committeemen.
A very interesting debate took place in All Saints’ Church on the evening of Dec. 3rd, under the auspices of the Sunday school. Subject of debate was, “Resolved, that a city boy has greater advantages than a country boy.” The captain for the affirmative was Mrs. A.J. Little; negative, Mr. Jarvis. Very interesting points where given on both sides although the negative won by five points. Chairman for the evening was W. King; critic, D.F. Wilson, Sr.; judges, Miss Hess, Mrs. E.V. Lockwood and D.F. Wilson, Jr. These regular Wednesday evening meetings are for the advancement of the Sunday school and any one interested in the work are invited. Meeting for Dec. 10th will be in the form of a parlor field meet and is in the hands of The Daniel’s Band, Mr. Lockwood’s class of boys.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 24 – 1910

1910 Nov 24 – Mossey River Council

A meeting of the Council was held in the Council Chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Nov. 11, Councillor Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Toye – Re Shannon Road – That this roadway be opened on payment by Thos. Shannon of $150. Motion list.
Lacey-Toye – That Thos. Shannon be notified to attended a special meeting of the Council, to settle the matter of the road, to be held at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 10 o’clock a.m.
Toye-Paddock – That any member of the Council who can attend the convection of Manitoba Municipalities be a delegate to the convention and that he be allowed $10 for expenses.
Hunt-Toye – That S. Bailey’s account for $75 as road commissioner be passed.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance Committee be passed; Dauphin Press Co., $10.50; Union Manitoba Municipalities, $20; Postage, $9; Dauphin Hospital, $100.
Paddock-Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Dec. 4th at 10 a.m.

1910 Nov 24 – Fork River

Tom Shannon was the unfortunate loser of a separator this week, by some unaccountable means it caught fire in the night and when the family got up in the morning they saw that the separator had been burnt.
Mr. Venables is now occupying this Dallas’ farm. Mr. Dallas and family have moved to Winnipegosis for the winter.
J. Lockhart and family spent Saturday in Winnipegosis.
Harry Little paid Dauphin a visit last week.
A stable 28×30 is now being built for the benefit of the congregation of the English Church, when completed it will be a credit to those who helped to put it up.
Wm. King is paying the Swan River Valley a visit this week, in the interest of the Orange Order.

1910 Nov 24 – To the editor of the Herald: –

SIR – Re “Fork Riverite’s” letter in your issue of Nov. 10th, which I presume he must have penned while suffering from an attack of whiskeyitis, otherwise he would surely not have been so careless in his statements. Re the establishment of post offices, I again invite him to examine documents at Oak Brae. Re irregularities and irresponsibility of mail carriers between Oak Brae and Fork River, I refer him to P.O. Inspector, Winnipeg feeling sure that if “Fork Riverite” will formulate his charges he will get the satisfaction he is no doubt looking for. “Fork Riverite’s” reference to the people being tankful to the government for building roads and bridges with the people’s own money, also as to the inability of the government to build and control elevators is too amusing to be taken seriously. If my previous letter was the cause of “Fork Riverite” stooping to utter falsehoods I am in a serious predicament, for I read somewhere “Was unto the sinner but we onto him that causeth him to sin.” So in future I shall refrain from replying to this individual who is “intoxicated with the exuberance of his own verbosity.” I have spoken.

Fred Lacey, P.M. Oak Brae

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 14 – 1912

1912 Nov 14 – Fork River

Rev. C.M. Littler, of Durban, who had chug of this mission a short time, is the gust of Wm. King, church warden, for a few days, renewing old acquaintances here and at Winnipegosis.
D.F. Wilson returned from spending the week’s end at Dauphin.
Mrs. F. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is spending a short time with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. O’Callagan, the company auditor, and D. Kennedy left for a trip to Sifton on business.
Mr. Rowe of Neepawa was here and rushed up two cars of stock in a short time and left with them for Saskatchewan.
Miss N.B. Nixon, who has been teaching school near Kamsack all summer, returned home from a short stay with her sister, Mrs. A. Rowe.
Miss Grace Little has returned after spending a few weeks with her friends in Winnipeg.
Sam Bailey left for a trip to Neepawa on business.
Sandy Munro, dredge master, and Willis Miller returned home having laid up the dredge for winter at the harbour at Snake Island.
The ladies of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church held a meeting at the house of Mrs. S. Bailey when considerable business was transacted. Mrs. F.B. Lacey, Oak Brae, was elected vice-president in place of Mrs. A. Cameron, who resigned, and other business and work was laid out for the coming winter with the object of raising funds for the parsonage which is to be started next summer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 7 – 1912

1912 Nov 7 – Fork River

George King, of Dauphin, was here renewing old acquaintances between trains.
Miss Grant of Pine View was visiting her friends at Valley River during the weeks end.
Thos. Ramsay, P.M. of Sifton, was here on business with D. Kennedy.
Walter Clark has returned staying for a short time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Rev. H.H. Scrase, who has been visiting his brother at Swan River and attending the mission at Dauphin, returned on Saturday’s train.
S. Briggs, who was here renewing acquaintances for a short time, has returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy and family have returned after visiting friends at Ochre River and Dauphin.
Miss Olive Clark and miss Comber have returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Hallowe’en has passed, and to judge from the looks of the town next morning, those who too part in the the tricks, should be pleased with themselves if they call it fun. Even the church was made to pay toll, which is going the limit.
The elevator gang has left. The elevator is now open for business with Jack Clemens in charge.
What’s the matter with the Bay Centre correspondent of the Press. We must have touched him on a sore spot by the remarks he makes of the Fork River scribe. We would advise him to give up his Hooligan tactics of sandbagging people and to roost with the owls till it freezes up.
One of our enterprising citizens has surrounded his lot on Main Street with an ornamental fence.

1912 Nov 7 – The Fork River Settlement

Pretty much all the history of the Dauphin district dates from the advent of the C.N.R. The actual settlement of the northern part of the country, which includes Fork River and Winnipegosis, commenced in 1897, when the railway entered. It is true there were parties who squatted here and there, but the first settlement amounted to nothing when estimated in figures. It was not until three or four years later that the municipality of Mossey River, which comprises the territory described, was organized. Your correspondent spent a few house at Fork River the other day, and what is more important, spent them pleasantly. It is some fourteen years since the writer first visited the new thriving village of Fork River, and some of those he formed an acquaintance with then, were there to greet him last week. The village of Fork River is located on the Fork and Mossey Rivers, and within a mile or two of its centre, a considerable number of people reside. The land along the Mossey and Fork Rivers is as good as there is to be found anywhere on the American continent, which is saying much. It was but natural then that those who came in first selected the best farms, those along the rivers. The country about was at one time covered with a growth of timber, which included tamarack, spruce and poplar. The latter kind was the most frequently met with. Much of it, of course, has since disappeared before the axe of the lumberman and the wood chopper. Another destructive elements has been fire. In the early days wood had little value and no effort was made to preserve timber. Much timber was needlessly destroyed which would be of considerable value today. But most of us are like the German, if our foresight was as good as our hindsight, we would soon get rich. There is, however, much consolation in the fact that good land will soon produce enough grain to find money to purchase fuel. Like other new districts the Fork River settlement has been up against manta drawbacks, notably wet seasons and poor roads. But somebody remarks, are these not the condition which develop strong men? Yes, truly, but, at times, even the heart of the pioneer sinks. Take the present year as an example. Conditions were such as to try the metal most of us are made of. Even more, the loss of crop is bad enough, but add to this financial obligations incurred and can’t be met, and the burden seems too heavy to bear.
But enough of lamenting. Let us turn to the people themselves. We don’t know where one will find a finer band of pioneers than at Fork River. There is Tom Glendenning, who was there many a day before the railroad. A splendid specimen of the pioneer; good-hearted and a true friend.
Tom Briggs, another who was in the settlement before, we were going say, the war, but we mean before the railroad. The Briggs Bros., Dave and Tom, went though the worst of it, and still wear pleasant faces. Incidentally, it manta be mentioned that Dave is no longer following, like Cincinnatus, the low.
There’s Sam Bailey, who, while not in before the iron horse, has been there long enough to establish his sterling qualities. He’s a good fellow and one can’t meet too often.
Wm. King, pioneer farmer and stock breeder. Has faced difficulties, met them and overcame them. Besides farming on an extensive scale he is bending his energies to improve his own and other people’s stock. Truly a valuable man in any community.
D.F. Wilson – there’s no mistaking him; besides quality he’s got size, both important factors in a new country. He has farmed, is a breeder of stock and fills the important office of municipal clerk. Has also done his share to develop the district.
Nat Little, pioneer merchant. Has been there a long time, and, what’s better, has succeeded. A good fellow with a weakness for the Shetland pony.
Coun. Geo. Nicholson, too, has had the usual ups and downs, seen the rough and the smooth and is still staying with the job.
Reeve Lacey, not such an old-timer as some of the others, but has, in the time he’s been there established his worth and taken a willing hand in the work of development. For several years he has been in the council and is now its head.
W.T. Snelgrove can look quite a ways back. He has seen more than a little of the life of the pioneer. As a hunter he has quite a record in the deer line and can relate some interesting experiences. Some day, when we have time at our disposal and more space we may relate some of W.R.’s exploits.
While speaking of the Snelgroves its opportune to mention morally and Alf. There some pioneers, too.
Alex. Cameron is not exactly one of the prime old-timers, but has been in the distinct quite a few years. There is just this difference between Alex. and most of the other settlers, he had the “dough” and they didn’t. It don’t take long to tell this, but oh, what a world of meaning there is in it. Money is highly important to us all, but when we haven’t got any and need it, words fail to impress its importance on us. May every man who has a healthy pocketbook know how to use its contents as judiciously and generously as Alexander Cameron.
There are many others worthy of a word in this article, but space forbids. They have done their part and performed it well. What more can be said? There’s the Rowe brothers, A. Hunt, Geo. Tilt, W. Northam, C. Clark, F. Cooper, and Frank and Vivan Hafenbrak.
Then, what about the women? Are they, too, not pioneers in the true sense. Yes, indeed; they are worthy of a special article and even then justice could not be done them. They have taken their part, a part which carried its own burden. A burden, no matter how heavy, always cheerfully carried when the interest of their families and their homes was at stake.
Municipal organization should come in for a chapter. Its work is important in our advancement. The reeves and councillors help materially to make history. If they have done their part well and faithfully their names should be writ in large letters.