Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 19 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 19 – Fork River

Herman Godkin, real estate agent of Dauphin, spent a few days with W. Williams.
We have been informed that Mr. Walter Clark was fortunate to get a moose. The head is said to be the finest seen in these parts with a spread of forty-four inches.
Sid. Gower, engineer, returned from Dauphin and intends working with W. Williams this winter.
We were pleased to meet Peter Robinson, an old-timer, in town. He is spending a short time with his parents on the Mossey River.
The C.N. telegraph gang is here renewing the poles, which work was needed.
The Newell moving picture show that was booked for Tuesday and Wednesday did not come off at the orange Hall for lack of accommodation. We need a good boarding house here for the travelling public.
There was not a very large turner to the masquerade ball in the Orange Hall on account of the farmers being busy threshing.
Mr. McIntosh, of Valley River, was here on business.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase will hold a Xmas service in the school house, Winnipegosis on Xmas morning at eleven o’clock, and in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, in the evening at eight o’clock.

1912 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Malley, from Brandon, arrived in town Tuesday. We trust the weather will be favourable for his trip up the lake.
The municipal elections are on now. May we hope that the wiser promises made by the candidates be fulfilled by the successful ones. We certainly need more passable roads, and here be it remarked that if our church wardens finds transportation between here and Fork River too difficult to accomplish in the future, the vision of the rectory, seen here, will have to materialize.
A Christmas morning service will be held in the school house 11 a.m. Come and help sing the carols insuring a “Merry Christmas.”
The Santa Claus fund seems to be a popular one. Perhaps it is because he is such an adept of minding his own business. He is remembering our bachelors with many plum puddings.
The Card Circle will be closed this week for the year. It is a matter of serious consideration if it should be reopened as so many lovers of the game do not enter before 9 p.m., which is near the time when wise and honest heads seek their rest; besides beige started to while pleasantly away a couple of hours, thus inviting congenial spirits, and finding ourselves entertained by a stranger proves a mental lack which should more advantagely be supplied at home, nevertheless we trust for a closing game this week that will reveal its true merit and may the winners of the prizes make good use of them. A certain Mr. Webber is to be thanked for the gentleman’s, which is a gun metal watch.
If we hurt ourselves as much by falling when climbing up hill, as we would so doing when running down hill, no one could be blamed for refusing to climb; but one of nature’s mercies is that we cannot.
The Christian League held a very successful meeting ask week.
The hunting season being closed may the stronger sex once more settle down to “the daily round.”
No moose, no heads, no tales.
Wm. Parker, of this Armstrong Trading Co. is up the lake or out to Pine Creek auditing books.
The young people of our town have a bond of sympathy with Dauphin ones in the difficulty (met here) of preparing a skating rink – see the lake.

1918 Dec 19 – Had Both Legs Crushed

Orval McInnes, a boy about 15 years of age, met with a bad accident at Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The boy was assisting to put ice in an ice house when the block that was being raised slipped from the grippers and fell on his legs, crushing them badly. He was brought to the hospital here the same afternoon.

1918 Dec 19 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Dec. 14.
Heath Officer Dr. Medd was through this district this week and has closed the school for the time being as some of the scholars are down with influenza.
D. Crerar has sold the Hudson’s Bay farm for a good figure. What about the herd law now?
Mr. Laidlaw has finished threshing. The cattle will have a chance to feed considerable land next spring.
Hechter Bros.’ gasoline tractor has arrived and they intend to turn over considerable land next spring.
W. Paddock has broke considerable land this year. Steam and gasoline engines materially aid in preparing the land for crop.
Mr. Winger has sold his flock of sheep to Mr. Venables for a good figure. There is no doubt but sheep pay well and in the future more will be kept in the district.
Mr. Waddell, from Missouri, is the new teacher engaged for the Bicton Heath School. It is up to us to “show Mr. Waddell.”
F. Sharp has completed his house and stable. The buildings are the right type for the farmers and we hope to see more of them erected.
Thos. Toye, our local weather prophet, says the winter will be a mild one. Tom, it may be said, does not make his observations from charts, but seeks his weather lore from wild animals, such as the muskrat, which he says you can depend on.

1918 Dec 19 – Fork River

Chas. Bugg, of Ochre River, was in town lately renewing acquaintances.
Pte. Arthur Shannon is home, having received his discharge.
The election is over and we are now already to shake hands and enter into the Christmas spirit, good will toward all men.

1918 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

The Dominion Government is making headway with the cutting of a canal at Meadow Portage which, when completed, will open up a waterway with Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Manitoba. The land through which the canal will run has already been cleared and boarded and in the spring about 600 men will be employed doing excavation work.
A card party, in aid of the Red Cross, is being held every Wednesday evening in the Rex theatre. A good musical program is provided and refreshments are served.
A special Xmas service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 22nd, in the Union Church. Special Xmas hymns and solos will help to make the service attractive. Subject will be “The Brotherhood of Man.” A hearty welcome is extended to all.
On the afternoon of Xmas day a Xmas tree entertainment will be held in the above church and a huge tree loaded with toys and decorations will be exhibited to delight the hearts of the children. Santa Claus has arranged to give every child a present from the tree.
A bank will shortly be established at Winnipegosis.
A recent traveller on the Dauphin and Winnipegosis express complains bitterly of having to have an extra washing day in the same week owning to the dirty condition of the train.
The Armstrong Independent Fisheries is sending ten teams up the lake this week to bring in fish. Other companies also have teams employed bringing down fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 18 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 18 – Ethelbert

Postmaster Skaite is still confined to his home by illness. Mrs. S. is attending to the duties of the office during her husband’s absence.
The deer season is over and quite a few people here are dining on venison.
Sleighing is needed to give an impetus to the wood business.
Clerk K.F. Slipetz was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
A branch of the Grain Growers’ Association was organized here last week under favourable auspices. The branch starts of with a membership of 60 and the members are all enthusiastic. The following are the officers: President, M. Pacholok; vice, J. Pachkowski; sec.-treas., K.F. Slipetz.

1913 Dec 18 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon returned from a few days visit to Dauphin.
W. Williams has left with his outfit to take out lumber on his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Miss Bessy Wilson returned from a few weeks visit among friends in Sifton and Dauphin.
D. Kennedy has purchased a handsome pair well-bred colts for drivers.
Mrs. J. Parker and daughter left for Winnipeg for a short visit.
Mrs. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is having a week’s visit with her sister, D. Kennedy.
The Orangemen of Fork River appreciate very much the kindness shown them by the ladies in coming out and cleaning out their large hall gratis. The brethren wish to tender them a hearty vote of thanks for same.
D. Briggs, of Brandon, and Mr. Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, had the good luck to get a moose each.
Those who shot large game are, Harold Shannon, a fine elk; Fred King, moose; Frank Hafenbrak, moose; S. Munro, elk; J. Richardson, moose.
On Friday night the ladies of Fork River gave a ball in the Orange Hall. The ladies supplied the refreshments and paid a fee of 25 cents. The gentlemen were free. There was a large turnout and a most enjoyable evening.

1919 Dec 18 – Fork River

The Unity Christmas tree of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River will be held in the Orange Hall on the evening of Monday, 22nd inst. This promises to be the event of the season. A large attendance is requested as Santa is bringing Mrs. Santa. Admission, gentlemen 50 cents; ladies and children free.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 12 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 12 – Fork River

Miss E. French, of Grandview, is staying with Mrs. John Clemens.
Mrs. I. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor of Mr. Duncan Kennedy’s.
Some persons have been kind enough to visit the storehouse of one of our citizens and help themselves to meat, and he takes this means of advising them that he has laid in a stock of ammunition and is ready for target practice.
S. Reid returned from a short visit to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is spending a week among her numerous friends in Dauphin.
A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the home of Mrs. Nat Little on Dec. 4th. A few braved the snow storm and after business was done an enjoyable time was spent. It was arranged that the next meeting be held at the home of the vice-president, Mrs. Lacey, of Oak Brae, in January at the call of the president, Mrs. W. King.
Jack Richardson has been elected by acclamation councillor for Ward 1 and we believe he will be all right. No doubt we will miss the usual display of fireworks when we ask for anything. We’ll get used to it in time I guess. Say, it’s nice to be able to bind and stack your crop in good time, while others have to flounder around in mud and snow and yet we are all expected to cash up. What for? “Keep Smiling.”
Dear “Freddy” asked for another term to finish what he didn’t do last year? He reminds us of “Sir Wilfy” and the Hudson Bay Railway. It’s the same old chestnut at election time. Nuff said.
The annual public Xmas tree under auspices of the W.A. and All Saints; Sunday School will be held in the Orange Hall Xmas eve. A programme provided. Everybody come, bring the kiddies and have some fun.

1912 Dec 12 – Winnipegosis

The Women’s Auxiliary held a meeting last week at Mrs. Kitcheson’s that was very encouraging to its members, who, without any graves to tend can say “we are seven,” though they have the problem to solve of the “how” and “why” they are to raise funds to build a church. The proceeds to be realized from the concert to be held on the 20th will be allocated to the mission debt contacted last summer. Regret is felt that we have not a residing minister here. We know Mr. King deserves credit for the faithful way he succeeds in bring us a Sunday supply. Mr. Noble is constant to his duties and taking circumstances into consideration we do not fare so badly.
The Roman Catholics held mass last Sunday morning, Father Derome officiating.
The C. League last week entertained a fair number (not withstanding the storm) at their months social evening.
The Card Circle the last two evening was of indifferent issue, the prizes being won by draw. In future admission is free.
Mrs. Cunliffe has suffered from a fall down the step of her home. We trust she has not sustained any serious injury.
Miss Parker, of Valley River, came in on Saturday to visit her sister, Mrs. Hippisley.
The late storm, which was of the blizzard kind, has greatly subsided though drifts are forming. The hunters will be delighting in the advantage it affords them.
Mr. Thompson, of Portage la Prairie succeeded in securing a moose on Saturday last. Messrs. Starling and Lunn arrived on Saturday from Portage to join his party. Dr. Medd is recalled from his outing to attend Miss Whale, who is ill from the effects of a bad cold.
Mr. Newell’s moving pictures were of an edifying character as well as amusing. He has left town for Fork River.
Mr. McNichol is very low at present.
The late H.B. Stand has the appearance, from a new coat of paint, of possibly being an attractive centre of business.

1918 Dec 12 – Fork River

Two cars of horses were brought in to the district lately. Horses equally as good as can be bought locally, but strange to say the farmers prefer over their hard earned ducats for animals that are backed up, not with a pedigree, but with a plausible story.
How is it that the minutes of the council have not been published lately? He only opportunity the ratepayers have of knowing what is going on is what they read in the columns of the Herald. Let us have light.
A cablegram received from Lorne Lacey states that he has arrived safely in England. Lorne has been a prisoner of war in Germany for a considerable time, and it is a great relief to his friends to know that he is safe on British soil once more.
Sid Frost left last week in the best of health to spend the winter with his parents in Rathwell. He stopped over in Winnipeg, where he took sick and died. Decreased was of a quiet disposition and was liked by all who knew him. He was a member of L.O.L. No. 1765.
Corporal Stanley King is spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. King. He will resume his duties as section foreman at Togo. Mr. and Mrs. King contributed four sons to the defence of the Empire, which is a record to be proud of.
The contest for the reeveship is proving interesting. All three candidates appear to be confident of election. The counting of the ballots on Tuesday night will solve the mystery.

1918 Dec 12 – Winnipegosis

The first carload of fish this season was shipped out on Tuesday by the Armstrong Independent Fisheries, Limited.
J.G. Hamilton has arrived in town to take over the departmental management of the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store.
Mr. Bradley has raised a porker which tips the scale at 490lbs.
H. Johnson, who was fishing on Lake Winnipegosis for the Armstrong Trading Co., lost his life early this week by falling through the ice. The deceased was returning home to his camp and trod on thin ice which broke and threw him into the water. He was carried away by a strong current before help could arrive. The deceased leaves a wife to mourn his loss.
The collectors’ report shows over $300 collected for the Sailor’s fund from the town alone.
Last Saturday there was a lively scene at the C.N. railway station to welcome home two returned soldiers – Neily McCaulay and Alex Chartrand. Flags were in abundance and the whole town turned out to welcome the heroes home. The soldiers were heartily cheered and the school children led the singing of patriotic songs. Both men were escorted in an auto driven by Mayor Whale to their homes. The school children and townspeople formed a procession on either side of the auto and enlivened the way singing, cheering and waving flags. The reception of the soldiers was conducted under the superintendence of the Returned Soldiers’ League.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 28 – 1912

1912 Nov 28 – Fork River

The annual meeting of Mossey River School, No. 999 will be held at D.F. Wilson’s office on Monday, Dec. 2nd at 10 o’clock, for the closing of the year’s business and electing a trustee.
C. Clark spend Sunday at Dauphin among friends.
Rec. H.H. Scrase returned from a few days visit among his parishioners at Winnipegosis.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, accountant for the A.T. Co., spent a short time at the Co.’s store on business.
Several of our citizens collapsed the other morning and on investigating it was caused by trying to meet the train which arrived five minutes ahead of time from Dauphin, which was an unheard of thing before in this burgh. We trust they will keep it up instead of keeping the farmers in the cold two or three hours every day as heretofore.
Mr. Darroch, of Dauphin, was here for a short time on business.
Miss Olive Clark left for a short vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Mrs. Humpherys and family, of Dauphin, are staying at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson. They have the sympathy of the people of this community in their said bereavement in the death of Mr. Humphreys, who was held in ugh esteem in by all who knew him here.
Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, attended a hurried call to the home of Willis Miller of Mowat and we are pleased to hear Mrs. Miller is improving. The Dr. is under the impression that paying a night call over the new grade on the south road is equal to passing through a cyclone. As Dunk is used to travelling the north road and did not put the break on in time, things were well shaken before taken according to prescription for one.
The Orangemen of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, will have a grand masquerade ball on Dec. 13th, in the hall. Grand march at 9 o’clock. Supper provided. Admission tickets, gentlemen $1.00. Everybody welcome.
Nomination for reeve and councillors for the year 1913 will be held in the Municipal hall, Winnipegosis, on Tuesday, Dec. 3rd, between the hours of one and two, for Mossey River Municipality.

1912 Nov 28 – Sifton

The late fine weather has done much to help out conditions in this part of the country. Many farmers now have all the feed they will require.
From present indications it looks as if the output of wood this winter is going to be large.
General regret is felt here at the departure of Coun. Ogryslo for Dauphin. He’s a good councillor and a good fellow.
The question now is frequently asked, “Who is going to be our new councillor?” The names heard mentioned are John Kennedy, P. Wood and several of our prominent Galician residents. We hope it will be a good man as there is much work to do in Ward 6 the coming year.
With the crop not as good as usual the lower price of grain is more severely felt. It is becoming to be generally regarded that mixed farming is the sure and safe way to succeed. Batter, eggs and livestock find a good market all the time.
$1.00 pays for the Herald from now until the end of Dec. 1913.

1912 Nov 28 – Winnipegosis

The Christian League topic for this week is given out as “Anticipation.” A correspondent deems it permissible to remark, that, if it would retrace its steps and board the public it would perhaps more quickly realize its object and be in less danger of being overtaken by the ego.
The Card Circle last week entertained a guest, Mr. Wilson, of the Western Fancy Goody Co., who was delayed in town. Clem Bradley was somewhat consoled for his recent unlucky play in Dauphin, by winning fat prize in the first home game.
The entertainment intended to be given by the W.A. on the 6th. Dec. has to be postponed till the 20th, owing to the advent of a moving picture company for the first week of December, and a masquerade ball to be held in Fork River on the 13th.
The teachers are to attend the Dauphin convention, and Mrs. Ketcheson and Miss Bardley will ail themselves of a holiday in good company.
The school being closed for a week gives the children a chance of revelling in pond skating though minus 5 (sense).
The lake is new frozen over.
Miss Evelyn Burrell, who has been quite ill from the effects of a severe cold is able to be up again, but is still under the doctor’s case.
J.P. Grenon has returned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 17 – 1910

1915 Nov 17 – Burglary at Sifton

On the night of November 8th, the office of Paul Wood, Sifton, was broken into and some $1500 in notes stolen. The lock was wrenched and broken from the door, showing how admittance was gained. As soon as the robbery was known, Provincial Constable Rooke was telegraphed for. Up to the present no clue has been found, but it is generally thought to have been done by someone familiar with the premises.

1915 Nov 17 – Fork River

Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister Mrs. Ivor Humphreys in Dauphin.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary of the English Church paid us a visit this week and gave an excellent magic lantern entertainment in the Orange Hall. The subjects given were views of Japan and Bunyan’s Pilgrims Progress etc. A large crowd turned out and all were satisfied with the evening’s enjoyment.
Mrs. M. Snelgrove paid Dauphin a visit this week.
The young people around this district are now busy skating and having a good time.

1915 Nov 17 – North Lake

John Strasdin was up before P.M. Munson last week, for shooting on Sunday. He is going around singing a song entitled “There will come a time some day.”
Inspector Walker visited the schools around here.
Although Councillor Lacey gets mixed up with missing Post Offices, we notice he did not get mixed up with missing the tamarac swamp, on sec. 17, this year for we can now get through it with ease.
W. Williams has finished threshing around here.
Thos. Glendenning shipped the finest car of wheat this year, that ever went out of Fork River. Tom says its better than “our’n” and we guess he’s rights.
Jack Robertson still knocks around although he had a nasty smash.

1915 Nov 17 – Sifton

About four inches of snow fell on Saturday night. The sleighs are making a good showing already.
Isaac Silverwood, Dauphin, who had the contract of moving the R.C. Greek Rite Chapel at Sifton has successfully complete moving it to its new foundation across the road from its former position.
Craig Bros., of Dauphin, who are building the new R.C. mission building, having the building well under way. It is quite a credit to the appearance of the village or will be when finished.
W. Hewey, of Dauphin, who was in this vicinity boring wells, returned to Dauphin last week after a couple of days at unsuccessful attempts at penetrating the earth’s crust.
A C.N.R. bridge gang outfit were here for a few days building a much needed stock yard which will be a great convenience to stock shippers.
The daily train service lately inaugurated on the Winnipeg Prince Albert line via Dauphin is being much appreciated and marks another accommodation and is a credit to the management.

1915 Nov 17 – Winnipegosis

The Council met at Winnipegosis last week when some important business was done.
Dr. Medd, who has been in this district for some time, residing at Winnipegosis, left here this week for pastures new.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Anglican Women’s Auxiliary, gave an entertainment, in the schoolhouse, which was attended by a large crowd. During the interval Miss Doris Hurst and Miss D. Parker sang some songs. Mrs. Bradley and several ladies of the local auxiliary had a chat with Miss Millidge.