Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 26 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 26 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Howlett and Max and Roland King are among those leaving for winter fishing up the lakes.
Mr. Nat Little has made the sale of a J.I. Case’s threshing outfit composed of a 6 horse power engine and an all steel separator; 18 inch cylinder and 36 inch gear. It was tested here before taking out and did first class work for so small a machine. I goes to a Ruthenian east of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Harold Clark has returned home from the Dauphin Hospital. We are pleased to see him around again.
Our Mowat friend is on the warpath again; the scribe seems to have touched him in a tender spot; the cap seems to fit and we have no objection to him wearing it. The downfall of the Laurier government will be a little inconvenience to some, no doubt, as the vision of a good fat wad over the garden wall will vanish; still the acrobatically training of some will serve them in good stead, especially those who have been trying a two-handed game; but will it work? Our Mowat friend ends up his correspondence as usual by quoting about wickedness and holiness from the good Book. We haven’t much doubt but what our Mowat friend has a good share of the former and is not overburdened with the latter. His Satanic majesty will have a high old time eating to him later on for taking affidavits is any good he will do the old fellow out of his situation sure.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ and there was a large turnout of children and parents. Mr. Littler delivered a very appropriate address to the children and Miss Marjory Scrase sang “Jesus loves me.” The S.S. children helped in the chorus, which was nicely rendered.
D.F. Wilson, Municipal clerk is taking a trip to Dauphin to attend immigration meeting there.

1911 Oct 26 – North Lake

J. Cordon is renovating the front of Armstrong’s store these days with a coat of paint.
We noticed an item in the Press of Oct. 12th, sent in by the Mowat correspondent, re: scarlet fever scare at North Lake falling through and only two or three slight cases and that before the scare occurred they were convalescent. When the Mowat correspondent was at one of the quarantined houses about 10 days after the doctor was called he saw one or two convalescent cases at this particular house where the health officer found 6 cases all ripe and sound scarlet fever. That brings our moat friend a little not.
At two other houses there were two cases, at another 3 more convalescent, making a total of 11 cases. We have no doubt if the Mowat correspondent would only get the health officer’s word as to exactly how many cases he really found on Sept. 21st, he would find that the scare he quotes as fallen through was such as to call for strict measures and create a scare where there are so many children. For ourselves we prefer to stand by Dr. Medd’s inspection and decision than by our Mowat correspondent.
Jack Strasdin expects to be around here with his threshing outfit at freeze up.

1916 Oct 26 – Fork River

Miss Ashcroft, nurse of the Provincial Health Department, spent a week here visiting the different schools.
Roy Frost left for his home at Rathwell, having spent the summer months time with Mr. S. Reid. As there will be less “frost” we look for Indian summer.
Miss Bessie Wilson has left for Winnipeg to take a three-month course at the Agricultural College.
Frank Warshasky has shipped a car of fat stock to Winnipeg.
Joe Parker intends putting in the winter fishing with Joe Burrell on Lake Winnipegosis.
Pte. A. King, of the A.M.C., dept. No. 10, spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Aubrey expects to leave for England in a few days.
Mr. Robertson, R.R. commissioner, was here as a station agent. It is time one was appointed.

1916 Oct 26 – Winnipegosis

The “Manitou” left on her last trip on Tuesday. She is bound for Long Point. There was a little ice in the river but she expects to make a quick trip and weather prophets say there will be open water for ten days yet.
The death of Karl Goodmanson under mysterious circumstances is giving the authorities some trouble. An inquest and post mortem examination have been held and suspicions are strong. Liquor is at the bottom of it. Goodmanson is spoken of as a good neighbour and a “First rate” fellow as long as liquor was out of his reach. The question is where did the liquor come from?
The sad death occurred at Edmonton of Mrs. Welcome Morris. Pte. Morris sailed for England with the 107th. Mrs. Morris, Sr., has gone to Edmonton and will return with her grandchild.
Donald Hattie has rented his boarding house and has taken a job with Capt. W.B. Sifton is the log camp for the winter.
Capt. Mspes’ family have left for their winter home on Hill Island for the winter fishing season. Joe Burrell and family have also gone for the fishing season.
Dunc. Kennedy is assisting the station agent during the rush.

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