Robert P. Johnston (1885-1917)

Although a few months late, as I originally started this post in November of last year, I decided to finally post the work I’ve done related to one of my first cousins. I have collected the files of every WWI serviceman in my family that I have so far identified and this is but one of those stories.

Robert P. Johnston was born on December 15th, 1885 to parents William John Johnston (1861-) and Martha Ann Johnston (1854-1933) in Renfrew, Ontario, Canada. The medical history sheet from his war file reveals he was born in Forester Falls which makes perfect sense as this is where the Johnston clan settled in the area.

Robert can be found in the 1891 census living in the township of Ross with his parents and four siblings, James P. (1884-), John Samuel (1887-1978), William Andrew (1889-1971), and Noah Thomas (1890-). Interestingly enough, I believe his brother James was named after his maternal grandfather, James Patrick Johnston (1827-1905) and who is the first of the Johnston line to immigrate to Canada.

Another interesting tid-bit is that Robert’s middle initial is listed as ‘P’ in one census record while the other is listed as ‘B.’

1891censusrpjohnston

1891 Census.

I found the family in the 1901 census where they’ve made a substantial move west now living in Westbourne, Manitoba. This was a distance of over 1,600km. I’m curious as to whether or not the move was made so that Robert’s father could work and own a farm of his own rather than work as a labourer in Ontario. I was able to find a Western Land Grant for William Johnston Jr. which may be Robert’s brother but I am unable to confirm at this time.

1901censusrpjohnston

1901 Census.

There are some inaccuracies when it comes to birth years of the children between the census records and they are as follows:

Name Dates Difference
James P. 1884 vs. 1882 2 years
Robert P/B. 1885 vs. 1883 2 years
John Samuel 1887 vs. 1885 2 years
William Andrew 1889 vs. 1888 1 year
Noah Thomas 1890 vs. 1889 1 year

The children’s birthdates are a few years off, but I’m more inclined to believe the dates themselves are correct as Robert’s birthdate December 15th matches what is found on his attestation paper.

I’ve been stalling on writing this piece because I’ve had difficulty locating certain family member’s records. For instance, I don’t have James’ birth record; the same can be said of his younger brother John. This frustrates me as I’ve found the birth records for Robert, William, and Noah.

Furthermore, I’m unable to find the family in any census records for 1911 or 1916. I’ve located a few family members in the 1921 census, but a lot has happened in that 20 year period. For now, I will continue to focus on Robert, before I touch on some of the other family members.

Sometime between the 1901 census and the birth of his daughter, Grace Loretta Johnston (1915-2014), Robert married Eleanore Loretta Schneider (1895-1991).

Eleanore, also known as Ella, lived with her family in Edrans, where she is found with her parents and her six siblings in the 1911 census.

The date of their marriage can be narrowed to sometime between 1911 and 1915 yet I have not been able to locate it. The distance between the two communities is 40km, so I imagine the Johnstons might have moved closer to Edrans or the Schneiders towards Westbourne. I am leaning a bit more towards the latter since I found Eleanore’s parents and siblings living in Westbourne in the 1916 census.

I would like to search the census records a little closer to Edrans based on some other locations mentioned in other documents including Keyes, Wellwood, and Austin. These locations are mentioned as later residences for Robert’s wife and mother. All of these locations are further west than Westbourne.

On September 11th, 1915, Robert travelled south-west to Hughes Camp, previously known as Sewell Camp, and attested. He enlisted as a private and his regimental number was 623165. Robert is described as thirty years and nine months old, 5 foot 9 1/2 inches with brown hair and eyes. Some 48 days later, Robert arrived in England on October 30th, 1915, after travelling on the SS Lapland from Halifax.

The next of kin listed is Robert’s wife under a PO Box in Wellwood, Manitoba. There are some additional notations on the attestation paper which appear as though Robert original next-of-kin listed was going to be his mother but he apparently changed his mind. An “A” was originally written but was crossed out and replaced with an “R.” There is also the start of what I believe to be the word “mother” but was replaced with the word “wife.”

From Robert’s pay book, signed March 30th, 1916, he indicates in his Will that everything should go to his wife, Ella, living in Edrans. The time between when Robert attested and when he signed his Will was 6 months while it was some 15 days before he was sent to France.

Another address lists Robert’s wife living in Keyes dated August 12th, 1918. Additionally, Robert’s mother, Martha Ann, is listed as living in Keyes as well.

Yet another document list’s Ella as living in Austin with a stamp on the reverse dated October 25th, 1922. This same address is found on a second card.

After Robert landed in Europe in October, he contracted influenza which he sought treatment for on November 18th, 1915. He was treated at the Bramshott Military Hospital and discharged on November 30th, 1915. This would not be the last time Robert would seek treatment at a medical centre.

Robert was originally assigned to the 61st Battalion but was transferred to the 44th Battalion on October 16th, 1915. This information can be found on Robert’s casualty form which also states Robert embarked and arrived overseas with the 27th Battalion on April 15th, 1916. He left the Canadian Base Depot (CBD) with his unit on May 4th and arrived in the field on May 6th, 1916.

A month later, on the 6th of June, Robert was wounded in action at the battle of St. Eloi. He was thrown onto a stake hurting his ribs on the right pectoral region. Below are excerpts from the 27th Battalion war diaries.

F CAMP. JUNE 6, 1916.
Battalion in Brigade reserve at F Camp. Weather, heavy rain in early morning clearing towards noon. Wind fresh westerly. At 3:50PM received message to fall in and move at once to the Asylum past west of Ypres H12d central.

A CAMP. JUNE 6, 1916.
4:15PM. Battalion moved as ordered. [Diving] to shelling of road battalion moved by platoons at 100 yard intervals. Met by guides and proceeded at once to the Ramparts in Ypres at I14b24 ref sheet 28.

6:30PM. Arrived at Ramparts where Battalion headquarters were established along with Brigade headquarters. Brigade front was held by 28th Battalion in left sub-sector and 31st Battalion in right sub-sector. After an intense bombardment lasting some hours the enemy blew up four mines at Hooge covering a frontage of 200 yards and then attacked and made some ground. Sent “C” Company and 100 men of “D” boy to occupy Zillebeke Switch in I16 in support of 31st Battalion. Furnished carrying parties of 150 men for front line at night. Men not in trenches were quartered in Infantry Barracks in Ypres.

On June 23rd, 1916, Robert was transferred to the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre (CCAC) via the HS Newhaven and was admitted to the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in London. He was transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital at Bromley on July 5th, 1916, and later to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital at Epsom (also known as Woodcote Park) on July 7th, 1916.

It was during an exam on July 5th that the doctor recounts how Robert was injured and the severity of those injuries. Robert’s ribs had healed but with some irregularity on the third rib in addition to pain on coughing and breathing.

On August 21st, 1916, Robert was transferred from the CCAC to the 11th Reserve Battalion in Shroncliffe. He was taken on strength by the Battalion on August 22nd, 1916, where he remained until a little after 1917. In September 1916, Robert sought treatment for an ailment at the Military Hospital in Shorncliffe and was transferred to the special Canadian Hospital in Etchinghill.

Robert was transferred to the 27th Battalion overseas on March 6th, 1917. He landed and was taken on strength in France where he fought with his unit. Seven months later, on September 11th, 1917, Robert was awarded a good conduct badge during training exercises. Below is a copy of the training schedule from the war diaries.

ESTREE CAUCHIE. SEPTEMBER 11, 1917.
Battalion in rest ESTREE CAUCHIE. Weather fair. Wind S.W. Remainder of Battalion bathed. Training as per Syllabus.

Time Schedule 1 Schedule 2
9:10AM to 10:00AM Physical Training Section and Platoon Drill. Bayonet Fighting. Rifle exercises.
10:00AM to 10:30AM Interval. Interval.
10:30AM to 12:30PM Musketry. Company in Attack. Rifle Grenades. Bombing, Lewis Gun. Musketry.

Communication Section and Company Signallers 9:10AM to 10:00AM instructed by Bomb Officer. 10:30AM to 12:30PM – Signalling.

Company Scouts and Snipers will report to Scout Sgt. after C.Os. parade on days in which their Companies have Bombing.

Sixteen men per Coy. will report to wiring instructor during Bombing period.
All Companies will practice attack as well as Bombing and musketry with Gas Respirators on.

“A” and “B” Companies will follow Schedule 1, “C” and “D” Coys. will follow Schedule 2 September 11th and will alternate following days.

Company Officers will spend one hour each afternoon on map reading and Compass work. Opportunity should be given Senior N.C.Os. to take advantage of this work.

Nearly two months later, Robert is reported missing on Nov 6th, 1917. This date is particularly interesting as it appears he was likely killed by a shell during the Battalion’s assault on the village of Passchendaele.

I have transcribed the following page from the Battalion’s war diaries.

PASSCHENDAELE. NOVEMBER 6, 1917.
Battalion in front line in front of PASSCHENDAELE. Weather dull. Wind N.E. Battalion assembled for the assault and all in position at 4AM. Zero hour was at 6AM. Battalion attacked the village of PASSCHENDAELE with the 31st Battalion on the left and the 26th Battalion on the right. All objectives captured at 7:40AM.

Day spent in consolidating position. 9 Machine Guns and 76 prisoners were captured. Approximate casualties were: 13 Officers and 240 O.Rs. Operation Orders No. 197 for move from HILL 37 to Assembly Position attached.

There were two Victoria Cross recipients for this date and their participation in the fighting on Nov 6th, 1917. One of the recipients was James Peter Robertson who was part of the 27th Battalion and was awarded the cross posthumously. I wonder whether the two men knew each other, and how many of their friends died alongside them that day.

On June 28th, 1918, Robert is reported as having been killed in action and his name can be found on the Ypres Memorial. He was 31 years old.

casualtyrjohnston

An interesting remark on one of the forms in his file indicates that Robert’s wife married his brother, William, only 32 days after he was declared dead.

 

payform

War Service Gratuity Form.

 

On July 30th, 1918, Ella married William Andrew and on September 26th, 1918, Robert William Johnston (1918-2018) was born. Based on his date of birth, Robert William was likely conceived sometime in December 1917 or January 1918 only a few months after Robert went missing in France. I wonder then, whether anything was going on between Ella and William before Robert’s disappearance or if their relationship developed suddenly when it appeared Robert would not return.

Both explanations are plausible, but with a piece of information I received from two researchers in Ontario who work with WWI records I’m leaning more to the first scenario. If a soldier required treatment or hospitalization for venereal disease their pay home would be stopped for that period. In turn, this would lead to family questioning why pay was stopped which might serve as a catalyst for a new relationship. Robert was in hospital receiving treatment from October 11th to December 18th, 1016 which meant his pay would have been stopped for two months – a substantial amount of time.

Two more children would be born to Ella and William, Anne Louise Johnston (1920-2004) and Vernon Andrew Johnston (1923-1944).

Ella and her three children, Grace, Robert, and Anne can be found living with Ella’s brother, Albert Schneider in the 1921 census. I don’t know where William is, though I suspect he is working somewhere on another farm. The full family of William, Ella, Grace, Robert, Anne, and Vernon can be found in the 1926 census split between two pages.

1920censusejohnston

1921 Census.

 

1926census

1926 Census.

 

Both Robert and Vernon served in the second world war although only one would return home. Vernon rose to the rank of Corporal with the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) and was killed September 13, 1944. He was buried at the Calais Canadian Military Cemetery in St. Inglevert, France.

Robert was injured in 1942 and 1944, with the second injury being severe enough to have him sent back to Canada where he convalesced at Deer Lodge Hospital in Winnipeg.

Based on the information above, I believe the only child born to Robert and Ella was their daughter, Grace. Grace married Norman George Bowden Hay (1898-1958), who was 17 years her senior, on October 19, 1940. She had met him while working on the Hay family farm. They would have 7 children before Norman passed away on March 19, 1958.

Grace passed away in 2014 while her brother, Robert, passed away in 2018.

One of the reasons why I wanted to do a write-up of Robert is not because of anything specific to him, but because of the following doodle I found in his file. It amused me to see this little smiling pumpkin and I bet you the person who drew it likely never thought it would see the light of day.

 

doodle

Assigned Pay Sheet.

 

Update to Mossey River Honour Roll

I’ve made a few updates the Mossey River Honour Roll with an addition of a few names under:

  • Fork River,
  • Sifton, and
  • Winnipegosis.

The stats are as follows:

WWI Honour Roll
Community Old Number New Number
Fork River 30 31
Sifton 28 29
Winnipegosis 101 109

That’s ten new names, mostly from Winnipegosis. I was also able to determine one of the men under unknown area was from Sifton and another actually belongs to the WWII list.

Update to Mossey River Honour Roll

It’s been a while since I last updated the Mossey River Honour Roll in 2016.

With the passing of the hundredth anniversary of Armistice Day, I decided to make a big push to find and link all of the soldiers from the districts of:

  • Fishing River,
  • Fork River,
  • Ethelbert,
  • Oak Brae,
  • Sifton,
  • Waterhen
  • Winnipegosis, and
  • Valley River.

The stats are as follows:

WWI Honour Roll

Community Old Number New Number
Fishing River 0 1
Fork River 17 30
Ethelbert 0 10
Oak Brae 0 1
Sifton 0 28
Winnipegosis 35 101
Valley River 0 5
Waterhen 0 2
Total 52 178

That’s one hundred and twenty-six new names I’ve added!

There are still eighteen individuals who I have been unable to find documents for, but I haven’t exhausted all the venues yet. I’m going to do some cross-referencing to see if I can locate the missing documents. Additionally, there could still be some soldiers I’ve missed altogether.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 24 – 1914

1914 Dec 24 – Twenty-Seven Recruits Accepted

The following recruits have been accepted for the third contingent which is at present being recruited. Twenty-seven have already enlisted. There are openings for 110.
A. Day (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013), R.D. Reeve (Robert Drury Reeve, 1882, 74195), W. Coleman (William Coleman, 1876, 424688), W.F. Percy (???), J.E. Welch (John Edward Welch, 1891, 74199), J.D. Munson (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039), G. Prieur (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219), E. Burnett (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323), W.J. Wallace (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200), T.M. Ray (T.M. Ray, ???, 74206), Wm. Donaldson (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188), F. Clark (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009), R. Smith (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196), W.C. Mitchell (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202), B.A. Whitmore (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, ??? A74750), H. Lys (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.), H.L. Pearson (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194), C.W. Shaw (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875, 424037 or A24015), A.G. Sanderson (???), Dauphin; A. Grove (???), Swan River; P.E. Millard (Percy Edward Millard, 1878, 74190), McCreary; A.H.G. Whitaker (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891, 424077 or 424245), Grandview; J.S. Blundell (James Stuart Blundell, 1893, 74201), Winnipegosis; H. Gardiner (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894, 424020), Kelwood; J. Gallant (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019), Asheville; I. Zufelt (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518), Gilbert Plains; G. McDonald (???).

1914 Dec 24 – Ethelbert

Mr. K.F. Slipetz house caught fire from the chimney on Wednesday morning and the interior in the vicinity of the roof was damaged.
We are all waiting for snow. Until it comes there will be very little wood marketed.
The Presbyterian Christmas tree entertainment on Tuesday night was largely attended. The programme was a good one.
Mr. and Mrs. W.H. White went to Dauphin on Wednesday to spend the Christmas holidays.

1914 Dec 24 – Fork River

Several men have left here to put up ice for the A.T. Fish Co.
Mrs. Williams has returned home from Dauphin Hospital.
Mr. Jean Rosald and Miss Christina were visitors to Dauphin this week.
Mr. Joe Johnston left for Winnipegosis, where he intends to reside in future.
Reeve King, Councillors Hunt and Lacey were present at the council meeting at Winnipegosis on Friday.
D.F. Wilson, clerk, has returned from a three day visit to Winnipegosis collecting taxes. The council decided to leave the rebate for taxes open till Dec. 31st.
Professor J. Robinson has returned from visiting in the States and is now satisfied that there are worse places than Fork River to live in.
Paul Delcourt and several others from here visited Winnipegosis recently.
The members of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, at their annual meeting decided to hold their annual New Year’s ball on January 1st. Grand march at 9 o’clock. Admission $1.00 a couple. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time.
The following officers were elected for L.O.L., No. 1765 for the year 1915:
W.M. – C.E. Bailey
D.M. – W. King, re-elected.
Chaplain – W. Northam, re-elected.
Recording-Secretary – Wm. King, re-elected.
Financial-Secretary – A. Hunt.
Treasurer – S. Bailey, re-elected.
Director of Ceremonies – F. Cooper, re-elected.
Lecturer – F.F. Hafenbrak.
2nd Lecturer – S. Reid.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 23 – 1915

1915 Dec 23 – News from War Front

Lieut. Denis Cockrill, who was recently wounded, has sufficiently recovered to return to the trenches. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
Private Jos. Gallant who enlisted at Dauphin last winter, has been recommended for the D.S. medal. He rescued two officers after they had been wounded by the Germans near their trenches. (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019)

1915 Dec 23 – Sixty now Enlisted

Recruiting for the battalion with headquarters at Dauphin is going on briskly. The officers and men here now total 60, and it is expected by the 1st of the New Year will be over 100 strong.
The officers state that the men enlisted are well suited for the service and are engaged drilling every day. Physical drill exercises are held in the town hall and platoon work at the agricultural grounds. The officers in command and privates are as follows:

OFFICERS
Lieut.-Col. R.A. Gillespie, O.C. (Robert Alexander Gillespie, 1881, xxx)
Capt. and paymaster, H. Hunter (Henry Cecil Hunter, 1888, 234232)
Lieut. V.N. Severn, keeper of records (Vernon Nicholl Severn, 1890, xxx)
Lieut. J.W. Skinner (Joseph Winstanley Sinner, 1875, xxx)
Sergt. M.A. Young (Martin Albert Young, 1880, 460218)
Sergt. A.C. Wade (Arthur Ca?ebourne Wade, 1871, 693015)

PRIVATES
F. Crowe (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
H.R. Tarzwell (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
R. Merrell (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Meader (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
J.C. Henwood (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
T.M. Jones (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
H.V. Cousans (Henry Victor Cousans, 1885, 1000003)
F. Kilborn (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
W. McClernon (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.E. Hooper (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
C.W. Elliott (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
H. Gardiner (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
C. Klyne (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
W.E. Demery (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
J. Gough (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
M. Jacobson (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
E. Sandgrew (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)
A. Douglas (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
J.W. Lane (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
R. Pollard (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
W. Hatt (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
J. Hickie (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
A.F. Tigg (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
T.G. Kirk (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
W. Greenshields (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
J.E. Donnelly (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
S. Hesson (Samuel Hesson, 1880, 1000071)
G. Montgomery (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W.J. Crittenden (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
J.F. Calder (???)
A.E. Taylor (Albert Edward Taylor, 1893, 1000063)
J.H. Codd (John Codd, ???, 1000064)
J. Love (John Love, 1877, 1000067)
A. Love (Andrew Love, 1883, 1000072)
J. Minnis (James Minnis, 1876, 1000073)
M.W. Primrose (Malberry Whittington Primrose, 1894, 1000077)
J. McLetchie (John McLetchie, 1885, 1000070)
F. Hicks (Fredrick Hicks, 1891, 1000080)
C. Benson (Christian Benson, 1887, 1000081)
J. Humphry (???)
W.F. Terrell (William Francis Terrell, 1890, 1000141)
M.J.T. Cathcart (William Joseph Tidmarsh Cathcart, 1898, 1000147)
G. Douglas (George Douglas, 1897, 1000148)
J.G. Cathcart (John George Cathcart, 1872, 1000146)
C. Wilkey (Charles Henry Wilkey, 1895, 1000149)
G. Wilkey (George Wilkey, ???, 1000155)

NOTES
Tuesday was pay day, and the bank tellers were given a heavy bombardment for an hour.
Marsh Cathcart has enlisted as regimental bugler.

1915 Dec 23 – Had Head Cut Off

Ochre River, Dec. 21 – A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, Dec. 21, about noon when Charlie Blackman, a farmer of this district was instantly killed by the bursting of a circular wood saw. Mr. Blackman had just returned from the poll where he had been recording his vote and was cutting wood
Deceased was an old resident of the district and leaves a wife and ten children, 5 sons and 5 daughters. The eldest being a son 17 years of age. The saw that Mr. Blackman was operating was known to be cracked, but had been working for some time in that condition.
Coroner Rogers, from Dauphin visiting the scene of the accident, and after learning the facts decided an inquest was not necessary.

1915 Dec 23 – Young Ruthenian Accidentally Shot

A young Ruthenian, 24 years of age, accidently shot himself at Ethelbert on Monday evening. He was hunting rabbits at the time, and pushed the butt end of the gun in a hole, discharging it, the contents entering his abdomen, making a bad wound. Drs. Culbertson and Bottomley were sent for and went to the northern town on Tuesday morning. They dressed the wound but have little hopes for the recovery for the young man.

1915 Dec 23 – Fork River

Mrs. N. Little and daughter, Grace have returned from two weeks’ trip south.
Mrs. A. Hunt and children left on Wednesday’s train for a two months’ vacation with her friends at Ottawa.
It seems to be the order of the day of late for the Dauphin train to arrive late and take a rest at Winnipegosis for from 4 to 3 hours while they catch a load of fish for the return ship. Passengers waiting to go to Dauphin have to hang around all day. How long will the suffering public have to put up with this kind of service?
Mrs. Craig, of Weyburn, is here on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Northam.
Mr. W. Williams, our lumber magnets, has a gang out on his Lake Dauphin limits preparing for the winter’s out of lumber.
The returned hunters report big game hard to get this year. They have not had the success of other years. In a few years, if the present slaughter goes on, there will be no big game left to hunt. To preserve these fine animals a close season of two or three years should be put in force at once by the government.
F.O. Murphy paid the burg a long visit between trains last week. Fred took a cargo of eggs with him as he says “Murphys” are not too bad an old time. The only thing that it takes the train so long to go to Dauphin the eggs might hatch out on the road and he would have to get a hen coop on his arrival.
The Orangemen of Fork River will [1 missing line] ball on December 31st in the Orange Hall. Admission, gents $1, ladies free. Good music and supper provided. An invitation is extended to all.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

A grand patriotic concert, including a ladies Indian Club display song tableaux, a dramatic dialogue and the orchestra will be held in the Rex Theatre, on Tuesday, Jan. 4th, 1915, at
Eddie Chermok’s new store is all ready for business now. His stock arrived last train.
Mrs. McEachern, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
The whist drive of the Cosmopolitan Club took place on Friday evening. The prize winners were Miss Margaret Goodman and Mr. Wiseman. The bobby prize went to Miss Bertha Magunson and Mr. J. Campbell.
The Xmas tree held n the Presbyterian Church was a great success and the turn out was the nest in the annals of the town. Miss Gracie Whale was presented with a prize for the best attendance at Sunday school for the yea and John Wallace won second prize. Santa Claus did not forget any of the children.
Jas. McInnes, Walter Grenon, Joe Mossington, and Capt. Buck, returned from their hunting ground and report a good time. They brought back some good specimens of the wild steers of the Northlands.
Settlers are still flocking into the vacant lands north of here. There is room for all comers yet.
The school is closed for the festive season and we regret to say that we are losing Miss Whitemore who will attend Normal at Winnipeg after holidays. Miss Whitore will be greatly missed as she has endeared herself to her pupils and her many friends alike in this town.
Miss McMartin left on Wednesday’s train for her home at Franklin to spend the holiday season.
D.S. Hatties’ rink beat E.R. Black’s rink by 9-7. The ladies are taking an active interest in curling this season and can throw as good a rock as many of the boys.
Harry Hunter, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
Mr. Goodman returned from a business trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday’s train.
Miss Augusta Crawford arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday’s train to spend Xmas at her home here.
If the mail gets any heavier Comf. will have to get a horse and rig. What price, Casey.
Mrs. Ben Hechter left on Wednesday’s train for Winnipeg on a visit.
F. Hechter left, for Waterhen on Tuesday afternoon.
We had a special train up for fish on Tuesday.
Don’t forget the Red Cross concert next week. Buy your ticket now.
The secretary treasurer of the village reports the taxes coming in very will and a great many took advantage of the discount up to the 15th Dec. The taxes are payable at par up to July 1st.
The Council of the Village meet in the Council Chambers at 2 p.m. on Monday, 3rd, of January.
Mrs. Ben Hechter and Miss Molly Hechter left on Wednesday for Winnipeg on a visit.
Ray Burley, Bert Arrowsmith, G. Johannason, A. Allan and Rev. Clixby are up from Brandon for the holidays.
On the night of the 21st inst. the Bicton Heath children were coming to Winnipegosis to the Xmas tree with Supt. Tom Toye as driver and on arriving inside the town limits a few of our children in happy spirits were singing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” which patriotic song so scared the wild quadrupeds that they bent it for the tall timbers leaving Supt. Toye and his whole school in the ditch singing “Will Ye Na Come Back Again?” However, nothing daunted by this little mishap Supt. Toye marched with his flock to the Presbyterian Church, where they enjoyed a most pleasant time.
Last week an old Frenchman at Waterhen left his nephew’s house to go to the house of a neighbour and got lost and froze to death.
Geo. Adam, of the Fishery spent Wednesday in town.
Jas. Alex and W. Walmeley returning from Waterhen Saturday and report fishing good.
Alex. Bickel arrived to town on Saturday with two loads of fish and returned from there Friday.
We are glad to report all well at Ed. Morris’ camp. The teams returned from there on Friday.
We regret to lose for a little while, and yet we are so proud to report that our worth citizen, Mr. Frank Hechter has enlisted for active service with the 107th Battalion and will be leaving us to join his regiment about the 10th of January. Frank will be badly missed but we hope to give him a royal welcome on his return. We understand he takes the rank of quarter-master sergeant. The business will be carried on by his brother, Ben Hechter until his return.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick returned last week from the hunting ground. Rev. Kirkpatrick got a nice elk.
The trains are very late in arriving and leaving lately.
Mr. Robertson, surveyor, is in town after inspecting the roads at Cowan and Camperville.
The snow low left for the north at the latter end of last week.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is spending a few days in town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 21 – 1916

1916 Dec 21 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. J.D. James, Grandview, killed. (James Daniel Stanley James, 1892, 151767)

1916 Dec 21 – Frank Meader Wounded

Mrs. Meader received a telegram on Wednesday notifying her that her son, Pte. Frank Thomas Morris Meader was wounded on Dec. 7th, at Camlers, France. The wounds consist of a gunshot in the back and left thigh. (Frank Thomas Morris Meader, 1896, 425693)

1916 Dec 21 – Another Returned Soldier

The list of returned soldiers continues to grow. There are now five of these men in town. On Wednesday Pte. John Ball, who was recently wounded in France, reached home. He is suffering from paralysis on one side and it will be sometime before he is able to be about.
Pte. Bird McKinstry is expected to arrive this week.

1916 Dec 21 – Fork River

What are the Fork River farmers doing in the mater of the proposed Mossey Agricultural society? The Ruthenians and South Bay people seem to be setting them as example.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 20 – 1917

1917 Dec 20 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. W.R. Watson, Magnet, Man., killed in action. (Robert William Watson, 1891, 424075 ???)
Pte. W. Lee, Dauphin, killed in action. (Wilford Lee, 1897, 100095)

1917 Dec 20 – Fork River

W.R. Snelgrove has sold his farm on the Mossey River and is intending going east for the winter.
E. Hunter and Sid Frost have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
The C.N.R. bridge gang are driving piles for a new bridge over the Fork River at the town.
A pile bridge is being built over Mink Creek at P. Solomon’s. It appears to your correspondent that the time has arrived for the municipality to put in concrete abutments in new bridges it intends erecting.
T.N. Briggs has received word from Walter Clark, who is doing his bit in the trenches, that he is well.
Post office hours on Christmas Day, 10 to 12 a.m.
The train service, if you can dignify by such a name, is to say the least, erratic. The train may arrive, and then again, it may not. But I guess there is nothing to do but grin and bear it.
We wish the herald staff a merry Christmas.
We understand that our Pro-German resident now intends taking a trip south.

1917 Dec 20 – Winnipegosis

The shipping of fish is in full swing. Teams are hauling from every point and the catch seems to be good. Six cars were shipped out on Saturday the 15th, and as many more will likely go on Tuesday.
The memorial service on Sunday was well attended. The names of seven of our noble men who have died at the front were read out. Miss F. Grenon played “Consolation” as a voluntary, and Miss McArthur sang “Rock of Ages” by request.
The Red Cross entertainment of Wednesday, 12th, under the management of Mrs. Paddock’s committee, netted $42.
Owing to the general interest in Red Cross work and the lack of assistants the Presbyterian Sunday school will not give their usual concert. Instead he members of the school will take part in an entertainment, from 3 to 6 o’clock on the afternoon of Monday the 24th. A silver collection will be taken at the door, and a 10c fishpond will be arranged. The tree, of course, will be the chief attraction, and each child will receive a bag of candy.
Mrs. Theodore Johnston wishes to thank all friends and others who, by their presence at the memorial service held in honour of her son, showed their sympathy with her in her sad bereavement.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 17 – 1914

1914 Dec 17 – Another 110 Men Wanted

Another large force for overseas service is to be raised in Canada at once. Major G.C.J. Walker received a wire this Thursday morning to this effect. The telegram read as follows:
“You are authorized to mobilize immediately one company of infantry a total 110 men for overseas service. Standard height, 5 feet 4 inches; age, 18 to 45; chest, 33 ½ inches.”

1914 Dec 17 – Injured Man Getting Better

Thos. Free, who was badly injured in a collision at Kamsack a couple of weeks ago and had to have one of his legs amputated, is making excellent progress towards recovery. It is probably he will be able to return o his home next week.

1914 Dec 17 – Jack Myers Shot in Leg

Jack Myers, a well-known resident of Gilbert Plains, was shot in the leg last week while hunting in the Riding Mountains by a young fellow named Coulter. Coulter saw the bushes move and before his companion, a man named Morran, could stop him, fired and dropped Myers.

1914 Dec 17 – Ruthenian Patriotism

An evidence of the patriotism of some of the Ruthenian settlers was given on Saturday when two of them. Panko Schnuyk and Peter Toporoski came to town to tender their mites for their country. Each gave a dollar towards the patriotic fund and also gave their promise to contribute a dollar a month each to the fund as long as the war lasted.

1914 Dec 17 – Fork River

Mr. W. Williams returned from a visit to Mrs. Williams who has been very sick for some time in the Dauphin Hospital. We are all pleased to hear that Mrs. Williams has recovered enough to be able to return home next week.
Mr. George O’Neill, of Mowat, returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and is delighted with the lake Town.
Mr. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, one of the candidates for the reeveship arrived in this burg in company with Mr. Steve Lytwyn, a representative of the Armstrong Trading Co. Mr. Lytwyn is assisting Mr. Hechter in his campaign to get control of the municipality.
Mr. Duncan Kennedy, late manager of the Armstrong Trading Company, has accepted a position with Mr. Hechter, of Winnipegosis. Mr. Kennedy has been here for the company for several years and attended strictly to business ear in year out. Although we are sorry to see Mr. Kennedy and his family leave, his friends wish him all kinds of good luck.
The box social under the auspices of All Saints’ Woman’s Auxiliary on the 11th, was fairly well attended. The boxes realized good prices in the hands of our friend, “Scotty,” who acted as auctioneer, and a nice sum was realized. It was, we believe, one of the most enjoyable times ever held in the hall. Credit us due the ladies for the nice display of boxes to tempt the boys. The social came to a close at 4.30 in the wee small hours.
There will be a public Christmas tree under the auspices of All Saints’ Sunday school on Wednesday evening, Dec. 23rd, to commence at 8.30 sharp. Everybody is invited to come and help give the kiddies a good time. Admission, adults 23 cents, children free. Proceeds to go towards maintaining the Sunday school.
Mr. Thomas, travelling Missionary of the Anglican Church, will preach in All Saints’ Church on Dec. 20th at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. Everyone invited.
Rev. Mr. Thomas will hold a meeting in All Saints’ Anglican Church on December the 19th, at 2.30 p.m. sharp. All members and those who are in sympathy


1914 Dec 17 – Sifton

The Grain Growers’ Patriotic concert held here last Friday met with great success. There was very good talent from Dauphin, also West Bay and Fairville. There was a very good attendance indeed from the outlying districts. The Sifton boys proved themselves very good in their little play, “Christmas night at the Front.”
Mr. Robt. Brewer shipped another car of stock on Monday. Quite a rustler is “Bobs.”
We all regret that Mr. William Birch, late station agent, has left town for good. We understand he is going to Invermay, Sask., and we all wish him the best of luck.
Mr. Caldwell, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town last week on business.
We understand that Mr. John Aller, of Fairville, is holding a social next Saturday in aid of the Red Cross Society. We trust it will be a success.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, are now busy canvassing orders as they expect their drilling outfit this week. They are deserving of success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 14 – 1916

1916 Dec 14 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. A.C. McPhee, Minitonas, killed. (Alexander Campbell McPhee, 1896, 425152)
Corp. H.A. Hickman, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. H.L. Pearson, Dauphin, missing. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)

1916 Dec 14 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little shipped a team of Shetland drivers to his daughter, Mrs. E. Cameron, at Neepawa.
The annual Christmas tree will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. on Friday night, Dec. 22nd. Everybody come and help the kiddies have a good time.
W. King, P.M., has received word from his son Edwin, who is a scout at headquarters in France, that he is well. Max, who is with the Scotch-Canadians, and was wounded at the Somme in September, is in the trenches again doing his bit. Aubrey the youngest son, is stationed in England, is reported getting on fine.
Mrs. Paul Wood has returned to her home at Sifton, after having spent a few days with Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. Birch, provincial constable, was here a week regarding the burning of A. Redurik’s stacks. P.M. Venables sentenced John Phycolo to $300 and to keep the peace for two years or six months in jail. John preferred the latter alternative.
Mr. Jasper, of Harding, Man., who has been visiting two weeks with Thos. Glendenning on his ranch, returned home on Thursday.
Messrs. Williams, Briggs, and Rowe, took a joy ride to Dauphin in “Billy’s automobilly.” They found the walking very good on the return trip from Valley River home.
Fred King and f. cooper are having a few days at Dauphin this week.
We are in the midst of a campaign for the reeveship. It is well to have our municipal affairs intelligently brought before the ratepayers every once in a while. It makes for a better condition of affairs.

1916 Dec 14 – Sifton

The Wycliffe School holds its Xmas concert and dance on Dec. 20th, Wednesday evening. The lunch will be in the form of a box social and promises to be a pleasing feature of the entertainment. The girls are busy making their boxes, so boys don’t forget the date. Everybody welcome. Program holders entitled to reserved seats. Come early and be prepared to revel in a good time. We present you with Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar tragedy, Red Riding Hood and all kinds of items suited to the varying hour.
Pte. Frank Mealing paid a flying visit to his home on Saturday to bid goodbye to his relations and friends here. At a previous visit his friends presented him with a handsome wristwatch, the time being visible in the dark. He carries with him our sincere best wishes for success at the front and a safe return.
Home Economic Society at the annual meeting five of the old officers with the addition of miss Munson were re-elected as follows:
Mrs. Paul Wood, president.
Miss Reid, vice.
Miss Baker, chairman of Red Cross committee.
Miss Munson, chairman program committee.
Mrs. J.A. Campbell, sec.-treasurer.
Mrs. Oulette kindly provided refreshments and she and Miss peal Ashmore gave musical selections.
The Society new has a membership of nineteen and regularly hold meetings for Red Cross work at different members’ homes. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. John Kennedy.
On Friday a social evening was given by the Society at the home of Mrs. Oulette, when the members have themselves up to unrestricted frivolities for one evening. The single ladies ran off with the prizes; the winners being Misses Munson, Baker and Wood.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 13 – 1917

1917 Dec 13 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. Horace Hill, Dauphin, died of wounds. (George Horace Hill, ????, 718071)
Pte. John Hicks, Dauphin, wounded. (???)

1917 Dec 13 – Winnipegosis

Word has been received by his family that Charlie Marcroft, who was reported missing, is now reported killed in action.
The Independent Fish Producers shipped two cars of fish last Saturday. This company will also run a snow plow similar to the Armstrong Trading Company’s to bring down the dish from the north-end of the lake.
The operation of putting up ice is under way, the ice in the river being thick enough now to harvest.
Mr. J.H. McArthur returned last week from the north end of the lake, where he has been in charge of the “Manitou,” which was frozen in at Whisky Jack harbour.
Miss S. Stephenson has given up her position in the Armstrong Trading Co.’s sore, and will be succeeded at the cashier’s desk by Mrs. A.S. Walker.
Mrs. King and Mrs. Kennedy are expected from Dauphin and Ochre River respectively to attend the memorial service of their brother on Sunday, the 16th.
Promptly renew your subscription to the Herald.
Thomas Young has removed his boarding house across the track immediately facing the station, where will be prepared to furnish meals as in the past.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 9 – 1915

1915 Dec 9 – Private Jas. Craig on Wrecked Steamer

Private James Craig was on the hospital boat that struck a mine in the English Channel recently and was wrecked. In a letter to his brothers here he gives a description of his thrilling experience as follows:
I would have written you before this but I didn’t know how long I might have been in the last place I was in or whether I would go back to my regiment. Instead of going to my regiment the doctor sent me to the base and then across to England so here I am in the hospital with some kind of disease in my joints, more especially in one of my knees and the experience I came through when coming across the Channel hasn’t helped me any. I have something to be thankful for in being here at all. I suppose you will have seen in the papers of that disaster to the hospital ship being sunk by a mine in the Channel an over 80 wounded soldiers were drowned. Well, I was on the boat at the time and I have to thank Providence that I was amongst the saved. He boat was sunk three miles from Dover. I was in the upper deck astern at the time she struck the mine. There must have been a big hole torn in her for she immediately began to sink ahead and listing to the portside. There was only one boat got away full. I got in the boat nearest me and when it was full nobody knew anything about how to lower it. We kept tugging and pulling at the block ropes but nothing wound work and thee was none of the crew to be seen to let us see or help us to get it launched, so we all got out again. By that time a lot of the fellows had jumped overboard and as the ship was still going though slower, they were left behind struggling in the water. It wasn’t long before a destroyer came along side so close that a number of men jumped on to it but it moved off for some reason. Later the boat came close in again and some more got on it.

JUMPED INTO THE SEA.
I was in the act of making a jump, but it was too far away at the time, so I stood for a minute or two thinking and taking in the situation. In thinking what would be best to do, I rushed down below and got hold of a lifebelt. When I got up I could hardly stand on deck there was so much list. Well, I took up a position ready to jump. I had thrown off my heavy overcoat and taken off my boots. I don’t know how long I stood there watching her gradually sinking; finally, I thought it was time for getting clear of her before she sunk so I jumped into the water and got several good mouthfuls of it for the sea was pretty choppy at the time. Before I jumped I saw some rowboats making for us so I struck out to meet them. I was picked up by one of them and put on destroyer. The ship that was nearest us at the time was coming to our assistance when she also struck a mine and sunk.
I left the ship none too soon, just two or three minutes after she went out of sight. There were some heartrending scenes that I won’t forget as long as I live. When I was in the water I could see the propellers still running above me and some ropes had got entangled around them and were making a terrible noise.

1915 Dec 9 – Private Izon Wounded

Mr. John Izon, of Dauphin Plains, received a little from his brother, Private Hubert Izon, this week. The letter contains the information that Hubert, who was in the trenches in France, was hit on the shoulder by a piece of shell; the shell driving the bone in for about three inches. He is at present in the hospital at Taplon, England, and slowly recovering from the wound.

1915 Dec 9 – Military Notes

J.W. Skinner, locomotive shop foreman of the C.N.R., has received his lieutenancy commission in the 53rd battalion. He will be quartered in Dauphin during the winter under Lt.-Col. Gillespie and starts on duty his week.
Et. Severn, of Winnipeg, one of Lt.-Col. Gillespie’s staff, arrived in town this week, to whip the Dauphin ???.
The recruits now number 45, and together with the staff of officers the total enlistment is about 50.

1915 Dec 9 – Fork River

Mr. E. Hunt, from Ontario, is a visitor to his brother Mr. A. Hunt for a couple of weeks.
Mrs. Sam Reid [1 line missing] a visit to friends in Winnipeg for a week.
Mrs. J. Chippey received word her mother was very sick and left on the train for a week’s visit at her home.
Mr. D. Scarth, of Hartney, is a visitor with Mr. T.N. Briggs during the hunting season.
Mrs. Little and daughter, Miss Grace are visitors to Winnipeg for a few days.
Mrs. Paul Wood and children of Sifton, are visiting Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the homestead in the Mossey.
Mr. Sam Reid left with his hay press for the old Hood ranch on Lake Dauphin having taken a contract to pressing hay for Shand & Thomas of Dauphin.
Mr. W. King received a letter from his son Edwin, of the 44th Batt., which is in England, who states that things are quite lively over there. The weather is wet and sloppy. This is quite a contrast to the dry winter weather of Manitoba, and the boys feel the change badly.
Several parties left on the 1st to take in the hunt for the big game.
Hunter Bros. shipped their first load of Lake Dauphin fish on Saturday.
Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, was here loading for 25 head of yearlings and two year olds which he will feed for winter.

1915 Dec 9 – Winnipegosis

There was a most successful skating carnival in the rink on Monday night, in aid of the Red Cross Society. The turnout was splendid and the door receipts were $??. The ladies served tea and coffee at ten cents a cup which will bring the total receipts up to a good figure. The prize winners were Miss Myrtle Grenon, Mr. ???, Mrs. ??? McMartin, Miss Geekie, Miss Crawford, Mr. R. Bradley, Miss Margaret Bradley, Miss A. Hechter, Miss Esther Hechter, Miss Beth MacAulay and ??? Cecil Paddock.
Sam Sanderson had the misfortune to lose a valuable team of horses last week in a crack in the ice.
John Redisk is all smiles these days – it is a baby girl.
Frank Hechter returned from Waterhen after spending a week there. He reports fishing good.
The new store across the ??? is doing a good business.
We are sorry to report the death of Mr. and Mrs. Dudley’s little baby girl, which took place on the 4th inst. The funeral was on the 7th.
The council had their regular monthly meeting on the ?th inst., and among other business they passed the herd law. A copy of same can be had at the clerk’s office.
Mr. L???, rancher of Waterhen, passed through here on his way to Winnipeg for a business visit.
C.L. White, fishing overseer, made a quick trip to River last week.
Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick left on Wednesday for the west on a hunting expedition.
W.R. Paddock, left for Pine River and Garland on business.
Threshing is now finished in this district and the crops have been very good.
The town is livening up now that the fish teams are coming in so steady.
The Municipal elections are over again for another year and everyone is happy.
New settlers still keep coming in here and we are glad to welcome them.
Mr. Kenny Morris, of the 79th Battalion, spent a few days leave of absence with friends here.
Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick, an old-timer, here took the service in the Methodist Church on Sunday last, and the church was crowded to its utmost capacity.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Dec 7 – Municipal Nominations

Reeve
Nominations for rural Municipalities throughout the province took place on Tuesday. In these municipalities two weeks elapse before election day.

MOSSEY RIVER.
Reeve – F.B. Lacey, acclamation.

COUNCILLORS.
Ward 2 – A. Hunt, acclamation.
Ward 4- J.S. Seiffert, acclamation.
Ward 6 – No nomination.

1911 Dec 7 – Fork River

An ice gang left here for the put up ice for the Armstrong Trading Co., Winnipegosis, composed of Messrs. Munro, Johnston, Gower and others.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis is to be opened for summer fishing again. It will be a great blunder if it is. As it is winter fishing is of great benefit to the resident fisherman and farmer, where as summer fishing is for the benefit of the 102 American companies and means clearing out the lake in about two seasons.
George Tilt left last week for Dauphin on a business trip.
Rev. Mr. Cruikshank held a service in the Methodist Church on Tuesday evening assisted by Mr. Malley, of Winnipegosis. A business meeting was held after service.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Breiver, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Armstrong.
Our trains here have not been on time more than twice for the last month. We were informed by a traveller from Winnipeg that instead of the train leaving Dauphin on time they had to wait while they manufactured a conductor and when he was manufactured they had to wait while he got some breakfast and then it did not matter when they started. Farmers wait hours for their mail and freight. Of course we sympathized with the traveller as we are used to waiting in Dauphin while they manufacture an engine to take a train out, but this is our first experience in making conductors. What’s next?
The office of the municipality will be closed from the 12th to 14th of the month. The Sec.-treasurer will be at the council chamber, Winnipegosis, during this period.

1911 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sec-treasurer of the municipality will be here at the council chamber Winnipegosis, from the 12th to the 14th of this month.

1916 Dec 7 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. J.L. Godkin, Minitonas, died of wounds. (John Laurence Godkin, 1897, 2382826 ??? (not found on virtual memorial))
Pte. J.T. Taylor, Winnipegosis, wounds. (???)

1916 Dec 7 – Death of Pte. Harold Curtis

Private Harold Curtis succumbed to his wounds last week. By his death Mrs. Curtis has sacrificed her tow and only sons on the alter of her country. The loss is inestimable, but the Empire must be saved, and many more such sacrifices will have to be made by mothers, fathers and some before the war is brought to a successful completion. Our deep sympathy goes out to the grief-stricken mother.

1916 Dec 7 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Northam has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin.
Metro Boyko has purchased he old ???.
W. Stonehouse, of Oak River, is in town.
Miss Leone Stonehouse has returned to Dauphin, after having spent the week-end with her mother.
F.F. and V. Hafenbrak, Fred and A. King and Jack Richardson, have returned from the deer chase with a bull moose each.
David Briggs has returned to Rathwell after a week’s visit to T.N. Briggs.
Thos. Barnard contractor of Dauphin, is busy plastering Will Northam’s new residence.
Mr. Kasmir has purchased a car of fat cattle for S.B. Levins, of Winnipeg.
The ladies of the Home Economics Society have sent a number of Xmas boxes to gladden the hearts of our soldier laddies at the front.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, and J.P. Grenon, of Winnipegosis, paid a short visit to W. King, P.M., when passing through Fork River to Dauphin.
The municipal nominations took place on Tuesday, Reeve Lacey is opposed by F.B. Venables. Mr. Venables is also running against G.E. Nicholson in Ward 1. Archie McDonnell was elected by acclamation in Ward 3, as also was John Namaka for Ward 5.

1916 Dec 7 – Sifton

We much regret the illness of our popular station agent, Mr. Oulette, who was removed to the Dauphin Hospital by special on Sunday morning. Mrs. Oulette returned, however, Monday with more reassuring news of her husband’s speedy recovery.
News from Lance-Corp. Walters this week informs us that he is fast recovering from his wounds, but the shock of the shell, which buried him, has in a great measure robbed him of hearing in his right ear.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore entertained this evening (4th) at their residence a large number of old friends on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of their marriage. Mrs. Ashmore decorated her table with the top tier of her wedding cake, which she hopes to have an evidence for her 25th. After Mr. Paul Wood had made the presentation of a cut glass service in ??? evening was spent in music and song, Mrs. Campbell presiding at the piano with her usual brilliancy.
Look out for Wycliffe School concert and dance Wednesday, 20th.

1916 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sunday school Christmas tree and concert will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 20th. This annual event has, in the past always been held in the Presbyterian Church but on the present occasion will be given in the Rex Hall. This change will given room for more stage effect and also better accommodation for the parents and friends, who have always filled the church to its utmost capacity. The programme will be a good one including a representation by the children of the famous Christmas story of Charles Dickens, entitled “The Christmas Carol.” The message of the carol is of universal interest Under the touch of the spirit of Christmas the selfish man is rid of his selfishness, plum pudding and roast beef are found to be indigestible without kindness, charity mercy, and forbearance. The story will be given in the form of a three-act play and several tableaux.
We ask everybody to reserve his evening and appreciate the efforts of the children by giving them a full house. This year the Christmas presents ??? Sunday school without the aid of gifts from the parents and friends. This is partly to save time and also to avoid the inequality in the gifts received by the children.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 3 – 1914

1914 Dec 3 – Shot in Hand

A Galician named Lazar was brought to the hospital on Tuesday from the mountain with a bullet in his hand. The wound is not a dangerous one.

1914 Dec 3 – Boy Died

Sam, the 9-year-old son of S.J. Buchanan, of McCreary, was brought to the hospital on Monday, having been shot in the stomach and arm by a man who was hunting rabbits. The wound was a bad one and the boy died on Monday night. The remains were taken to McCreary on Tuesday for interment.

1914 Dec 3 – Soldiers Given Send Off

The departing soldiers on Monday morning were given a great send off at the station. The citizens turned out in large numbers and the town band was also present. Bunting and flags were displayed from all sides, and the military spirit was contagious. The special train the boys were to go odd on was over an hour late and this gave everyone an opportunity for a hand shake and chance to say good-bye. As the train steamed in with its long line of coaches the band struck up a popular air, and cheer followed cheer. The scene was one that will long be remembered.
During the short stay here the soldier boys from the west mingled with the crowd and the time was spent in a jolly way singing patriotic songs, waving flags and cheering.
As the train left the station the band played and the crowd simply went wild. Women shed tears, hats were thrown into the air flags and handkerchiefs were waved and cheer followed cheer.
It was a great send off the boys got and one not soon forgotten.

1914 Dec 3 – Sifton

We are glad to learn that miss Rowe, head nurse of the Presbyterian mission, is now on the way to recovery from a long illness.
Owing to bad roads there has been very little business done in the district of late.
The town will was completed last week and there is every indication of there being an abundance of water.
A party composed of our prominent business men paid a visit to Ethelbert last week with the view of inspecting the Kennedy Mercantile Co,’s new grist mill. They report the mill is running smoothly and doing excellent work.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz celebrated on Tuesday the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ida, to Prof. Matoff, which was witnessed by their many friends and relations of the various ???.
Mr. Joe Clarke, late Sawyer-Massey salesman, paid us a visit on Monday. He reports thing quiet at present but he says business will be humming in the near future. Hoe is sure no pessimist.
The teacher and children of the Wycliffe School gave a fine entertainment in the schoolhouse on Friday evening. The one entitled “War Scenes,” consisting of four parts, namely part I, soldiers fighting; 2nd, arrival of Red Cross nurses dressing the wounded on the battlefield; 3rd, hospital scene; 4th, soldiers and Red Cross nurses tenting on the battlefield, was certainly good. The other part of the programme included solos, readings and plays, consisting of “Henry VIII” and “Britannia.” Several patriotic songs were sung during the programme. A dance concluded the evening. The whole thing proved a great success.

1914 Dec 3 – Winnipegosis

California weather.
F. Hechter arrived home on Monday’s train from Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. and Miss McArthur left this week for Winnipeg, where they will reside for the winter.
Messrs. Thompson and St. John arrived last week from Portage for their annual big game shoot. J. McInnis and Walter Grenon accompanied them on the shoot.
Capt. Coffey spent the weekend at home at Dauphin returning on Monday.
Our train service is to be changed slightly. Instead of the train arriving on Saturday as heretofore, it will arrive on Friday, starting on the 4th inst., otherwise the schedule remains the same.
The fish are beginning to come in. The first loads arrived on the 25th, for the A.T.Co. From all reports the fishing is good.
Miss Emblem and miss Burrell spent the weekend at Snake Isle.
Doc. Medd, who has been attending the assizes at Portage, returned on Monday’s train.
Wm. Walmsley has been confined to the house through sickness. Better hurry, Bill, they’ve started curling.
Mr. Foley lost his residence through fire, last week, over heated stovepipes being the cause. Mr. Foley lost everything that was in the house, as the fire had gained too much head way before being discovered.
The entertainment and bazaar in the Methodist Church last Friday afternoon and evening was a grand success. The programme, though not a lengthy one, was of a classical nature and was fully appreciated by the large crowd present.
The municipal elections promise to cause some excitement, especially in Ward 5, where it is understood, “Old Reliable,” Tom Toye and J. Namarko will be the contestants.
The rink opened for skating and curling on Monday night. It is not every town of our size that has a curling and skating rinks open this winter. It should be fully appreciated and patronized by old and young, both skaters and curlers.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 2 – 1915

1915 Dec 2 – Enlisting Continues Active

Enlisting is now progressing actively and there are some 32 on the roll at present. Col. Gillespie is expected back from Winnipeg at the end of the week with his staff of officers.
The following is a list of those who have enlisted together with the places they hail from.
F. Crowe, Dauphin. (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
R. Tarzwill, Dauphin. (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
J.N. Meader, Dauphin. (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
R. Marrell, Dauphin. (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Henwood, Gilbert Plains. (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
Trevor Jones, Dauphin. (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
R. Courier, Dauphin. (???)
F. Kilborn, Ochre River. (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith, Dauphin. (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
H. Gardiner, Gilbert Plains. (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
J. Hooper, Dauphin. (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
W. McClernon, Dauphin. (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.W. Demery, Winnipegosis. (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel, Winnipegosis. (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
M. Jacobson, Winnipegosis. (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
C. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
J. Gough, Laurier. (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
C.W. Elliott, Gilbert Plains. (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
Wm. Hatt, Portage la Prairie. (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan, New Brunswick. (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
R. Pollard, Dauphin. (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
A. Tigg, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
J. Hickie, Gilbert Plains. (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
T. Kirk, Ochre River. (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
A. Douglas, Dauphin. (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
– Donnelly, Gilbert Plains. (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
G. Montgomery, Dauphin. (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W. Greenshields, Gilbert Plains. (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
W.J. Crittenden, Dauphin. (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
E. Sandgrew, Dauphin. (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)

1915 Dec 2 – Had Foot Amputated

John Prefonowski had his left foot run over by a train at Ashville on Wednesday. He was brought to the hospital, where the foot was amputated.

1915 Dec 2 – Mossey River Council

Mossey River Council meeting was held a Fork River, Saturday Nov. 18th, all members present.
The new member, (D.G. McAulay), for Ward III was sworn in.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner; the Red Cross Society; St. Joseph’s Orphanage; Canadian Ingot Iron Co.; J.L. Bowman re Standard Lumber Co., account; J.N. McFadden; the Solicitor, re Shannon Road Judgement; the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; the Secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities; the Patriotic Fund; J. Bickle, Jr.; C.H. Bickle; Ethelbert Municipality, re Isolation Hospital; a petition asking for the formation of a new Union School District to be called Ferley and a communication re the proposed new School District of Don.
Hunt-Reid – That the plans of subdivisions of N.W. 3-13-18 submitted by J.N. McFadden be approved.
Yakavanka-Reid – That Mrs. J. Mylanchanka of N.E. 23-29-70 be given rebate of fifty percent off her taxes.
Hunt-Reid – That the Orange Hall at Fork River be charged only the same amount of taxes as in 1914.
Hechter-Reid – That the clerk write the Department of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to give estimates of a bridge across Fishing River between sections 1 and 2, Tp. 29, Rge. 19.
[1 line missing] son be appointed arbitrator in the matter of the establishment of the proposed Union School District of Ferley.
Hunt-Reid – That work done by Fred Cooper on the road allowance between sections 22 and 23 in Tp. 29, Rge. 19 be inspected and measured and paid for by Ward I as soon as the ward has money to its credit.
Hechter-Yakavanka – That the Reeve and Councillors Hunt and Reid be delegates to the Union of Manitoba Municipalities Convention to be held at Stonewall and that they be allowed $20, for expenses.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. McAulay be appointed to take the positions on the different committee left vacant by the resignation of Mr. Bickle.
Hechter-McAulay – That the declarations of the Reeve $12.00. Coun. Hunt 24.40 and Coun. Reid 26.20 for letting and inspecting work he paid.
A by-law establishing the School District of Don in Tp. 30, Rge. 17 was passed, also a by-law amending the license by-law by putting a license fee of $1.00 per head on all horses brought into the municipality for sale.
Hechter-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert Wedding

Mr. Kenneth McLean, of the town of Ethelbert, was on Oct. 27th, united in the bonds of matrimony with Miss E. Wray, who was head nurse at the Ethelbert Mission Hospital. The ceremony was performed at the home of her parents in Toronto where the young couple were the recipients of many valuable presents. After the marriage they went on a tour through the States visiting friends in Chicago and stopping at other important points. On returning to Ethelbert they were met by their many friends and in spite of their endeavours to evade the crowd, they came in contact with the usual shower of rice. They were afterwards escorted to the Mission house for tea. On Tuesday following a large reception was given the bride and groom at the town hall, where they were presented with a beautiful writing desk and bookcase combined; also a jardiniere stand. Beside this they were presented with other costly presents. The bride and groom both responded to the address and presentation in a very touching manner. After a well rendered programme, which was heartily enjoyed by all, the guest partook of refreshments provided by the ladies.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert

All here were glad to know old Jack Oshoost received his deserts in the court at Dauphin on Tuesday. It was a cowardly set to throw a bottle, which might have killed Finegold.
Wood is coming in only in small quantities so far.
Considerable quantities of wheat have been marked at this point this fall.
The new Presbyterian hospital is nearly completed. Mr. Josh Law, of Dauphin, is doing the painting.
Mr. Ben Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday to give evidence at the Finegold-Oshoost trial.
Mr. W.H. White is ??? ??? the year. [1 line missing] a term.

1915 Dec 2 – Fork River

Mr. Sam Reid is a visitor to Winnipeg for the week on business.
Mr. Cameron left for his home at Neepawa after having spent a week with friends at the point.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Hyde, of California, left for Carnduff, Sask., having spent two weeks with Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Mr. Hyde thinks this part of the country is all right, and he is sure right in his judgment.
Mr. Fred Cooper took a few days’ vacation at Dauphin last week.
Misses Bessie and Pearl Wilson paid Winnipegosis a short visit between trains.
“Main” street is quite lively with teams coming in with wheat to the elevator from all parts of the district, some coming 30 miles out. It gives us a glimpse of what the thriving village of Fork River will be when the district settled up and all the land [1 line missing] several elevators as well as many more business places. We have the land from which prosperous homes can be established once the right kind of men are in our midst.
Mr. Glandfield, lay reader, is paying Sifton a visit on his velocipede. Don’t you know it’s good healthy weather for wheeling.
The thresherman’s ball on Friday night was quite a success. Team loads from all parts came and a very pleasant night was spent.
A large number of the boys are busy cleaning their rifles and grinding up their butcher knives to do execution to the big game when the season opens.
Mr. Peach, of Swan River, school inspector, is visiting the several schools in this district this week.
We are sure in the banana belt when peaches are out on the street not frozen this time of year.

1915 Dec 2 – Winnipegosis

The Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in town for a few days last week.
The Cosmopolitan Club held a whist drive before their weekly dance last Friday evening.
Fish are coming in new and the town is livening up.
F. Hechter left for Waterhen Saturday.
Don’t forget the skating carnival on the rink on Monday next.
The rink opened for the season on Monday last and there was a good attendance.
Mr. Jas. McInnes and party left for a hunting trip Saturday.
G.L. Irwin, of Dauphin, is spending a few days hunting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 26 – 1914

1914 Nov 26 – Ethelbert Children Do Well

To the Editor of the Herald:
Please allow me some room in your paper to state how well the boys and girls in my room have done towards helping to relieve the suffering of the Belgium children. A little over a week ago I mentioned the subject to them and they immediately decided to try and do something. The result is that they have collected in the neighbourhood of $25. This, I think, is a credit to them and I am writing this to show how the boys and girls are willing to help if they are given the chance and how they will make good.
W.H. WHITE.
Principal Ethelbert School.

1914 Nov 26 – Soldiers Return Thanks

To the Editor of the Herald:
Sir – On behalf of the boys allow me, through the medium of your paper to thank all those very kind townspeople who have in such substantial and many ways subscribed to their welfare.
During the time of our enforced visit to Berlin or Constantinople we hope the town will prosper and so afford us some chance of again taking up a more peaceable occupation on our return.
Orders will be taken for scalps and other trophies.
ARTHUR C. GOODALL.
Reg. Serg. Maj., 32nd M.H.

1914 Nov 26 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Oct. 29th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Good Roads Association, the health officer, G.A. Warringon, C.E., the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and St. Joseph’s Orphanage.
Hechter-Lacey – That the clerk write Mr. McGilvray and ask him to come to this municipality and lecture on the Good Roads Act.
Lacey-Hunt – That in all cases where a contractor calls for inspection of work that is found incomplete, according to the terms of the contract, the contractor shall be charged with the cost of the inspection fees and mileage.
Lacy-Richardson – That the health officer’s livery account in connection with the diphtheria cases be certified to by Dr. Medd and paid, the said expense to be charged in the tax accounts of the parties involved.
Hechter-Lacey – That each councillor be authorized to collect voluntary subscriptions for the patriotic fund. All money so collected to be sent in to the treasurer of the municipality.
Toye-Bickle – That the clerk be instructed to credit Ward 1 with 23 pieces of tamarac pilling and charge the same to the public works account, the piles having been expended n the Bailey Bridge.
Hunt-Richardson – That all road commissioners’ certificates issued after this date be payable only to the parties to whom they are issued.
Lacey-Richardson – That any representatives of the council attending the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities be allowed $15.00 for expenses.
Bickle-Toye – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter be representatives to the Convention.
Hunt-Richardson – That Coun. Lacey take the place of J.D. Robertson, resigned, on the public works committee.
Lacey-Richardson – That the council suggest to the Minister of Public Works that in future all grants to the municipality be paid through the office of the municipality and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to our member, Mr. Hughes.
Toye-Lacey – That the clerk write the Minister of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to inspect the bridges recently completed over German Creek.
Hunt-Hechter – That the municipal collectors be bonded to the extent of $500 each.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hechter-Richardson – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work, T. Toye $25.30, C.H. Bickle $39.10 and A. Hunt $28.70, be passed.
Toye-Lacey – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Nov 26 – Fork River

Reeve W. King and D.F. Wilson are attending the convention of the Union Municipalities at St. Boniface this week. Coun. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, is also attending the convention.
The company’s auditor, assisted by Messrs. John Sieffert and Jas. Campbell, is taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co. store here this week.
A pie social was held at the home of Mrs. W. King for the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on the 18th inst. All report a pleasant time and the disposal of much pie.
Mr. Thomas, our grain buyer, is kept busy pretty much all the time. The quantity of what being marketed here this season is surprising considering the adverse conditions prevailing during part of the year.
Wood has started to come in since the snow arrived. It is expected that there will be considerable quantities brought in for shipment here this winter.
All old acquaintances hereabouts learned with regret of the misfortune which befell Thos. Glendenning last week in the burning of his barn last week. He had doors, windows and other material with which to erect a new house stored in the buildings when the fire occurred and all was burned. He also had about $1500 worth of grain burned. No insurance was carried on the building or the contents. With the true spirit of the pioneer he is starting to rebuild.
Many have taken out big game hunting licences and it looks as if the fleet-footed deer will have a warm time this season.
There is some talk of a contest for the reeveship. It seems only fair that the present reeve should have another term.
Mrs. Wm. Williams has just undergone a serious operation in the Dauphin Hospital.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 12 – 1914

1914 Nov 12 – Men for Second Contingent

The following have successfully passed the preliminary medical examination here this week conducted by Dr. Bottomley. The men are now drilling at the barracks under Sergeant-Major. Goodall and Sergeant Highfield. There are 50 men wanted from district No. 10., which territory is almost all in the Dauphin district, for the Second Contingent.
A.G. Cockrill, Dauphin. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
T. Boakes, Swan River. (Thomas Boakes, 1892, 81084)
A. Kerr, Swan River.
F. Conley, Benito.
S.J. Ellis, Dauphin.
W.J. Falconer, Dauphin. (William John Falconer, 1894, 106218 SGT)
J.L. Younghusband, Dauphin.
J.W. Cleaver, Dauphin. (John Wesley Cleaver, 1890, 106138)
Andrew Andrew, Dauphin. (Andrew Andrew, 1883, 81019 CSM)
J.W. Meek, Dauphin. (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578 QMS)
Glen H. Pettis, Dauphin. (Glen Haslome Pettis, 1893, 81704 SGT)
H. Knight, Dauphin.
A. Richmond, Swan River.
W.H.G. Cattermole, Grandview. (William Harry Gage Cattermole, 1879, 81140)
H. Wade, Dauphin.
D. Leigh, Ashville. (Duncan Blake Leigh, 1893, 106356)
A. Towns, Grandview. (Alfred Towns, 1893, 81894 LCP)
Jas. Walkey, Dauphin.

1914 Nov 12 – Fork River

Mr. R.M. Bell has left for a short vacation to Brandon and Russell.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Alexandria, Ont., are visiting their daughter, Mrs. A. Snelgrove.
Mrs. Joe Hunter left for home at Severn Bridge, Ont., after spending a few weeks with her sons, Sam and Harry.
The school was closed on Wednesday. The kids enjoy a holiday in the middle of the week or at any other time.
Mr. T.B. Venables has left for a vacation trip to Boissevain. Major Humphries is in charge of the farm during his absence.
Mr. Sam Hunter has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mr. Sydney Howlet, of Million, paid his friends of this burgh a visit, while passing through from Winnipegosis.
The Orangemen’s patriotic ball on November the 5th was admitted by all to be the best event of the kind ever held in this little burgh. There were fifty couple present, Dauphin, Dublin Bay, Sifton and Winnipegosis represented. The music was furnished by the Russell family and several others. From the opening at nine o’clock with the grand march till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 4:30, everything moved along pleasantly and most enjoyably. The ladies furnished a good supper. Speeches and songs were given during that interval. The song, “It’s a Long, Long, Way to Tipperary” by the three Russell children was well received. Ice cream was served by the ladies of the Women’s Auxiliary and a nice sum realized for the fund. The Orangemen wish to thank the public for the assistance given towards making it a success.

1914 Nov 12 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Bradley is fast recovering from the effects of the burning she received on Hallowe’en night.
Mr. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Dr. Medd took Mrs. R.C. Birrell to Dauphin on Monday for treatment. Mrs. B. has been in unsatisfactory health for some time past.
Capt. Coffey arrived on Wednesday’s train.
We see that Charlie White has been appointed fishery overseer for the province. We hope that this does not mean that our old friend may have to pull up stakes and locate elsewhere.
What Winnipegosis would be without a curling club it is hard to say. It is truly our chief winter sport. A meeting was held recently to organize and the feeling prevails that the game will be as popular as ever this season. Dr. Medd is president and Fred McDonald secretary-treasurer. The curlers have taken over the rink from Mr. Whale, and will manage it themselves this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 31 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 31 – Hotel Sold

The Lake View hotel, owned by Frank Hechter, at Winnipegosis, has been sold to H.M. Hicks, of Winnipeg. The hew proprietor will take possession at once. Mr. Foster, the manager for Mr. Hechter, is leaving for other parts.

1912 Oct 31 – Hallowe’en Ball

What holds more charms and spells for the young than the Scotch superstitions and customs regarding Hallowe’en? Burns in his poem, “Hallowe’en” describes to us filly the traditions of his country. Those interesting customs are more or less exploded now, and Hallowe’en with its mystic rites is fast dying out. So it was with much curiosity and interest that those who love to trip the light fantastic looked forward to the Hallowe’en ball given by the G.I.A. to the B. of L.E. on Tuesday evening of this week. Nor were any of the seventy-five couples present disappointed. Unique decorations appropriate to the occasion were carried out, with pumpkins, black cats, bats and other Hallowe’en favours. A brilliant headlight on the stage with one of the pumpkin lanterns on top, and two on either side supplied the light for the popular twilight waltz. At the entrance of the hall the word welcome was formed with flag pennants. The black cats ands bats showed up effectively on the sidewalls. The call for supper came after the strains of the soft dreamy melody of the twilight waltz had died away. It was served in the fire hall and reflected much credit on the efforts of the ladies to provide an appetizing repast.
Mrs. J.W. Johnston was master of ceremonies, and acquitted himself as always, in a most creditable manner. The music, which was supplied by the McMurray Orchestra was all that could be desired. The selections for the extras provided by Mrs. W.H. Sutherland were much appreciated by all.
The committee in charge of the ball were as follows:
Management – Mesdames D.A. Roberge, A. Thomson, F.L. Ball, J. McKeever, Mrs. R.M. Smith.
Reception – Mesdames W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, F.L. Ball, A. Thomson.
Decorations – Mesdames J. McKeever, W.H. Sutherland, D.A. Roberge, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.
Floor – Brothers W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, A. Thomson, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.

1912 Oct 31 – Tag Day at Winnipegosis

A Tag Day was held at Winnipegosis and the Dauphin Hospital Ladies’ Aid is indebted to the ladies of that place for the proceeds amounting to fifteen dollars.

1912 Oct 31 – Fork River

Mrs. Isaac Armstrong has returned from visiting her daughter at Gilbert Plains.
Mrs. S. Bailey was a visitor to Dauphin on a land deal so we are informed.
Thomas Shannon returned from a short trip to friends at Canora.
Miss Peal Wilson left for Dauphin with her brother, Fleming Wilson.
Mrs. S. Reid and children returned from Rathwell after spending a week with her friends.
The ladies of the Leap Year committee have invited the gentlemen to a farewell ball in the Orange Hall on Friday night, November 1st. The ladies will supply refreshments, the boys are simply to look pleasant.
Mr. Swartwood, superintendent of the International Harvester Co., was taking stock at D. Kennedy this week.
The Northern Elevator Co. have about finished their up-to-date elevator at this point and it is quite an improvement to the looks of the town.
Mrs. B. Tate of Dauphin, visited Mr. and Mrs. Tom Bailey on the Mossey this week.
All Saints’ Church was very tastefully decorated for the Harvest Festival held on Sunday last. Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very appropriate sermon and a large congregation attended from Sifton, Mowat and the surrounding country.
Miss Gertrude Cooper is spending the week with her parents on the Fork River.

1912 Oct 31 – Sifton

Mr. Russell, principal of Wycliffe School, is building a house for himself. The present house in which he resided was bought by John Kennedy.
There’s a great dissatisfaction amongst the ratepayers of Sifton S.D. The taxes of said school are at the rate of 36 mills on the dollar and the trustees are expected to give an explanation why they have found it necessary to put the estimate so high. In comparison with the taxes of other school districts this is certainly a very high rate.
The Roman Catholic Polish Church has a new priest who is to take charge of said church. The present pastor, the Rev. Plocmski, is leaving the church.
The new Mercantile Co.”s store is expected to open its business in two weeks’ time.
Mr. Reid, section foreman, says that the road bed of the C.N.R. over his section was never in better condition.
Mr. Souborin, late Greek and Roman Catholic priest here but now of Montreal, is visiting with friends here.
An old country Greek Catholic priest is to be located at Ethelbert permanently. Last Sunday he was a visitor to Sifton.
Miss P. Malkowicz has been appointed principal of Sifton School by the school board for the next twelve months.
J. Holland, teacher of Mink River School has brought his wife from Rossburn. John has been batching it for nearly two months.

1918 Oct 31 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. Karl McFarlane, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. A. McQueen, Grandview, wounded. (Arthur McQueen, 1894, 2418348)
Pte. G.P. Norman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Gisli Peterson Norman, 1895, 294050)
Pte. Andrew Baldwin, Dauphin, wounded. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74183)
L. Corp. K.R. Young, Ochre River, missing. (???)
Pte. J.O. Plante, McCreary, wounded. (Joseph Ovide, Plante, 1897, 2381123)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 28 – 1915

1915 Oct 28 – Almost Fatal Shot

Peter Nykolak, a young Ruthenian living at Sifton, had a love affair which he took to heart very much. The young lady of his affections proved fickle and Peter sought consolation by the suicide route on Saturday morning last. He used a large revolver in trying to commit the act, the bullet entering the lower part of his chin and came out near the bridge of his nose. The blood flowed freely from the wound and it looked for a time like the final act in Peter’s career. When Dr. Harrington arrived he found the wound a dangerous one, but not necessarily fatal.
The injured man was brought to the hospital here and is now on a fair way towards recover.

1915 Oct 28 – Fined at Winnipegosis

The Winnipegosis Fox Ranch Co., was fined $35 and costs on Tuesday by Mr. P.M. Whale. The company was charged with buying moose meat for their foxes on the ranch.
Sam Sanderson, a halfbreed was fined $10.00 for selling moose meat. He was also found guilty of having moose meat in his possession. For this charge he was left off on suspended sentence. Game guardian Joyce prosecuted.

1915 Oct 28 – Recruiting to Start at Once

Dauphin has been created by the Militia Dept. headquarters for a detachment area and provincial battalion. Recruiting will start at once with Major Walker as recruiting officer.

1915 Oct 28 – Fork River

Mrs. William Allan, of Grandview, is visiting at her daughter’s, Mrs. T. Dewsberry.
Section Foreman Dewberry has quite a broad smile these days. It’s all owing to the “wee new section foreman.” Nurse Tilt says he’s a bouncer.
Mr. Beatty, traveller for the Mooney Confectionery Co., of Winnipeg, was busy here on Monday taking orders.
The err has commenced in earnest that no more are to be had for grain. The stook threshing is finished and the stacks are fast disappearing. The yield is fair, but prices are low and the grade is poor owning to early frost.
Nat Little is fitting around in his auto. It is running all the better for having a prolonged rest.
Mr. Rowe, of Arden, is busy here buying up a shipment of cattle for his farm.
We had our first fall of snow on Monday, the 25th, which is a gentle reminder to prepare for winter.
Felix Marantz, merchant of Sifton, arrived here this week in his auto and spent a short time with Mr. Shuchett on business.
Mr. and Mrs. Sid Gower arrived home from their honeymoon on Saturday, which was spent at Dauphin. We whish them long life and happiness.
Mr. Woods, post office inspector of Winnipeg, spent sometime here last week going into post office affairs. He found everything O.K.
Mr. Frank Hechter, councilor for ward 4, was a visitor here on business last week. Frank generally wears a smile; he finds it costs no more than a grouch.
Private Alex. Reader, of the 45th battalion, was here renewing acquaintances last week. He has returned to Sewell.
Jack Chipley and family are off on a visit to friends at Metton for a week.

1915 Oct 28 – Sifton

Presentation to Mr. Wm. Walters on his departure from Sifton to join “The Colours,” Oct. 19th, 1915, Canadian Expeditionary Force – Allies vs. Germany, etc.
Mr. Walters – On behalf of a few friends of Sifton, Dublin Bay and the district you have served so faithfully in the past, we have the pleasure in presenting you with this wrist watch as a little token of our esteem and regard for your good fellowship, ready courtesy and obliging manner. We trust, as its hands mark the fleeing hours, the time will bring yourself nearer to a safe and happy return to take up your duties once amongst us.
The boy scouts presented themselves at the early morning train as a guard of honour to wave their last farewell to Mr. Walters, who cordially shook hands with each scout, hoping he would soon come back to them again.
A large number of the friends of Mr. Walters met for a farewell supper at Mr. Ashmore’s to make him a presentation address. Thirty-two sat down to supper and the evening was spent in a convivial manner, whiling away the house with laughter and song to the strains of music some of the best local talent being present.
Football – The Boy Scouts played their return match on Father Sabourin’s grounds with the boys of his school. The whole of he Wycliffe School children were present to see the match. There were also many other spectators who vociferously harangued the scouts. Although the Catholic School team was much heavier than the Scouts, their grounds very cramped, and a high wind blowing, the game resulted in a draw. It was a tough game and the Catholic boys pressed hard for a score towards the finish, but the gallant little fellows responded to the rush and held their own with courage and determination seldom found in boys of tender years.
Trafalgar Day – The Sifton scouts were very busy on Trafalgar Day, responding to the British Appeal through H.R.H., the Duke of Connaught, chief scout of Canada, in collecting for the Red Cross Fund. By their untiring efforts it is expected to forward over $50 from Sifton and district. The scouts would be glad to take this opportunity of thanking most cordially their many patrons for their kindness to them; also Mr. Paul Wood, who lent his team to take the troop out east.
The provincial assistant and organizer, Mr. A.T. Macintosh, will visit the Sifton scouts this week.
Miss Reid and Mrs. (Rev.) Scott, [1 line missing] Presbyterian Mission House here, paid a visit to ??? ??? ??? on the labours to renew acquaintances with their old pupils. They were pleased to visit the Wycliffe Schools, where they were shown round and entertained by pleasing songs from the school children.

1915 Oct 28 – Winnipegosis

The grand masquerade ball in the Rex Hall last Friday was a roaring success, and the costumes were a credit to our northern town. The hall was filled to its utmost capacity and the proceeds, after paying all expenses, amounted to $17.25, which includes a donation of $3.00 from Mr. Sid. Coffey, and goes to the Patriotic Fund. Much credit is due the management for the arrangement, and for such a happy evening. The prize winners were: lady’s best representative costume, 1st., “Britannia,” Miss McMartin; gentlemen’s best representative costume, 1st, “Cavalier,” J.P. Grenon; lady’s second prize, “French Doll,” Mrs. McInnes; gentlemen’s second prize, “Bullfighter,” Mr. Adams, Sifton; third prize, “Turk,” W. Morton; gentlemen’s first prize, comic, “Uncle Sam,” D. Kennedy; lady’s first prize, comic, “Folly,” Miss Bertha Magnasson; gentlemen’s second prize, comic, “Clown,” Harry Grenon; lady’s second prize, comic, “Coaster woman,” Miss C. Bradley. The judges were Miss E. MacArthur, Mrs. Dennett and Dr. Medd, and much praise is due these ladies and the doctor for the able manner in which the judging was done. Miss MacArthur presented the prizes.
W. Morton left on Monday’s train for a two weeks’ vacation to Winnipeg and eastern points.
Mr. F. Partridge is in charge of the station during Mr. Morton’s absence.
Mr. Joyce, game guardian, is again with us on business.
Fred Clarke, the fur traveller, is spending a few days in town and we are always glad to see his merry smile.
D.G. Macaulay left on Monday for Chicago and eastern cities on business.
Mr. Andrews and friends left on Sunday [1 line missing].
We understand quite a few more recruits have enlisted from here and will be leaving us on Wednesday. This town has done well for he size of it. We are proud of our boys.
Mrs. Burrell (grandma) left us on Monday for her old home in Collingwood, Ont., for an extended visit and she will be greatly missed by us all. Mrs. Comf. Burrell accompanied her to Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 25 – 1917

1917 Oct 25 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. Alfred Kelly, Dauphin, died. (Alfred Louis Kelly, 1881, 461093)
Pte. S.A. Keays, Dauphin, wounded. (Samuel Alfred Keays, 1893, 255859)
Pte. V. Rogers, of Ochre River, wounded. (John Vercor-Rogers, 1885, 216982)

1917 Oct 25 – Awarded Military Medals

The following Dauphin boys have been awarded military medals since the commencement of the war:
Flight Lieut. W.G. Barker. (William George Barker, 1894, 106074)
Gunner. Stewart Widmeyer. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Batchelor. (???)
Pte. Wm. McLean. (???)
Pte. Percy Lowes. (???)

1917 Oct 25 – Fork River

Fred Cooper arrived home from Dauphin in his new car the other day. Fred, looks imposing sitting at the wheel.
Mr. Timewell has returned from a trip south.
His Grace Archbishop Matheson paid Fork River a visit on Saturday last and held confirmation service.
The snowstorm of Saturday night found considerable grain out in the stook and some potatoes and roots in the ground.
There are three grain buyers on the market new exclusive of the elevator. This should prove satisfactory to all.
Carloads of fat stock are going out on every train. It seems a pity to see so many young heifers being sent out for beef.
The children’s Sunday school service was postponed from Oct. 21 till Oct. 28.
Cohen’s “cordial” is a thing of the past. As Bill Walmsley says “No use trying to establish an industry in this northern end of his country.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 24 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 24 – Typhoid Fever Outbreak

Typhoid fever has broken out among the school children at Winnipegosis and the school has been closed.

1912 Oct 24 – Fork River

J.H. Martinson, of Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, real estate agent, was here on business last week.
Alex. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, was a visitor to Dauphin on business a few days ago.
Mr. Sturdy, who has been all summer at the A.T. Co. store at Winnipegosis, is assisting Mr. Kennedy in the store here now.
Samuel Reid, returned home after a week’s holiday with friends at Brandon.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family spent a few days in Dauphin lately with friends.
J. Parker, of the Stark farm, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Captain Russell, of Sifton, was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s lately.
Miss Comber returned home after spending the summer at Selkirk.
Mr. Silverwood, of Dauphin, was in town for a short stay the guest of Wm. Williams, lumber merchant.
George Sumpton, of Dauphin, is here for a short stay with Mr. Snelgrove.
The railway traffic is getting so heavy on this line that it takes two locomotives to handle a train, especially when they take the side track for it.
The Press of October 17th refers to Macdonald election as a “Howling Farce” and has not got sand enough to print the exact majority.
F. Champion, of Cleveland, England, was here a few days ago in connection with a business transactions.
Harvest festival service at All Saints’ will be held in the church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 27th.

1918 Oct 24 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Lloyd Winters, Ashville, killed in action. (Lloyd Levi Winters, 1896, 2129348)
Lieut. Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, killed. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Arthur Day, Dauphin, gassed and wounded. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
Pte. J.W. Lane, Dauphin, wounded. (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
Pte. Go.F. King, Dauphin, wounded. (George Francis King, 1891, 151775)
Pte. W.K. Goodman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Wilbert Karl Goodman, 1894, 294203)
Pte. W.J. Bothwell, Makinak, wounded. (Wilfred James Bothwell, 1899, 2184456)
Pte. L. Ward, Grandview, wounded. (Lewis Ward, 1896, 2129152)
Pte. J. Lahaie, Makinak, wounded. (Joseph Lahaie, 1889, 291727)
Lance Corp. D. Stewart, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. E.L. Abrey, Dauphin, wounded. (Ernest Lincoln Abrey, 1889, 865837)
Pte. C.A. Blackmon, Ochre River, wounded. (Charles Alexander Blackmon, 1897, 1001157)

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair was held on Oct. 10th. The weather was perfect but this militated against the attendance for threshing was going on. The attendance of children was good, still some of the schools were very poorly represented owing to the rush of work on the farms. The lack of teachers for some of the schools and the many changes in teachers in others, was a serious handicap to the welfare of the club during the past years.
Lawrence Rowe won the Bank of Commerce prize for the vest pair of pigs at either the Fork River or Winnipegosis fairs, with a very creditable pair of Yorkshires.
It is to be hoped that the club will receive greeter interest from the parents in the coming year and so encourage the children in this work.

PRIZE LIST.
The following is a list of prize winners at the fair:
Grain growing:
Wheat sheaf – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Wheat, 20 lbs – Fred Jager 1st, Peter Zaplitney 2nd.
Rye sheaf – Albert Janowski 1st.

Stock, Calves:
Dairy – Donald McEachern 1st, Arthur Jamieson 2nd, Dave Nowosad 3rd.

Calves:
Beef – Bob Williams 1st, Kate Williams 2nd, Steve Beyko 3rd, Bill Williams 4th.

Pigs:
Pair – Lawrie Rowe 1st, Alice Nowosad 2nd.

Poultry:
Pen of Barred Rocks (3) – Kate Williams 1st, Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Pen Buff Orpingtons – Dave Nowosad 1st, Stanley Lundy 2nd.
Pen White Leghorns – Stanley Benner.
Pen Black Minorcas – Mike Borowski 1st, Bob Williams 2nd.
Pen Brown Leghorns – Bill Williams 1st.
Pen White Rocks – Arthur Jamieson 1st.

Gardening: Half bushel potatoes – Rosie Sowenski 1st, Alex. Zaplitney 2nd, Nicola Poctylo 3rd, Annie Sowinski 4th.
Six carrots – Charlie Jager 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Lawrie Rowe 3rd.
Six turnips – Lawrie Rowe 2nd.
Six beets – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Two cabbages – Annie Beyko 1st, Mike Borowski 2nd, Charlie Jager 3rd.
Pumpkins – Nellie Kolokicvk 1st.
Onions – Alice Nowosad 1st, Charlie Jager 2nd.

Cooker:
Loaf of bread – Viola Rower 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Buns – Viola Rowe 1st.

Sewing – Viola Rowe 1st, Annie Beyko 2nd.
Patching – Viola Rowe 1st, Emily Strasdin 2nd.
Fancy work – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Canning – Viola Rowe 2nd.
Longest ??? thistle root – Peter Zaplitney 1st, Fred Jager 2nd.
Woodwork – Bob Williams 1st, Dave Nowosad 2nd, Belle Williams 3rd.
Ducks – Sophie Beyko 1st.
Butter – Rosie Sowskine 1st, Mary Mieke 2nd.
Knitting – Emily Strasdin 1st.
Scribblers – Yumtaska 1st, Annie Chornoboy 2nd, Nellie Karwstski 3rd.

Writing:
Grade I – Horace Thompson 1st, Clara Dewberry 2nd.
Grade II – Ivor Humphreys 1st, Alley Dewberry 2nd.
Grade III – Bernard Hunt 1st, Lulu Thompson 2nd, Golkie Schuchett 3rd.
Map of Manitoba – Dave Nowosad 1st, Viola Rowe 2nd, Arthur Jamieson 3rd.

Handwork:
Grade I – Mossey School.
Grade II – Mossey School.
Nature Book – Beatrice Rowe 1st.
Collection of butterflies – Irene Bailey 1st.

1918 Oct 24 – Winnipegosis Boys’ and Girls’ Fair

The Boys’ and Girls’ Cub Fair was held at Winnipegosis on Friday, Oct. 11th. This was the fist event of the kind ever held in this locality and thanks to the efforts of the public school teachers, was a decided success. Keen interest was displayed by the residents of South Bay, and a large number were on hand to view the fair.
The judges were Miss Speechley and Mr. Murray, of the Extension Department of the M.A.C.
The sewing exhibit, largely due to the efforts of Miss M. McMartin, was a credit to Winnipegosis schools. The chickens were good, as were also the display of vegetables. With a greater interest taken by the surrounding schools we hope to double or treble our entries another year.
The secretary and organizer was Mr. H.L. Williams, public school principal.

PRIZE LIST.
Class I: Pair of pigs – Harry Whale 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Single pig – Wallie Pouliet 1st, Evelyn Groff 2nd, Harry Whale 3rd, Gordon Rognvaldson 4th.
Class II, Chicken Raising: Pen of 3 Barred Rocks – Walter Keen, South Bay, 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd, Wilfred Moyer, South Bay, 3rd, Ignace Bobinsky, South Bay, 4th, Mike Samimski, South Bay, 5th, Anthony Bobinsky, South Bay, 6th.
Pen of 3, any other breed – Daisy Walmsley 1st, Cecil Paddock 2nd.
Class III, Gardening: One dozen potatoes – Beverly Schaldemose 1st, Elizabeth Moyer, South Bay, 2nd, Ruth Groff 3rd, Evelyn Groff 4th, Mike Verchaski 5th, Gladys Cartwright 6th.
Dozen large onions or 3 large turnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, Elizabeth Moyer 4th.
Dozen parsnips – Lois Whale 1st, Wilfred Moyer 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd.
Dozen carrots or beets – Mary Marchenski 1st, Mike Samimski 2nd, Albert Moyer 3rd, John Moodry 4th, Elizabeth Moyer 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Class IV, Cooking: Two loaves of bread – Lottie Moore 1st, Attie Hechter 2nd.
Dozen oatmeal cookies – Margaret McAuley 1st, Lottie Moore 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd, Alice Hechter 4th.
Dozen cornmeal muffins – Ruth Groff 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Lottie Moore 3rd.
Class V, Sewing: Work bag – Mary Magnuson 1st, Ester Hechter 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd.
Knitted article – Cecil Paddock 1st, Mary Marchinski 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Evolda Whale 4th.
Sewing apron – Mary Magnuson 1st, Verna Denby 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Esther Hechter 4th, Evolda Whale 5th, Charlotte Adam 6th.
Red Cross Collection – Evolda Whale 1st, Mary Magnuson 2nd, Amelia Adam 3rd, Charlotte Adam 4th, Addie Ketcheson 5th.
Night gown or tea apron – Charlotte Adam 1st, Addie Ketcheson 2nd, Edith Hubble 3rd, Amelia Adam 4th.
Table runner – Helen Macaulay 1st, Lenore Denby 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Dust cap and work apron – Lenore Denby 1st, Tina Marchenski 2nd, Mabel Rognvaldson 3rd.
Piece of crochet work – Attie Hechter 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Lenore Sehaldemose 4th, Mary Marchenski 5th, Lois Whale 6th.
Two Red Cross articles – Lenore Sehaldemose 1st, Mabel Rognvaldson 2nd, Tina Marchenski 3rd, Ruth Groff 4th.
Middy suit – Lottie Moore 1st, Lenore Sehaldemose 2nd.
Class VII, Weed Contest: Collection of seeds of 10 noxious weeds – Ignace Bobinsky 1st, Mary Fleming 2nd, Ella Martin 3rd, Arthur McLellan 4th.
Class VIII, Woodwork Contest – Stanley Miket 1st, John Wallace 2nd, Nieh Rudiak 3rd, Alec. Ogryzlo 4th.

1918 Oct 24 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the week-end with his parents.
There was a very good turnout to the Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Mr. Fred Tilt is building a house next to the Orange Hall. He has retired from farming and will reside in town.
Dunc Kennedy and party from Ochre River passed through the town on Sunday on their way to Winnipegosis.
Pte. Venables, who has just returned from overseas, is visiting his brother, T.B. Venables.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ Church and the attendance was good. It is hopeful sign when interest is taken in our young people.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 21 – 1915

1915 Oct 21 – Leveson-Gower – Lacey

A quiet home wedding took place at Oak Brae (Fork River) on Wednesday, the 20th inst., when Mr. Sidney Leveson-Gower was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Hendy, daughter of Mr. F.B. Lacey. Rev. R.E. Spence, of Dauphin, performed the ceremony. The bridesmaid was Miss Harriest Lacey and the groomsman, Mr. Garnet E. Lacey, Miss Ada Steckley played the wedding march. The happy couple will spend the honeymoon at Dauphin with friends.

1915 Oct 21 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Phillips, traveller for a store from Winnipeg, spent a day here taking orders from the store. George is one of the old-timers.
Mr. Camur, of the Fork River Mercantile Co., left for Winnipeg with a carload of cattle. Another buyer left with a car of stock for the west.
Ben Warshosky has received another car of Western horse flesh.
Sergant Jack Angus spent the week-end with friends on his way from Winnipegosis to Sewell. The social evening in honour of the boys at Winnipegosis was a great success. We were glad to se the boys as they passed through on their return to Sewell Camp. The Fork Rive boys have returned to Sewell; yes, and what about their send off. Comment is unnecessary.
Mr. F.B. Lacey, reeve, was a Winnipegosis visitor lately.
The winter will soon be on us and the sidewalk on Main Street to the post office is not finished. It will be another case of mud and slush in the spring if something is not soon done. The only thing we are sure of in this municipality is our [1 line missing].
Judging from the weekly consignments of fruit arriving here lately the King’s fruit store seems to get rid of it in short order, which goes to show the service is appreciated by the public.
Harry Grenon, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days here at the elevator looking after the A.T. Company’s interest.
Sid Gower is spending a few days with Mr. Lacey on the Mossey River.
Threshing is going ahead with all speed. The returns are reported large.

1915 Oct 21 – Winnipegosis

Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Ena Fredickson returned on Monday from a week’s visit to friends in Winnipeg.
Miss Sarah Stevenson, of Red Deer point, is spending a few days in town.
Sergeant Angus and Privates Jim Taylor and Charley Bickle spent a few days with friends on leave of absence.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy was well attended and the proceeds amounted to $10.50.
The council met as a Court of Revision in the Council Chambers on Thursday, the 14th inst., and all protests were dealt with in due order.
There are quite a number of vacant houses in town now as most of the fishermen have gone up the like for the winter fishing.
Geo. Bulter, of Waterhen, spent Saturday in town.
Geo. Adams and Mr. Loire were business visitors in town for the week-end.
The good Samaritan, Thos. Toye, not only keeps our lighthouse shedding their welcome rays but is also a friend in need to animals in difficulty on the prairie. He lifted an old white horse who was down and out on Sunday and sure saved it from slow starvation. The Sunday before he received a party of young people whose boat drifted and grounded close to the lighthouse.
Jas. McInnes returned Sunday from a trip up the lake.
Dr. Medd returned Monday from a trip to Shoal River.
The young ladies of the town are busy these days making toffee for the soldier boys who left here and joined the 79th.
Mr. Peach, inspector of schools, arrived in town on Monday for a few days.
Thomas Ramsay, of Sifton, spent Monday in town and reports things very quiet in the southern town.
D.G. McCaulay shipped a car of cattle to Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Eddie Chermok’s new store is quickly nearing completion and will be ready for the stock in a few days.
Provincial Constable Wait, of Dauphin, was in town for a few days on business.
There was a potato grown on the lake shore at Red Deer point which measured 12 inches long and 3 inches in circumference. This is the country to prow potatoes.
Harry Grenon has been at Fork River the past few days weighing in the grain off the Company farms.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd October, or you will miss the time of your life. Tickets on sale at D. Kennedy’s or at C. Burrell’s barber shop.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 19 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 19 – Fork River

Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on Sunday. The church was tastefully decorated with flowers, grain and vegetables. The ladies and officers are to be congratulated on the fine display. The service was conducted by Mr. Littler, B.A.; Miss Nixon, organist. A large congregation took part in thanking the giver of all good things for a bountiful harvest.
Mr. Littler is leaving the mission to attend St. Johns College at Winnipeg. Mr. Harding of Algoma, will carry on the work in this mission this winter.
Our bonanza farmer, T.N. Briggs, is smiling. Wheat 37 1/2 bushels to the acre.
The C.N.R. should have an extra bonus for the grandly they handle our mail and express lately. It comes in an old box car with about two inches of coal dust all over the floor. Fancy mail bags and grapes with a nice coating of coal dust and baggage and express with syrup and dust. They might clean out the car but any old thing goes on this line.
John Newsdale is visiting his parents after spending the summer teaching in Saskatchewan.
Wm. Coultas’ team took a notion to run away the other day. The sudden stoppage in the river caused him to take a few graceful revolutions through the air. He received a good shaking up, however he is doing nicely.
Threshing is the order of the day this fine weather. There are four outfits working within two miles of town. The yield is very good.

1916 Oct 19 – Dauphin’s Population 3200

The recent census shows the population of the own to be 3200. Naturally this comes as a great disappointment. The falling off, however, can be to a large extent accounted for in the fact that over 1000 young men have been recruited from the town. The normal population must be close to the 4000 mark.

1916 Oct 19 – The Week’s Casualty List

Stuart Geekie, Winnipegosis, killed. (Stewart Geekie, 1893, 150410)
Wm. Patterson, Ochre River, killed. (???)
A. Stevenson, Minitonas, killed. (Albert Victor Stevenson, 1892, 425361)
Robin Cruise, Dauphin, killed. (Robert Wallace Cruise, 1899, 425650)
Jas. Brown, Dauphin, wounded. (James Evelyn Brown, 1896, 151554)
Pte. Younghusband, Dauphin, killed. (Francis Lloyd Younghusband, 1892, 81863)
Lance Corp. H.G. Alguire, wounded. (???)

1916 Oct 19 – Fork River

J. Schuchett and Mr. P. Zacks left for Winnipeg to arrange for taking over Mr. Zacks’ stock as he is leaving here. Zack brothers are taking three cars of potatoes to Winnipeg. They have purchased the spuds from the farmers here at 45 cents a bushel. The snow storm of Tuesday has delayed the thrashing for a few days. Farmers are busy loading grain from the platform and getting satisfactory results from their shipments. Wheat prices keep advancing. Truly the farmer is king this year.

1916 Oct 19 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J. Mossington and children have returned home from a long visit to friends in Toronto.
The tug “Isabelle” left on Sunday morning towing a barge load of supplies and W.B. Sifton’s log camp outfit. W. Johnston was also a passenger with his fishing outfit, and L. Schaldemose took his family up for the winter.
The “Manitou” returned Monday. She has one more trip to make before the close of navigation.
Mr. Wm. Sifton, of Minitonas, is visiting his daughter Mrs. A.S. Walker.
Last week some fines were imposed on account of liquor. Geo. Bickle, who is not a householder, was found guilty, and Ed. Chermok, a general merchant here, was fined for having liquor in his store. The authorities are on the watch for others who are suspected.
The Red Cross Society had a very successful meeting at Victoria Hall last Wednesday [1 line missing] the entertainment will be given by Mrs. Paddock and Mrs. White.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 17 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 17 – Committed for Trial

One night last week several windows were broken in the store of Katz & Brackman at Ethelbert. I.J. Katz, who happened to be in town, swore that he saw Peter Pundy and another party that he could not recognize in the dark, break the windows with an axe. Pundy was brought before Magistrate Skaife, on the charge, and after two nights were consumed in hearing and evidence, was committed for trial. F.E. Simpson appeared for the prosecution and J.L. Bowman for the defence.

1912 Oct 17 – Ethelbert

A preliminary hearing was held before Police Magistrate R. Skaife on the evenings of the tenth and eleventh of Oct. An information, charging Peter Pundy, was laid by H. Brachman of the firm of Katz & Brachman, with breaking four panes of glass and other damages, amounting to over $20, during the night of Oct. 10th, to their store on Main Street. Considerable interest was manifested by the Ruthenian population, the court being crowded each night until midnight and feeling ran high. Mr. Simpson, of Dauphin, put the case for prosecution, and Mr. Bowman for the defence. After a prolonged and careful hearing, it was thought by the magistrate, the charge needed further investigation and Pundy was remanded for trial at Portage la Prairie. He was allowed at large, after entering into bail himself in $200, and two others for $150 each, for his appearance at Portage to stand his trial.
The Elevator is nearing completion and will need only a few more days to make it ready to receive the crop.
Norman Booth, the buyer for the Elevator Co., went west a few days ago, where he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Olive Ward, the daughter of Cross Ward, postmaster of Deepdale. Mr. Booth and his wife have returned to Ethelbert, where they will reside until the grain season is over. Cross Ward is an old resident of Ethelbert and our hearty congratulations are given to the newly wed couple, that they may live long, and prosper in their new undertaking.
Geo. Marantz has commenced business in John McLean’s store, and is doing his best to attract customers by a good display of new goods in his windows.
J. McLean expects to transfer the balance of his stock still unsold at an early date. He retains the grist mill which he hopes to run as usual this winter.
The ever present and crying need of the hour, is now, and ever will be, good roads to move the crops.
There are rumours that something will be done, in this direction, by the Council availing themselves of the government’s offer to pay two-thirds of the cost of constructing main roads through the district.

1912 Oct 17 – Fork River

J. McCaulay, Massey-Harris travelling agent, was here a few days on business with D. Kennedy.
Peter Ellis, after spending the week-end with his family, has returned to Kamsack.
Samuel Bailey took a trip to Dauphin on business last week.
Clem Kennis, who has been at Prince Albert for some months, returned home and states the harvest very late all over the West.
Robertson & Snelgrove are shipping their threshing outfit to Yorkton for the season and Pat Powers is going along. Nothing like lots of “Power.”
Miss L. Clark, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents.
Rev. H.H. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit lately to meet some persons from Meadow Portage on church business.
Mrs. G. Tilt, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the farm on the Mossey.
Miss Margaret and Gertrude Kennedy are visiting with Mrs. Chas. Wilkes of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Scelly was up last week from Dauphin visiting Mr. Clemons.
Mr. Glendenning is visiting his uncle, Thos. Glendenning, on the Mossey for a few days.
Next Sunday, Oct. 20th, special children’s service at the English church at 3 o’clock, and on Sunday, Oct. 27th, the annual harvest festival service will be held and a suitable sermon for the occasion will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. All are welcome to the services.
Rev. Sam. Cruch, late of Glenella and family, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Kennedy for a few days on their way to Tullesford, Sask.

1912 Oct 17 – Sifton

Church of England services are held regularly every fortnight at Sifton (Tuesday evening) and also at other times by arrangement.

1912 Oct 17 – Winnipegosis

Harvest festival service will be held at Winnipegosis school house at 7.30 on Oct. 20th. Collection will be made for the Home Mission Fund. The sermon will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase, minister in charge.
J.R. Parker, of the Standard Lumber Co., has gone to Winnipeg to endeavour to secure men for work in the woods.
Jos. Birrell took his child to the hospital at Dauphin on Monday.
Active preparations are being made for the winter’s fishing. The prospects for fishing are said to be exceptionally poor.
The cattle industry in these parts is proving most profitable. Several shipments were recently made to Dauphin. Campbell Benson was the purchaser.

1918 Oct 17 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. William Alfred Cleland, Dauphin, killed. (William Alfred Cleland, 1894, 865829)
Pte. Chas. Gray, Dauphin, killed. (???)
Pte. Francis Ingram Rogers, Asheville, wounded. (Francis Ingram Rogers, 1899, 1001239)
Pte. Harold Allan Dunlop, Dauphin, wounded. (Harold Allan Dunlop, 1897, 718788)
Pte. Campbell, Winnipegosis, wounded. (???)
Pte. Chris Benson, Dauphin, wounded. (Christian T Benson, 1887, 1000081)
Pte. Orval Wood Struthers, Dauphin, gunshot wound in right leg. (Orval Wood Struthers, 1895, 151250)
Pte. J.H. Paulson, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Johann Hannibal Paulson, 1891, 2504017)
Pte. W.S. Hamilton, Dauphin, gassed. (???)
Pte. George Edward Buchannon, Dauphin, wounded. (George Edward Buchannon, 1894, 1000633)
Pte. Ray Neely, Dauphin, wounded. (Ray Neely, 1897, 1000556)
Pte. William Meldrum, Dauphin, wounded. (William Meldrum, 1897, 1000280)
Pte. Harry Hamilton Olson, Dauphin. (???)
Pte. E.N. Humphries, Dauphin, wounded. (???)

1918 Oct 17 – Churches and Schools Closed

By order of the health officer of the town all churches, schools and public places of amusement have been closed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

1918 Oct 17 – The Man of the Hour
Gen. Spanish Flu.

1918 Oct 17 – TOWN OF DAUPHIN
SPANISH INFLUENZA
WARNING TO THE PUBLIC

This disease is very prevalent in some parts of the world today, and has reached our Town. It is therefore advisable that people generally should know something about it, its symptoms, and the measure and method of its communicability; and should be advised as to the general rules for its restraint and cure.
Spanish Influenza is generally believed to be a variety of the old type of Influenza with which we have been long familiar, with in addition possibly some increase of virulence, due to the conditions and places in which this present epidemic had its origin.
It is a “Germ” disease, and is conveyed from one suffering from it to others, by the secretions of the mouth, nose, throat and lungs. The use of towels or cups in common will readily spread it. Coughing, spitting or sneezing by anyone who has it, in the company of others, will readily spread it. Crowded and ill ventilated living rooms and sleeping places, as well as ill ventilated and insanitary places of work are conductive to its dissemination.
The following are the symptoms which generally accompany an attack:
Fever, headache, backache, inflamed throat, and often bleeding from the nose. In addition to these symptoms, in more severe cases a troublesome cough with a sense of constriction in the chest follows. From these develop the case of Broncho-Pneumonia which is the feature of the disease mainly responsible for deaths.
If cases should come to your neighbourhood, think first of Prevention. Don’t go to any house or place in which there may be persons with the above symptoms. Don’t let any person suffering from these symptoms come to your home or place of business. Don’t use common towels or drinking cups in any place. Keep away from people who have the disease, if you do you won’t get it. If on the other hand, you mingle with people who have it there is no known method of disinfection which would prevention your taking it. Therefore stay away and keep in he open air and sunlight as much as possible.
If you should be attacked by the disease, go to bed at once. Rest and Warmth are very important factors in its cure. Take warm drinks, live on fluids, and send for your Physician. Having done these things promptly, there is usually little danger. Not doing them, and taking chance, may turn a very mild illness into a very serious and sometimes a fatal one.
Attendants on all cases should wear gauze masks.

E. BOTTOMLEY,
Health Officer, Town of Dauphin.

1918 Oct 17 – Fork River

Mr. Hanson, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a few days in town lately.
Leo Beck has purchased the threshing outfit of Charles Bugg and is making the straw fly.
There are now five outfits threshing within a radius of three miles so good progress is being made with the work.
Potatoes, yes sir. From a pound of Victory seed 50 lbs. were produced. When I comes to grain or vegetables Fork River district stands at the top.
Mrs. Moxam, from Winnipeg, is visiting at the home of Mr. Sam Reid.
So far the Spanish Flue has laid its hand lightly on us. However, we must not be behind the times or out of fashion, so that anyone from now on who gets a cold will claim to have had an encounter with His Nibbs King Flu. But, say, if we could only resort to the remedy of happy memory, hot toddy, wouldn’t the male portion of the population be suddenly afflicted.

1918 Oct 17 – Sifton

Sunday automobile travelling is just as prevalent as ever. The writer counted nine in town last Sunday. There are lots of places where yellow paint and rotten eggs could be used a plenty.
The foundations for the large Ruthenian hall has been laid and the material is on the ground.
It is about time the foreigners (and most of them are still foreigners and pride themselves on it) learned to take notice of our national statutory holidays. On Thanksgiving Day may loads of grain drove into market, the owners knowing nothing of the day, caring less, and most indignant at not being able to unload. But let an Anglo-Saxon try t hire one on a saint’s or holy day – nothing doing!
Philip Wood and Leslie Kennedy and Miss Lottie Isaacovitch and enjoying a short holiday here.
This district is not behind most of the districts in grain yields. Thirty bushels to the acre is quite common, and as high as 40 and even 50 bushels to the acre has been threshed.
W. Terin still delivers fresh fish to town, easing up the H.C.L.
An average of two car loads of live stock are shipped from here each week throughout the year, excepting possibly three months.
Several gas tractors have been sold at this point, with a promise of many more next season.
Our roads, and especially our culverts, are generally speaking, a disgrace. The wear and tear to rolling stock and automobiles, not to mention horse flesh, is beyond calculation. A culvert one foot or more above the grade was responsible for a small automobile wreck on Saturday in ward 6. The council will be asked to pay the damages.
Glorious Indian summer, with a forecast of winter within the next two months at least.