Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 19, 1920

Jail Sentences in Future

Jail sentences, with no option of a fine, will be imposed on all persons guilty of breach of the Manitoba Temperance Act in future, according to the amendment to the Act, which was brought before the legislature this week by the Hon. Thomas H. Johnson, Attorney-General.

Fork River

Mr. Maine is the new teacher at Fork River School and Miss U. Harlowe at Pine View. We’re forever changing teachers. “We’re forever changing teachers.”
Wm. King, Milton Cooper and H. Hunter attended the meeting of the Dauphin Country Orange lodge at Dauphin last week.
Fork River chicken fanciers were not represented at the recent poultry show at Dauphin. This is to be regretted as there are some good strains of stock in this district. Poultry raising should be developed to a much greater extent than it is.
Some of our farmers are drawing hay 25 miles. This illustrates the importance of conserving feed for the opening of spring work.
Wolves are fairly numerous this winter and some fine pelts are being brought to town. It pays to join in the fun of the chase when you can get $25 for a skin.
The debate on the night of the 11th inst., proved of more than ordinary interest. The topic was, “Resolved, That married life is preferable to single life.” The following championed the affirmative: Miss. E. Carlson, captain; L. Lacey, M. Shannon and Miss Carlson. Negative – Mr. C. Bailey, captain; Mrs. A.J. Little, F. Wilson, Jr., and Mrs. C. Bailey. The affirmative won. The critic was Mr. A. Hunt, and in his review he ably dealt with the arguments pro and con. The judges were Mrs. F. Cooper, Mr. Main and D.F. Wilson, Sr.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 5, 1920

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Feb. 2.
The political committee of the United Grain Growers met at Winnipegosis on Jan. 19th to transact business.
The G.G. held their annual meeting on Jan. 23rd, when officers for the present year were elected. There was a good turnout and prospects for the year look good. A committee of three was appointed to interview Mr. Bickle re threshing outfit. The next meeting will be held at Winnipegosis on Feb. 7th. This change has been made for the purpose of giving the members who reside at Winnipegosis a chance to attend the meetings. After the regular business was finished nominations were called for. The following were elected: President, Thos. Toye; vice, Duncan Crerar; sec.-treasurer, Frank Sharp. Directors – James Laidlaw, J. Haywood, A. Dumas, F. Girling, C. Bradley, G. Godkin. At this meeting the ladies’ section was well represented and refreshments were served.
By the way, what about the corduroy road leading to Bicton Heath school? There are fourteen children on the east side of the muskeg who will be compelled to go without any education another year if this work is not done immediately. It is high time that some of our worthy councillors should be getting busy?

Fork River

Miss McIntyre, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of Mr. Cooper.
E.V. Lockwood is spending the week in Dauphin.
The question is frequently asked, what has become of the Member for Gilbert Plains. The people here never see him.
Donnie McEachern is spending the week in Dauphin with his mother, who is in the hospital at Dauphin.
Feed is scarce and all available will be needed for the stock at home.
The mid-week meeting in All Saints’ Church, January 28th, was in charge of the school teachers. The program was commenced with a solo from Mrs. A.J. Little and a story by Miss G. Cooper. The Fork River School debate, “Resolved, that a horse is better than a cow,” in charge of the teacher, Miss Ian Briggs followed. The members of the affirmative side were David Nowasod, Percy and Mildred Carlson, and the negative side Ben Schuckett, Bob Williams and Betty Williamson. Judges, Mrs. Lockwood, Miss Cooper and Miss Hess. Critic Professor J. Williamson. Decision was given in favour of the affirmative side. The debate was a lively one and a credit for school boys and girls, and was greatly appreciated by the large audience present. The evening was brought to a close with a piano solo by Mrs. A.J. Little, reading by Miss Cooper and the singing of the National Anthem.
The Debating Society is preparing something lively for Wednesday, February 11th. W. King, chairman.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 22, 1920

Ethelbert

We have been asked to publish a copy of telegram sent to the Acting Prime Minister at Ottawa by the Ruthenians of this vicinity. It is herewith:
“Canadians of Ukrainian descent, in mass meeting assembled at Ethelbert, unanimously protest against the brutal invasion of Ukrainian East Galicia by imperialistic Poland, against the decision of Peace conference of July 11th, sanctioning the invasion, and against the decision of Supreme Council of November 20th awarding to Polish invaders a mandate over Ukrainian East Galicia for twenty five years. We appeal through the Canadian Government to the Government of Great Britain and other allied governments and people to right great wrong done to four million Ukrainians of East Galicia. We urge governments to have polish invading armies withdrawn from Ukrainian East Galicia to have that territory occupied by inter-allied armies, and to compel Poland to make reparation for destruction of Ukrainian villages and towns, and to indemnify families of civilians murdered by Polish soldiery or robbed by Polish officials. We appeal to governments to settle East Galician question in accordance with wish of people concerned. We request the Canadian Government to convey this our appeal to the government of Great Britain and to British plenipotentiaries at Paris.”
The above protest shows clearly where the root of wrong is and what the Ukrainians demand.

Fork River

The first annual Grain Growers’ Masquerade Ball, which took place Friday evening, the 16th of January, was a huge success and the big event of the New Year. The costumes were varied and created a pretty color scheme. There were six prizes awarded. Miss Gertrude Cooper as a Japanese lady, and Mr. D. Briggs, as a soldier, were awarded the prize for the best dancers. Mrs. Charles Bailey, representing a Gypsy fortune teller, was awarded first prize for best lady’s costume; Miss Viola Rowe, representing a country maid with her quaint hat, dress and crook was awarded second prize. Dr. A.J. Little, representing a colored dude was awarded first prize for best gentleman’s costume. Mr. Milton Cooper as Pierrot, was awarded second prize. The prize for best comic costume was awarded to Mr. Norman Shannon, who represented a tramp. The judges were Mrs. T.B. Venables, Mrs. A.J. Little and Mr. Williamson. After the judging and unmasking at midnight refreshments were served.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rawson are moving to Winnipegosis.
Fork River Literary and Debating Society met at the home of Mrs. A.J. Little, Saturday evening last to discuss the next debate, which will be held Wednesday evening, Feb. 4.
Fork River Women’s Institute met at Mrs. Tuck’s Saturday afternoon for the election of officers and to appoint directors for Agricultural Society. Mrs. A.J. Little was elected Secretary to succeed Mrs. Ina Briggs, Mrs. T.B. Venables and Mrs. McEachern were elected directors.
Mr. Fleming Wilson, Mr. T.B. Venables, Mr. Duncan Briggs, delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention held at Brandon, gave their reports on Tuesday evening’s meeting.

Winnipegois

The Tennis Club is arranging to hold a masquerade ball on Friday, Feb, 18th. A ball is always popular and a masquerade ball doubly so. This dance promises to be the event of the season.
The fish catch has been exceptionally good this winter. The December catch was the largest in the history of the late. Many of the fishermen will return from the north early next month.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 2, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Sept. 25th. Only a small turnout was registered, this without a doubt being due to the fact that the majority were busy threshing, still, all the same, there could and should have been more and the comrades are earnestly asked to remember the meeting on October 9th. A full attendance is desired and, in fact, must be had, and all are asked to make a special effort to attend. Matters of great importance to the association will be dealt with and it is the desire of the executive that a representative meeting give its ruling on these matters.
On the 14th inst. the second entertainment arranged by the Veterans will be placed on at the town hall, viz., The Victorian Serenaders. There will be a dance after the same as the previous show an the co operation of all to secure a good house is asked. Little need be said as to the merits of the company as same is well known to the majority, but it will fully maintain the reputation established by the Castle Squares and good value for money is assured.
We would draw the attention of the reader to the special appeal from the G.W.V.A. in this edition of the paper and ask that they give the proposition their support. This will be the first time that a general appeal has been made in this district by the returned men and we are confident that we shall not ask in vain, but that the public will respond in the same spirit as the men did in the past four years.
Comrades, keep the 9th October in your “bean” and attend the meeting that night.

Presented With Meerschaum Pipe

The employees of the town met at the hall on Wendesday afternoon and presented ex-Chief Bridle with an address and valuable meerschaum pipe. Mr. Bridle and family left on the early morning train for British Columbia.

Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork River did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Chraighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 25, 1919

Dauphin Industry Checked

(From The Winnipeg Free Press.)
Some districts are dogged by misfortune. Here we have a proposal in the House of Commons to abolish hanging just as Dauphin was coming to the fore as a good place to grow help.

Farms Sold for Big Prizes

Frick brothers, from Illinois, purchased the Hambleton and Puchalski farms this week. Both are half sections and close to town. The price paid for the former was $30,500 and the latter $35,000.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Sept. 23.
Duncan Crerar has returned home from Winnipeg after interviewing Hon. Dr. Thornton in regard to our school affair.
The Coffey and Grenon farm here was sold the other day to two American farmers for the sum of $7000.
Mrs. Sharp is leaving soon for England. Her absence will be regretted sincerely by her numerous friends.
The second lawsuit between Cooper and Russell will be heard before J.P. Tilt, of Fork River, on the 24th inst.
The Grain Growers’ of this district will hold a meeting at the house of Jas. Laidlaw on Friday, Oct. 2nd. Members are requested to be present.
Thos. Toye has purchased from Jas. Costello, of Alberta, the famous Clydesdale stallion “Gay Lad.”
Pte. John Heywad, of Virden, has taken up land in this district and has brought in his stock. He is busy securing a supply of hay for the winter.
Vacant land in this district is nearly all being taken up by returned soldiers.
Capt. Wm. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has gone to Brandon. He has been holding meetings here at different points.
The weather of the past week has been unfavorable for haying and harvesting operations.
The municipal grader working between Winnipegosis and Fork River does not seem to be making as good progress as we would like, but, before offering criticism, we will bide our time.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held in the Union church Friday evening, Sept. 10th. A goodly number of the members were present and the programme proved a very interesting one. Misses Ruth McCauley and Lottie Black gave a very pleasing duet. Miss Kathleen Dempsey delighted the audience with a recitation, Mrs. Houchin gave a splendid and well prepared paper on the subject, “Why Women Should be on the School Board.” Miss M. McMartin gave a talk, and illustrated the difficult subject, “Chilling of Childhood.” She explained in her usual intelligent manner what helps to make a beautiful life. Ten cent tea in aid of the library fund was served at the close by Misses Falconer and MacDougall, when the meeting closed with “God Save the King.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 31, 1919

Charged with Rape

Robt. Lambert, aged 17, of Minitonas, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on the 25th inst., charged with rape. The girl is 16 years of age. He was remanded for trial.

Notes of the Fair

It is now only a week until the Dauphin fair will be in full swing. A large number of entries have already been made in vegetable and other hall exhibits. The early harvest is not interfering to any great extent with the entries in other classes so much as was at one time feared. They are assured of some good entries in cattle and horses as entries have already been received from J.D. McGregor, Brandon; John Graham, Carberry; C. Moffatt and J.I. Turner, Carroll. J.C. Crowe, Gilbert Plains, and W.H. Devine are expected with exhibits of Pereherons.
The unfortunate accident to Lieut. Kerr’s aeroplane at Portage la Prairie will prevent his appearance, but Lieut. Casewell, of Brandon, will fly in his stead. The public are thus assured of a threat in aeronautice.
The 4rd Cameron Highlanders band, of Winnipeg, will be in attendance.
It is understood that Thursday and Friday afternoons will be declared civic holidays in town.
See the Farmerette girls. They are the latest sensation.
It is almost certain Col. Barker, V.C., will be among the visitors.
Cheap rates are offered on the railway. A fare and one-third for return tickets.
All the leading baseball teams of the district are entered in the tournament. $450 are offered in prizes.
The entries for the horses races are large, and the speeding contest will be the [missing] in Dauphin.
Lieut. Casewell and Lieut. Bennett will make flights in their airplane and do the latest stunts.
Prospects for the Poultry Department are very bright. Entries are coming in from many outside points.
All entries for the Poultry section, including eggs, must be in by Aug. 2nd, and other sections by Aug 5th.
Racing Program
Thursday, Aug. 7th
2.30 pace, 2.25 trot, purse $500
Half-mile running race, purse $200
Friday, Aug. 8th
2.12 pace, 2.07 trot, purse $700
5-8ths mile running race, purse $200
2.20 trot, purse $700

In Memoriam

Meston—In loving memory of Pte. Walter Russell Meston, 1st Depot Batt., who died at Winnipeg, July 22nd, 1918, aged 23 years.
We miss thee from thy place, dear;
We miss thee from our home;
But thou art called to better things,
The whyfor should we mourn.
Inserted by his parents, sisters and brothers.

Sent Up for Trial for Incest

Henry Bracher, a farmer from the Minitonas district, was before the police magistrate on the charge of incest. The evidence warranted his being remanded for trial.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has moved out of town on to his farm a mile south where he has had a considerable amount of land broken this summer.
Fred Cooper, A. Hunt and Sam Reed, who have had a two weeks’ vacation in the west, returned home this week satisfied that there are worse places to farm than Fork River.
George Shannon has purchased a Happy Farmer tractor.
The annual meeting of the Mossey River School district was held on the 22nd. W. King, sen., was elected trustee for the coming term, Mrs. A. Rowe retiring.
Geo. Tilt has sold his farm to Mr. Steffesen.
Fork River residents are always well represented at the Dauphin fair and the attendance will be increased this year. When you have a good car and good roads the trip is only a jaunt.
Flying machine stunts will attract us all. Looping the loop and all the rest is new to the people of the north.

Winnipegosis

The municipality of Mossey River has a powerful new grader, which is at work building the road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Geo. Klyne, the teacher engaged by the School District of Don, who died suddenly last week, was buried on the 26th inst. F.B. Lacey the government representative, attended the funeral. The deceased came from North Dakota.
The ladies’ baseball team from Dauphin played the Winnipegosis team on Friday last. The Dauphin team won out.
The J.J. Crowe Lumber Co., Ltd., has bought out A.C. Bradley and is erecting a large lumber yard here.
Mr. Shaunnessey, general manager of the Booth fisheries, was a visitor last week and inspected the company’s property here.
Quite a number of our citizens, will leave on Thursday next to attend the Dauphin fair.