Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 23 – 1915

1915 Dec 23 – News from War Front

Lieut. Denis Cockrill, who was recently wounded, has sufficiently recovered to return to the trenches. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
Private Jos. Gallant who enlisted at Dauphin last winter, has been recommended for the D.S. medal. He rescued two officers after they had been wounded by the Germans near their trenches. (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019)

1915 Dec 23 – Sixty now Enlisted

Recruiting for the battalion with headquarters at Dauphin is going on briskly. The officers and men here now total 60, and it is expected by the 1st of the New Year will be over 100 strong.
The officers state that the men enlisted are well suited for the service and are engaged drilling every day. Physical drill exercises are held in the town hall and platoon work at the agricultural grounds. The officers in command and privates are as follows:

OFFICERS
Lieut.-Col. R.A. Gillespie, O.C. (Robert Alexander Gillespie, 1881, xxx)
Capt. and paymaster, H. Hunter (Henry Cecil Hunter, 1888, 234232)
Lieut. V.N. Severn, keeper of records (Vernon Nicholl Severn, 1890, xxx)
Lieut. J.W. Skinner (Joseph Winstanley Sinner, 1875, xxx)
Sergt. M.A. Young (Martin Albert Young, 1880, 460218)
Sergt. A.C. Wade (Arthur Ca?ebourne Wade, 1871, 693015)

PRIVATES
F. Crowe (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
H.R. Tarzwell (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
R. Merrell (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Meader (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
J.C. Henwood (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
T.M. Jones (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
H.V. Cousans (Henry Victor Cousans, 1885, 1000003)
F. Kilborn (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
W. McClernon (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.E. Hooper (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
C.W. Elliott (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
H. Gardiner (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
C. Klyne (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
W.E. Demery (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
J. Gough (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
M. Jacobson (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
E. Sandgrew (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)
A. Douglas (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
J.W. Lane (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
R. Pollard (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
W. Hatt (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
J. Hickie (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
A.F. Tigg (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
T.G. Kirk (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
W. Greenshields (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
J.E. Donnelly (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
S. Hesson (Samuel Hesson, 1880, 1000071)
G. Montgomery (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W.J. Crittenden (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
J.F. Calder (???)
A.E. Taylor (Albert Edward Taylor, 1893, 1000063)
J.H. Codd (John Codd, ???, 1000064)
J. Love (John Love, 1877, 1000067)
A. Love (Andrew Love, 1883, 1000072)
J. Minnis (James Minnis, 1876, 1000073)
M.W. Primrose (Malberry Whittington Primrose, 1894, 1000077)
J. McLetchie (John McLetchie, 1885, 1000070)
F. Hicks (Fredrick Hicks, 1891, 1000080)
C. Benson (Christian Benson, 1887, 1000081)
J. Humphry (???)
W.F. Terrell (William Francis Terrell, 1890, 1000141)
M.J.T. Cathcart (William Joseph Tidmarsh Cathcart, 1898, 1000147)
G. Douglas (George Douglas, 1897, 1000148)
J.G. Cathcart (John George Cathcart, 1872, 1000146)
C. Wilkey (Charles Henry Wilkey, 1895, 1000149)
G. Wilkey (George Wilkey, ???, 1000155)

NOTES
Tuesday was pay day, and the bank tellers were given a heavy bombardment for an hour.
Marsh Cathcart has enlisted as regimental bugler.

1915 Dec 23 – Had Head Cut Off

Ochre River, Dec. 21 – A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, Dec. 21, about noon when Charlie Blackman, a farmer of this district was instantly killed by the bursting of a circular wood saw. Mr. Blackman had just returned from the poll where he had been recording his vote and was cutting wood
Deceased was an old resident of the district and leaves a wife and ten children, 5 sons and 5 daughters. The eldest being a son 17 years of age. The saw that Mr. Blackman was operating was known to be cracked, but had been working for some time in that condition.
Coroner Rogers, from Dauphin visiting the scene of the accident, and after learning the facts decided an inquest was not necessary.

1915 Dec 23 – Young Ruthenian Accidentally Shot

A young Ruthenian, 24 years of age, accidently shot himself at Ethelbert on Monday evening. He was hunting rabbits at the time, and pushed the butt end of the gun in a hole, discharging it, the contents entering his abdomen, making a bad wound. Drs. Culbertson and Bottomley were sent for and went to the northern town on Tuesday morning. They dressed the wound but have little hopes for the recovery for the young man.

1915 Dec 23 – Fork River

Mrs. N. Little and daughter, Grace have returned from two weeks’ trip south.
Mrs. A. Hunt and children left on Wednesday’s train for a two months’ vacation with her friends at Ottawa.
It seems to be the order of the day of late for the Dauphin train to arrive late and take a rest at Winnipegosis for from 4 to 3 hours while they catch a load of fish for the return ship. Passengers waiting to go to Dauphin have to hang around all day. How long will the suffering public have to put up with this kind of service?
Mrs. Craig, of Weyburn, is here on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Northam.
Mr. W. Williams, our lumber magnets, has a gang out on his Lake Dauphin limits preparing for the winter’s out of lumber.
The returned hunters report big game hard to get this year. They have not had the success of other years. In a few years, if the present slaughter goes on, there will be no big game left to hunt. To preserve these fine animals a close season of two or three years should be put in force at once by the government.
F.O. Murphy paid the burg a long visit between trains last week. Fred took a cargo of eggs with him as he says “Murphys” are not too bad an old time. The only thing that it takes the train so long to go to Dauphin the eggs might hatch out on the road and he would have to get a hen coop on his arrival.
The Orangemen of Fork River will [1 missing line] ball on December 31st in the Orange Hall. Admission, gents $1, ladies free. Good music and supper provided. An invitation is extended to all.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

A grand patriotic concert, including a ladies Indian Club display song tableaux, a dramatic dialogue and the orchestra will be held in the Rex Theatre, on Tuesday, Jan. 4th, 1915, at
Eddie Chermok’s new store is all ready for business now. His stock arrived last train.
Mrs. McEachern, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
The whist drive of the Cosmopolitan Club took place on Friday evening. The prize winners were Miss Margaret Goodman and Mr. Wiseman. The bobby prize went to Miss Bertha Magunson and Mr. J. Campbell.
The Xmas tree held n the Presbyterian Church was a great success and the turn out was the nest in the annals of the town. Miss Gracie Whale was presented with a prize for the best attendance at Sunday school for the yea and John Wallace won second prize. Santa Claus did not forget any of the children.
Jas. McInnes, Walter Grenon, Joe Mossington, and Capt. Buck, returned from their hunting ground and report a good time. They brought back some good specimens of the wild steers of the Northlands.
Settlers are still flocking into the vacant lands north of here. There is room for all comers yet.
The school is closed for the festive season and we regret to say that we are losing Miss Whitemore who will attend Normal at Winnipeg after holidays. Miss Whitore will be greatly missed as she has endeared herself to her pupils and her many friends alike in this town.
Miss McMartin left on Wednesday’s train for her home at Franklin to spend the holiday season.
D.S. Hatties’ rink beat E.R. Black’s rink by 9-7. The ladies are taking an active interest in curling this season and can throw as good a rock as many of the boys.
Harry Hunter, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
Mr. Goodman returned from a business trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday’s train.
Miss Augusta Crawford arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday’s train to spend Xmas at her home here.
If the mail gets any heavier Comf. will have to get a horse and rig. What price, Casey.
Mrs. Ben Hechter left on Wednesday’s train for Winnipeg on a visit.
F. Hechter left, for Waterhen on Tuesday afternoon.
We had a special train up for fish on Tuesday.
Don’t forget the Red Cross concert next week. Buy your ticket now.
The secretary treasurer of the village reports the taxes coming in very will and a great many took advantage of the discount up to the 15th Dec. The taxes are payable at par up to July 1st.
The Council of the Village meet in the Council Chambers at 2 p.m. on Monday, 3rd, of January.
Mrs. Ben Hechter and Miss Molly Hechter left on Wednesday for Winnipeg on a visit.
Ray Burley, Bert Arrowsmith, G. Johannason, A. Allan and Rev. Clixby are up from Brandon for the holidays.
On the night of the 21st inst. the Bicton Heath children were coming to Winnipegosis to the Xmas tree with Supt. Tom Toye as driver and on arriving inside the town limits a few of our children in happy spirits were singing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” which patriotic song so scared the wild quadrupeds that they bent it for the tall timbers leaving Supt. Toye and his whole school in the ditch singing “Will Ye Na Come Back Again?” However, nothing daunted by this little mishap Supt. Toye marched with his flock to the Presbyterian Church, where they enjoyed a most pleasant time.
Last week an old Frenchman at Waterhen left his nephew’s house to go to the house of a neighbour and got lost and froze to death.
Geo. Adam, of the Fishery spent Wednesday in town.
Jas. Alex and W. Walmeley returning from Waterhen Saturday and report fishing good.
Alex. Bickel arrived to town on Saturday with two loads of fish and returned from there Friday.
We are glad to report all well at Ed. Morris’ camp. The teams returned from there on Friday.
We regret to lose for a little while, and yet we are so proud to report that our worth citizen, Mr. Frank Hechter has enlisted for active service with the 107th Battalion and will be leaving us to join his regiment about the 10th of January. Frank will be badly missed but we hope to give him a royal welcome on his return. We understand he takes the rank of quarter-master sergeant. The business will be carried on by his brother, Ben Hechter until his return.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick returned last week from the hunting ground. Rev. Kirkpatrick got a nice elk.
The trains are very late in arriving and leaving lately.
Mr. Robertson, surveyor, is in town after inspecting the roads at Cowan and Camperville.
The snow low left for the north at the latter end of last week.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is spending a few days in town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 2 – 1915

1915 Dec 2 – Enlisting Continues Active

Enlisting is now progressing actively and there are some 32 on the roll at present. Col. Gillespie is expected back from Winnipeg at the end of the week with his staff of officers.
The following is a list of those who have enlisted together with the places they hail from.
F. Crowe, Dauphin. (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
R. Tarzwill, Dauphin. (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
J.N. Meader, Dauphin. (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
R. Marrell, Dauphin. (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Henwood, Gilbert Plains. (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
Trevor Jones, Dauphin. (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
R. Courier, Dauphin. (???)
F. Kilborn, Ochre River. (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith, Dauphin. (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
H. Gardiner, Gilbert Plains. (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
J. Hooper, Dauphin. (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
W. McClernon, Dauphin. (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.W. Demery, Winnipegosis. (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel, Winnipegosis. (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
M. Jacobson, Winnipegosis. (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
C. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
J. Gough, Laurier. (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
C.W. Elliott, Gilbert Plains. (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
Wm. Hatt, Portage la Prairie. (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan, New Brunswick. (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
R. Pollard, Dauphin. (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
A. Tigg, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
J. Hickie, Gilbert Plains. (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
T. Kirk, Ochre River. (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
A. Douglas, Dauphin. (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
– Donnelly, Gilbert Plains. (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
G. Montgomery, Dauphin. (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W. Greenshields, Gilbert Plains. (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
W.J. Crittenden, Dauphin. (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
E. Sandgrew, Dauphin. (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)

1915 Dec 2 – Had Foot Amputated

John Prefonowski had his left foot run over by a train at Ashville on Wednesday. He was brought to the hospital, where the foot was amputated.

1915 Dec 2 – Mossey River Council

Mossey River Council meeting was held a Fork River, Saturday Nov. 18th, all members present.
The new member, (D.G. McAulay), for Ward III was sworn in.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner; the Red Cross Society; St. Joseph’s Orphanage; Canadian Ingot Iron Co.; J.L. Bowman re Standard Lumber Co., account; J.N. McFadden; the Solicitor, re Shannon Road Judgement; the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; the Secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities; the Patriotic Fund; J. Bickle, Jr.; C.H. Bickle; Ethelbert Municipality, re Isolation Hospital; a petition asking for the formation of a new Union School District to be called Ferley and a communication re the proposed new School District of Don.
Hunt-Reid – That the plans of subdivisions of N.W. 3-13-18 submitted by J.N. McFadden be approved.
Yakavanka-Reid – That Mrs. J. Mylanchanka of N.E. 23-29-70 be given rebate of fifty percent off her taxes.
Hunt-Reid – That the Orange Hall at Fork River be charged only the same amount of taxes as in 1914.
Hechter-Reid – That the clerk write the Department of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to give estimates of a bridge across Fishing River between sections 1 and 2, Tp. 29, Rge. 19.
[1 line missing] son be appointed arbitrator in the matter of the establishment of the proposed Union School District of Ferley.
Hunt-Reid – That work done by Fred Cooper on the road allowance between sections 22 and 23 in Tp. 29, Rge. 19 be inspected and measured and paid for by Ward I as soon as the ward has money to its credit.
Hechter-Yakavanka – That the Reeve and Councillors Hunt and Reid be delegates to the Union of Manitoba Municipalities Convention to be held at Stonewall and that they be allowed $20, for expenses.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. McAulay be appointed to take the positions on the different committee left vacant by the resignation of Mr. Bickle.
Hechter-McAulay – That the declarations of the Reeve $12.00. Coun. Hunt 24.40 and Coun. Reid 26.20 for letting and inspecting work he paid.
A by-law establishing the School District of Don in Tp. 30, Rge. 17 was passed, also a by-law amending the license by-law by putting a license fee of $1.00 per head on all horses brought into the municipality for sale.
Hechter-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert Wedding

Mr. Kenneth McLean, of the town of Ethelbert, was on Oct. 27th, united in the bonds of matrimony with Miss E. Wray, who was head nurse at the Ethelbert Mission Hospital. The ceremony was performed at the home of her parents in Toronto where the young couple were the recipients of many valuable presents. After the marriage they went on a tour through the States visiting friends in Chicago and stopping at other important points. On returning to Ethelbert they were met by their many friends and in spite of their endeavours to evade the crowd, they came in contact with the usual shower of rice. They were afterwards escorted to the Mission house for tea. On Tuesday following a large reception was given the bride and groom at the town hall, where they were presented with a beautiful writing desk and bookcase combined; also a jardiniere stand. Beside this they were presented with other costly presents. The bride and groom both responded to the address and presentation in a very touching manner. After a well rendered programme, which was heartily enjoyed by all, the guest partook of refreshments provided by the ladies.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert

All here were glad to know old Jack Oshoost received his deserts in the court at Dauphin on Tuesday. It was a cowardly set to throw a bottle, which might have killed Finegold.
Wood is coming in only in small quantities so far.
Considerable quantities of wheat have been marked at this point this fall.
The new Presbyterian hospital is nearly completed. Mr. Josh Law, of Dauphin, is doing the painting.
Mr. Ben Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday to give evidence at the Finegold-Oshoost trial.
Mr. W.H. White is ??? ??? the year. [1 line missing] a term.

1915 Dec 2 – Fork River

Mr. Sam Reid is a visitor to Winnipeg for the week on business.
Mr. Cameron left for his home at Neepawa after having spent a week with friends at the point.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Hyde, of California, left for Carnduff, Sask., having spent two weeks with Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Mr. Hyde thinks this part of the country is all right, and he is sure right in his judgment.
Mr. Fred Cooper took a few days’ vacation at Dauphin last week.
Misses Bessie and Pearl Wilson paid Winnipegosis a short visit between trains.
“Main” street is quite lively with teams coming in with wheat to the elevator from all parts of the district, some coming 30 miles out. It gives us a glimpse of what the thriving village of Fork River will be when the district settled up and all the land [1 line missing] several elevators as well as many more business places. We have the land from which prosperous homes can be established once the right kind of men are in our midst.
Mr. Glandfield, lay reader, is paying Sifton a visit on his velocipede. Don’t you know it’s good healthy weather for wheeling.
The thresherman’s ball on Friday night was quite a success. Team loads from all parts came and a very pleasant night was spent.
A large number of the boys are busy cleaning their rifles and grinding up their butcher knives to do execution to the big game when the season opens.
Mr. Peach, of Swan River, school inspector, is visiting the several schools in this district this week.
We are sure in the banana belt when peaches are out on the street not frozen this time of year.

1915 Dec 2 – Winnipegosis

The Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in town for a few days last week.
The Cosmopolitan Club held a whist drive before their weekly dance last Friday evening.
Fish are coming in new and the town is livening up.
F. Hechter left for Waterhen Saturday.
Don’t forget the skating carnival on the rink on Monday next.
The rink opened for the season on Monday last and there was a good attendance.
Mr. Jas. McInnes and party left for a hunting trip Saturday.
G.L. Irwin, of Dauphin, is spending a few days hunting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 27 – 1910

1910 Oct 27 – Arthur Milner Dead

Arthur Milner, the young man who had his back broken some five weeks ago by the falling of a scaffold, died in the hospital on Wednesday. The funeral will take place this afternoon fro the residence of Mr. F. Clark with the Dauphin Citizens Band in charge.

1910 Oct 27 – Bullet Lodged in Tissues of Cheek

By the accidental discharge of a .22 calibre rifle on Sunday, a Galician lad was the victim of the bullet. The bullet went through one cheek knocking out a tooth and lodged in the tissues of the other cheek. The boy was brought to Dauphin Monday and the bullet extracted by Dr. Ross.

1910 Oct 27 – Destructive Fire at Ethelbert

A very destructive bush fire took place last week near Ethelbert. From what can be learned it appears that a farmer near sec. 7-29-21 had just finished threshing, the straw of which had been blown into some bush that he wished to clear. The readiest way seemed to him to be to burn the straw pile and bush at the same time. After a time the wind seemed favourable, and he set it going. Two of his neighbours, seeing the fire, remonstrated with him, and expressed their fear that it was very dangerous to set it on fire; to which it is said he replied, “Oh, t will not back up. Unfortunately the wind changed to the northeast, with the result that the fire rushed over part of sec. 18 and most of sec. 17. Hence about 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon it was noticed by the farmers on 17 hat the fire was gaining rapidly upon them.. H. Fekula began at once to try to check the fire by ploughing fire guards round his stacks of hay in the meadows (which run for a good distance northwards, between the colonization road and the road allowance between 17 and 18.) Jacob Mascuik was the next too see that his stacks were in danger, and his team and plough to turn over a few furrows to save his stacks. By this time the fire had got fairly going, and Jos. Mills and L.L. Katz came up at a run to save hat they could.

But alas, they were all too late, and only partly prevented the complete destruction of their stacks of hay. Jacob Mascuik lost six stacks valued at three hundred dollars, James Mills lost five stacks valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and H. Fekula lost three stacks. In the meantime the fire had widened out until thee was a rushing, roaring belt of flames a mile wide, and it seemed for a time as if a very serious disaster was about to take place. K. McLean rushed out of town, and calling at the school he impressed the older boys, and away they to see what could be done.

After going about a mile it was seen that the fire had got too good a hold, to stop it by ordinary means, and hence Mr. McLean could do nothing to save a hay stack of from sixty to seventy tons, from total destruction, which he had, had put up for winter feed. The fire continued its course until about ten o’clock, when through the strenuous efforts of the people it was checked a short distance from the Ethelbert school, after destroying about 1000 tons of hay. Thus during the night of Thursday we were allowed to sleep in peace, after a hard fight.

Unfortunately, Kenneth McLean, after leaving the scene of the fire, went home and being dead tired, as soon as he sat down in his easy chair, he went to sleep. The window was left open, with the result that he got a severe chill, which developed into pleurisy and he has been bedfast and under the doctor’s care ever since. However we are glad to say he has taken a turn for the better and hopes to be about again in a few days.

Well, it was thought the fire had been done with, but no siree. Bush fires do not die out so quickly as that, they smoulder and linger in rotten logs or tree stumps and given a fair chance, the fire will start up again in a fresh place, and that is just what it did do. On Friday morning the wind had changed again, blowing to the south. This soon fanned into flame the dying embers and away it went south and again ruin and disaster faced the settlers’ farms and stacks in the Mink Creek district. Fortunately Mink Creek was full of water, this combined wit the efforts of the people saved the mink Creek district from even a worse fate than had befell their neighbours to the south of them. But from all account it was close call. Whilst it is true that fire is a good servant, it is also true that it is a bad master, and if only reasonable precautions had been taken, much of this great loss might have been prevented. For instance, H.P. Nicholson had some hay in the fire zone, but his men had left it well fire-guarded, thus saving his stacks. The old proverb says: “A stitch in time saves nine.”

It is time that some steps were taken to prevent such terrible loss. As it is, there is no apparatus to fight fire if it should take place, neither is there a Fire Guardian to take the lead and call out and organize a band of fire fighters if needed, and it is needed at Ethelbert.

Do not wait until the horse is stolen before you lock the stable door. Now it is the time to get ready.

1910 Oct 27 – Immigration hall to be Closed

Dr. P.J. Beauchamp immigration officer at this point, has received notice from the Department of interior that the hall here will be closed and not again reopened. The hall under Officer Beauchamp has done an important work in providing accommodation while settlers are being located and regret is heard on all sides that the building is not to be reopened. The building and lots will be put up for public sale at an early date by the department.

1910 Oct 27 – Fork River

Nat Little paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis last week.
C. Parks from Winnipeg is visiting friends here.
The Children’s Day Service at the English Church was very well attended and one of the children Miss Marjorie Scrase, sang “Fair Waved the Golden Corn,” splendidly.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooper who have been here for a few months left here last week for Brantford where they will reside in future.
Carloads of pressed hay are being sent out from this point.
On Tuesday night the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy was gladdened by the arrival of a little baby girl.
Mr. F. Storrar paid a visit to Dauphin lately.
Harry Nicholson was up here this week doing business.
A meeting of the Orangemen of this district was held last Saturday when it was decided to have a ball on Nov. 4th to help pay off the debt on the hall.
Methodist Services will be held at 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings instead of at 3 o’clock.

1910 Oct 27 – Sifton

C. Genik of Winnipeg is the guest of his daughter Mrs. C.A. Jones.
W. Thirell of the C.P.R. land department has been in Sifton the past week collecting for that department.
Messrs. Marantz & Gorfin are dissolving partnership. R. Marantz will carry on the store business alone.

1910 Oct 27 – Winnipegosis

On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will preach in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church at 7.30 p.m. The subject will be “Soul Rest.”
On Sunday last October 23rd, the Methodists inaugurated a new Sunday School. The number of children present more than exceed all the anticipation of the promoters. With a fine equipment of teachers it is confidently expected that success will crown the new institution.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 21 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 21 – Sifton

The elections are now over and we are all glad we can now get down to business.
The threshing has been interrupted in this district by the frequent showers of rain.
The Misses Goforth and Reid, who spent their vacation in Saskatchewan, returned to town on Friday last. The ladies in question are well known as the nurses of the Presbyterian hospital here. The nurses are very popular here and on their return were tendered a reception at the Manse, which was decorated for the occasion. During the evening the ladies were presented with an address, which contained many complimentary terms, showing the esteem in which they are held and the appreciation of their work. The address was signed by J. Kennedy, J. Reid, Wm. Barry, W.J. Ashmore and C.A. Jones. At the conclusion of a very pleasant evening spent socially, refreshments were served by the ladies.

1911 Sep 21 – Winnipegosis

Wm. Sifton is spending a few days in town renewing acquaintances (before election).
Miss Sarah Hjalmerson is spending a few days at Snake Island the guest of Mrs. N. McAuley.
Miss M. Crawford left Thursday for Winnipeg, where she will attend business college.
Mr. and Mrs. Dennit and Miss Hansford are leaving town in October for England.
Miss Lily McAuley of South Bay, is visiting with Mrs. J.W. McAuley.
Mr. Paul Paplson and bride returned last week, after spending a two weeks’ honeymoon in Winnipeg.
Sunday, Sept. 24th, a confirmation service will be held in Victoria hall, conducted by Rev. B. Thorinson.
Misses Emma and Margaret Good, man of Red Deer Point, are the guests of Mrs. T. Schaldemose.
The Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.’s tug left Monday for Shoal River with Ted Cartwright in charge.
Ken McAuley, of Kamsack, is renewing acquaintances in town.
Wm. Walmsley in again managing the Lake View Hotel. His many friends are pleased to see his genial smile again at the hotel.

1916 Sep 21 – Maxwell King Wounded

Wm. King, postmaster at Fork River, received a cablegram this week from France stating that his son, Private Maxwell King, has been wounded.

1916 Sep 21 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on Wednesday, the 30th ult., all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner, re Fishing River Bridge, and from J.L. Bowman, re Cooper ditch.
McDonell – Reid – That the Basham Bridge be put in repair at once and that Coun. Reid be authorized to use any means to accomplish it that he may find necessary.
McDonell – Reid – That J.S. Seiffert be paid $25 for repairing the McAuley Bridge and that it have a further covering of two-inch tamarac plank eight feet long in the centre and that the clerk be authorized to issue orders for the plank and one leg of six-inch spikes.
McDonell – Reid – That the municipality make a grant of $50 to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; $25 to be paid now and $25 at the end of the year.
Reid – Namaka – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt – Campbell – That the accounts [1 line missing] in work be passed, $19.50.
McDonell – Reid – That the clerk notify Lawrence municipality that the council will pay 50 percent of any improvements made on the boundary line between the municipalities and that the construction of a ditch running into Lake Dauphin, which has been under consideration by the councilors of the adjourning wards be let by public auction by Reeve Lacey and Coun. Radcliff to arrange a date for such letting.
Hunt – Campbell – That Coun. McDonell, Reid and Namaka be a committee to inspect the Fork River-Winnipegosis road with a view to its improvement and report at the next meeting of the council.
Reid – McDonell – That the six pieces of timber purchased from W. Williams by the reeve be paid for.
Reid – Hunt – That as the plank ordered for the Fork River sidewalks has not been delivered for the purpose be purchased from W. Williams.
A by-law striking the rate for 1916 was passed. Municipal rate 12 ½ mills municipal commissioner’s rate, 4 mills, and general school rate, 5 ½ mills.
Hunt – Campbell – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1916 Sep 21 – Fork River

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 7 – 1913

1913 Aug 7 – First Rat Seen at Dauphin

One swallow does not make a summer but the indications always are that when one makes its appearance others will not be long in following. The first rat, so far as our information goes, was seen at the railway station a few days ago by O. Law, of the express office. The rodent was a large one and run under the platform when a rock was thrown at it.

1913 Aug 7 – Fork River

Mr. Dryden returned from a short stay in Dauphin and is going into the hay business.
Mrs. Murray, of Selkirk, has been spending a week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Weatherhead has returned from her holidays and the Mossey River School stated on Monday.
The herd law came into force August 1st for one day only and another was substituted in its place of no earthly use as we see. There endeth another municipal shuffle.
Mr. Jones agent for the London Assurance Co. has been around inspecting their business in this part. He thinks this part of the country all right.
Master Laurie Rowe invited a number of his young friends to his home at the farm one day last week. All present report having a jolly time.
A number of young folks spent a very pleasant evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt in honour of Miss Nixon, who is leaving to resume school duties after the holidays.
H. Armstrong returned from Dauphin where he was working and intends to go into farming again.
D. Kennedy was a visitor at the Lake Town Sunday.
Mr. O’Callaghan, chief auditor, and Mr. Shears, accountant, were at the A.T. Co’s store on Wednesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 6 – 1911

1911 Jul 6 – Leg Amputated

T. Lee, a young farmer, who resides south of Gilbert Plains in the Glenlyon district met with a serious accident the early past of the week. He was endeavouring to stop a runaway team attached to a mower, when his left leg came in contact with the knives which badly cut it. He was brought to the hospital here on Tuesday, where upon examination it was found necessary to amputate it below the knee. The young man is doing as well as can be expected.

1911 Jul 6 – Fork River

Miss Burrell of Winnipegosis, was a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy a few days last week.
Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys at Dauphin.
Mrs. Snelgrove was a visitor to Dauphin Saturday to the home of her daughter, Mrs. F.F. Chase.
H. Chute of Dauphin, is busy with his gasoline engine and plows turning over the soil on Messrs. Chase and Lockhart’s farms.
H. Falconer, Government Weed Inspector, was here this week giving instructions to municipal inspectors Bailey and King.
The Orangemen of Fork River will hold their 10th annual bask picnic on July 11th. A program of sports is being arranged and they day’s fun will be wound up in the evening with a ball.
Coronation service was held in All Saints’ Church on the 24th ult. The members of L.O.L. No. 1765 attended in a body and the church was filled to the doors. Mr. G.M. Littler B.A., preached a very appropriate sermon which was much appreciated.
Wm. King, returned Saturday from attending the Orange Lodge convention in Winnipeg. He reports being entertained in royal manner and also getting a number of ideas which ought to stir the local brethren to greater enthusiasm.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy entertained at her home last Monday in honour of her sister, Miss Bertha Johnston, who is a nurse on the Dauphin Hospital staff. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by all present. Miss Johnston visited several days in their neighbourhood.
Mrs. N. Little and daughters, while out driving last week met with an accident caused by the team running away. The ladies were thrown from the buggy, Mrs. Little receiving a serve shaking up and a number of cuts and viruses. A nurse was called and Mrs. Little was soon made comfortable. Miss Grace and Miss Lulu escaped unhurt.
The school will remain where it is at present, is the decision given by Chairman Hunt, who held the deciding ballot at the ratepayers meeting Monday. A meeting of the ratepayers was called from the purpose of taking a vote whether the school should be moved to town or remain where it is. The vote resulted in a tie and Chairman Hunt was called on to make the decision.

1911 Jul 6 – Sifton

Miss M. O’Donnell who has been teaching school here for the past year; left on Tuesday of last week for a visit to her home in Carleton Place, Ont.
Our local baseball team went to Ethelbert and played a friendly match on Saturday. The honours were about even.
Miss Eva Zlebita of Toulon, who has been attending school here for the past term, returned to her home in Toulon on Tuesday.
Miss Marion Flemming of Winnipeg, is spending her holidays at the Presbyterian mission the guest of Nurses Gofoth and Reid.
Miss Scott of Neepawa, is a visitor at Sifton.
Mr. Emanuel Michaliuk returned to Winnipeg on Saturday, after having completed a successful term as junior school (bilingual) teach here.
The Presbyterian Sunday School held their annual picnic on Dominion day, which was indeed a success. The Ethelbert football team came down and played off a return match. The Ethelbert boys proved a little too heavy for us however, winning the game one to nothing in the last half.
During this week to Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Jones at Sifton a daughter and to Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz at Dauphin a daughter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 23 – 1912

1912 May 23 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Colin McArthur Falls Off Pier and is Drown – Town to Become Summer Resort
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning, when Colin McArthur, fell off the wharf and was drowned in the Mossey River. The particulars are very meagre. Decreased was seen on the wharf a short time before his body was found floating in the river. It is believed that he had an attack of heart failure and fell in and no one being present he was drowned. A strange feature of the accident was that the body continued to float on the water after life had become extinct. Deceased was a mill-wright and had worked at his trade in several parts of Manitoba. He came West from Orillia, Ont. He was about 50 years of age.
Preparations are being madder to make this place a summer resort and there is every prospect of the enterprise being carried out successfully. Our location on the lake and river is ideal and with a fine sandy beach in close proximity there is no better place for boat and fishing.
F. Hechter and J.P. Grenon were passengers to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Mr. Parker, of Sandwich, Ont., is at present in charge of the hatchery.
Postmaster Ketcheson is now fully in the harness and promises to fill this important position in a satisfactory manner.

1912 May 23 – Mail Robbery
Mail Bag Disappears Between Fork River and Sifton
Contains Much Money

A few days ago the postmaster at Fork River, D. Kennedy, gave the mail bag from that point to one of the C.N.R. brakeman on the train on that particular day. This man acknowledges receipt of the bag and states that he placed it in the car in the usual way. It may be stated that there is no mail clerk on the Dauphin-Winnipegosis trains and the mail pouches along the line are taken in charge by the railway employees. This necessarily involves much risk to the bags as the employees are engaged at each station for a considerable time in switching and performing other duties.
The bag in question was not missed until Dauphin was reached and a search made for it when it was found to have disappeared. The postoffice authorities at Winnipeg were at once apprised of the matter and Inspector Hicks sent to investigate. He was here on Tuesday and looked into the matter without being able to solve it. Later, however, two special service men were put on the case and developments are expected.
The theory advanced is that the bad disappeared at Sifton.
The registered mail was particularly heavy on this day and besides cheques and money orders there were several hundred dollars in cash.

1912 May 23 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert has just had a clean up and looks better for it.
Rev. G. Tymchely, Ruthenian Independent minister, is visiting in Dauphin.
W.A. McPhedran, is starting on his trip to B.C., which had to be delayed owning to the sickness of his little girl. We are glad to say she is getting better but not fit to leave, so Mr. McPhedran has been forced to abandon the holiday trip
Geo. Kolenezuk is leaving the Ruthenian store, and is going back to farming. He visits Dauphin with that end in view.
No cordwood is moving owning to want of cars.

1912 May 23 – Fork River News

Miss Olive Clark of Dauphin, is visiting her parents this week.
Mrs. Paul Wood, of Sifton, and Mrs. Ivor Humphreys, of Dauphin, are the guests of Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. D. McEachran returned from an extended visit to California and the Western States.
Rev. A.S. Wiley held Communion Service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday and preached an excellent sermon.
The weather, though still cold, has greatly improved since the late rains and farmers are getting to work on the land.
A football club was organized here on Saturday and the following officers elected: E.S. Biggs, chairman; A.H. Culverhouse, captain; Dune Briggs, vice-captain; Harcourt Benner, sec.-treas. The managing committee includes, in addition to those already mentioned, Walter Clark and Edwin King.
Mr. Hicks, post office inspector of Winnipeg, laid off here on his return from transferring the postoffice at Winnipegosis to W. Ketcheson and visited D. Kennedy, P.M.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper left for Kamsack on a visit to their several friends at that point.
Joseph Lockhart is visiting Dauphin on business.
Miss Mabel Shannon left for Winnipegosis, having accepted a position as assistant in the new postoffice there.
John Richardson is moving his family out on his homestead at Mowat.
We have been informed that Colin Inkster has sold his farm to Mrs. Ridd, who purchased the Bellhouse far a short time ago.
The Rev. S. Fyles, of Portage la Prairie, S.S. Field Secretary of the Anglican Church, held holy communion service at Sifton, All Saints’ Fork River; and W. King warden at Fork River, on Church and S.S. business.
Garnet Lacey, of Oak Brae, left for a short vacation south looking for a high spot.
The ninth annual vestry meeting of Fork River Mission was held in All Saints’ Church. The Rev. Mr. Fyles as chairman, Mr. Biggs, as vestry clerk. Wm. King gave his report as warden and sec.-treasurer of the mission, which was accepted and passed. A vote of thanks was tendered the retiring wardens of Fork River. Winnipegosis, Sifton and to the W.A. for services rendered during the year. Officers for the coming year; Wm. King, minister’s warden and sec.-treas. C.E. Bailey, people’s warden, Fork River; C. Bradley, people’s warden, Winnipegosis; J. Reid people’s warden, Sifton; Mr. Biggs, organist, Fork River; H.H. Scarse and D. Kennedy, auditors, Fork River; Mr. Biggs, representative to Synod.
Reading between the lines of the Fork River scribe of May the 9th, signed “Parrot” may i ask why is the original “Parrot” defunct? We feel certain that the one who penned the reply has donned a borrowed plumage and without wishing to give offence it would be more appropriate for him to sign his name C-R-A-N-E in future as a wiseacre like him is out of his class among the “parrots”. The Jackdaw is no more; the M.C. is laid off with the catalogue and circular phobia and the skyscrapers safely under the shadow of his wings, they should rest in peace and as they shamrock is out of business the scribe will let the thistle and the rose have a show as I know they are anxious for the pay. The reply to well-wisher is so disjointed it remands us of the joke of the Governor of North Carolina. “Dry Day”.

1912 May 23 – Sifton

Seeding may be stated as slow.
T. Ramsey is now in charge of his Majesty’s postoffice. Tom and his obliging wife will make good officials. Long may they reign.
No visitor is more anxiously looked for each week than the Dauphin Herald. It certainly has become the people’s paper.
C.A. Jones, who has been carrying on a mercantile business here for a good many years, has sold out to Fred Farion.
Felix Marantz went to Dauphin on Tuesday.