Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 19, 1920

Jail Sentences in Future

Jail sentences, with no option of a fine, will be imposed on all persons guilty of breach of the Manitoba Temperance Act in future, according to the amendment to the Act, which was brought before the legislature this week by the Hon. Thomas H. Johnson, Attorney-General.

Fork River

Mr. Maine is the new teacher at Fork River School and Miss U. Harlowe at Pine View. We’re forever changing teachers. “We’re forever changing teachers.”
Wm. King, Milton Cooper and H. Hunter attended the meeting of the Dauphin Country Orange lodge at Dauphin last week.
Fork River chicken fanciers were not represented at the recent poultry show at Dauphin. This is to be regretted as there are some good strains of stock in this district. Poultry raising should be developed to a much greater extent than it is.
Some of our farmers are drawing hay 25 miles. This illustrates the importance of conserving feed for the opening of spring work.
Wolves are fairly numerous this winter and some fine pelts are being brought to town. It pays to join in the fun of the chase when you can get $25 for a skin.
The debate on the night of the 11th inst., proved of more than ordinary interest. The topic was, “Resolved, That married life is preferable to single life.” The following championed the affirmative: Miss. E. Carlson, captain; L. Lacey, M. Shannon and Miss Carlson. Negative – Mr. C. Bailey, captain; Mrs. A.J. Little, F. Wilson, Jr., and Mrs. C. Bailey. The affirmative won. The critic was Mr. A. Hunt, and in his review he ably dealt with the arguments pro and con. The judges were Mrs. F. Cooper, Mr. Main and D.F. Wilson, Sr.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 22, 1920

Ethelbert

We have been asked to publish a copy of telegram sent to the Acting Prime Minister at Ottawa by the Ruthenians of this vicinity. It is herewith:
“Canadians of Ukrainian descent, in mass meeting assembled at Ethelbert, unanimously protest against the brutal invasion of Ukrainian East Galicia by imperialistic Poland, against the decision of Peace conference of July 11th, sanctioning the invasion, and against the decision of Supreme Council of November 20th awarding to Polish invaders a mandate over Ukrainian East Galicia for twenty five years. We appeal through the Canadian Government to the Government of Great Britain and other allied governments and people to right great wrong done to four million Ukrainians of East Galicia. We urge governments to have polish invading armies withdrawn from Ukrainian East Galicia to have that territory occupied by inter-allied armies, and to compel Poland to make reparation for destruction of Ukrainian villages and towns, and to indemnify families of civilians murdered by Polish soldiery or robbed by Polish officials. We appeal to governments to settle East Galician question in accordance with wish of people concerned. We request the Canadian Government to convey this our appeal to the government of Great Britain and to British plenipotentiaries at Paris.”
The above protest shows clearly where the root of wrong is and what the Ukrainians demand.

Fork River

The first annual Grain Growers’ Masquerade Ball, which took place Friday evening, the 16th of January, was a huge success and the big event of the New Year. The costumes were varied and created a pretty color scheme. There were six prizes awarded. Miss Gertrude Cooper as a Japanese lady, and Mr. D. Briggs, as a soldier, were awarded the prize for the best dancers. Mrs. Charles Bailey, representing a Gypsy fortune teller, was awarded first prize for best lady’s costume; Miss Viola Rowe, representing a country maid with her quaint hat, dress and crook was awarded second prize. Dr. A.J. Little, representing a colored dude was awarded first prize for best gentleman’s costume. Mr. Milton Cooper as Pierrot, was awarded second prize. The prize for best comic costume was awarded to Mr. Norman Shannon, who represented a tramp. The judges were Mrs. T.B. Venables, Mrs. A.J. Little and Mr. Williamson. After the judging and unmasking at midnight refreshments were served.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rawson are moving to Winnipegosis.
Fork River Literary and Debating Society met at the home of Mrs. A.J. Little, Saturday evening last to discuss the next debate, which will be held Wednesday evening, Feb. 4.
Fork River Women’s Institute met at Mrs. Tuck’s Saturday afternoon for the election of officers and to appoint directors for Agricultural Society. Mrs. A.J. Little was elected Secretary to succeed Mrs. Ina Briggs, Mrs. T.B. Venables and Mrs. McEachern were elected directors.
Mr. Fleming Wilson, Mr. T.B. Venables, Mr. Duncan Briggs, delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention held at Brandon, gave their reports on Tuesday evening’s meeting.

Winnipegois

The Tennis Club is arranging to hold a masquerade ball on Friday, Feb, 18th. A ball is always popular and a masquerade ball doubly so. This dance promises to be the event of the season.
The fish catch has been exceptionally good this winter. The December catch was the largest in the history of the late. Many of the fishermen will return from the north early next month.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 31, 1919

Charged with Rape

Robt. Lambert, aged 17, of Minitonas, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on the 25th inst., charged with rape. The girl is 16 years of age. He was remanded for trial.

Notes of the Fair

It is now only a week until the Dauphin fair will be in full swing. A large number of entries have already been made in vegetable and other hall exhibits. The early harvest is not interfering to any great extent with the entries in other classes so much as was at one time feared. They are assured of some good entries in cattle and horses as entries have already been received from J.D. McGregor, Brandon; John Graham, Carberry; C. Moffatt and J.I. Turner, Carroll. J.C. Crowe, Gilbert Plains, and W.H. Devine are expected with exhibits of Pereherons.
The unfortunate accident to Lieut. Kerr’s aeroplane at Portage la Prairie will prevent his appearance, but Lieut. Casewell, of Brandon, will fly in his stead. The public are thus assured of a threat in aeronautice.
The 4rd Cameron Highlanders band, of Winnipeg, will be in attendance.
It is understood that Thursday and Friday afternoons will be declared civic holidays in town.
See the Farmerette girls. They are the latest sensation.
It is almost certain Col. Barker, V.C., will be among the visitors.
Cheap rates are offered on the railway. A fare and one-third for return tickets.
All the leading baseball teams of the district are entered in the tournament. $450 are offered in prizes.
The entries for the horses races are large, and the speeding contest will be the [missing] in Dauphin.
Lieut. Casewell and Lieut. Bennett will make flights in their airplane and do the latest stunts.
Prospects for the Poultry Department are very bright. Entries are coming in from many outside points.
All entries for the Poultry section, including eggs, must be in by Aug. 2nd, and other sections by Aug 5th.
Racing Program
Thursday, Aug. 7th
2.30 pace, 2.25 trot, purse $500
Half-mile running race, purse $200
Friday, Aug. 8th
2.12 pace, 2.07 trot, purse $700
5-8ths mile running race, purse $200
2.20 trot, purse $700

In Memoriam

Meston—In loving memory of Pte. Walter Russell Meston, 1st Depot Batt., who died at Winnipeg, July 22nd, 1918, aged 23 years.
We miss thee from thy place, dear;
We miss thee from our home;
But thou art called to better things,
The whyfor should we mourn.
Inserted by his parents, sisters and brothers.

Sent Up for Trial for Incest

Henry Bracher, a farmer from the Minitonas district, was before the police magistrate on the charge of incest. The evidence warranted his being remanded for trial.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has moved out of town on to his farm a mile south where he has had a considerable amount of land broken this summer.
Fred Cooper, A. Hunt and Sam Reed, who have had a two weeks’ vacation in the west, returned home this week satisfied that there are worse places to farm than Fork River.
George Shannon has purchased a Happy Farmer tractor.
The annual meeting of the Mossey River School district was held on the 22nd. W. King, sen., was elected trustee for the coming term, Mrs. A. Rowe retiring.
Geo. Tilt has sold his farm to Mr. Steffesen.
Fork River residents are always well represented at the Dauphin fair and the attendance will be increased this year. When you have a good car and good roads the trip is only a jaunt.
Flying machine stunts will attract us all. Looping the loop and all the rest is new to the people of the north.

Winnipegosis

The municipality of Mossey River has a powerful new grader, which is at work building the road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Geo. Klyne, the teacher engaged by the School District of Don, who died suddenly last week, was buried on the 26th inst. F.B. Lacey the government representative, attended the funeral. The deceased came from North Dakota.
The ladies’ baseball team from Dauphin played the Winnipegosis team on Friday last. The Dauphin team won out.
The J.J. Crowe Lumber Co., Ltd., has bought out A.C. Bradley and is erecting a large lumber yard here.
Mr. Shaunnessey, general manager of the Booth fisheries, was a visitor last week and inspected the company’s property here.
Quite a number of our citizens, will leave on Thursday next to attend the Dauphin fair.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 10, 1919

Police Court Cases

P.M. Hawkins, Presiding
On information laid by Constable Coleridge, John Goik appeared before the police magistrate on the charge of “non-registration under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $5 costs. Urko Chorny also appeared on the charge of “removing without permit under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $9 costs or 30 days hard labor. Urko elected to take the 30 days.
On information laid by Chief Bridle several boys were assessed $2 and costs each, for bicycle riding on sidewalks.
Wm. Bell faced the magistrate on Monday on two charges. First, that of “driving a motor while intoxicated,” second, for “having liquor I place other than private dwelling.” On the first charge he was fined $25 and $5 costs, and on the second count he was assessed $200 and $5 costs.

Saturday July 19th, Peace Day

Saturday, July 19th, has been proclaimed Peace Day, and a statutory holiday.

Fork River

Miss Ina and Stella Briggs left for their homes in Southern Manitoba to spend the holidays.
Pte. Miller has returned from overseas and is visiting at the home of his father, Charles Miller.
Pte. Merko and his war bride have arrived from overseas and are visiting with friends here.
Max Gashina has returned from overseas and is visiting at his home before going north to homestead.
The members of the Purple Star L.O.L. will hold their 17th annual basket picnic on July 12th at Fork River. Sports of all kinds.
The late heavy rains have proved of immense benefit to the district. The crops now promise well.
The auditor’s report is now in the hands of the clerk and will be perused with much interest. The ratepayers are entitled to know how the business of the municipality is conducted, and the council should let its light shine so that all may see its good work.
The question of the hour: “Are we to have the new school?” It is up to the ratepayers to say yea or nay.

Mossey River School Exams.

Results of exams: Examinations at Mossey River School No. 999:
Grade VII—Blanche Hunt 77.
Grade VI—Louise Rowe 63.
Grade V, Sr—Viola Rowe 76, Willie Thompson 73, Lorne Shannon, Gordon Atkins.
Grade V, Jr—Beatrice Rowe 79, Pearl Reid 67, Irene Bailey 65, Mary Briggs 64, Verna Reid 62, May Shaw 56.
Grade III—Lulu Thompson 87, Bernard Hunt 84, Percy Shannon 75.
Grade II—Ivy Hunt 92, Danny Wilson 69, Ivor Humphries 63, Alvin Bailey 59.
Grade I—Horace Thompson, Courtney Humphries, Albert Shannon.
Grade I, Jr—Charlie Rowe, Clara Pearson, Walter Pearson, Reggie Wilson.
K.E. Briggs, teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 20, 1919

5 Cases on Assize Docket

The spring assizes for the Dauphin Judicial District opened on Tuesday with Mr. Justice Metcalfe, presiding. There are five cases on the docket, which are as follows:
King vs. F.B. Race, theft of liquor from railway car.
King vs. H. Porteous, Roblin, assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
King vs. Geo. Kuzio, Winnipegosis, sedition.
King vs. John Bouazuv, Roblin, posting obscene letter.
King vs. W.B. Dempsey, Winnipegosis, forcible entry upon land.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Formal Opening of Club Rooms
The new club rooms of the G.W.V. association, in the Lilly block, were formally opened by Mayor Bowman on Tuesday, the 18th.
In opening the proceedings Mayor Bowman said it gave him great pleasure to be with them that evening. He regretted the absence of the president who was indisposed and hoped that he would soon be restored to his usual good health. He paid a high complement to the officers of the association for undertaking an enterprise of such magnitude and to the ladies of the auxiliary, who had done so much to help forward the good work. The aims of the association needed no explanation, it being well-known that it was formed for the betterment and uplift of veterans of the great war just ended. In closing his worship said that public opinion would be behind any association formed for the help and assistance of the returned men and extended the best wishes of the citizens of Dauphin and district to the association. He then formally declared the club rooms open.
A short programme followed, Miss Maggie Stark giving a humorous reading and Mrs. Heaslip a song, for which she received a well-merited recall. Major Skinner gave an address in which he touched on many subjects of great interest to the veterans and townspeople. The McMurray orchestra contributed several selections and its presence at any function is always heartily welcomed.
Dancing at once commenced, while in the assembly and recreation rooms a series of games of progressive whist were strongly contested. Mrs. Nash won the ladies’ prize, the gentleman’s prize going to Comrade Jack May.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary provided an abundance of toothsome delicacies, which were enjoyed, and for which they received hearty thanks. Dancing was kept up with spirit till an early hour, McMurray’s orchestra furnishing the magic.
There was a large gathering and the function was voted one of the best ever held in Dauphin.

Race Case Proceeding

The grand jury found a true bill in the King vs. Race, and the evidence of a number of witnesses for the crown was heard. This (Thursday) morning the case for the defence was started. The trial is attracting much interest. F.B. Simpson is the crown prosecutor and J.L. Bowman is defending Race.

Mossey River Council

The council of the municipality of Mossey River met at Fork River on the 5th inst., as a court of revision. After the numerous appeals were disposed of the minutes of the last council meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Reparation Committee, Ottawa, the solicitors re. Hartman account, H. Houchin re use of council chamber for War Veterans, H. Shannon asking for refund of taxes, the secretary of the Weed Commission, A. Gunmunderson asking to be struck off the assessment roll, J.C. Adam re taxes on lot in Winnipegosis, the rural municipality of Wallace re equalized assessment, the Manitoba Returned Soldiers’ Commission.
A petition praying for the dismissal of the collector and another asking for the building of a road on the correction line; also two applications for the position of weed inspector.
Hunt-Reid – That Simpson, McGirr & Co., solicitors for the municipality, be instructed to apply to the legislature of the province of Manitoba at the present sitting for a special act legalizing the assessment for the yea 1918, and that the council approve of the draft form of act hereto appended and authorized the solicitors to consent to such amendments of revision thereof as may be required by the law amendments committee of the legislature.
That W.B. Findlater, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, be requested to introduce the said special act to the legislature.
Hunt-Namaka – That the clerk write solicitors re Hartnian account with the village of Winnipegosis.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Whereas, the Union of Manitoba Municipalities, at its recent convention in Winnipeg, pledged the co-operation of all municipal councils and officials in Manitoba to the Returned Soldiers’ Manitoba Commission in its work of reestablishing in civil occupations soldiers returning from the war; and, whereas, the municipality of Ochre River has regarded I as a patriotic duty to do everything possible to assist in this commendable purpose; therefore, be it resolved, that this municipality hereby undertakes to obtain satisfactory employment for all returned soldiers who were residents of this municipality at the time of enlistment, or, in the even of it being found impossible so to do, to promptly report to the commission, giving reasons for such failure and the address where the returned unemployed soldier may be found. The clerk is hereby directed to give such assistance to the commission as is necessary for the carrying out of the purpose of this resolution. Carried.
Hunt-Reid – That Edwin W. King be appointed weed inspector for year 1919 at a salary of $125 per month, and that is duties begin on the 15th day of May, and continue up to the 15th day of October, and that the clerk in notifying him of his appointment, ask him to attend the convention of weed inspectors to be held in Winnipeg.
The council adjourned to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, March 17.
Robt. Marsland was here last week with his sawing and crushing outfit.
Frank Sharp has been on the sick list for a few days.
Mrs. Russell has received the good news that her son, Pte. Walter, is on his way home from overseas.
The chips will soon begin to fly as there is quite a number of new buildings going up in the spring.
The Grain Growers meet the first Friday in each month. At the last meeting matters of importance were dealt with. Resolutions were passed asking for a reduction in the tariff and refusing concessions to the liquor interests.
There has been considerable land cleared of scrub during the winter, and breaking will be pushed forward in the spring.
The school questions is the burning issue of the hour.

Sifton

A very crowded meeting was addressed by Mr. R. Fletcher and others in Wycliff School last Thursday, the 13th inst., on the question of “Municipal Schools.” Much interest was shown in the bylaw and it is thought that it will be supported on the 25th. Mr. Dyk spoke in Ruthenian and Paul Wood occupied the chair.
Three carloads of lumber are being unloaded by local farmers.
It is proposed to build a municipal public hall here and a bylaw will to all probability by voted on to sanction the borrowing of a sum of money on debentures for that purpose.
From all accounts Sifton is not proud of its new liquor detective or spotter. Nor is he of much practical use here as we are all on the “water wagon” just now.
It is expected that the new government trunk highway, Winnipeg to Swan River, will run through Sifton. No better route could be found.
Logs, hay, straw, fence posts, etc., are being feverishly drawn. If the snow held until June – which heaven forbid! – there would still be that last load to draw.
Our local barber recently did 43 shaves and 17 haircuts from 7 p.m. until closing time. A pretty good records – but then, he only opens on Saturday evenings.
Mr. Thos. Winshy has replaced Mr. Wheeler as manager of the Bank of Commerce. He thinks Sifton has a bright future, and with a few mines, factories and so on opened up may make quite a city. Joking aside, we have a first-class site for an up-to-date creamery. Who will build it? Not tow, only one. We have two mills.
A progressive whist drive is advertised for next Friday evening in Wycliff School. Refreshments, prizes and a good time – all for 25 cents.

Breathe gentle zephyrs o’er snow-covered state,
Blow steady south wind, cross forest and lake
Urge spring-time sun they perennial power,
Burst waiting bud and unfold bashful flower.

Lines of winged strangers flock up from the south.
Sound calls and carols from many a mouth.
Fiel is long time white turn your black into green,
Gild fruitful autumn with glorious sheen.

Winnipegosis

One of the brightest events of the social season was a tea given by Mrs. Steele on the 17th. The decorations in the spacious drawing room were appropriately Irish in honor of the Saint and the same bright spring color prevailed throughout all the rooms and even reflected in the costumes of the young ladies serving and prepared out from the sandwiches. The event took the form of a shower to assist the young ladies of the Order of the Needle with a bazaar which the are planning.
Andrew Lunn, who has been hauling stone on a contract for the Manitoba Gypsum Company, will be through next week.
Mr. Hamilton returned last week with his family and will shortly move into the Bradley house.
The Red Cross Committee are planning a box social on the 27th in Rex Hall.
A large crowd was at the station to welcome Charlie Burrell on is return from overseas. He was somewhat exhausted from the trip up but is resting nicely now and will be glad to see his friends.
S. Coffey has his moving picture show in full swing again.

Winnipegosis

The second production of the Winnipegosis Dramatic Society which took place on the 7th inst., was a very creditable one. The play chosen, “The Arrival of Kitty,” is a 3-act farce of good construction, smart action and bright dialogue, and amused the house greatly. The cast was well balanced, so well balanced that special mention of individual’s would be out of place, each one of the players, including the Pup, having earned his or her meed of praise. The production showed marks of greater experience on the part of the promoters, and improvement in this direction is not yet complete.
The gross receipts amounted to $121, the allocation of which, and plans for the future, will be discussed at an early meeting of the society.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 19 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 19 – Fork River

Herman Godkin, real estate agent of Dauphin, spent a few days with W. Williams.
We have been informed that Mr. Walter Clark was fortunate to get a moose. The head is said to be the finest seen in these parts with a spread of forty-four inches.
Sid. Gower, engineer, returned from Dauphin and intends working with W. Williams this winter.
We were pleased to meet Peter Robinson, an old-timer, in town. He is spending a short time with his parents on the Mossey River.
The C.N. telegraph gang is here renewing the poles, which work was needed.
The Newell moving picture show that was booked for Tuesday and Wednesday did not come off at the orange Hall for lack of accommodation. We need a good boarding house here for the travelling public.
There was not a very large turner to the masquerade ball in the Orange Hall on account of the farmers being busy threshing.
Mr. McIntosh, of Valley River, was here on business.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase will hold a Xmas service in the school house, Winnipegosis on Xmas morning at eleven o’clock, and in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, in the evening at eight o’clock.

1912 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Malley, from Brandon, arrived in town Tuesday. We trust the weather will be favourable for his trip up the lake.
The municipal elections are on now. May we hope that the wiser promises made by the candidates be fulfilled by the successful ones. We certainly need more passable roads, and here be it remarked that if our church wardens finds transportation between here and Fork River too difficult to accomplish in the future, the vision of the rectory, seen here, will have to materialize.
A Christmas morning service will be held in the school house 11 a.m. Come and help sing the carols insuring a “Merry Christmas.”
The Santa Claus fund seems to be a popular one. Perhaps it is because he is such an adept of minding his own business. He is remembering our bachelors with many plum puddings.
The Card Circle will be closed this week for the year. It is a matter of serious consideration if it should be reopened as so many lovers of the game do not enter before 9 p.m., which is near the time when wise and honest heads seek their rest; besides beige started to while pleasantly away a couple of hours, thus inviting congenial spirits, and finding ourselves entertained by a stranger proves a mental lack which should more advantagely be supplied at home, nevertheless we trust for a closing game this week that will reveal its true merit and may the winners of the prizes make good use of them. A certain Mr. Webber is to be thanked for the gentleman’s, which is a gun metal watch.
If we hurt ourselves as much by falling when climbing up hill, as we would so doing when running down hill, no one could be blamed for refusing to climb; but one of nature’s mercies is that we cannot.
The Christian League held a very successful meeting ask week.
The hunting season being closed may the stronger sex once more settle down to “the daily round.”
No moose, no heads, no tales.
Wm. Parker, of this Armstrong Trading Co. is up the lake or out to Pine Creek auditing books.
The young people of our town have a bond of sympathy with Dauphin ones in the difficulty (met here) of preparing a skating rink – see the lake.

1918 Dec 19 – Had Both Legs Crushed

Orval McInnes, a boy about 15 years of age, met with a bad accident at Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The boy was assisting to put ice in an ice house when the block that was being raised slipped from the grippers and fell on his legs, crushing them badly. He was brought to the hospital here the same afternoon.

1918 Dec 19 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Dec. 14.
Heath Officer Dr. Medd was through this district this week and has closed the school for the time being as some of the scholars are down with influenza.
D. Crerar has sold the Hudson’s Bay farm for a good figure. What about the herd law now?
Mr. Laidlaw has finished threshing. The cattle will have a chance to feed considerable land next spring.
Hechter Bros.’ gasoline tractor has arrived and they intend to turn over considerable land next spring.
W. Paddock has broke considerable land this year. Steam and gasoline engines materially aid in preparing the land for crop.
Mr. Winger has sold his flock of sheep to Mr. Venables for a good figure. There is no doubt but sheep pay well and in the future more will be kept in the district.
Mr. Waddell, from Missouri, is the new teacher engaged for the Bicton Heath School. It is up to us to “show Mr. Waddell.”
F. Sharp has completed his house and stable. The buildings are the right type for the farmers and we hope to see more of them erected.
Thos. Toye, our local weather prophet, says the winter will be a mild one. Tom, it may be said, does not make his observations from charts, but seeks his weather lore from wild animals, such as the muskrat, which he says you can depend on.

1918 Dec 19 – Fork River

Chas. Bugg, of Ochre River, was in town lately renewing acquaintances.
Pte. Arthur Shannon is home, having received his discharge.
The election is over and we are now already to shake hands and enter into the Christmas spirit, good will toward all men.

1918 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

The Dominion Government is making headway with the cutting of a canal at Meadow Portage which, when completed, will open up a waterway with Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Manitoba. The land through which the canal will run has already been cleared and boarded and in the spring about 600 men will be employed doing excavation work.
A card party, in aid of the Red Cross, is being held every Wednesday evening in the Rex theatre. A good musical program is provided and refreshments are served.
A special Xmas service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 22nd, in the Union Church. Special Xmas hymns and solos will help to make the service attractive. Subject will be “The Brotherhood of Man.” A hearty welcome is extended to all.
On the afternoon of Xmas day a Xmas tree entertainment will be held in the above church and a huge tree loaded with toys and decorations will be exhibited to delight the hearts of the children. Santa Claus has arranged to give every child a present from the tree.
A bank will shortly be established at Winnipegosis.
A recent traveller on the Dauphin and Winnipegosis express complains bitterly of having to have an extra washing day in the same week owning to the dirty condition of the train.
The Armstrong Independent Fisheries is sending ten teams up the lake this week to bring in fish. Other companies also have teams employed bringing down fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 18 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 18 – Ethelbert

Postmaster Skaite is still confined to his home by illness. Mrs. S. is attending to the duties of the office during her husband’s absence.
The deer season is over and quite a few people here are dining on venison.
Sleighing is needed to give an impetus to the wood business.
Clerk K.F. Slipetz was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
A branch of the Grain Growers’ Association was organized here last week under favourable auspices. The branch starts of with a membership of 60 and the members are all enthusiastic. The following are the officers: President, M. Pacholok; vice, J. Pachkowski; sec.-treas., K.F. Slipetz.

1913 Dec 18 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon returned from a few days visit to Dauphin.
W. Williams has left with his outfit to take out lumber on his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Miss Bessy Wilson returned from a few weeks visit among friends in Sifton and Dauphin.
D. Kennedy has purchased a handsome pair well-bred colts for drivers.
Mrs. J. Parker and daughter left for Winnipeg for a short visit.
Mrs. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is having a week’s visit with her sister, D. Kennedy.
The Orangemen of Fork River appreciate very much the kindness shown them by the ladies in coming out and cleaning out their large hall gratis. The brethren wish to tender them a hearty vote of thanks for same.
D. Briggs, of Brandon, and Mr. Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, had the good luck to get a moose each.
Those who shot large game are, Harold Shannon, a fine elk; Fred King, moose; Frank Hafenbrak, moose; S. Munro, elk; J. Richardson, moose.
On Friday night the ladies of Fork River gave a ball in the Orange Hall. The ladies supplied the refreshments and paid a fee of 25 cents. The gentlemen were free. There was a large turnout and a most enjoyable evening.

1919 Dec 18 – Fork River

The Unity Christmas tree of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River will be held in the Orange Hall on the evening of Monday, 22nd inst. This promises to be the event of the season. A large attendance is requested as Santa is bringing Mrs. Santa. Admission, gentlemen 50 cents; ladies and children free.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 5 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 5 – Fork River

Miss M.B. Nixon left for Winnipeg, for a weeks visit among friends.
Miss Muriel Alterton, of Mossey River, and Miss Grant, of Pine View Schools attended the convention at Dauphin.
Mrs. Geo. Shannon and Mrs. Kennedy returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Wm. King expressed to E. Walker, of Dauphin, a trio of Mammoth Bronze turkeys for breeding purposes.
Fred Cooper, W. Williams and T. Shannon’s threshing outfits are busy these days.
D.F. Wilson, F.B. Lacey and J. Seiffert, members of the council, returned from a week’s trip to the Municipal Convention at Winnipeg.
Miss Lizze Clark returned to Dauphin after spending a few days at her home.
Mr. Monington, of Neepawa, is staying with J. Robinson for the hunting season.
Duncan Kennedy has received two shipments of pure bred Plymouth Rocks from Portage la Prairie last week and is now in the market with pure bred roosters.
Joe Lockhart was elected trustee for Mossey River School for the coming term in place of Wm. King, who retires this term.
Looking over the Herald we notice the annual statement of receipts and expenditures for ten months of the municipality of Mossey River. Just the same old two by four statement. Why not publish in book form in detail like Dauphin. Our council seems to be behind the times in this respect. Year after year we are asking for this to see where our money is expended and this year we cannot see where any of it has been expended on the roads.

1912 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

The annual school meeting was held in the school house on Monday, a large number of ratepayers being present. Messrs. Grenon, Whale and Thomas were elected as trustees for the coming year and Mr. Shear continues as sec.-treasurer. Mr. Hulme’s engagement is for the year. The master of a new school to be erected was discussed. The lots have already been secured, as we hope it will not be long till they are build on.
Rev. H.H. Scrase remained in town from Sunday’s service till Tuesday.
Harry Grenon is preparing to open a business in the late Hudson’s Bay post.
The Misses Paddock had a party last night to entertain Miss Hazel Coffey who has been visiting the Misses Whale while Mr. and Mrs. Whale made a trip to Dauphin.
We are pleased to see certain patients are able to be out again.
The young people’s enjoyment on the lake will be curtailed since the snow has come.
A few of the men from the fishing camps took advantage of the recent glistening ice to make a trip back to town, an enviable one “on their steely feet so bright.”
Mrs. Bradley has enjoyed a most delightful visit from her sister, Mrs. Armstrong. Miss Charlotte accompanies her aunt back to Portage.
Mr. and Mrs. Hippesley, of South Bay, have returned from a trip to Dauphin. Regret is felt at the probability of their moving West to B.C.
A visit to Mrs. Johnston’s home would assure anyone of the benefit on illness to be gained by sojourning there.
Miss Hayes reports an interesting convention held in Dauphin.
Hunters are arriving in town in pursuit of the fleet footed game of the woods.

1918 Dec 5 – Blew Out His Brains

Telesphore Gagnon, who resided with his two sons at Valpoy, 15 miles northeast of Ste. Rose, committed suicide last week by blowing out his brains with a shotgun. Gagnon lost his wife a year ago, and also suffered lose to his property by fire. These matters preyed on him until his mind became unbalanced and led him to commit the rash act. He was 60 years of age.

1918 Dec 5 – Had Arm Amputated

Thos. Switzer, who resides in the Sandringham district, had the misfortune to accidentally discharge his rife, the bullet entering his left arm. He was brought to the hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the arm below the elbow.

1918 Dec 5 – Major Barker Critically Ill

A cablegram from France to Mr. G. Barker at the end of the week states that the condition of his son William is critical.

1918 Dec 5 – Military Funeral

Pte. Wilbur Olsob, of the 226th Batt., who died of influenza, was accorded a military funeral, he arrangements being in the hands of the G.W.V.A. The funeral cortege assembled at 2.30 p.m. at Farrell’s undertaking parlours on Friday afternoon, where a service was conducted by Rev. J.A. Haw, who also officiated at the graveside. About 50 members of the association, under command of Capt. Scrase, attended. Lieut. Clark and Sergt. Chambers were in charge of he firing party.

1918 Dec 5 – Rural Nominations

MOSSEY RIVER
Reeve – T.B. Venables, F.B. Lacey, J.D. Robertson
Ward 1 – J. Yakavanka
Ward 3 – E.A. Marcroft
Ward 5 – J. Namaka

1918 Dec 5 – Victoria Cross for Barker

Major Wm. G. Barker has been awarded the highest honour possible for distinguished service at the front, the Victoria Cross.
Other Dauphin boys who have been decorated, include:
Military Cross – Lawrence Shand
Military Medals – Stuart R. Widmeyer (deceased), G.A. Jackson, Geo. F. King, N. Chard, A. Douglas and J. Fletcher

1918 Dec 5 – Fork River

Mrs. M. Angus has returned to Winnipeg after spending two weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Craighill.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Brewer are patients in the hospital at Dauphin.
W. King, I.H.C. agent, has just finished a warehouse in which to store implements.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Northam have taken up their residence in the parsonage for the winter.
H. Swartwood, of Dauphin, was a recent visitor in our midst.
Sid Frost has left for Rathwell. Before leaving Wm. King, on behalf of Sid’s many friends here, presented him with a valuable violin and case in recognition of his services in a musical way.
Wm. Williams was a Dauphin visitor on Tuesday.
F.B. Lacey, T.B. Venables and J.D. Robertson are the nominees for the reeveship.
The Fork River, Mossey River and Pine View Schools are still closed.
Several of the hunters have returned. Which one shot the steer?

Pte. N. MacCauley, of Winnipegosis, was among the returned soldiers from overseas this week.

1918 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

A special peace thanksgiving service was held in the Union Church on Dec. 1st. The church was well decorated with flags of the Allies, and was packed to overflowing. The hymns were of a joyful, patriotic and military character, and were heartily sung. The Rev. A.E. Hook conducted the service and took on his subject, “Trusting in God.” He gave a vivid description of the terrible struggle which had lasted over four years, and spoke of the murmurings which had sometimes arising during the war. People had doubted if there was a God and if there was he was not a righteous God. The termination of the war, however, had vindicated God as a righteous God. He said that we had many things to be thankful for because of the war. He mentioned principally that drink and practically been abolished and that nations had been awakened into prayer in a manner they had never done before.
The ban, which had closed down all public gatherings during he epidemic of influenza, was lifted last week and there are no cases in town, though there are a few in the rural districts.
The first load of fish from the lake arrived in town on Tuesday. The fishing has been delayed somewhat on account of the mild weather, but the prospects of a large catch are good.
D. Roy Grenon skated into town today from Waterhen, a distance of over 25 miles.
Winnipegosis reports over two crowns to its credit in the Victory Loan Drive.
Two carloads of wheat were shipped out of town this week.
The fishermen have started to put up ice for summer use.
The collectors report that subscriptions to the Mercantile Sailors’ Fund are coming in well.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 31 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 31 – Hotel Sold

The Lake View hotel, owned by Frank Hechter, at Winnipegosis, has been sold to H.M. Hicks, of Winnipeg. The hew proprietor will take possession at once. Mr. Foster, the manager for Mr. Hechter, is leaving for other parts.

1912 Oct 31 – Hallowe’en Ball

What holds more charms and spells for the young than the Scotch superstitions and customs regarding Hallowe’en? Burns in his poem, “Hallowe’en” describes to us filly the traditions of his country. Those interesting customs are more or less exploded now, and Hallowe’en with its mystic rites is fast dying out. So it was with much curiosity and interest that those who love to trip the light fantastic looked forward to the Hallowe’en ball given by the G.I.A. to the B. of L.E. on Tuesday evening of this week. Nor were any of the seventy-five couples present disappointed. Unique decorations appropriate to the occasion were carried out, with pumpkins, black cats, bats and other Hallowe’en favours. A brilliant headlight on the stage with one of the pumpkin lanterns on top, and two on either side supplied the light for the popular twilight waltz. At the entrance of the hall the word welcome was formed with flag pennants. The black cats ands bats showed up effectively on the sidewalls. The call for supper came after the strains of the soft dreamy melody of the twilight waltz had died away. It was served in the fire hall and reflected much credit on the efforts of the ladies to provide an appetizing repast.
Mrs. J.W. Johnston was master of ceremonies, and acquitted himself as always, in a most creditable manner. The music, which was supplied by the McMurray Orchestra was all that could be desired. The selections for the extras provided by Mrs. W.H. Sutherland were much appreciated by all.
The committee in charge of the ball were as follows:
Management – Mesdames D.A. Roberge, A. Thomson, F.L. Ball, J. McKeever, Mrs. R.M. Smith.
Reception – Mesdames W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, F.L. Ball, A. Thomson.
Decorations – Mesdames J. McKeever, W.H. Sutherland, D.A. Roberge, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.
Floor – Brothers W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, A. Thomson, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.

1912 Oct 31 – Tag Day at Winnipegosis

A Tag Day was held at Winnipegosis and the Dauphin Hospital Ladies’ Aid is indebted to the ladies of that place for the proceeds amounting to fifteen dollars.

1912 Oct 31 – Fork River

Mrs. Isaac Armstrong has returned from visiting her daughter at Gilbert Plains.
Mrs. S. Bailey was a visitor to Dauphin on a land deal so we are informed.
Thomas Shannon returned from a short trip to friends at Canora.
Miss Peal Wilson left for Dauphin with her brother, Fleming Wilson.
Mrs. S. Reid and children returned from Rathwell after spending a week with her friends.
The ladies of the Leap Year committee have invited the gentlemen to a farewell ball in the Orange Hall on Friday night, November 1st. The ladies will supply refreshments, the boys are simply to look pleasant.
Mr. Swartwood, superintendent of the International Harvester Co., was taking stock at D. Kennedy this week.
The Northern Elevator Co. have about finished their up-to-date elevator at this point and it is quite an improvement to the looks of the town.
Mrs. B. Tate of Dauphin, visited Mr. and Mrs. Tom Bailey on the Mossey this week.
All Saints’ Church was very tastefully decorated for the Harvest Festival held on Sunday last. Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very appropriate sermon and a large congregation attended from Sifton, Mowat and the surrounding country.
Miss Gertrude Cooper is spending the week with her parents on the Fork River.

1912 Oct 31 – Sifton

Mr. Russell, principal of Wycliffe School, is building a house for himself. The present house in which he resided was bought by John Kennedy.
There’s a great dissatisfaction amongst the ratepayers of Sifton S.D. The taxes of said school are at the rate of 36 mills on the dollar and the trustees are expected to give an explanation why they have found it necessary to put the estimate so high. In comparison with the taxes of other school districts this is certainly a very high rate.
The Roman Catholic Polish Church has a new priest who is to take charge of said church. The present pastor, the Rev. Plocmski, is leaving the church.
The new Mercantile Co.”s store is expected to open its business in two weeks’ time.
Mr. Reid, section foreman, says that the road bed of the C.N.R. over his section was never in better condition.
Mr. Souborin, late Greek and Roman Catholic priest here but now of Montreal, is visiting with friends here.
An old country Greek Catholic priest is to be located at Ethelbert permanently. Last Sunday he was a visitor to Sifton.
Miss P. Malkowicz has been appointed principal of Sifton School by the school board for the next twelve months.
J. Holland, teacher of Mink River School has brought his wife from Rossburn. John has been batching it for nearly two months.

1918 Oct 31 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. Karl McFarlane, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. A. McQueen, Grandview, wounded. (Arthur McQueen, 1894, 2418348)
Pte. G.P. Norman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Gisli Peterson Norman, 1895, 294050)
Pte. Andrew Baldwin, Dauphin, wounded. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74183)
L. Corp. K.R. Young, Ochre River, missing. (???)
Pte. J.O. Plante, McCreary, wounded. (Joseph Ovide, Plante, 1897, 2381123)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 18 – 1917

1917 Oct 18 – Births

MUNRO – At Fork River, on Oct. 6th, to Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Munro, twins, both boys.

1917 Oct 18 – Many Fines at Winnipegosis

A number of parties appeared before Magistrate Whale at Winnipegosis on Tuesday at the instance of Inspector Gurton. Seven were fined and one case withdrawn. The fines and costs amounted to $800. One of the parties fined had been doing a thriving business in selling “cordials,” “liniments” and “bunion” cures, all to be taken inwardly.

1917 Oct 18 – Fork River Boys and Girls Club

This fair took place on Friday, Oct. 11th. The conditions were most unfavourable as the weather could not very well have been worse and the settlement being in the middle of the threshing prevented the grownups as well as many of the children from attending and there were numbers of exhibits which the children had no doubt taken great pains with that never appeared at all. The following is the first prize:
Wheat sheaf – 1st, Fred Yager, 2nd, Peter Yepletney.
Twenty pounds threashed wheat – 1st, Peter Yepletney, 2nd, Fred Yager.
Pair of pigs – 1st, Robert Williams.
One pig – Lawrence Shannon.
Half bushel of potatoes – 1st, Nellie Kolikitchka, 2nd, Albert Galcuski, 3rd, Maurice Delcourt, 4th, Peter Yepletney, 5th, Blanche Hunt, 6th, Maurice Delcourt, 7th, Mable Russell, 8th, Peter Zepletney, 9th, Peter Rudkanvitch, 10th, Emilie Strasden.
Trio of white Wyandotts – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, David Nowosad, 3rd, Clara Hunt.
Trio of barred rocks – 1st, Lawrence Rowe, 2nd, Robert Williams.
Trio of buff Orpingtons – 1st, Alice Nowosad, 2nd, Robert Williams.
Trio of white Leghorns – F. Benner.
Trio of black Minorcas – 1st, Jenny Chernowes, 2nd, Metro Yarish.
Trio brown Leghorns – Mike Barcuski.
Sewing, girls over 14 – Alice Nowosad.
Girls under 14 – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Edith Shannon.
Foal – Joe Shannon.
Loaf of Bread – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Mable Russell.
Canned peas – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, L. Rowe.
Canned beans – 1st, Karl Shields, 2nd, L. Rowe.
Beast poultry coup (special) – Alice Nowosad.
Crocheting (special) – Emilie Strasden, 2nd, Mary Mazurka.

SCHOOL PRIZE LIST.
Writing:
Grade 1 – 1st, Adolf Redwasky, 2nd, Stephen Nowosad.
Grade 2 – 1st, Charlie Yager, 2nd, John Wowk.
Grade 3 – 1st, Bernice Rowe, 2nd, Michael Michalina Hilash.
Grade 4 – 1st, John Pick, 2nd, Wasyl Fediuk.
Grade 5 – 1st, Aug. Perwin, 2nd, Dave Nowosad.
Grade 6 – 1st, Peter Zapitlney, 2nd, Erma Delcourt.
Grade 7 – Duncan Robertson.
Grade 8 – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, Clara Hunt.

Map Drawing (war map of the world):
Grade 4 – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, Arthur Jamieson.
Grade 6 – 1st, Dorothy Venables, 2nd, Blanche Hunt.
Grade 8 – 1st, Edith Shannon, 2nd, Clara Hunt.

Scribblers:
Grade 8 – 1st, Clara Hunt, 2nd, Edith Shannon.
Grade 6 – 1st, Erma Delcourt, 2nd, Dorothy Venables.
Grade 5 – 1st, Annie Phillipchuk, 2nd, Evelyn Robertson.
Grade 4 – 1st, Viola Rowe, 2nd, Arthur Jamieson.
Grade 3 – 1st, Patty Richardson, 2nd, Bernice Rowe.
Grade 2 – 1st, Goldie Shuchett, 2nd, Victor Forster.
Grade 1 – 1st, Danny Wilson, 2nd, Stephen Nowosad.

Paper folding:
Grade 3 and 4 – 1st, Nellie Saloman, 2nd, Joe Masiowski.
Grade 1 – 1st, Agnus Masiowski, 2nd, Teenie Laporawski.

Raffia Collection: 1st, Mowat School, 2nd, Pine View.

Fancy Flowers: first, Mary Muzyaka, second, Jenny Janowski.

Collection of Leaves:
Grade 8 – 1st, Alice Nowosad, 2nd, Clare Hunt
Grade 6 – 1st, Erma Delcourt, 2nd, Blanche Hunt.
Grade 5 – 1st, Annie Phillichuk, 2nd, Dane Nowosad.
Grade 4 – 1st, Sofia Yaroslawky, 2nd, Joe Nowosad.
Grade 3 – Pearl Reid.
Grade 2 – Bernard Hunt.

Collection of woods:
Grade 2 – Earnest Halfinbrak.
Grade 4 – 1st, Albert Janowski, 2nd, Alexander Zaplatney.
Grade 6 – Peter Zaplatney.

School chorus, 1st, Mossey School, 2nd, Janowski.

1917 Oct 18 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, are visiting at the home of Mr. Sandy Cameron at Mowat.
The annual S.S. service will be held in All Saints’ Sunday afternoon, Oct. 21st, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron, of Neepawa, are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nat Little.
Mr. Levins, of Winnipeg, has put in a large pair of scales and is buying wheat for the McLanghlin Co.
Quite a little of the Winnipegosis “cordial” is said to have reached here. It is sure hot stuff.
Renew your subscription to the Herald promptly.

1917 Oct 18 – Winnipegosis

Thanking the people of Winnipegosis for their liberal support and hoping we can make as good a showing in the coming year.
Inspector Gurton was here on Tuesday and Magistrate T.H. Whale disposed of the liquor cases. Seven of the “boys” had to come across with the coin of the realm. The total of the fines and costs amounted to $800.
It was sure hard on “the old man,” who did such a thriving business with his “liniments” and “cordials” and “bunion” cures. The fall business was just beginning to pick up, too.
Magistrate Whale says if the cases keep up he will have to procure a wig and gown.
Most of the fishermen are at the north end of the lake preparing for the winter’s work.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 13 – 1910

1910 Oct 13 – Fined $60

Thos. Shannon, of Fork River, administered a severe beating to a neighbouring farmer, Morley Snelgrove, and was arraigned before Geo. O. Bellamy, P.M., of Winnipegosis, and fined $40 and costs for the assault and $10 and costs for trespass. The beating given to Snelgrove was a terrible one.

1910 Oct 13 – Killed by Fall From Wagon

A sad accident occurred last Tuesday evening about seven o’clock some sixteen miles from Roblin, by which James Blakely, eldest son of Mr. Robert Blakely, of Grandview, met an almost instantaneous death. He had been for a long time employed as a freighter for the Hanbury camps, and in company with a young Englishman named Joe pulled out of Roblin with two loads immediately after dinner on Tuesday, and they had got about sixteen miles on their journey when it began to rain. Blakely evidently had reached back on his load to get his coat and standing up was in the act of putting it on when the wheel dropped into a rut, throwing the unfortunate man to the ground between the horses. He struck on the side of his head, dislocating the neck. He died just as the driver of the rig following reached him and pulled him from under the horses. – Grandview Exponent.

1910 Oct 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Dallas and Mrs. G. Shannon paid Dauphin a visit last week.
Hugh Harley, of Swan River, was here doing business last week.
D.F. Wilson returned from Dauphin last week.
G. Tilt was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Miss Nixon left last week on a visit to friends in Winnipeg.
Mr. Salter, of the Winnipeg Portrait Oil Co. has been here doing business.
Mrs. C. Clark paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis a day or two ago.
Mr. and Mrs. Sims, North Dakota, have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. J. Lockhart of this district.
Next Sunday special service at the English Church, Children’s Day. Sermons appropriate for the day will be preached by the missionary in charge.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 5 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 5 – Fork River

Mrs. C. Clark is visiting her son Harold, who is in the Dauphin Hospital with fever.
Mr. T. Shannon has purchased an up-to-date Sawyer & Massey separator.
Mr. J.G. Littler is visiting Sifton this week.
Mr. F. Wilson of Humphrey & Wilson, is up on a trip to his home.
Miss B Johnston who was visiting Mrs. D. Kennedy has returned to Dauphin to resume her duties at the hospital there.
We have not seen anything of our friend Joe, Liberal financier, since the 21st. We sincerely hope he is in good health.
The Liberal Conservative ball in the Orange Hall Friday night was a success. Dancing was kept up to about daylight. Premier Borden was ably assisted by Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Fielding, Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pugsley, Judge Wilson, Hon. T.N. Briggs, Senator Kennedy and other Honourables of all shades of politics and religion.
Harvest Festival in All Saints’ Anglican Church at three o’clock Sunday afternoon.

1916 Oct 5 – The Week’s Casualty List

Pte. S.F. Ferguson, of Melton, has been wounded. (Samuel Fremon Ferguson, 1894, 424783)
Lieut. Percy Willson is reported wounded. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)
Pte. Bert Blakely, Grandview, killed. (Albert Edward Blakely, 1897, 151543)
Pte. Wm. Gilbert, late of the Bank of Commerce staff, wounded. (William Alexander Gilbert, 1895, 150929)

1916 Oct 5 – Fork River

Mr. Shuckutt has returned after having spent the Jewish New Year in Dauphin with friends. Zack brothers merchants have removed their stock to the boarding house building on Main Street and are open for biz. Private Herman Godkin spent a few days visiting Mrs. Williams’ sister. His company expects to leave for overseas shortly. We wish him a safe return. W. King has received a letter from his son Private Maxwell King who is in the 14th general hospital with a shrapnel wound in the knee. He expects soon to be able to return to his company. The day before he went in the drive 5th September he had a talk with Lieutenant Worsey and Pete McCarty of Dauphin telephone man. Both had come through alright up to that time and wished to be remembered to all acquaintances at home.

1916 Oct 5 – Winnipegosis

We have been having a good deal of wind and there is snow in the air. The lake presents a very turbulent and unattractive aspect. Traveling by water just now is not very pleasant.
The “Manitou” is in and has brought down the summer fishermen with their boats and outfits. Preparations for winter fishing are rapidly going forward. If this weather continues we are likely to have and early closing of navigation. The 20th of October is considered as the safe limit.
The Red Cross Society held their regular monthly meeting on the evening of the 2nd. Mr. White finds it necessary to resign from the presidency but accepted the office of vice-president. Names were suggested for the office of the president and the matter of election is to be left in the hands of the executive committee. It is a marvel that so few come out to Red Cross business meetings. Every one claims to be interested in Red Cross work, and well they may be when over one hundred young men from this district have gone over to fight for us, while we sit securely at home beside a warm fire and a big lamp and read of their brass doings in Flanders and France. Come out to the monthly meetings on the first Monday of every month and then you will know what is being done and have a better chance to have a hand in it. The executive cannot get around and invite you personally and besides this is a public affair as much as the governing of your village, so come out and help; both men and women.
Miss Dolly Geekie has returned from Dauphin for a visit. Her many friends are pleased to see her.
Mrs. Frank Hechter had a cable that the 107th Battalion, in which her husband is an officer, had safely reached England.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 3 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 3 – Fined $50 and Costs

Fred Buchij, a Galician, had a row over cattle with another Galician at Valley River. In the melee Buchij ran a pitchfork into the other man. The case was tried before P.M. Munson on Wednesday and Buchij fined $50 and costs. He paid up.

1912 Oct 3 – Killed at Kamsack

Thos. Powell, formerly of Dauphin, was killed at Kamsack on Monday. He was a car repairer. He was working under a car when a train shunted on the track and shoved the car over him. He was badly crushed. Powell was at one time an employee in the railway shops here.

1912 Oct 3 – Threshing Progress

Threshing commenced in several parts of the district this week and will be general if the fine weather continues. A great deal of the grain is being stacked this fall with the object of going ahead with the plowing.

1912 Oct 3 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 25th Sept. All members present.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Sarnia Bridge Co., Supt. Irwin, of C.N.R., the solicitors, the Highway Commissioner, J.P. Grenon and the Million for the Manitoba League.
A report of the public works committee condemning the Bailey Bridge unsafe for traffic was read.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Minster of Public Works be asked to send an engineer to examine the site of the Bailey Bridge and that government aid be asked for to construct it.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the clerk write Supt. Irwin, of the C.N.R., re ditch from Mossey River north to the Sanderson Creek and also re crossing on Cocker Road.
Seiffert – Nicholson – That the council pass a by-law to expropriate a roadway sixty six feet wide along the west side of the C.N. through the N.W. 18-30-18.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask that some of the members of its council meet Reeve Lacey and Coun. Robertson at the bridge across the Mossey River on the boundary line between the two municipalities to consider what is best to be done as the bridge is becoming unsafe.
Nicholson – Toye – That no action be taken towards collecting the price of the Shannon road from Thomas Shannon till Dec. 1st, 1913.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the declarations of Councillors McAuley, Toye and Nicholson for $13.80, $17.70 and $24.30 respectively for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Nicholson – Robertson – That no person be allowed to dump garbage within 200 yards of any residence, street or road in the village of Fork River, and that the Armstrong Trading Co., be notified to remove the refuse deposited by them behind the Orange Hall immediately.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the Minister of the Interior re memorialized to throw the swamp lands in the municipality open for the homesteads.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the C.N.R. be asked to place an agent at Fork River during the shipping season.
A by-law to establish the rate for 1912 was passed, the rates being municipal rate, 12 mills; municipal commissioner’s rate ½ a mill, and the general school rate 4 mills.
McAuley – Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on November 1st.

1912 Oct 3 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. Scrase visited Rural Dean Wiley and on his return visited Sifton on church business.
Thomas Shannon returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The northern Elevator Co., has a gang here putting up an elevator. An elevator is needed here and it will fill a long felt want.
Archie McKerchar and W. Clarkson of Winnipegosis, spent Wednesday evening with the boys at the Orange Hall and report things booming among the fishermen there.
The cattle buyers are getting busy. One shipped part of a car of sheep last week.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Donnie, visited Mrs. J.E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, last week.
Mrs. H. Scrase returned from Winnipegosis after spending a few days with her friends and while there attended the installation of officers of the W.A. at the point.
A large number attended the council meeting but no miracles have been performed so far to the satisfaction of the people as promised year ago.
Mrs. C.L. White, of Winnipegosis, is visiting at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Jim Parker is now living on the old Parker farm and keeps his gang moving. We are always glad to see new faces among us.
Rev. H. Scrase will hold divine service in All Saints’ Church every Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Fork River and Winnipegosis school house every Sunday at 7.30 p.m. and at Sifton on Mondays and Tuesdays evening as will be arranged there by next Sunday.
Nat Little arrived home on the special Saturday evening from his trip south. Specials seem to be the order of the day. Nothing like lots of train service, if they only come the same day as advertised. Nuff said.

1912 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

Fine weather is again with us and our people are wearing pleasant faces. Do you know, people are a good deal like the weather, they change quickly. When the sun is shining all have pleasant faces; when it is dull and overcast long dismal countenance surround us. Give us the man who smiles whether it rains or shines. He’s the one worth while.

Friend, life will frequently grow
Dreary: no fortunate isles
Lie where time’s dun water flow
Give me the fellow who smiles.

Peter McArthur returned to town on Saturday from Dauphin.
All Saints’ Church was the scene of a pretty wedding on Monday, when William Christensen was united in the holy bond of wedlock to Marie Louise Lebel. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Derome of Makinak.
The “old-timers” sketches running in the Herald are quite interesting. Winnipegosis has a few men who are well worth writing up. They have seen the country under all conditions, and what’s more, have made good. We’ll name just a few. peter McArthur, Jos. Grenon, Sr., Tom Whale, and Hughie McKellar, the fish expert. To have Hughie tell the history of the little fishes from the cradle to the table, would prove a mighty interesting chapter. In a future issue of the herald Hugie will be asked to tell what he knows.
Capt. Coffey has been here during the past week. The Capt. is nothing if not optimistic. He looks for a good season fishing.

1918 Oct 3 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. T. Grenier, Makinak, killed in action. (Telesphore Joseph Grenier, 1895, 291698)
Pte. Chas. W. Skinner, Dauphin, wounded and missing. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)
Pte. Harold Tomalin, Dauphin, killed in action. Pte. Tomalin was a fireman on the C.N.R. when he enlisted last January. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Tomalin, reside at Magnet, Man. (Harold Tomalin, 1896, 2129193)

1918 Oct 3 – Dramatic Meeting on Battle Front

One of the Dauphin boys writes the Herald of a dramatic meeting he had with another local boy at night. “We were,” he writes; “on the move and had come to a stop on account of the congestion of traffic. A fleet of Fritz’s planes came out and dropped about fifty bombs around us. Looking around by the light that the bombs made I saw another Dauphin boy about ten feet away. We only had time for a handshake and wish for “good luck” when the traffic moved on.

1918 Oct 3 – Fork River

Mr. Pettit, of Winnipeg, paid this burgh a visit in the interest of the new Victory War Bond campaign.
Mrs. Tait, of Indian Head, Sask., is visiting at her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Timewell.
Mr. Love has arrived from Lake Manitoba and has taken charge of the Salada School, west of town.
Max King was a visitor to Winnipeg for a few days on business with the Military branch.
We notice Dauphin merchants are closing their stores at 6.30 p.m. What a contrast to some of our stores in this burg which are kept open much longer hours and sometimes on Sundays. The latter should be stopped at once.
James McDonald has finished his residence and moved into it.
T.A. Briggs has received a shipment of horses for Bonanza farm. The man who is able to receive a bunch of horses these days must have a bonanza bank account.
Fork River farms are in demand a good prices. Several deals are likely to go through shorty.
A Herald subscriber tells your correspondent he is mistaken when he states that “King potato” has not been crowned. He sure is the crowned potentate of this part of the country at any rate.

1918 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

RED CROSS NOTICE.
The annual meeting of the Red Cross Society will be held on Tuesday evening, the 8th of October, at 8 o’clock, in Rex Hall. Every member is requested to be present. A report of work done during the year will be made by the secretary, and officers will be elected for the coming year. It is for the purpose of electing officers that a full attendance is requested.
Don’t forget that this work is for the wounded men of our army and navy, who have been winning the victories we are so jubilant about just now.

E.L. MACARTHUR,
Sec.-Treasurer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 18 – 1913

1913 Sep 18 – Dynamite Will be Used

Although the lake at the point where young Romeo Fleury was drowned last week has been thoroughly dragged and tramped no trace of the body has been found. Dynamite will now be used to bring the body to the surface.

1913 Sep 18 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams and family left for Winnipegosis’ summer resort for a few days.
Mrs. Tarbath and family left for their home in Winnipeg after spending a few weeks wit her sister, Mrs. S. Reid.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughter returned from a visit among friends at Dauphin.
The Mowat correspondent has woke up again after being dormant several months, and remarks that the energetic Herald’s correspondent’s criticism on road making, scrapers, etc., is about right, but goes on to state I never refer to mail matte which are going on around our P.O. For the benefit of our Mowat friend I beg to state that I do not know of anything to say against the management of our P.O. here. The P.O. inspector was here a short time ago and found everything in order. There has been no friction here since the Oak Brae P.O. was changed to fresh quarters. This act did not seem to agree with the Mowat correspondent. This reminds us of the Bailey Bridge here. It was condemned by our council over a year ago and notices put up and nothing has been done to it up o date. The people have to go over it safe. A child was thrown out of a rig at this spot and barely escaped with her life. Again the Tilt Bridge has been in use for years and never was properly finished. The Cameron Bridge stringers are so rotten you can pick some of them to pieces. Despite this our council has left its tenders for another bridge; this in the face of a largely signed petition from the ratepayers opposing it.
The ratepayers invited the reeve and council to meet them in the Orange Hall last Saturday night to hear their views on the bridge question and other matters. Only one councillor had backbone enough to face the music. Under the circumstances those present decided there was only one thing to do and that was have a general housecleaning in December. The majority of those present left to serenade Professor Weaver and his bride, who arrived home from their wedding trip. We wish Gordon and his wife long life and happiness.
James Campbell and wife passed through here on their way to spend the winter at the north end of the lake. Jimmy is well-known here and one of the right sort and we wish them both happiness and prosperity.
A very pleasant afternoon was spent recently at the home of Mrs. S. and Mrs. C. Bailey on the Mossey River by their lady friends. Amusements were indulged in and our old friend Sam was quite at home as umpire. If our friends get as efficient with the baseball bat as Ma is with the rolling pin, there’s nothing left but to give them the franchise with as good grace as we can and save our pates.
The harvest festival will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church next Sunday, Sept. 21st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
Don’t forget the clearing sale at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store. Now you have your chance. The prices you can’t beat.

POST OFFICE STAFF REPLY.
To the Editor of the Herald:
SIR: – We notice in last week’s issue of the Press some remarks from Mowat regarding our correspondent for the Herald in connection with municipal matters, which we have no particular interest in, but we wish to draw the attention of our readers to the items regarding mail matter trouble at Fork River P.O., which are very much out of place at best as coming from a gentleman and one who holds a position in our midst from whom we expect better things, from whom we should be taking example. We would like to say that personally we are not aware of any trouble in mail matters at this office and if our friend has any complaint he has up to now not made any mention of same to any of our staff here. If there is any trouble we should like to hear it straight and we shall certainly remedy it. If it is a case of soreness or petty personal spite, we shall ignore it. Some of us have made mistakes and are only too willing to admit it but we like to hear our faults to our faces. We are sorry to have taken up so much of your valuable space and thank you for same.

POST OFFICE STAFF.
Fork River.

1913 Sep 18 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Coben is in Dauphin to visit her husband who is in the hospital. Friends here were sorry to hear he had to have his foot taken off.
Mrs. White is visiting with friends at Dauphin.
The fishing has been extra good and large quantities are being brought down from the north end of the lake. Some of the fishermen have returned to town.
On Friday evening the 12th inst. A few of Miss Mabel Shannon’s friends gave her a very pleasant surprise by assembling at the house without invitation and suspending the amusements of the evening to read the following memorial: –
“We the undersigned, express our regret that miss Mabel Shannon is leaving Winnipegosis, but we feel that the business training she is the undergo will enlarge her sphere of usefulness and we wish to show our estimation of her high moral character and our appreciation of her services in post office, church and society by the accompanying token of remembrance from her friends at Winnnipegosis.”
The Rev. R. Turnbull made a very humourous and appropriate speech, and Miss Hayes presented the gift, gloves and bank cheque. Mr. Hulme made a few closing remarks.
The young people enjoyed themselves until time was forgotten. The moon seem especially kind to them as it was light as day, excusing to some extent the lateness of the hour. The entertainment closed with best wishes for Miss Shannon’s success in her business course.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 15 – 1910

1910 Sep 15 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 15 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 15 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 15 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 12 – 1912

1912 Sep 12 – Arm Broken in Runaway

A spirited team belonging to Geo. Lampard ran away on Wednesday afternoon. The driver, Thos. McKay, was thrown out of the rig and had his left arm broken.

1912 Sep 12 – Infantry for Dauphin

A movement is on foot in town to organize a military regiment. A preliminary meeting was held in Harvey & Bowman’s office on Monday evening, when Dr. Walker was appointed chairman and L. Shand secretary. It is proposed to have four companies if possible. A public meeting will be held shortly at which Col. Steele will be the speaker and afterwards officers selected.

1912 Sep 12 – Ethelbert

The awful thunderstorm, and the great rain of Wednesday has left things in very bad shape here, and unless we have a spell of fine weather the prospects are none too good.
K. McLean is still improving and is able to be up and about, but he is still very weak and thin.
All the material and engine for the elevator are on the ground, but as yet no signs of the builders. They will have to get a hustle on.
There were two cases before R. Skaife on Saturday. Mrs. J. Rewniak asked that her husband, J. Rewniak, be bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months. The evidence went to show that John had been persistently ill-treating her ever since their marriage over two years ago, and that he had very recently threatened to shoot her father, an old man who is close on seventy, with the handle of a hay fork twice on the arm, making it black because he tried to protect her. He was bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months or forfeit $100.
The next case was a mixed up affair. Marko Dubyk sold a pig to N. Tkatchzuk, for five dollars, the pig to be delivered as soon as possible. Marko brought the pig to town, met some friends; they went and had drinks together, and entrusted the pig to Olexa Stassuk, to take to Tkatchzuk, but instead he took it home. Then he have it to S. Basaraba, who put it in his stye, and kept it for some weeks. Ultimely Olexa asked $3 for Tkatchzuk, and he should have his pig. This Tkatchzuk refused to give, but instead he wanted the pig, and $5.50 as a sort of fine for them keeping the pig. The case was decided as follows: Basaraba was ordered to take the pig to Tkatchzuk, and without any compensation for the feed of the pig. O. Stassuk had to pay the costs of the court, as his share of the fun, and Tkatchzuk as told that it was only the magistrate who had the privilege of extracting penalties.
Later Rewniak wanted the magistrate to order his wife to go back to him, but he was advised to treat her kindly in future, and then perhaps she might go back. But Maru says no, never.
The station has got the name “Ethelbert” printed in bold letters at both ends of the building, so that all who run can read.

1912 Sep 12 – Fork River

Sydney Howlett, of E. Million, spent a few days here and took a trip to Winnipegosis on business.
Garent Lacey has returned home after a few months vacation south looking for a high spot.
“Bishop” McCartney took a trip to Winnipegosis hunting his carriage. “Bejiggered if they get it again,” says the Bishop.
Nat Little has returned from a week’s visit to the States.
Our Mowat friend seems surpassed to see a gasoline boat about the size of a coffee pot, go from Winnipegosis to Lake Dauphin and return, and pats himself on the back, as its the dredge that did the trick. Why good sized boats loaded with freight passed up and down the Mossey, fifteen and twenty years ago.
Mrs. Wm. King who has been visiting at Vancouver and California. She says the Fork looks more like home.
D. Kennedy has purchased another “gee gee” for his delivery wagon. Just see the dust fly.
Duck shooting is the order of the day. It’s hard on the feathers.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from a visit to Dauphin and Sifton.
Thomas Shannon has been treating fall wheat for the farmers for seed and several have commenced sowing it.
We are informed some one is looking for a schooner to find the levels after the storm and he is not alone. There’s schooners and schooners.
Lost or strayed, the minutes of three or four council meetings.
Teacher, “What is it Tommy.” “Dad says we will get them all right if we had an assistant. We must not expect too much after such an electric storm. It’s so depressing.”
John Clements and family of Dauphin, arrived to take off his crop in the Chase farm.
Nat Little has put on a new wagon for delivering cream at the station.
The planer has started up again, and Billy Williams is making the shavings fly.

1912 Sep 12 – Sifton

Stephen Kosy’s stable was struck by lightening last Thursday. There were in the stable, a team of horses, harness and fifty hens. Fortunately the horse broke the board and ran out but the harness and hens were burned. Stephen had his stable insured.
On the same date Hnat Skarnpa’s stable was burned, lightening being the cause.
The harvest has been checked for a few days by bad weather.
Four of our well-known citizens have formed a company and will build a big store. Our Fedor of Blue Store does not like to see any more stores in own. He would rather buy out Pinkas and have the while business to himself.
The rumour is abroad that in a short time some of the Ruthenians intend to organize a co-operative store. Building is to begin next week.
Thos. Ramsay is busy building a new postoffice and boarding house.
Paul Wood has bought three lots in block one from Nicola Haschak.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 10 – 1910

1910 Sep 10 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 10 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 10 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 10 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 4 – 1913

1913 Sep 4 – Ethelbert

An extraordinary general meeting of the shareholders of the Ruthenian Trading Company, Limited, was held at two o’clock at Ethelbert, on the 28th day of August. The president, Mr. M. Pacholok was in the chair. The president explained that the meeting had been called for the purpose of considering the question of increasing the capital stock of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars by the creation and issue of six hundred new shares of the par value of twenty-five each. The matter was then left to the meeting for discussion. After a long discussion a by-law of the directors passed the 26th day of July, authorizing the increase of capital of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars was sanctioned and confirmed by special resolution of the shareholders.
The Ruthenian Literary Society, under the leadership of K.F. Slipetz, its president, arranged a programme of giving lectures to the farmers. The subjects that are taken up are: organization, economy and mixed farming. We shall be very glad to get particulars and, if possible, regulations of farmers’ societies. This need is very necessary for us. We, as farmers, don’t want to be left behind the other farmers but must struggle or the survival of the fittest for existence.
Mr. Hill, an Ethelbert pioneer, is renewing acquaintance here. We are always gad to see old friends.
Some of the prominent Ruthenian farmers at Garland are forming a company with the idea of buying up the other business there.
The construction of a Greek Catholic Church at Garland has been postponed on account of some members objecting to the transfer of the said church under the name of Bishop Budka.

1913 Sep 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Avid Briggs, of Brandon, is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Potts, of Neepawa, returned home after a week’s vacation with Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat.
Miss Gilanders and brother, of Brandon, returned home after spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lockhart.
John Mathews and Fred Storrar are assisting Mr. T.N. Briggs, the bonanza farmer, with his harvest.
We are pleased to hear the town orator has recovered from his recent illness. Some of the fair sex remarked he was becoming thin as its hard on the constitution sitting on the sidewalk without a sunshade.
Mrs. Fred Cooper and Miss Alice Godkin are visiting with friends at Dauphin.
Alfred Snelgrove, who has been on the dredge at Regina all summer, returned home and is of the opinion there are worse places than Fork River.
We notice the hum of Tom Shannon’s and King Bros.’ machinery threshing a few loads of grain. Fred Cooper and Billy Williams have their outfits ready to start as soon as the grain is fit.
Dr. Ross and W.H. Morison, of Dauphin, passed through here with their automobile on Tuesday. The roads north of here were so soft that they had to return and take the train from Fork River to Winnipegosis. The appropriation money for the north road must have miscarried.
Jack Angers, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end in town renewing acquaintances.
W. Howitson, of Winnipegosis, is clerking in A.T. Co. sore at this point for a time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 31 – 1911

1911 Aug 31 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Kemp of Ontario, are visiting at the home of Mr. Sam Bailey on the Mossey River.
A children’s service was held on Sunday afternoon in All Saints’ Anglican Church. The Altar and church were tastefully decorated by the S.S. children and superintendent Mr. G.M. Littler preached an appropriate sermon and Miss M. Nixon presided at the organ. The service was greatly appreciated.
Mr. Jack Robinson, an old-timer is visiting at Mr. T. Shannon’s. John was unfortunate enough to run into a telephone wire that was down and spoilt his countenance for a time. It is very dangerous to have wire down across the roads.
Our old friend the Jackdraw claims it takes brains to write those seventeen articles and its the first time we suspected he had any. That is to judge by his reasoning power lately.
Mr. G.M. Littler is changing Sunday with Rev. Mr. Nash of Gilbert Plains. There will be baptismal and holy communion services in All Saints’ Church Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 22 – 1912

1912 Aug 22 – Ethelbert

P.G. Keays, assistant to the chief games guardian, was in Ethelbert for a couple of days lately to see the P.M. anent a recent case of shooting chickens out of season and went away satisfied that the party convicted had got off easy.
Kenneth McLean, we are glad to say, is improving in health, but slowly. The Dr. thinks he may be allowed to get up this week, all being favourable.
Mrs. A. Willy and Mrs. McViears are visiting at the home of the stations operator here. Mrs. Willy left for home the early part of the week.
Mr. Finnen is here trying to interest the people in the insurance business.
M. Troy, of the Massey-Harris Co., has been here for some days conferring with the agent.

1912 Aug 22 – Fork River

James McDonald, of Minitonas, is staying with his old friend, Nat Little.
Mr. Wade, of East Bay, was staying with W. Davis a few days and took several photographs of this part of the district, we are informed.
Wm. Stonehouse has been appointed constable by the council. They are to be contended for getting a wiggle on in this one case anyway.
Wm. Northam has taken a trip as far west as Weyburn, Sask., and intends stating their a short time.
Harold Shannon, returned from a short stay at Winnipeg.
We notice Joseph Grenon, Sr., has been given the management of the fish hatchery at Snake Island.
Rev. H.H. Scrase returned after a few days spent at Dauphin and Sifton on business.
Professor Millard, ventriloquist was here for a few days. A large crowd turned out to see his moving pictures in the Orange Hall. The show was well worth the money.
The young folks of this part enjoyed a very pleasant evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs, where they celebrated the coming of age of their son, Duncan.
Several carloads of timber are being unloaded for the elevator.
Mrs. J. McAuley, of Winnipegosis, returned home after a week spent with Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1910

1910 Aug 8 – Mossey River Council

A meeting of the council was held at Fork River on Thursday, July 14th, all the members present.
The minutes of two previous meetings were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Paddock – That the clerk write the superintendent of the C.N.R. and ask for an increased train service on the Winnipegosis branch.
Lacey-Fleming – That the clerk write to the superintendent of the C.N.R. and request that he appoint some responsible person to take charge of freight delivered at Fork River until it is called for by the person to whom it is consigned.
Hunt-Toye – That the clerk instruct Mr. Pruder re Road Commissioner’s certificate – that he must settle the matter with Mr. Walmsley.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Reeve and Coun. Paddock be a committee to investigate Mrs. McCleods claims.
Toye-Fleming – That Councillors Lacey, Nicholson and Hunt be a committee to see Messrs. Whale and Davis and secure a title to Fork River cemetery.
Lacey- Nicholson – That the Reeve, when in Winnipeg secure to lay out a road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Lacey-Toye – That all pathmasters notify the clerk or Road Commissioner of the ward when any serious obstruction or damage has occurred in their respective beats.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the clerk be instructed to write Thos. Shannon and notify him to repair the roadway damaged by him not later than July 18th.
Hunt-Paddock – That motions 5, 6, 7, and 8 of meeting March 13 and motions 15, 16, 17, and 18 of meeting May 21, be expunged.
Lacey-Toye – That S. Bailey be engaged as road commissioner on Main road between Fork River and Winnipegosis at $2.50 per day and that he be empowered to secure the necessary labour at lowest possible cost and to commence work as soon as possible.
Nicholson-Hunt – That the clerk notify M.W. Snelgrove that the Council is prepared to settle for the Shannon road as soon as advised to do so by its solicitor.
Lacey-Fleming – That Road Commissioner Toye’s account for letting and inspecting work amounting to $22.50 to be paid.

A by-law authorizing the loan of $1000 at Bank of Ottawa was passed.
Fleming-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1910 Aug 8 – Fork River (too late for last issue)

D.F. Wilson returned from seeing the Winnipeg Exhibition last week.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Lockhart left here Monday to attend Brandon fair.
Mrs. S. Bailey returned from Winnipeg last Saturday.
The crops around this district are looking excellent and providing the ether last good a bumper harvest will be the result and the farmers are jubilant.
D. Shinks returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
The Church of England picnic which was held at Lake Dauphin last Tuesday was a great success, it was an ideal day and quite a number drove from Fork River. The sports were good and the boys and girls had a good time. The sack race was won by R. King, 1st; E.W. King, 2nd; three legged race, F. King and C. Wilson; married women’s race, Mrs. Kennis, 2nd; long jump E. King; horse race, D. Briggs; egg race, Mrs. G. Shannon, 1st; Mrs. T. Shannon, 2nd. S. Gower and the Rev. H.H. Scrase were busy all the afternoon looking after the sports etc., so as to give everybody a good time. Football between Mowat and Fork River was a hard fought game won by Fork River 1-0; baseball was also indulged in. Mr. F.B. Lacey and S. Gower got the booth and grounds ready and quite a number went on the lake in boats provided.

1910 Aug 8 – North Lake

Mr. and Mrs. F.B. Lacey paid a visit to North Lake last week.
Messrs. Weaver, and Shrog have been stranded on the shores of Lake Dauphin for a few days owning to their raft being unable to ride the waves. They hope to make Million Lighthouse some time this fall.
J. Spearing, who has been in Dauphin Hospital undergoing on operation is back with us again.
Any one wishing to see a good field of wheat should have a look at Tom Glendenning’s. It’s a dandy.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 21 – 1910

1910 Jul 21 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson is visiting Winnipeg this week.
Mr. Stonehouse is building a house for P. Ellis in town.
F.B. Lacey Councilor, was taken sick in the council chambers last Thursday. The incessant heat was the cause of it.
S. Bailey has been appointed by the Reeve and Council to look after the new road now being build from Fork River to Winnipegosis. This is what has been needed for years.
Mrs. Scrase has been visiting friends at Winnipegosis.
The Orangeman’s picnic here on the 12th was a very successful event. The following is a list of the winners of the day’s sports.
Boys’ sixteen years and under – H. Shannon, A. King.
Needle contest for ladies – Mrs. Shannon, Mrs. Hafenbrak.
Men’s pony race – H. Shannon, H. Little.
Men’s sack race 50 yards – W. King, F. Wilson.
Men’s hop skip and jump – R. King, S. Campbell.
200 yard race for men – R. King, W. King.
Men’s long running jump – J. Lockhart, R. King.
Ladies race 25 years and older – Mrs. H. Snelgrove, Mrs. Shannon.
Men’s relief race 50 yards – R. King, D. Briggs, C. Wilson and H. Benner.
Baseball between South Bay and Fork River, South Bay won.
Girls’ race 5 years and under – G. Dallas, B. Rowe.
Boys’ race five years and under – D. Lockhart, Sloper John.
Girls’ race eight years and under – E. Hunt, E. Shannon.
Boys’ race eight years and under – T. Lockhart, M. Brasduse.
Girls’ race ten years and under – H. Shannon, N. William.
Boys’ race ten years and under – M. Cooper, W. Shannon.
Girls’ race twelve years and under – E. Storrar, M. Brasduse.
Boys’ race twelve years and under – S. Fillipcuke.
Girls’ race sixteen years and under – J. Paddock, L. Clarke.
Lively game of baseball between Fork River and Winnipegosis was won by Fork River. Score 19 – 4.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 13 – 1911

1911 Jul 13 – Four Fingers Taken Off

At the farm of D.E. Collison, Ochre River, on Monday, a young Galician lad had four fingers of his right hand taken off by a crushing machine. He was brought to town for medical treatment.

1911 Jul 13 – Fork River

Mrs. George Shannon was a visitor to Dauphin this week on business.
The annual meeting of the ratepayers of Mossey River School, 999, was held Tuesday the 4th, to elect a trustee, Mr. D.F. Wilson, retiring, Mr. A. Hunt was elected to fill the vacancy. The motion for moving the school house to Fork River was lost by the chairman giving the resting vote in favour of the present site; t is a pity as most of the scholars have 1 1/2 miles to walk to school.
Several famers here and Winnipegosis took a trip to Dauphin to hear R.L. Borden the great Conservative Leader speak. The Borden express passed through here on Friday morning with the ambulance car on behind in charge of Dr. Medd and a live Whale.
A large number of people from here took in the English Church Excursion from Gilbert Plains to Winnipegosis, among them the members of the Board of Trade who chartered a Winnipegosis liner for a sail and report the time of their lives.
In looking over the items published of the minutes of Mossey River Council it states they have taken over the Fork River Cemetery; and engaged Dr. Medd as health officer. As these two items are coupled together your correspondent would suggest our health officer get our cemetery committee together and confine them to their last resting place as the pigs and cattle are running over everything and half the summer gone and no fence to fit to keep stock out.
A heavy rain and hail storm passed through here on Friday evening, doing considerable damage.
Miss Finch and miss Hill ex-school teachers of the Mossey River School are spending their holidays at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
Miss Pearl Wilson returned from a visit to Mr. Humphreys of Dauphin.
Mr. A. Hodgson stayed over to help the boys out with the Orange Picnic on the 11th.
Miss Alice and Ethel Finch of Carman are visiting friends at Fork River.

1911 Jul 13 – Sifton

Mrs. Wm. Riler and family left on Tuesday week for Netherhill, Sask., where they are intending to reside.
Miss Scott, who was a visitor at the mission for a few days, returned to Neepawa on Thursday. Miss Scott intents leaving for eastern Ontario shortly where she will spend the balance of the summer visiting with friends.
An electric storm passed over the village on Friday. Mr. Felix Marantz lost three valuable horses having been struck by lightening and the fourth one received a severe shock.
The wild strawberry season has about closed for this year. The strawberries seem to have been in much demand, much more than could be procured to supply.
Mr. Wm. Barrie is leaving on a business trip to Victoria B.C. and other coast points.
Mr. D.R. Barlow, contract of building the R.C. Mission Church here.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 2 – 1910

1910 Jun 2 – Fork River

Percy Gentleman arrived from England last week and paid several friends here a visit. He intends to homestead in this country.
Wm. King is busy these days looking after the registration.
Miss Collins from McCreary is visiting her sister here.
Tag-day caused a bit of excitement and a fair sum was realized.
A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the home of Mrs. Ballard’s Winnipegosis, and it was decided to send a delegate to attend the annual meeting in Winnipeg in June. Mrs. Ballard, vice-president, was the choice of the meeting.
The Methodist concert held last week was very well attended considering the busy time. The chair was occupied by the Rev. Mr. Rowan and this programme started with a chorus entitled Welcome; recitation, Ray Ellis; solo by Mrs. Clawson; play entitled “An Interrupted Proposal”; song by Mrs. Clawson and Mr. Snelgrove; dialog, Out All Around; recitation by Miss Tyndall and the play “My Turn Next” was very well done; chorus, “Good Night.” The evening came to a close about midnight. Refreshments and ice cream were served, dancing was kept up till early morning.
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. T. Shannon died last week. The funeral service was taken at the home by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. Quite a number came and showed their sympathy and proceeded to the cemetery when the committal service was held.
A social and dance is to be held at the home of Mrs. W. King on Tuesday evening, June 7th at 8:30. Admission 10 cents. Proceeds for the Women’s Auxiliary.

1910 Jun 2 – North Lake

John Bolinski made a trip to Dauphin last week. Our roads are now in fairly good shape for travelling.
F.B. Lacey has been instrumental in starting another school in this district.
The grain around here is looking good.
Mr. Bell of Fork River has purchased the Mazurink Farm.
Jacob Strasdin has four colts this year.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 26 – 1910

1910 May 26 – Sentenced to Three Years

John Demoria, the young half-breed who was arrested by Constable Hunking at Dauphin last week for housebreaking, was tried before Geo. O. Bellamy, P.M. on the charge and found guilty. He was sentenced to three years in the reformatory at Portage la Prairie, where he was taken on Saturday morning.

1910 May 26 – Fork River

A Conservative meeting was held last Wednesday in D.F. Wilson’s office.
H.P. Nicholson of Dauphin, visited here last Friday.
R. Hunt from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Cooper from Brantford, came up last Friday’s train.
Miss Finch and Miss C. Bailey paid Winnipegosis a visit last Friday.
Mayor Sparling of Dauphin was up here last week looking over some farms.
The Armstrong Trading Company of Winnipegosis will shortly open up an up-to-date store in this village.
Mrs. C. Smith and family who have been residing here for two years left this week for Calvin, North Dakota.
The Mossey River Municipality held a meeting at Winnipegosis last Saturday when some important business was done.
A very important Orangemen’s meeting was held in the Orange Hall last Wednesday when four of the members were advanced to the Royal Scarlet Chapter. Seven gentlemen from Dauphin came up and a very pleasant time came to a close in the early morning.

1910 May 26 – Winnipegosis

A very impressive memorial service for Edward VII was held on Friday, May 20th in the Presbyterian Church. Previous to the service in the church, the children of the day school under the charge of Reeve Grenon and Mr. Shannon paraded the streets en route to the church. The congregation was a large one and the service was conducted by Rev. H.H. Scrase (English Church minister). A brilliant address on the life and character of our late King was given by the Rev. W.E. Rowan (Methodist minister) and was highly appreciated. The Rev. Mr. McKay (Presbyterian minister) also took part in the service. The Dead March in Saul was impressively rendered on the organ by Miss McArthur.
The Quarterly Board of the Methodist Church was held on Friday evening under the chairmanship of the Rev. A.E. Smith of Dauphin, the chairman of the District. All the departments of the church work were reported to be in a flourishing condition, and a hearty invitation to remain as minister of the church for another year was extended to the highly esteemed minister, Rev. W.E. Rowan. Mr. Rowan’s acceptance of the invitation gave great satisfaction to the members of the Board.
On Tuesday the 24th the ladies held a picnic for the purpose of raising funds to procure a baseball outfit. A good time was enjoyed by everyone and the baseball enthusiasts will at once organize and get the game started.
C.F. Stewart, who was spending a few days in town returned to Dauphin Monday.
H.W. Grenon has built and opened up a poolroom and tobacco store.
Tag-day, the ladies were kept quite busy all day, the result of their untiring efforts being about $100.
McArthur’s boats returned from the north bringing in a raft of about 540,000 feet of lumber.