Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 21 – 1916

1916 Dec 21 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. J.D. James, Grandview, killed. (James Daniel Stanley James, 1892, 151767)

1916 Dec 21 – Frank Meader Wounded

Mrs. Meader received a telegram on Wednesday notifying her that her son, Pte. Frank Thomas Morris Meader was wounded on Dec. 7th, at Camlers, France. The wounds consist of a gunshot in the back and left thigh. (Frank Thomas Morris Meader, 1896, 425693)

1916 Dec 21 – Another Returned Soldier

The list of returned soldiers continues to grow. There are now five of these men in town. On Wednesday Pte. John Ball, who was recently wounded in France, reached home. He is suffering from paralysis on one side and it will be sometime before he is able to be about.
Pte. Bird McKinstry is expected to arrive this week.

1916 Dec 21 – Fork River

What are the Fork River farmers doing in the mater of the proposed Mossey Agricultural society? The Ruthenians and South Bay people seem to be setting them as example.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 14 – 1916

1916 Dec 14 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. A.C. McPhee, Minitonas, killed. (Alexander Campbell McPhee, 1896, 425152)
Corp. H.A. Hickman, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. H.L. Pearson, Dauphin, missing. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)

1916 Dec 14 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little shipped a team of Shetland drivers to his daughter, Mrs. E. Cameron, at Neepawa.
The annual Christmas tree will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. on Friday night, Dec. 22nd. Everybody come and help the kiddies have a good time.
W. King, P.M., has received word from his son Edwin, who is a scout at headquarters in France, that he is well. Max, who is with the Scotch-Canadians, and was wounded at the Somme in September, is in the trenches again doing his bit. Aubrey the youngest son, is stationed in England, is reported getting on fine.
Mrs. Paul Wood has returned to her home at Sifton, after having spent a few days with Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. Birch, provincial constable, was here a week regarding the burning of A. Redurik’s stacks. P.M. Venables sentenced John Phycolo to $300 and to keep the peace for two years or six months in jail. John preferred the latter alternative.
Mr. Jasper, of Harding, Man., who has been visiting two weeks with Thos. Glendenning on his ranch, returned home on Thursday.
Messrs. Williams, Briggs, and Rowe, took a joy ride to Dauphin in “Billy’s automobilly.” They found the walking very good on the return trip from Valley River home.
Fred King and f. cooper are having a few days at Dauphin this week.
We are in the midst of a campaign for the reeveship. It is well to have our municipal affairs intelligently brought before the ratepayers every once in a while. It makes for a better condition of affairs.

1916 Dec 14 – Sifton

The Wycliffe School holds its Xmas concert and dance on Dec. 20th, Wednesday evening. The lunch will be in the form of a box social and promises to be a pleasing feature of the entertainment. The girls are busy making their boxes, so boys don’t forget the date. Everybody welcome. Program holders entitled to reserved seats. Come early and be prepared to revel in a good time. We present you with Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar tragedy, Red Riding Hood and all kinds of items suited to the varying hour.
Pte. Frank Mealing paid a flying visit to his home on Saturday to bid goodbye to his relations and friends here. At a previous visit his friends presented him with a handsome wristwatch, the time being visible in the dark. He carries with him our sincere best wishes for success at the front and a safe return.
Home Economic Society at the annual meeting five of the old officers with the addition of miss Munson were re-elected as follows:
Mrs. Paul Wood, president.
Miss Reid, vice.
Miss Baker, chairman of Red Cross committee.
Miss Munson, chairman program committee.
Mrs. J.A. Campbell, sec.-treasurer.
Mrs. Oulette kindly provided refreshments and she and Miss peal Ashmore gave musical selections.
The Society new has a membership of nineteen and regularly hold meetings for Red Cross work at different members’ homes. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. John Kennedy.
On Friday a social evening was given by the Society at the home of Mrs. Oulette, when the members have themselves up to unrestricted frivolities for one evening. The single ladies ran off with the prizes; the winners being Misses Munson, Baker and Wood.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Dec 7 – Municipal Nominations

Reeve
Nominations for rural Municipalities throughout the province took place on Tuesday. In these municipalities two weeks elapse before election day.

MOSSEY RIVER.
Reeve – F.B. Lacey, acclamation.

COUNCILLORS.
Ward 2 – A. Hunt, acclamation.
Ward 4- J.S. Seiffert, acclamation.
Ward 6 – No nomination.

1911 Dec 7 – Fork River

An ice gang left here for the put up ice for the Armstrong Trading Co., Winnipegosis, composed of Messrs. Munro, Johnston, Gower and others.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis is to be opened for summer fishing again. It will be a great blunder if it is. As it is winter fishing is of great benefit to the resident fisherman and farmer, where as summer fishing is for the benefit of the 102 American companies and means clearing out the lake in about two seasons.
George Tilt left last week for Dauphin on a business trip.
Rev. Mr. Cruikshank held a service in the Methodist Church on Tuesday evening assisted by Mr. Malley, of Winnipegosis. A business meeting was held after service.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Breiver, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Armstrong.
Our trains here have not been on time more than twice for the last month. We were informed by a traveller from Winnipeg that instead of the train leaving Dauphin on time they had to wait while they manufactured a conductor and when he was manufactured they had to wait while he got some breakfast and then it did not matter when they started. Farmers wait hours for their mail and freight. Of course we sympathized with the traveller as we are used to waiting in Dauphin while they manufacture an engine to take a train out, but this is our first experience in making conductors. What’s next?
The office of the municipality will be closed from the 12th to 14th of the month. The Sec.-treasurer will be at the council chamber, Winnipegosis, during this period.

1911 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sec-treasurer of the municipality will be here at the council chamber Winnipegosis, from the 12th to the 14th of this month.

1916 Dec 7 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. J.L. Godkin, Minitonas, died of wounds. (John Laurence Godkin, 1897, 2382826 ??? (not found on virtual memorial))
Pte. J.T. Taylor, Winnipegosis, wounds. (???)

1916 Dec 7 – Death of Pte. Harold Curtis

Private Harold Curtis succumbed to his wounds last week. By his death Mrs. Curtis has sacrificed her tow and only sons on the alter of her country. The loss is inestimable, but the Empire must be saved, and many more such sacrifices will have to be made by mothers, fathers and some before the war is brought to a successful completion. Our deep sympathy goes out to the grief-stricken mother.

1916 Dec 7 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Northam has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin.
Metro Boyko has purchased he old ???.
W. Stonehouse, of Oak River, is in town.
Miss Leone Stonehouse has returned to Dauphin, after having spent the week-end with her mother.
F.F. and V. Hafenbrak, Fred and A. King and Jack Richardson, have returned from the deer chase with a bull moose each.
David Briggs has returned to Rathwell after a week’s visit to T.N. Briggs.
Thos. Barnard contractor of Dauphin, is busy plastering Will Northam’s new residence.
Mr. Kasmir has purchased a car of fat cattle for S.B. Levins, of Winnipeg.
The ladies of the Home Economics Society have sent a number of Xmas boxes to gladden the hearts of our soldier laddies at the front.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, and J.P. Grenon, of Winnipegosis, paid a short visit to W. King, P.M., when passing through Fork River to Dauphin.
The municipal nominations took place on Tuesday, Reeve Lacey is opposed by F.B. Venables. Mr. Venables is also running against G.E. Nicholson in Ward 1. Archie McDonnell was elected by acclamation in Ward 3, as also was John Namaka for Ward 5.

1916 Dec 7 – Sifton

We much regret the illness of our popular station agent, Mr. Oulette, who was removed to the Dauphin Hospital by special on Sunday morning. Mrs. Oulette returned, however, Monday with more reassuring news of her husband’s speedy recovery.
News from Lance-Corp. Walters this week informs us that he is fast recovering from his wounds, but the shock of the shell, which buried him, has in a great measure robbed him of hearing in his right ear.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore entertained this evening (4th) at their residence a large number of old friends on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of their marriage. Mrs. Ashmore decorated her table with the top tier of her wedding cake, which she hopes to have an evidence for her 25th. After Mr. Paul Wood had made the presentation of a cut glass service in ??? evening was spent in music and song, Mrs. Campbell presiding at the piano with her usual brilliancy.
Look out for Wycliffe School concert and dance Wednesday, 20th.

1916 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sunday school Christmas tree and concert will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 20th. This annual event has, in the past always been held in the Presbyterian Church but on the present occasion will be given in the Rex Hall. This change will given room for more stage effect and also better accommodation for the parents and friends, who have always filled the church to its utmost capacity. The programme will be a good one including a representation by the children of the famous Christmas story of Charles Dickens, entitled “The Christmas Carol.” The message of the carol is of universal interest Under the touch of the spirit of Christmas the selfish man is rid of his selfishness, plum pudding and roast beef are found to be indigestible without kindness, charity mercy, and forbearance. The story will be given in the form of a three-act play and several tableaux.
We ask everybody to reserve his evening and appreciate the efforts of the children by giving them a full house. This year the Christmas presents ??? Sunday school without the aid of gifts from the parents and friends. This is partly to save time and also to avoid the inequality in the gifts received by the children.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 26 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 26 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Howlett and Max and Roland King are among those leaving for winter fishing up the lakes.
Mr. Nat Little has made the sale of a J.I. Case’s threshing outfit composed of a 6 horse power engine and an all steel separator; 18 inch cylinder and 36 inch gear. It was tested here before taking out and did first class work for so small a machine. I goes to a Ruthenian east of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Harold Clark has returned home from the Dauphin Hospital. We are pleased to see him around again.
Our Mowat friend is on the warpath again; the scribe seems to have touched him in a tender spot; the cap seems to fit and we have no objection to him wearing it. The downfall of the Laurier government will be a little inconvenience to some, no doubt, as the vision of a good fat wad over the garden wall will vanish; still the acrobatically training of some will serve them in good stead, especially those who have been trying a two-handed game; but will it work? Our Mowat friend ends up his correspondence as usual by quoting about wickedness and holiness from the good Book. We haven’t much doubt but what our Mowat friend has a good share of the former and is not overburdened with the latter. His Satanic majesty will have a high old time eating to him later on for taking affidavits is any good he will do the old fellow out of his situation sure.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ and there was a large turnout of children and parents. Mr. Littler delivered a very appropriate address to the children and Miss Marjory Scrase sang “Jesus loves me.” The S.S. children helped in the chorus, which was nicely rendered.
D.F. Wilson, Municipal clerk is taking a trip to Dauphin to attend immigration meeting there.

1911 Oct 26 – North Lake

J. Cordon is renovating the front of Armstrong’s store these days with a coat of paint.
We noticed an item in the Press of Oct. 12th, sent in by the Mowat correspondent, re: scarlet fever scare at North Lake falling through and only two or three slight cases and that before the scare occurred they were convalescent. When the Mowat correspondent was at one of the quarantined houses about 10 days after the doctor was called he saw one or two convalescent cases at this particular house where the health officer found 6 cases all ripe and sound scarlet fever. That brings our moat friend a little not.
At two other houses there were two cases, at another 3 more convalescent, making a total of 11 cases. We have no doubt if the Mowat correspondent would only get the health officer’s word as to exactly how many cases he really found on Sept. 21st, he would find that the scare he quotes as fallen through was such as to call for strict measures and create a scare where there are so many children. For ourselves we prefer to stand by Dr. Medd’s inspection and decision than by our Mowat correspondent.
Jack Strasdin expects to be around here with his threshing outfit at freeze up.

1916 Oct 26 – Fork River

Miss Ashcroft, nurse of the Provincial Health Department, spent a week here visiting the different schools.
Roy Frost left for his home at Rathwell, having spent the summer months time with Mr. S. Reid. As there will be less “frost” we look for Indian summer.
Miss Bessie Wilson has left for Winnipeg to take a three-month course at the Agricultural College.
Frank Warshasky has shipped a car of fat stock to Winnipeg.
Joe Parker intends putting in the winter fishing with Joe Burrell on Lake Winnipegosis.
Pte. A. King, of the A.M.C., dept. No. 10, spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Aubrey expects to leave for England in a few days.
Mr. Robertson, R.R. commissioner, was here as a station agent. It is time one was appointed.

1916 Oct 26 – Winnipegosis

The “Manitou” left on her last trip on Tuesday. She is bound for Long Point. There was a little ice in the river but she expects to make a quick trip and weather prophets say there will be open water for ten days yet.
The death of Karl Goodmanson under mysterious circumstances is giving the authorities some trouble. An inquest and post mortem examination have been held and suspicions are strong. Liquor is at the bottom of it. Goodmanson is spoken of as a good neighbour and a “First rate” fellow as long as liquor was out of his reach. The question is where did the liquor come from?
The sad death occurred at Edmonton of Mrs. Welcome Morris. Pte. Morris sailed for England with the 107th. Mrs. Morris, Sr., has gone to Edmonton and will return with her grandchild.
Donald Hattie has rented his boarding house and has taken a job with Capt. W.B. Sifton is the log camp for the winter.
Capt. Mspes’ family have left for their winter home on Hill Island for the winter fishing season. Joe Burrell and family have also gone for the fishing season.
Dunc. Kennedy is assisting the station agent during the rush.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 19 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 19 – Fork River

Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on Sunday. The church was tastefully decorated with flowers, grain and vegetables. The ladies and officers are to be congratulated on the fine display. The service was conducted by Mr. Littler, B.A.; Miss Nixon, organist. A large congregation took part in thanking the giver of all good things for a bountiful harvest.
Mr. Littler is leaving the mission to attend St. Johns College at Winnipeg. Mr. Harding of Algoma, will carry on the work in this mission this winter.
Our bonanza farmer, T.N. Briggs, is smiling. Wheat 37 1/2 bushels to the acre.
The C.N.R. should have an extra bonus for the grandly they handle our mail and express lately. It comes in an old box car with about two inches of coal dust all over the floor. Fancy mail bags and grapes with a nice coating of coal dust and baggage and express with syrup and dust. They might clean out the car but any old thing goes on this line.
John Newsdale is visiting his parents after spending the summer teaching in Saskatchewan.
Wm. Coultas’ team took a notion to run away the other day. The sudden stoppage in the river caused him to take a few graceful revolutions through the air. He received a good shaking up, however he is doing nicely.
Threshing is the order of the day this fine weather. There are four outfits working within two miles of town. The yield is very good.

1916 Oct 19 – Dauphin’s Population 3200

The recent census shows the population of the own to be 3200. Naturally this comes as a great disappointment. The falling off, however, can be to a large extent accounted for in the fact that over 1000 young men have been recruited from the town. The normal population must be close to the 4000 mark.

1916 Oct 19 – The Week’s Casualty List

Stuart Geekie, Winnipegosis, killed. (Stewart Geekie, 1893, 150410)
Wm. Patterson, Ochre River, killed. (???)
A. Stevenson, Minitonas, killed. (Albert Victor Stevenson, 1892, 425361)
Robin Cruise, Dauphin, killed. (Robert Wallace Cruise, 1899, 425650)
Jas. Brown, Dauphin, wounded. (James Evelyn Brown, 1896, 151554)
Pte. Younghusband, Dauphin, killed. (Francis Lloyd Younghusband, 1892, 81863)
Lance Corp. H.G. Alguire, wounded. (???)

1916 Oct 19 – Fork River

J. Schuchett and Mr. P. Zacks left for Winnipeg to arrange for taking over Mr. Zacks’ stock as he is leaving here. Zack brothers are taking three cars of potatoes to Winnipeg. They have purchased the spuds from the farmers here at 45 cents a bushel. The snow storm of Tuesday has delayed the thrashing for a few days. Farmers are busy loading grain from the platform and getting satisfactory results from their shipments. Wheat prices keep advancing. Truly the farmer is king this year.

1916 Oct 19 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J. Mossington and children have returned home from a long visit to friends in Toronto.
The tug “Isabelle” left on Sunday morning towing a barge load of supplies and W.B. Sifton’s log camp outfit. W. Johnston was also a passenger with his fishing outfit, and L. Schaldemose took his family up for the winter.
The “Manitou” returned Monday. She has one more trip to make before the close of navigation.
Mr. Wm. Sifton, of Minitonas, is visiting his daughter Mrs. A.S. Walker.
Last week some fines were imposed on account of liquor. Geo. Bickle, who is not a householder, was found guilty, and Ed. Chermok, a general merchant here, was fined for having liquor in his store. The authorities are on the watch for others who are suspected.
The Red Cross Society had a very successful meeting at Victoria Hall last Wednesday [1 line missing] the entertainment will be given by Mrs. Paddock and Mrs. White.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 12 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 12 – Badly Injured

Nat Douse, a young man in the employ of the Burrows Mill at Grandview, met with a bad accident last Thursday. While at work in the mill he slipped and fell against the slash saws and sustained injuries to his right shoulder, the muscle and flesh being torn very badly. After he had his wounds dressed at Grandview he was brought to the hospital here. A few days later it was found necessary to amputate his arm at the shoulder. Douse is now making as good progress as can be expected towards recovery.

1911 Oct 12 – Planing Mill Burned

The planning mill belonging to T.A. Burrows at Birch River was destroyed by fire on Monday afternoon. Besides the mill a half dozen cars of lumber were also burned. The loss is covered by insurance.

1911 Oct 12 – Fork River

The heavy rains have tied up the threshing machines and stopped the ploughing. With the present fine weather work will commence again.
Constable G. Weaver has returned from a business trip to Dauphin and reports everything quiet.
W. King, Sam Bailey and D. Wilson paid a visit to Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The fishermen are busy preparing to go up to the lake for the winter’s fishing. It is remarkable how many Conservatives one meets there since the Borden Government was elected.
Mr. Littler is attending the Rural Deanery meeting in Dauphin.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, was up inspecting the government dredge working in the Mossey River.
In the Press, Sept. 28, page 1, is composed of items of Cruise’s big Majority and the Markets is said to be correct. Take the price of barley, No. 3, 60 to 62, No. 4, 60 to 64, first time we ever knew No. 4 to bring more than 3. On another page under the heading of Charvari it is stated barely looks like thirty cents and that the Press will be doing business at the same old stand. Would advise them to take a rest and not contradict themselves so often. On another page is a large rigmarole about T.A. Burrows the gentleman who it has been claimed used his office to feather his nest and was never heard on the floor of the house only to try and protect himself regarding the timber steal. Of course he should have a senatorship. Rats! As yet they have the audacity to talk about Jimmy Harvey and Glen Campbell.
Mr. F.B. Lacey, postmaster general of Oak Brae, is attending Council meeting at Winnipegosis.

1916 Oct 12 – The Week’s Casualty List

Sergt. Frank Burt, killed on Sept. 24th. Burt enlisted at Dauphin with the first contingent two years ago. (Frank Burt, 1876, 46965)
Pte. Anderson Reed Walker, killed. (Anderson Reid Walker, 1895, 2056)
Sergt. Fred. Clark-Hughfield, wounded. (???)
Pte. Hugh Dunston, wounded on shoulder. (Hugh Leo Dunstan, 1896, 150887)
Pte. Jas. A. Justice, wounded. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
Lieut. Percy Willson, died from wounds. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)

1916 Oct 12 – Winnipegosis

Miss Edna Grenon was among the arrivals on Saturday’s train to spend Sunday and Thanksgiving Day at home.
Mrs. P. McArthur has returned from a short visit to Minneapolis.
The “Manitou” has two more trips to make taking fishermen’s supplies up. We trust the present good weather holds so that she may get in safely before freeze-up.
There has been a good deal of liquor in town of late. There is something taking in the liquor law when these boozers can have it shipped up here to them from Ontario and deal it out to other boozers more benighted than themselves. Now that men are scare it would prove a very potent method of wheeling a man over far more effective than money.
Mrs. J.E. McArthur was a passenger on Tuesday’s train going to Winnipeg.
It is reported that Jimmie Taylor, who went to the front with the 79th, has been wounded.
The Red Cross evening at Victoria Hall on Thursday night under the management of Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Jarvett, was a great success socially and financially. Over $10 was taken at the door.
Mr. Lacey, of Fork River, was here on Saturday in connection with the business of building the Meadow Land and Don schools.
Miss Leith McMartin spent the week-end at Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 5 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 5 – Fork River

Mrs. C. Clark is visiting her son Harold, who is in the Dauphin Hospital with fever.
Mr. T. Shannon has purchased an up-to-date Sawyer & Massey separator.
Mr. J.G. Littler is visiting Sifton this week.
Mr. F. Wilson of Humphrey & Wilson, is up on a trip to his home.
Miss B Johnston who was visiting Mrs. D. Kennedy has returned to Dauphin to resume her duties at the hospital there.
We have not seen anything of our friend Joe, Liberal financier, since the 21st. We sincerely hope he is in good health.
The Liberal Conservative ball in the Orange Hall Friday night was a success. Dancing was kept up to about daylight. Premier Borden was ably assisted by Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Fielding, Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pugsley, Judge Wilson, Hon. T.N. Briggs, Senator Kennedy and other Honourables of all shades of politics and religion.
Harvest Festival in All Saints’ Anglican Church at three o’clock Sunday afternoon.

1916 Oct 5 – The Week’s Casualty List

Pte. S.F. Ferguson, of Melton, has been wounded. (Samuel Fremon Ferguson, 1894, 424783)
Lieut. Percy Willson is reported wounded. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)
Pte. Bert Blakely, Grandview, killed. (Albert Edward Blakely, 1897, 151543)
Pte. Wm. Gilbert, late of the Bank of Commerce staff, wounded. (William Alexander Gilbert, 1895, 150929)

1916 Oct 5 – Fork River

Mr. Shuckutt has returned after having spent the Jewish New Year in Dauphin with friends. Zack brothers merchants have removed their stock to the boarding house building on Main Street and are open for biz. Private Herman Godkin spent a few days visiting Mrs. Williams’ sister. His company expects to leave for overseas shortly. We wish him a safe return. W. King has received a letter from his son Private Maxwell King who is in the 14th general hospital with a shrapnel wound in the knee. He expects soon to be able to return to his company. The day before he went in the drive 5th September he had a talk with Lieutenant Worsey and Pete McCarty of Dauphin telephone man. Both had come through alright up to that time and wished to be remembered to all acquaintances at home.

1916 Oct 5 – Winnipegosis

We have been having a good deal of wind and there is snow in the air. The lake presents a very turbulent and unattractive aspect. Traveling by water just now is not very pleasant.
The “Manitou” is in and has brought down the summer fishermen with their boats and outfits. Preparations for winter fishing are rapidly going forward. If this weather continues we are likely to have and early closing of navigation. The 20th of October is considered as the safe limit.
The Red Cross Society held their regular monthly meeting on the evening of the 2nd. Mr. White finds it necessary to resign from the presidency but accepted the office of vice-president. Names were suggested for the office of the president and the matter of election is to be left in the hands of the executive committee. It is a marvel that so few come out to Red Cross business meetings. Every one claims to be interested in Red Cross work, and well they may be when over one hundred young men from this district have gone over to fight for us, while we sit securely at home beside a warm fire and a big lamp and read of their brass doings in Flanders and France. Come out to the monthly meetings on the first Monday of every month and then you will know what is being done and have a better chance to have a hand in it. The executive cannot get around and invite you personally and besides this is a public affair as much as the governing of your village, so come out and help; both men and women.
Miss Dolly Geekie has returned from Dauphin for a visit. Her many friends are pleased to see her.
Mrs. Frank Hechter had a cable that the 107th Battalion, in which her husband is an officer, had safely reached England.