Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 1 – 1910

1910 Dec 1 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson, clerk of the Municipality has been to Winnipeg this week to attend a conference of the different municipalities.
C. Parks opened up a grocery store in this village this week.
W. King returned from visiting several districts in Swan River Valley and seemed pleased with the trip and all that he saw.
The several school trustees are called to transact business in this district on December 5th at 10 o’clock sharp. All persons with children should make an effort to attend.
The nomination papers are out for the election of Reeve and Councillors for this district to be held at Winnipegosis, Dec. 6th.
W. Cooper’s hounds killed a wolf this week.
Charley Clarke paid Dauphin a visit last week.
J. Spearing, teacher of North Lake School, seemed to be getting on very well. He bought a farm just lately and erected a house on it. He speaks highly of the land in this district, but what is most needed is more settlers.
Mr. Barber from Winnipeg was up here this week on business.
D. Briggs killed three bears near here this week.

1910 Dec 1 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley held services as usual in the church at Winnipegosis and Fork River. His subject was “The Power of the Men of Vision.”
The weather here is mild, but skaters are not debarred the pleasure so much enjoyed by them. Dog trains are now arriving from time to time from up the lake, and it is expected that the ice will soon be strong enough for freighting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 30 – 1911

1911 Nov 30 – Fork River

Mr. A. Clawson, an old-timer, was here on a business trip.
Mr. D.F. Wilson, municipal clerk returned from Brandon, where he attended the municipal convention.
Mr. Guy Robinac passed through here on a trip to the Waterhen on Lake Winnipegosis.
Mr. James Johnston and A. Cooper have returned after spending the summer in Winnipeg.
We believe it would be to the interest of the public if our road commissioner would see that Main Street on both sides of track south of the station was kept clear of cordwood. It was almost impossible for farmer to move around last summer without running into cordwood or machinery, trying to get around the mud hole just wide enough for a wagon to pass through. There is any amount of room north of the station for wood and it would keep the business part from looking like a cord wood camp to those who pass through as we have a good town site if kept tidy. It would add to the appearance and comfort of everyone.
There is a shortage of cars here for farmers to load grain. What we need is another railroad through this part the country to wake up the C.N.R.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

1919 Nov 20 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. John Dobson and family, of Winnipeg, are visiting at the home of Reeve Venables.
D.F. Wilson, sec. treasurer is attending the Union of Municipalities convention at Winnipeg this week.
Milton Cooper, who has been in the Dauphin Hospital, is improving.
F.F. Haffenbrak is on a visit to Ninette, Man.
With the milder weather the attendance at Sunday school has increased. 42 were in attendance last Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 9 – 1911

1911 Nov 9 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Cooper and family have returned to their homestead up the Fork River.
Geo. King of the Dauphin Press, was here renewing acquaintances. We are always pleased to meet the old-timers.
Jim Cameron passed through here lately, having taken a position with the Armstrong Trading Co. at Pine Creek.
Hallowe’en passed off quietly. The “boys” were too busy hustling sheaves in to the threshing to get into mischief.
Capt. D. McLean has laid up the government dredge for the winter on the Mossey River.
Mr. Reid, of Rathwell, is inspecting land around Fork River with the intention of locating here.
We ask what justice there is in the Railway Co. supplying good grain cars to load cord wood into the merchants while farmers grain is lying in the granaries till prices are away down for want for cars. We consider it an injustice for men to be allowed to lock cars for cordwood when farmer are asking for cars for to load grain. Some people want the whole earth.
Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, members will have their Guy Fawkes bail on Friday, Nov. 10th, in the Orange Hall. A hearty welcome to all. Tickets $1 per couple.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 7 – 1912

1912 Nov 7 – Fork River

George King, of Dauphin, was here renewing old acquaintances between trains.
Miss Grant of Pine View was visiting her friends at Valley River during the weeks end.
Thos. Ramsay, P.M. of Sifton, was here on business with D. Kennedy.
Walter Clark has returned staying for a short time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Rev. H.H. Scrase, who has been visiting his brother at Swan River and attending the mission at Dauphin, returned on Saturday’s train.
S. Briggs, who was here renewing acquaintances for a short time, has returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy and family have returned after visiting friends at Ochre River and Dauphin.
Miss Olive Clark and miss Comber have returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Hallowe’en has passed, and to judge from the looks of the town next morning, those who too part in the the tricks, should be pleased with themselves if they call it fun. Even the church was made to pay toll, which is going the limit.
The elevator gang has left. The elevator is now open for business with Jack Clemens in charge.
What’s the matter with the Bay Centre correspondent of the Press. We must have touched him on a sore spot by the remarks he makes of the Fork River scribe. We would advise him to give up his Hooligan tactics of sandbagging people and to roost with the owls till it freezes up.
One of our enterprising citizens has surrounded his lot on Main Street with an ornamental fence.

1912 Nov 7 – The Fork River Settlement

Pretty much all the history of the Dauphin district dates from the advent of the C.N.R. The actual settlement of the northern part of the country, which includes Fork River and Winnipegosis, commenced in 1897, when the railway entered. It is true there were parties who squatted here and there, but the first settlement amounted to nothing when estimated in figures. It was not until three or four years later that the municipality of Mossey River, which comprises the territory described, was organized. Your correspondent spent a few house at Fork River the other day, and what is more important, spent them pleasantly. It is some fourteen years since the writer first visited the new thriving village of Fork River, and some of those he formed an acquaintance with then, were there to greet him last week. The village of Fork River is located on the Fork and Mossey Rivers, and within a mile or two of its centre, a considerable number of people reside. The land along the Mossey and Fork Rivers is as good as there is to be found anywhere on the American continent, which is saying much. It was but natural then that those who came in first selected the best farms, those along the rivers. The country about was at one time covered with a growth of timber, which included tamarack, spruce and poplar. The latter kind was the most frequently met with. Much of it, of course, has since disappeared before the axe of the lumberman and the wood chopper. Another destructive elements has been fire. In the early days wood had little value and no effort was made to preserve timber. Much timber was needlessly destroyed which would be of considerable value today. But most of us are like the German, if our foresight was as good as our hindsight, we would soon get rich. There is, however, much consolation in the fact that good land will soon produce enough grain to find money to purchase fuel. Like other new districts the Fork River settlement has been up against manta drawbacks, notably wet seasons and poor roads. But somebody remarks, are these not the condition which develop strong men? Yes, truly, but, at times, even the heart of the pioneer sinks. Take the present year as an example. Conditions were such as to try the metal most of us are made of. Even more, the loss of crop is bad enough, but add to this financial obligations incurred and can’t be met, and the burden seems too heavy to bear.
But enough of lamenting. Let us turn to the people themselves. We don’t know where one will find a finer band of pioneers than at Fork River. There is Tom Glendenning, who was there many a day before the railroad. A splendid specimen of the pioneer; good-hearted and a true friend.
Tom Briggs, another who was in the settlement before, we were going say, the war, but we mean before the railroad. The Briggs Bros., Dave and Tom, went though the worst of it, and still wear pleasant faces. Incidentally, it manta be mentioned that Dave is no longer following, like Cincinnatus, the low.
There’s Sam Bailey, who, while not in before the iron horse, has been there long enough to establish his sterling qualities. He’s a good fellow and one can’t meet too often.
Wm. King, pioneer farmer and stock breeder. Has faced difficulties, met them and overcame them. Besides farming on an extensive scale he is bending his energies to improve his own and other people’s stock. Truly a valuable man in any community.
D.F. Wilson – there’s no mistaking him; besides quality he’s got size, both important factors in a new country. He has farmed, is a breeder of stock and fills the important office of municipal clerk. Has also done his share to develop the district.
Nat Little, pioneer merchant. Has been there a long time, and, what’s better, has succeeded. A good fellow with a weakness for the Shetland pony.
Coun. Geo. Nicholson, too, has had the usual ups and downs, seen the rough and the smooth and is still staying with the job.
Reeve Lacey, not such an old-timer as some of the others, but has, in the time he’s been there established his worth and taken a willing hand in the work of development. For several years he has been in the council and is now its head.
W.T. Snelgrove can look quite a ways back. He has seen more than a little of the life of the pioneer. As a hunter he has quite a record in the deer line and can relate some interesting experiences. Some day, when we have time at our disposal and more space we may relate some of W.R.’s exploits.
While speaking of the Snelgroves its opportune to mention morally and Alf. There some pioneers, too.
Alex. Cameron is not exactly one of the prime old-timers, but has been in the distinct quite a few years. There is just this difference between Alex. and most of the other settlers, he had the “dough” and they didn’t. It don’t take long to tell this, but oh, what a world of meaning there is in it. Money is highly important to us all, but when we haven’t got any and need it, words fail to impress its importance on us. May every man who has a healthy pocketbook know how to use its contents as judiciously and generously as Alexander Cameron.
There are many others worthy of a word in this article, but space forbids. They have done their part and performed it well. What more can be said? There’s the Rowe brothers, A. Hunt, Geo. Tilt, W. Northam, C. Clark, F. Cooper, and Frank and Vivan Hafenbrak.
Then, what about the women? Are they, too, not pioneers in the true sense. Yes, indeed; they are worthy of a special article and even then justice could not be done them. They have taken their part, a part which carried its own burden. A burden, no matter how heavy, always cheerfully carried when the interest of their families and their homes was at stake.
Municipal organization should come in for a chapter. Its work is important in our advancement. The reeves and councillors help materially to make history. If they have done their part well and faithfully their names should be writ in large letters.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.