Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 27 – 1910

1910 Oct 27 – Arthur Milner Dead

Arthur Milner, the young man who had his back broken some five weeks ago by the falling of a scaffold, died in the hospital on Wednesday. The funeral will take place this afternoon fro the residence of Mr. F. Clark with the Dauphin Citizens Band in charge.

1910 Oct 27 – Bullet Lodged in Tissues of Cheek

By the accidental discharge of a .22 calibre rifle on Sunday, a Galician lad was the victim of the bullet. The bullet went through one cheek knocking out a tooth and lodged in the tissues of the other cheek. The boy was brought to Dauphin Monday and the bullet extracted by Dr. Ross.

1910 Oct 27 – Destructive Fire at Ethelbert

A very destructive bush fire took place last week near Ethelbert. From what can be learned it appears that a farmer near sec. 7-29-21 had just finished threshing, the straw of which had been blown into some bush that he wished to clear. The readiest way seemed to him to be to burn the straw pile and bush at the same time. After a time the wind seemed favourable, and he set it going. Two of his neighbours, seeing the fire, remonstrated with him, and expressed their fear that it was very dangerous to set it on fire; to which it is said he replied, “Oh, t will not back up. Unfortunately the wind changed to the northeast, with the result that the fire rushed over part of sec. 18 and most of sec. 17. Hence about 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon it was noticed by the farmers on 17 hat the fire was gaining rapidly upon them.. H. Fekula began at once to try to check the fire by ploughing fire guards round his stacks of hay in the meadows (which run for a good distance northwards, between the colonization road and the road allowance between 17 and 18.) Jacob Mascuik was the next too see that his stacks were in danger, and his team and plough to turn over a few furrows to save his stacks. By this time the fire had got fairly going, and Jos. Mills and L.L. Katz came up at a run to save hat they could.

But alas, they were all too late, and only partly prevented the complete destruction of their stacks of hay. Jacob Mascuik lost six stacks valued at three hundred dollars, James Mills lost five stacks valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and H. Fekula lost three stacks. In the meantime the fire had widened out until thee was a rushing, roaring belt of flames a mile wide, and it seemed for a time as if a very serious disaster was about to take place. K. McLean rushed out of town, and calling at the school he impressed the older boys, and away they to see what could be done.

After going about a mile it was seen that the fire had got too good a hold, to stop it by ordinary means, and hence Mr. McLean could do nothing to save a hay stack of from sixty to seventy tons, from total destruction, which he had, had put up for winter feed. The fire continued its course until about ten o’clock, when through the strenuous efforts of the people it was checked a short distance from the Ethelbert school, after destroying about 1000 tons of hay. Thus during the night of Thursday we were allowed to sleep in peace, after a hard fight.

Unfortunately, Kenneth McLean, after leaving the scene of the fire, went home and being dead tired, as soon as he sat down in his easy chair, he went to sleep. The window was left open, with the result that he got a severe chill, which developed into pleurisy and he has been bedfast and under the doctor’s care ever since. However we are glad to say he has taken a turn for the better and hopes to be about again in a few days.

Well, it was thought the fire had been done with, but no siree. Bush fires do not die out so quickly as that, they smoulder and linger in rotten logs or tree stumps and given a fair chance, the fire will start up again in a fresh place, and that is just what it did do. On Friday morning the wind had changed again, blowing to the south. This soon fanned into flame the dying embers and away it went south and again ruin and disaster faced the settlers’ farms and stacks in the Mink Creek district. Fortunately Mink Creek was full of water, this combined wit the efforts of the people saved the mink Creek district from even a worse fate than had befell their neighbours to the south of them. But from all account it was close call. Whilst it is true that fire is a good servant, it is also true that it is a bad master, and if only reasonable precautions had been taken, much of this great loss might have been prevented. For instance, H.P. Nicholson had some hay in the fire zone, but his men had left it well fire-guarded, thus saving his stacks. The old proverb says: “A stitch in time saves nine.”

It is time that some steps were taken to prevent such terrible loss. As it is, there is no apparatus to fight fire if it should take place, neither is there a Fire Guardian to take the lead and call out and organize a band of fire fighters if needed, and it is needed at Ethelbert.

Do not wait until the horse is stolen before you lock the stable door. Now it is the time to get ready.

1910 Oct 27 – Immigration hall to be Closed

Dr. P.J. Beauchamp immigration officer at this point, has received notice from the Department of interior that the hall here will be closed and not again reopened. The hall under Officer Beauchamp has done an important work in providing accommodation while settlers are being located and regret is heard on all sides that the building is not to be reopened. The building and lots will be put up for public sale at an early date by the department.

1910 Oct 27 – Fork River

Nat Little paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis last week.
C. Parks from Winnipeg is visiting friends here.
The Children’s Day Service at the English Church was very well attended and one of the children Miss Marjorie Scrase, sang “Fair Waved the Golden Corn,” splendidly.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooper who have been here for a few months left here last week for Brantford where they will reside in future.
Carloads of pressed hay are being sent out from this point.
On Tuesday night the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy was gladdened by the arrival of a little baby girl.
Mr. F. Storrar paid a visit to Dauphin lately.
Harry Nicholson was up here this week doing business.
A meeting of the Orangemen of this district was held last Saturday when it was decided to have a ball on Nov. 4th to help pay off the debt on the hall.
Methodist Services will be held at 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings instead of at 3 o’clock.

1910 Oct 27 – Sifton

C. Genik of Winnipeg is the guest of his daughter Mrs. C.A. Jones.
W. Thirell of the C.P.R. land department has been in Sifton the past week collecting for that department.
Messrs. Marantz & Gorfin are dissolving partnership. R. Marantz will carry on the store business alone.

1910 Oct 27 – Winnipegosis

On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will preach in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church at 7.30 p.m. The subject will be “Soul Rest.”
On Sunday last October 23rd, the Methodists inaugurated a new Sunday School. The number of children present more than exceed all the anticipation of the promoters. With a fine equipment of teachers it is confidently expected that success will crown the new institution.

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