Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 29, 1920

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members are requested to remember the meeting called for Thursday, Feb. 5th, in the rooms. Comrades Bowler and Wilton, of the Provincial Command, will address the meeting.
The association would be glad to receive any discarded magazines or books.

Fork River

Peter Ellis and son Ray, of Kamsack, spent last week here. He had Dun Hamilton sell his homestead effects. The goods off and sold well.
Robt. Hunt, homestead inspector, spent several days in the district last week. Bob is one of the old-timers and we are always glad to see him.
Max. King was a visitor to the Peg last week.
The funeral of the late John Basham took place on Sunday.
The Literary Society had the meeting in All Saints’ Church on the 20th inst. It was magazine night, Mrs. Ina Briggs, editor, had charge of the adult portion of the program. Mrs. A.J. Little gave a selection on the piano. The papers by the juveniles were very good. There were ??? by Prof. Williamson and his pupils, W. and A. Russell. Mrs. I. Briggs accompanied on the piano. There was a ten minute talk by Mr. Lockwood. There was a good ??? and all enjoyed the excellent program. W. King was chairman, Wednesday next, the 28th, the program will be in charge of the school teachers.
More snow has fallen of late. An abundance of snow always means sufficient moisture and good crops.
It seemed a little odd to be without the daily papers of late, but I suppose one has to get used to anything these days when the times are out of joint.

Sifton

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wood and family, who have gone to Florida, are greatly missed by their many friends and we wish them every success in their new home.
There is very little wheat coming to the elevator now. The most of it has been already marketed.
W.C. Wellborn was in town a few days ago and says the fishing on the lake is fairly good this winter.
The trains are running all hours these days.
Mike Poloski is in Winnipeg attending college this winter.
Ed. Woods, of Dubin Bay, is spending the winter with Mr. Willison.
The stock is wintering fairly well although feed is very scarce.
Mr. Fred Kitt spend a few days in Winnipeg lately.
Mr. Ramsey, who has been under the weather for some time, is improving in health.
The roads are good and the town is full of famers every day.
Brigham Young is again in our midst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 18, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, 11th inst., some 70 of the comrades being in attendance. Applications were received from 28 retuned men for membership, all of whom were accepted. This brings the local branch membership up to 331.
The main business of the evening was the question as to the possibility and advisability of having quarters owned and operated by the association. After considerable discussion the following resolution was arrived at: That this branch of the association go before the public of Dauphin and the municipality and collect the necessary funds for the erection of a building to be run and owned by this branch of the association. Same to take the form of a club room and home for returned soldiers and that provision shall be made to have bed rooms for the use of the members and that it shall be so constructed and planned that it shall be self-supporting, i.e., that the ground floor shall be suitable for rental for offices, etc. The resolution was carried without further comment. A committee was then appointed to submit to the association the best way to raise the money necessary and the manner that we shall go after same; also to draft plans as to the nature of the building that the association has in mind.
The committee that as appoint by the meeting was carefully selected and men naturally adapted to work of this nature were asked to act. One o the main ideas of the building is to have one on much the same lines as the Y.M.C.A. buildings in Winnipeg, which would be an asset to the town and a token of its appreciation to the men that had served. While the idea that we have in view is of erecting a building of a distinctive type so that it shall be recognized as a soldiers’ building it is not by any means proposed to make this a memorial building, but to be built, owned and operated as a building devoted to the veterans use, which will be self-supporting so that in the future years we may not have to go before the public for its support. That the scheme will receive the response from the public that will be necessary, if we are to have such a building, is looked upon with confidence, for judging by the generosity that has been given to the men of this town in the past is excellent encouragement that the same will be given in the present case. The public will be further notified in the near future as to the plans of the veterans and the manner in which they propose raising the funds that will be required.
The comrades are pleased to welcome home Comrade Mackie and his bride. They have the best wishes of the branch for their future happiness.
Please remember the Castle Square Entertainers on the 19th. This is a first-class show and will please the most particular. After the show the orchestra will play for a dance. Come and give that building a little lift.
Forms have been received by the secretary from the Provincial Command re the re-establishment question. These are to be filled out by every returned solider and returned to the secretary. They will be posted at the first opportunity and should be returned with as little delay as possible. A supply is also on hand in the G.W.V.A. building and call be filled in there. By calling you will assist the secretary and help yourselves in getting the best terms possible. These forms are required to give the Association the facts necessary to place the case of the returned men before the commission which has been appointed to look into their requests.

Made Haul of Scotch Whiskey

A bootlegger met with lard luck at Ste. Rose village last week. He arrived in town with two valises well filled bottles containing Scotch whiskey and secured a room at the hotel. On leaving the hotel to go down street to work up a connection he locked the door of the room. On returning, after being away less than half an hour, he found the room had been broken into and the liquor removed from the valises. He then interviewed the magistrate who informed him that the quicker he made tracks out of town the better for his welfare.

To be Appointed Chief of Police

Mr. F.W. Little, turnkey at the jail, will be appointed to the position of chief of police made vacant by the resignation of Chief Bridle. Mr. Little has been a member of the London, Eng. Police force and a few years ago served on the local force with satisfaction to the council.

Fork River

Willard McPhedren, from Ethelbert, has arrived to take charge of our 2×4 station. It is about time the railway company built a new station with a platform large enough to accommodate the growing business of our district.
Thanksgiving harvest festival was held on Sabbath last. Wet weather interfered with the attendance.
Geo. B. Scriven, Anglican lay reader, left on Monday for Faribault, Minn., where he will attend college.
Sunday school will continue as usual at 2 p.m.
F.B. Lacey and son have invested in a tractor. The faithful plodding horse is no longer speedy enough for our progressive farmers.
E. Munro is wearing a pleasant smile. The arrival of a little dairy maid is the reason for so much joy in the household.
J. Reid, of Sifton, one of the oldtimers, was a visitor in town on Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 14, 1919

Fair Notes

Some of the ladies were quite disappointed that there was no baby show this year. The baby show was very popular in past years and it was undoubtedly an oversight that it was not held this year. Mr. John Gorby, who was had charge of this department in past years, is the champion of the ladies and the babies and it will not be his fault if the show is not held next year. The babies are out greatest national asset and their welfare is contributed to by information supplied by physicians and professional nurses at these exhibitions.
The directors worked hard for several weeks to complete the details of the fair and have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts were appreciated and the exhibition a success in every way.
Chas. Murray, the patient and tireless secretary, had a busy three days of it.
The stock parade, headed by the band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders, was a striking feature on Friday.
Over 5000 people passed through the turnstiles on Friday.
The War Saving and Theft Stamp advertising display was very much in evidence on the grounds. The entrance to the grounds, the main building, grand stand, ticket office and other places throughout the grounds were nicely decorated with different lines of posters. It was evident that Mr. Blackadar intended that the large crowds that gathered each day on the grounds should be thoroughly informed regarding this movement.

Successful Exhibition

The 28th annual fair of the Dauphin Agricultural society, held on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of last week, was the most successful in its history. And this, too, in the face of the fact that the farmers were in the midst of the harvest. While it is true there was a falling off in most of the departments it is a noteworthy fact the exhibits generally were of a superior class. The livestock was the best ever shown here. Two notable herds were J.D. McGregor’s Aberdeens and John Graham’s shorthorns. In the Clydesdale, Percherons, Agricultural and light horses many fine animals were shown and nearly all the leading breeders of the district were represented.
The poultry section was by long odds the best in the history of the society. The exhibit was not only large but of the highest quality. Much credit is due the Poultry Association and its energetic secretary. Wm. Murray, for the success achieved.
The attractions were exceptionally good. The band of the 79th Cameron Highlanders from Winnipeg furnished the music on Friday and the splendid program was enjoyed by all.
Credit is due Mr. Wm. Rintoul for the manner in which the numerous young ladies executed the intricate dances. The little girls also did exceptionally well.
The Scotch dancing by the two little Simpson girls, to the music of the bagpipes played by their father, caught the fancy of the big crowd.
At 1.30 several hundred war veterans assembled in front of the grand stand and on behalf of the citizens Mayor Bowman extended them a hearty welcome. In his address he referred to the historic places in France where the Canadians made history and achieved undying fame. Robt. Cruise, M.P., also spoke, Major Williams, in the absence of Brig. Gen. Ketchen, replied on behalf of the men. Major Skinner added a few words in regard to a suitable memorial for those who had made the supreme sacrifice.

Fork River

E. Harris, formerly of Bracebridge, Ont., is visiting at the home of Fred Cooper.
Don’t forget to come to Fork River’s annual agricultural show, Friday, August 15th.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s, Dauphin, will preach in All Saints’ Anglican church, Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24 h, at 3.
Mrs. J. Rice, teacher of North Lake school, has returned home from visiting at Cypress River and Neepawa and is feeling better after her trip.
The White Star Co.’s new elevator is nearly completed. Thus the commercial importance of this centre grows.
Owen Pruder is busy overhauling the Northern elevator so as to have it ready for the fall delivery of grain.

Sifton

The marriage of Miss Anna Farion, daughter of Fred Farion, merchant, of this place, to Mr. W. Belashta of Canora, was celebrated at St. Paul’s parish church, on Wednesday, the 6th inst., at 9 p.m. Bishop Budka, with the assisting priests, officiated. Some two or three hundred invited guests were present. The church had been very tastefully decorated with flowers, which blended very pleasingly with the handsome costumes of the bride and attendants. To the lively strains of a bridal chorus, sung in Little Russian, the bride and groom, showered with confetti, and guests repaired to the large Ruthenian hall, where en exceptionally well appointed supper was served. Covers for at least two hundred and fifty were laid and the tables were used for several relays of guests. The hall was very tastefully festooned and draped, with roses and asters as floral decorations. An orchestra, composed of Ruthenians, four brothers, from Winnipeg, played very pleasingly and tastefully. Bishop Budka, on behalf of the guess, toasted the bride and bridegroom, the latter responded very neatly both in Little Russian and English. Dancing was kept up until daylight. A. Kozak, one of the old national Cossack dances, given most artistically by Miss Belashka, of Winnipeg, and Mr. Dyk, of Dauphin, was much admired; also the tasteful fox-trotting of Mr. Assifat. A number of visitors from Winnipeg were present, amongst others, Mrs. Stefanyk, Mr. and Mrs. Badnac, Dr. Pasdrey, and Lieut. Kreman editor of the Canadian Ruthenian. Mr and Mrs. Belashta have left for Canora, their future home, where Mr. Belashta is in the legal profession.
During the evening Mr. —– spoke at some length about the conflict between the Poles and so-called Ukrainians, the West Galicians, stating that Premier Lloyd George had alone amongst the Allied powers at the peace conference, expressed himself in favor of an independent Ukraina, separate from the claims of the Polish aristocracy. He was followed by Mr. F. Taciuk, of Dauphin. A collection, totaling one hundred and twenty dollars, was taken up to be forwarded to Europe for use against the Poles.

Winnipegosis

Geo. G. Spence, who was formerly manager for the Hudson’s Bay Company here, has bought T.H. Whale’s general store.
There is an average crop in this district in spite of the dry season. The grain is nearly all cut and threshing will soon commence.
All the fishermen in town are bustling getting in supplies and preparing for the fall fishing. Two of the companies large boats leave here within the next few days for points at the north end of the lake.
A party of forty business men came up from Dauphin Sunday and took a trip fifty miles up the lake, upon the steamer “Armenon.” The trip was an enjoyable one and everyone was delighted with it. A net was set on the voyage out and was taken in on the return voyage. Nineteen fish were caught and Mr. Dan Hamilton auctioneered them off and got as much as $2.00 for a “sucker.” A Dominion and a Provincial M.P. were among the party.
The English Church is holding a regular Sunday service at Winnipegosis.
The town council is planning for a new municipal hall and extensive sidewalks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 19, 1919

Bootleggers Busy

Bootleggers are enjoying a thriving trade with the construction gangs at work on the railway. A Ste. Rose correspondent writes that much of the liquor being sold is said to be of home manufacture.

Cross Duck Mountain by Auto

A Minitonas automobile party accomplished a feat on Tuesday which will stand as a record. They crossed the Duck Mountain in cars. One car contained Reeve Roy Johnston, Clerk J.H. Cannon, Thos. Tedford and H Bigham, and the other Geo. Hayes, W. Shiels, Mose Leslie and Wm. Sifton. The cars left Minitonas at 7 in the morning and arrived at Pine River on the opposite side of the mountain at 10 p.m. The distance is round about a hundred miles. The road followed was the old Sifton colonization trail. The cars met with no great obstacles on the trip beyond fording a stream or two. The members of the party are enthusiastic in describing the scenery in the mountain.

Fork River

Mrs. L. Rawson and family have arrived from the States. Mr. Rawson intends moving on to his farm which he recently purchased from H. Little. The farm adjoins the townsite.
Councilor Hunt has purchased a car. No doubt he will find the lumps on the road when he speeds up.
Ben Cannon is spending his vacation in Winnipeg.
W. Williams is putting his sawmill in shape to cut the logs brought in last winter.
A good heavy rain fell on Saturday. It was needed and has revived the crops.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Church at 3 p.m. Sunday school meets at 2 o’clock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 27, 1919

$20,000 Damage Suit

Suit for $20,000 against the Canadian National Railways has been filed in the Court of King’s Bench at Saskatoon by Evelyn Haley, widow of Joseph Haley, of Dauphin, a brakeman, who was crushed to death between a freight car and a loading platform on the C.N.R. at Hawkes Spur, near Hudson Bay Junction, last fall. The action will be heard at the next sitting of the court.

THE ACCIDENT
The fatal accident occurred early in the morning of October 18, 1918. According to the statement of claim which has been filed at the court house by Messrs. McCraney, McKenzie & Hutchison, solicitors for the plaintiff; Joseph Haley was a brakeman on an extra train, under Conductor B.L. Haley, of Dauphin. The conductor was instructed to proceed with his train from the junction to Hawkes Spur, one mile west, for the purpose of picking up two freight cars which were on the spur track. This was done, and after attending to his duties as brakeman, which included fixing switches and couplings, Haley gave the engineer the signal to go ahead. He then climbed on to the step of the last car on the train. It was dark at the time.
The train started and Haley was crushed between the side of the car and a loading platform that was placed alongside the tracks. He received injuries from which he died shortly after.

G.W.V.A.

Members of the above association please note that a general meeting will be held to night (Thursday) in association headquarters at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is requested.

Plebiscite Advocated

Increase interest is being taken in the matter of a memorial for our soldiers who made the supreme sacrifice. The residents of the rural municipality of Dauphin must be taken into consideration as well as the tow in the proposed memorial. It is suggested that a plebiscite should be taken. The matter however, should be thoroughly discussed in the columns of the Herald before it is submitted to a vote.

War and Repatriation

A lecture was given in the town hall on Monday evening on the above subject by Lieut.-Col. (Rev.) Woods, secretary of the Repatriation committee. Mayor Bowman presided and introduced the speaker.
Lieut.-Col. Woods said he did not think the people of Canada realized what was at stake during the four years of strife nor what was at stake today and proceeded to enlighten his audience as to the aims of Germany which fell nothing short, in his opinion, of the conquest of France, Belgium and Britain, and then the United States and Canada. The cruelty practiced and the devastation wrought by the Germans was spoken of and denounced. By the use of a diagram on a blackboard the speaker described the part taken by “The Little Black Devils” in the action of April 22nd, 1915, and paid a glowing tribute to their conduct on that memorable occasion. Referring to the conditions necessary to the reconstruction of the Empire he outlined the course to be adopted, his great plea being for unity and purity in all matters. Coming to the repatriation side of his subject, he described the scheme proposed for the settlement of returned men on the land. In the event of a man being able to prove hi ability to farm properly the government would purchase a quarter section of land, at a cost not exceeding $5000 and resell to the applicant at cost price, no commission being charged or allowed. An additional sum of $3000 may be borrowed for the purchase of stock and machinery. In this capital sum no interest will be charged for the first two yeas; at the end of that period 5 per cent per annum would be charged. Coming to the men who were not farmers Col. Woods said that vocational training would be given and all reasonable means employed to help the men to resume their places in the community and home life of the nation. The lecturer laid emphasis on the fact that many of “our boys” were coming back to us with their nervous system shattered, and he bespoke for them kindly sympathy and and consideration.
At the conclusion of his lecture Col. Woods invited those present to ask questions, which he would be pleased to answer.
Replying to the question, “Would returned men get a rebate on their taxes,” the answer was in the affirmative, it being explained that the provincial government would recoup the municipalities.
The Land Settlement Board, Post Office Building, Winnipeg, was the answer given to a question as to where returned men should apply for any and all information in connection with this scheme.
Col. Woods nominated a committee of ladies and gentlemen, Mr. F.T. Wright being mentioned as chairman.
A verse of the National Anthem brought the proceedings to a close.

Fork River

Geo. Tilt has bought from Jack Chipley his house and lots, and intends residing in town.
Wm. King has purchased the north half of 31/2 29 19, the Haryey farm and adjoining quarter.
Wm. Bollen, of Dauphin, is visiting this district selling medicines.
Fred Cooper has finished his contract for the gravel for the new schoolhouse and is now busy hauling gravel for the foundation for the new elevator which is to be built this summer.
On the 14th inst. a concert, box social and dance were held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the baseball club. Each event was a distinct success and reflected great credit on the members of the dramatic society who was responsible for the entertainment. The sale of the boxes realized the sum of $146.

Fork River Criticism

To the Editor of the Herald
Sir, Some two weeks ago a box social was held at Fork River and at the beginning of the proceeding a statement was made on the platform that the proceeds were to be used by a baseball outfit and the balance was to go to the return soldiers fund. The bidding for the boxes was spirited, good prices obtained and some $135.00 over expenses realized. It now transpires that some of those interested in baseball intend to use the money not only to buy bats, balls, etc. but also baseball uniforms for the players. Should this be carried out how much will be left for the return soldiers fund. There is not a doubt that the free bidding was due to the majority of those present believing that the greater portion of the money they were giving was going to the return soldiers fund and it has been remarked that this fund should get the even one hundred. For the past four years the government has been supplying free uniforms and should there be any return soldiers on the baseball team no one will object to their being supplied with a baseball uniform but then again there will be no doubt the others who did not accept a government uniform and presumably being on a baseball team they are sound wind and limb and there is no doubt that the people who payed their money would object to it being used to supply them with free suits to play baseball in when they refuse to accept uniforms to serve their country in.
A contributor,
Fork River, March 24.

Fork River Agricultural Society

The first meeting of this society was held in the municipal office at Fork River on Saturday March 22nd and was well attended. T.B. Venables was in the chair and E.F. Wilson acted as secretary. The chairman spoke of the advantages that would be accrued to the district through a good live agricultural society and those present showed considerable enthusiasm over the prospect. D.F. Wilson provisional secretary also spoke and read portions of the agricultural society’s act. The officers elected were T.B. Venables president, J.H. Richardson vice and as directors J.D. Robertson, W. King, F.F. Halfinbrak, W. Greghill, J. Yakavanka, Panko Solomon, S.J. Perepeluk, D.F. Wilson, Mike A. Moyer. A discussion then took place as the advantages of purchasing grounds and it was the unanimous opinion that the society should join the Mossey River School District in securing grounds large enough for an agricultural show. A meeting of the members is called to [unknown] purchase of the grounds Tuesday April 22nd.

Sifton

Subscriptions to the Great War Veteran Association of Dauphin from the Ruthenian citizens in the Sifton district. The subscriptions were given after a public meeting held on the 9th under the auspice of the Canadian Patriotic Association.
W. Mazuryk, 5, S. Stichishon 5, M. Litowetz 50 cents, K. Choloweky 4, H. Konowalchuk 5, Kostesky 5, J. Stifanuk 5, F. Guiazdowsky 5, A. Stifanuk 5, N. Dudar 5, P. Sawchyn 10, P. Trach 5, O. Burawkyo 5, N. Ogryalo 10, J. Korolyk 5, M. Nakonechny 5, A. Herman 1.50, G. Nikikchuk 2, M. Kuzyk 2, J. Kuyk 1, H. Dundar 1, O. Hrimak 5, W. Blenduk 25 cents, J. Feduk 5, D. Wasilishen 4, J. Wasilyshen , F. Kostur 5, T. Mostowy 5, T. Belesky 5, E. Pankiw 5, W. Jarema 5, M. Hafichuk 5, T. Bayduza 10, W. Kuzyk 1, N. Popelta 5, C. Bayduza 2, N. Zubreaky 1, N. Hnatuk 1, A. Atamanchuk 2, P. Brazchul 2, S. Harema 1, P. Hrushowy 75 cents, PO. Nakonechny 2, D. Heschuk 2, M. Kolcun 1.25, P. Lukenko 1, P. Swerbyos 15, W. Shimansky 5, F. Farion 15, Sopunik 5, D. Kindrat 6, H. Kindrat 5, J. Atamanchuk 1, H. Sokal 2, P. Kuzyk 5, Hryhorchuk 10, J. Rola 10, J. Burtniak 10, S. Lozinesky 5, S. Lusko 5, N. Xabiaka 5, A. Basurba 5, S. Halinsky 5, W. Brazchuk 5, S. Atamanchuk 5, H. Stasiuk 5, W. Paulak 5, H. Kopychuk 5, J. Zarusky 5, Miss P Xarusky 5, N Dozinsky 1, M. Pasieka 1, Mrs. A. Dolhun 1, S. Marsenuk 2, Pulak 5, S. Pulak 5, S. Jasentuk 2, P. Burtnial 5, W. Lilik 1, L. Waly 1, N. Jasentuk 5, C. Atamachuk 5, G. Shimanszy 2, S. Nabozak 1, Mrs. Merenchuk 2; Mrs. Shimansky 1, Mrs. A. Basaraba 2, Miss C. Basaraba 1, A. Weselowsky 2, J. Weselowsky 2, F. Bunka 1, P. Nabozniak 5, M. Komarnisky 2, B. Komarnisky 2, S. Weselowsky 1, H. Lysak 3, Mrs. Potosky 5, W. Lulashni 3, S. Dowbush 5, M. Lulashnik 2, J. Rafalsky 5, H. Shmigarowsky 5, M. Harasym 1, W. Kalita 5, M. Kwolik 5, J. Kwolik 5, N. Rokush 4, N. Pawlowsky 10, A. Jakamisky 5, S. Ganchar 2, K. Horodnisky 5, J. Ganchar 5, J. Lucharawy 4, S. Stadnyk 5, J. Zagrodny 2, P. Spoel 5, F. Kalychak 1, S. Jakamisky 1, N. Dirkach 1, A. Ganchar 5, J. Zagrodny 5, J. Ganchar 1, J. Jakilashek 2, A. Kruk 5, A. Kruk 5, N. Lukowich 2, Ganchar 2, Werbisky 1, Werbisky 2, J.A. Polowy 3, R.T. Edwards 1, M. Shachinger 7, S. Antoski 2, N. Uskowsky 2, O. Dirhak 2, N. Martinuk 4, S. Jasentuk 5, M. Jarema 1, N. Rizok 1, Z. Plawusky 1, J. Shmenduk 1, F. Burtniak 1, M. Saruk 2, W. Kinzersky 1, N . Brezdin 1, S. Brezdin 1, M.P. Berezyuski 5. Total $548.25.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society, held Friday, March 21st, took the form of a social evening. Owing to our regular club room being burned down some short time ago the meeting was held in the Union Church. An excellent address was given by Dr. Medd, touching on skin diseases and the hospital question, but the main question was “Infant Feeding.” The subject is a practical one and we feel that by having our local physician speak to us we are getting deeper into community life, which is the real aim of the society.
Mr. CH. Dixon, our local lawyer, gave a very interesting talk on law, and la-making and we feel very grateful to Mr. Dixon for having so favored us. Then followed a musical programme of choruses, duet, reading and a pleasing solo by Miss Ida Rintoal. Tea was served at the close by the ladies, and we felt that our social evening’s quarterly would prove a success not only to our members but to all interested in the town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 20, 1919

5 Cases on Assize Docket

The spring assizes for the Dauphin Judicial District opened on Tuesday with Mr. Justice Metcalfe, presiding. There are five cases on the docket, which are as follows:
King vs. F.B. Race, theft of liquor from railway car.
King vs. H. Porteous, Roblin, assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
King vs. Geo. Kuzio, Winnipegosis, sedition.
King vs. John Bouazuv, Roblin, posting obscene letter.
King vs. W.B. Dempsey, Winnipegosis, forcible entry upon land.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Formal Opening of Club Rooms
The new club rooms of the G.W.V. association, in the Lilly block, were formally opened by Mayor Bowman on Tuesday, the 18th.
In opening the proceedings Mayor Bowman said it gave him great pleasure to be with them that evening. He regretted the absence of the president who was indisposed and hoped that he would soon be restored to his usual good health. He paid a high complement to the officers of the association for undertaking an enterprise of such magnitude and to the ladies of the auxiliary, who had done so much to help forward the good work. The aims of the association needed no explanation, it being well-known that it was formed for the betterment and uplift of veterans of the great war just ended. In closing his worship said that public opinion would be behind any association formed for the help and assistance of the returned men and extended the best wishes of the citizens of Dauphin and district to the association. He then formally declared the club rooms open.
A short programme followed, Miss Maggie Stark giving a humorous reading and Mrs. Heaslip a song, for which she received a well-merited recall. Major Skinner gave an address in which he touched on many subjects of great interest to the veterans and townspeople. The McMurray orchestra contributed several selections and its presence at any function is always heartily welcomed.
Dancing at once commenced, while in the assembly and recreation rooms a series of games of progressive whist were strongly contested. Mrs. Nash won the ladies’ prize, the gentleman’s prize going to Comrade Jack May.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary provided an abundance of toothsome delicacies, which were enjoyed, and for which they received hearty thanks. Dancing was kept up with spirit till an early hour, McMurray’s orchestra furnishing the magic.
There was a large gathering and the function was voted one of the best ever held in Dauphin.

Race Case Proceeding

The grand jury found a true bill in the King vs. Race, and the evidence of a number of witnesses for the crown was heard. This (Thursday) morning the case for the defence was started. The trial is attracting much interest. F.B. Simpson is the crown prosecutor and J.L. Bowman is defending Race.

Mossey River Council

The council of the municipality of Mossey River met at Fork River on the 5th inst., as a court of revision. After the numerous appeals were disposed of the minutes of the last council meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Reparation Committee, Ottawa, the solicitors re. Hartman account, H. Houchin re use of council chamber for War Veterans, H. Shannon asking for refund of taxes, the secretary of the Weed Commission, A. Gunmunderson asking to be struck off the assessment roll, J.C. Adam re taxes on lot in Winnipegosis, the rural municipality of Wallace re equalized assessment, the Manitoba Returned Soldiers’ Commission.
A petition praying for the dismissal of the collector and another asking for the building of a road on the correction line; also two applications for the position of weed inspector.
Hunt-Reid – That Simpson, McGirr & Co., solicitors for the municipality, be instructed to apply to the legislature of the province of Manitoba at the present sitting for a special act legalizing the assessment for the yea 1918, and that the council approve of the draft form of act hereto appended and authorized the solicitors to consent to such amendments of revision thereof as may be required by the law amendments committee of the legislature.
That W.B. Findlater, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, be requested to introduce the said special act to the legislature.
Hunt-Namaka – That the clerk write solicitors re Hartnian account with the village of Winnipegosis.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Whereas, the Union of Manitoba Municipalities, at its recent convention in Winnipeg, pledged the co-operation of all municipal councils and officials in Manitoba to the Returned Soldiers’ Manitoba Commission in its work of reestablishing in civil occupations soldiers returning from the war; and, whereas, the municipality of Ochre River has regarded I as a patriotic duty to do everything possible to assist in this commendable purpose; therefore, be it resolved, that this municipality hereby undertakes to obtain satisfactory employment for all returned soldiers who were residents of this municipality at the time of enlistment, or, in the even of it being found impossible so to do, to promptly report to the commission, giving reasons for such failure and the address where the returned unemployed soldier may be found. The clerk is hereby directed to give such assistance to the commission as is necessary for the carrying out of the purpose of this resolution. Carried.
Hunt-Reid – That Edwin W. King be appointed weed inspector for year 1919 at a salary of $125 per month, and that is duties begin on the 15th day of May, and continue up to the 15th day of October, and that the clerk in notifying him of his appointment, ask him to attend the convention of weed inspectors to be held in Winnipeg.
The council adjourned to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, March 17.
Robt. Marsland was here last week with his sawing and crushing outfit.
Frank Sharp has been on the sick list for a few days.
Mrs. Russell has received the good news that her son, Pte. Walter, is on his way home from overseas.
The chips will soon begin to fly as there is quite a number of new buildings going up in the spring.
The Grain Growers meet the first Friday in each month. At the last meeting matters of importance were dealt with. Resolutions were passed asking for a reduction in the tariff and refusing concessions to the liquor interests.
There has been considerable land cleared of scrub during the winter, and breaking will be pushed forward in the spring.
The school questions is the burning issue of the hour.

Sifton

A very crowded meeting was addressed by Mr. R. Fletcher and others in Wycliff School last Thursday, the 13th inst., on the question of “Municipal Schools.” Much interest was shown in the bylaw and it is thought that it will be supported on the 25th. Mr. Dyk spoke in Ruthenian and Paul Wood occupied the chair.
Three carloads of lumber are being unloaded by local farmers.
It is proposed to build a municipal public hall here and a bylaw will to all probability by voted on to sanction the borrowing of a sum of money on debentures for that purpose.
From all accounts Sifton is not proud of its new liquor detective or spotter. Nor is he of much practical use here as we are all on the “water wagon” just now.
It is expected that the new government trunk highway, Winnipeg to Swan River, will run through Sifton. No better route could be found.
Logs, hay, straw, fence posts, etc., are being feverishly drawn. If the snow held until June – which heaven forbid! – there would still be that last load to draw.
Our local barber recently did 43 shaves and 17 haircuts from 7 p.m. until closing time. A pretty good records – but then, he only opens on Saturday evenings.
Mr. Thos. Winshy has replaced Mr. Wheeler as manager of the Bank of Commerce. He thinks Sifton has a bright future, and with a few mines, factories and so on opened up may make quite a city. Joking aside, we have a first-class site for an up-to-date creamery. Who will build it? Not tow, only one. We have two mills.
A progressive whist drive is advertised for next Friday evening in Wycliff School. Refreshments, prizes and a good time – all for 25 cents.

Breathe gentle zephyrs o’er snow-covered state,
Blow steady south wind, cross forest and lake
Urge spring-time sun they perennial power,
Burst waiting bud and unfold bashful flower.

Lines of winged strangers flock up from the south.
Sound calls and carols from many a mouth.
Fiel is long time white turn your black into green,
Gild fruitful autumn with glorious sheen.

Winnipegosis

One of the brightest events of the social season was a tea given by Mrs. Steele on the 17th. The decorations in the spacious drawing room were appropriately Irish in honor of the Saint and the same bright spring color prevailed throughout all the rooms and even reflected in the costumes of the young ladies serving and prepared out from the sandwiches. The event took the form of a shower to assist the young ladies of the Order of the Needle with a bazaar which the are planning.
Andrew Lunn, who has been hauling stone on a contract for the Manitoba Gypsum Company, will be through next week.
Mr. Hamilton returned last week with his family and will shortly move into the Bradley house.
The Red Cross Committee are planning a box social on the 27th in Rex Hall.
A large crowd was at the station to welcome Charlie Burrell on is return from overseas. He was somewhat exhausted from the trip up but is resting nicely now and will be glad to see his friends.
S. Coffey has his moving picture show in full swing again.

Winnipegosis

The second production of the Winnipegosis Dramatic Society which took place on the 7th inst., was a very creditable one. The play chosen, “The Arrival of Kitty,” is a 3-act farce of good construction, smart action and bright dialogue, and amused the house greatly. The cast was well balanced, so well balanced that special mention of individual’s would be out of place, each one of the players, including the Pup, having earned his or her meed of praise. The production showed marks of greater experience on the part of the promoters, and improvement in this direction is not yet complete.
The gross receipts amounted to $121, the allocation of which, and plans for the future, will be discussed at an early meeting of the society.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 6, 1919

Cold Weather

After January furnishing us with a delightful brand of weather. February started in with a falling temperature. The Government thermometer registered as follows: Monday, 10 below zero; Tuesday 19 below and Wednesday 5 below.

The Great Air Battle of Major W.G. Barker

(By Mrs. Thos. Playford)

Among the deeds that have been done
By airmen brave and skilled,
This last great air feat of the war,
With wonder all has filled.

O’er Mormal fores, all alone,
One brave aerial knight,
Flew searching for the British troops,
Or foe air craft in sight.

He soon espied a German plane;
Attacked it then and there,
And soon the enemy machine
Was broken in the air.

But still another hostile craft
Was coming very nigh,
Just then the young Canuck was stunned,
A shot had pierced his thigh!

But soon the major was alert,
There, in the dangerous spot,
For fifteen Hun planes now came near,
To fire the deadly shot.

But the brave boy his shots did fire,
So deftly and so well,
That though against such odds he fought
Three of the foe craft fell.

But he another wound received,
And fainted clean away,
But again he mastered his machine,
And did once more hold sway.

He flew at one great hostile craft,
It fell, but in his pride.
Just then his left arm, bruised and smashed
Hung useless by his side

With one hand left to steer and shoot,
While foes the air did fly
Those watching saw and held their breath,
At that cool, deadly skill.

Some minutes longer in the air
He played the awful game,
Put out of action two more for fair,
Then to the earth he came.

Our boy! Who nigh on sixty plane;
Single handed fought that day,
Now lies a sorely wounded lad
In Rouen far away.

And all who watched him on that day
So nobly act his part,
That he’ll soon recover from his wounds
Is hoped by each brave heart.

Dauphin’s brave boy has laurels won
From our Allies o’er the sea,
But for this great deed of valor done
He got the prized V.C.

And when he comes back home again
Having won so much renown
Won’t be proudly welcome by
Dauphin, his native town!

And while, at home, his parents wait
The coming of their boy,
All hearts that love the Maple Leaf,
Heard of his deeds with joy.

And when she had this story heard,
Of daring, skill and pluck,
Old England bowed her head and said,
“God bless our young Canuck.”

And when in after years we read,
In history, song and story,
Of man a great heroic deed.
That won both fame and glory.

Of all the deeds of airmen brave,
Not many will compare
With this fight of our Major hold,
Knight-errant of the air.

Dauphin, Jan. 31st, 1919.

Fork River

Wm. Williams has left for Lake Winnipegosis, where his new timber limit is located. He intends commencing operations on the limit this winter. C. Bugg and W. Tuck went with him.
Miss H. Lacey has returned from a week’s visit in Winnipeg.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, have left on a trip to the coast.
Owen Pruder, of the Northern elevator, has returned from a business trip to Winnipeg.
A number of cars of baled hay have been shipped from this point this winter. A good price has been realized. This is an industry that might be greatly developed.

Winnipegosis

A delightful old-fashioned evening party was held in the Rex Hall on Wednesday, Jan. 29th, under the direction of Miss McArthur, in aid of the Red Cross Society. Many old-time dresses were resurrected, and especially winning was Mrs. Shears in a costume representing Dickens’ Mrs. Sarah Gamp, Mr. Shears caused many a laugh as Mr. Pickwick. Mrs. Steele, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. (Dr.) Medd, Mrs. Morrison, Mrs. Campbell (of Sifton), Miss Paddock, Mrs. Ummell and many other ladies in old-time dresses made one feel they had stepped back fifty years. Mrs. A. Snelgrove had her hair dressed in a pretty Victorian fashion, while many other styles made one think of the Middle Ages. Everyone was delighted with the violin selections rendered by Mr. Shears and Mrs. Campbell. We would also like to thank Mrs. Medd, Miss Arnason, Miss Macarthur, the Misses Grenon, Mrs. F.S. Giggins and Mr. Wills for their help with the program. The ladies on the refreshment committee also deserve great credit. A dance finished up a most successful event.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 30, 1919

Winnipegosis

Miss Pearl Wilson, who for some time has been assistant in the post office here, has left to accompany Mrs. Wilson on a visit to Victoria, B.C. Miss Wilson has served the public well. She will be missed by social as well as business friends and our best wishes go with her.
Fishing operations here are quiet, owing to the dull market. It is reported that a number of fishermen have taken out their nets.
The Red Cross weekly entertainment of last week, under the management of Mr. C.L. White, was a bright and pleasant event and quite a number were present.
Miss Olive Hawkins, of Dauphin, has arrived to take the position of assistant at the post office.
Mrs. J. Campbell, of Sifton, is spending a few days in town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 16, 1919

Dauphin Flour in Belgium

Our readers will remember that shortly after the first reports of the suffering among the Belgian people, due to the Hun invasion in 1914, reached Canada, the Dauphin Milling and Creamery Co. Limited, ground a carload of flour from wheat donated by farmers and others in Dauphin and adjoining municipalities. This carload was duly shipped to Belgium but no official record was ever received of its having reached its destination. The following letter received a few days ago by the company makes very interesting reading, and it is gratifying to note that at least part of the donation reached the people for whom it was intended:
“52 Rue De Mondigny,
“Charleroi, Belgium.
“Dec. 1, 1918.
“Dear Sir,—You will no doubt be greatly surprised to receive this letter from a person that you have never seen nor heard of before, and your surprise will be still greater when you hear that it is written at your request.
“One day, early in 1915, I was present at the opening of a bag of flour which, with several others, had just arrived from Canada. At the bottom of the sack was a strip of paper bearing these words, ‘Whoever gets this bag of flour write and let us know if it is good.’ I would have written at once only the Germans, with their usual kindheartedness, made things so easy for us that letter writing was out of the question. I hope never to see a German again as long as I live. ‘The best of them are bad.’
“Your flour was excellent; it has not been our luck to have such good quality since. For the last three years our bread—it really doesn’t deserve the name of bread—was composed of everything except flour, thanks to Fritz.
“You would not recognize your flour sack. It has been transferred into a beautiful sofa cushion and occupies a prominent place in our drawing-room It is the admiration of all visitors.
“Last week the Canadian troops came to Charleroi; they received a warm welcome on all sides. Everyone here speaks highly of your compatriots, many English regiments passed two or three days in this town before entering Boschland. With every good wish for Xmas and with kindest regards.
“Believe me, yours sincerely,
(Signed) Andree McDonnell.”

Mossey River Council

The first meeting of the council of 1919 took place at Fork River on Jan. 7th.
The clerk swore in the newly elected members – T.B. Venables, reeve; J. Yakavanka, councilor for Ward 1; E.A. Marcroft for Ward 3, and J. Namaka for Ward 5.
Bylaws were passed making the councilors’ fees $4 per day and appointing D.F. Wilson sec.-treasurer at a salary of $875.
The bylaws of 1918 appointing the solicitors and health officer were confirmed for 1919.

COMMITTEES
Finance – Hunt, Marcroft and Paddock.
Bridges – Coun. Reid and Hunt.
Public Works – Coun. Marcroft, Paddock and Namaka be public works committee for Wards 3, 4 and 5, and Coun. Yakavanka, Hunt and Reid be public works committee for Wards 1, 2 and 6.
Paddock-Marcroft – That the bridge committee examine the bridges that are needing repairs and make an estimate of the material that will be required for the season’s bridge work and report to the clerk who is instructed to purchase same.
Hunt-Namaka – That the assistance which has been given to the family of the late Peter Smith be discontinued.
Hunt-Marcroft – That each councilor make a diagram showing the work in his ward which he would prefer to come under the working of the Good Roads Act for the yea 1919, and forward said diagrams to the sec.-treasurer, who is instructed to make a diagram from them showing the whole municipality, which diagram is to be forwarded to the Good Roads board.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the clerk instruct the solicitors to prepare a bill legalizing the assessment roll of 1918, and that the member for the constituency be asked to bring it before the legislature at the coming session.
Marcroft-Hunt – That a grant of $50 be made to ex-Reeve Lacey for miscellaneous expenses.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the assessment roll for the year 1919 is hereby adopted for the years 1919 and 1920.
Reid-Namaka – That Reeve Venables be a delegate to the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and that the delegates receive $25 for expenses.
Council adjourned to meet at the call of the reeve.

Fork River

Mrs. James Rice, of Northlake School, has returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Mrs. R. McEachren and daughter Helen were recent visitors to Dauphin.
A car of young fat stock was shipped out last train. Good prices were realized by the sellers.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Little have returned from a short visit south.
H. Swartwood, International Implement Co., general agent, was at Fork River last week to hook up the orders of the local agent, W. King, for the coming season. Agent Billy K. is most optimistic as to the coming season’s business and to show his faith, has placed liberal orders.
Sunday school in All Saints Church every Sunday at 2 p.m.
Mr. Jarvis is now teacher of the Mowat School.
The continued fine weather is very favorable to stock and they are in fine condition.
Grain and cordwood are coming to market in considerable quantities every day.
The following are the officers of Purple Star Lodge, L.O.L., No. 1765, for the ensuing term:
W.M., Bro. C.E. Bailey; D.M., W.J. King; chaplain, Edwin King; rec. secretary, Wm. King; fin. Secretary, A. Hunt; D. of O., F. Cooper; treasurer, Sam Bailey; lecturer, F.F. Hanfebrak; dep. lecturer, Sam Reid. Committeemen – M. Cooper, H. Hunter, W. Russell, Ed. Morris, S. King, Jos. Bickel.

Sifton

A crowded schoolroom showed the appreciation of the residents of Sifton district of the Wycliff School Xmas concert. The hit of the evening was a three-piece sketch called “Santa and the Fairies.” Joe Reid acted as Santa, Miss Tilly Farion as Queen of the Fairies, and Witch Doubletongue was impersonated by Mary Braschuk. Patriotic songs opened the program, while several part-song contributed much to the enjoyment of the evening. An effective item was a serenade by the school children, clustering in a semicircle on the platform, with a flashlight playing on them for the darkened auditorium. Mrs. J.A. Campbell contributed the piano and violin accompaniments.
A good old-time dance, at which there was a large attendance, followed the concert. The dance music was given by Mrs. Campbell and Messrs. Marcott, Potoski, Kuczma, Halinski, and others.
The proceeds of the evening, totaling $56.75, have been placed in the bank as the Wycliff School Children’s Amusement fund. Part of it is to be applied at once to the repair of the school toboggan slide, a new concert platform, and ropes for the swings.
The teachers of the school, Mr. Bousfield and Miss Trew, and the children are grateful to the friends who gave the ample and excellent refreshments; to Mr. Paul Wood for the loan of his piano and for the willing assistance given by friends before and during the evening.
The fudge and taffy were provided by the children from their own lunch as a treat to adults, enjoying the Christmas spirit. The artists responsible for the blackboard scenes of the stage were Leslie Kennedy and Tilly Farion.

Winnipegosis

Old Josey Campbell, who resides near Water Hen, had his house and content totally destroyed by fire last Friday. The house was a new frame building, and the loss is ruinous to old Josey.
The council of the Village of Winnipegosis held its regular meeting last Tuesday. The council has been shorthanded for several months but is now complete, being reinforced by the addition of two new councilors, J. Willis and Chas. Denby. The council donated $400 to the Red Cross and discussed the building of a hospital and giving the town better fire protection. These last two matters will come up again at next council meeting.
The interment of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy, Ochre River, formerly of this town, took place on Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Hook conducted the service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 25 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 25 – Fork River

F.F. Hafenbrak, T. Needham and R.C. Sparling, of Dauphin, all old timers, were here renewing old acquaintances on the 16th. We were pleased to see them.
Miss Alice Clark returned to her home at Paswegan, Sask., after spending a month visiting friends here.
Messrs. J. and P. Robinson, of Mowat, have returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis in connection with their fish business at Lake Dauphin. They have shipped a large number of boxes of fish from this point.
Several Americans have been looking over the district lately. They have returned to their home with the impression that this is a good country and promised to pay us a visit later on. They hope to get land where a number can settle together.
Wm. King wishes to thank the ratepayers of Mossey River municipality for their hearty support on the 16th. He says he will do all in his power for the benefit of the municipality.
The many friends of Mrs. A. Snelgrove are pleased to see her around after her recent illness.
Business here is dull, principally on account of the poor condition of the roads. A fall of snow would be much appreciated.
A large party of young folks from here attended the ball at Sifton on Fright night. They report a good time.
The New Year’s ball will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the members of purple Star L.O.L., 1765, on the night of January 1st, 1914. Good music and refreshments. Admission $1.00 per couple. Everyone welcome.

1913 Dec 25 – Sifton

The most successful ball ever given in the history of the village was attended Friday evening last by some sixty couples. From the opening Grand March at 9 p.m. to the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at six o’clock the next morning not a single untoward incident distributed the harmony of the gathering. A number of guests came from Fork River, Dublin Bay, Melton and Dauphin and seemed to thoroughly enjoy themselves. Mrs. Norman Gray and other ladies very kindly and ably accompanied several of the various violinists on the piano. The flute and zither accompaniment was also much appreciated. The music was good, the floor good, and the Sifton cooking of the best. A well-known critic was heard to remark that the hall, owned by the Kennedy Mercantile Co., is the best between Dauphin and Prince Albert. A vocal and instrumental programme, somewhat shortened by the unexpected absence of several of the artists was put on after supper, Mr. Henry Woods very ably acted as chairman. Mr. Paul Wood, on behalf of the hosts, the residents of Sifton, in a few words, bade everybody welcome and the compliments of the season. Amongst other prominent old-timers and friends were noticed. Mr. and Mrs. Mooney, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Woods, Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Gray, Mr. and Mrs. W. Fair, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Love of Melton and Dublin Bay; Mr. H. and Miss Little, the Misses Nelson, Miss Cooper, Miss Weatherhead, Fork River.
Miss (Nurse) Reid’s Sunday school class Christmas tree is to take place in the Kennedy Hall on Tuesday evening, the 23rd. All the kiddies are looking forward to a visit from Santa Claus. A fine program is promised.
While business has not been quite as brisk as in some former years every indication points to better times ahead. But, at this, the festive season, let us for the time, at least, forget our troubles and join in the gaiety and happiness that always prevail at the close of the year.

1913 Dec 25 – Winnipegosis

Constable Hunking took two Indians to Winnipeg on Monday, where they will appear before the chief Indian agent. The redskins have been getting liquor from some quarter and an effort is being made to find out who the guilty parties are. When this is done there is going to be something doing. Up to the present it is not definitely known who supplied the liquor but there are grave suspicions. It is understood some of the officials will visit this district before long.
Mr. McKerchar went to Dauphin on Monday.
Now that the cold weather has set in the fishing industry will take on more life. It’s an ill wind that blows nobody good.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Sieffert left for Brandon on Tuesday to spend Christmas with Mr. S’s parents.
Councillor elect Hechter appears to be hearing the honours of his office with the due gravity. There is one thing we may look for now that the portly Frank is in office, and that is, that the municipality of Mossey River and Winnipegosis will get some publicity. That is all this town and district needs to be appreciated by outside investors. Three Dakota men were in the district last week and they said it was surprising that such a fertile belt was so little known. They are going to move here and say others will follow. Let us advertise like Dauphin and Ochre Rive have done and then we will come into our own.
H. Wilson, L.C. Doran and C. Hober from Dakota were here last week looking over the district. They intend buying lands and with others making their homes here.

1919 Dec 25 – Sleeping Sickness at Swan River

The Swan River Star reports that the Board of Trade of that town has died from “sleeping sickness.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 17 – 1914

1914 Dec 17 – Another 110 Men Wanted

Another large force for overseas service is to be raised in Canada at once. Major G.C.J. Walker received a wire this Thursday morning to this effect. The telegram read as follows:
“You are authorized to mobilize immediately one company of infantry a total 110 men for overseas service. Standard height, 5 feet 4 inches; age, 18 to 45; chest, 33 ½ inches.”

1914 Dec 17 – Injured Man Getting Better

Thos. Free, who was badly injured in a collision at Kamsack a couple of weeks ago and had to have one of his legs amputated, is making excellent progress towards recovery. It is probably he will be able to return o his home next week.

1914 Dec 17 – Jack Myers Shot in Leg

Jack Myers, a well-known resident of Gilbert Plains, was shot in the leg last week while hunting in the Riding Mountains by a young fellow named Coulter. Coulter saw the bushes move and before his companion, a man named Morran, could stop him, fired and dropped Myers.

1914 Dec 17 – Ruthenian Patriotism

An evidence of the patriotism of some of the Ruthenian settlers was given on Saturday when two of them. Panko Schnuyk and Peter Toporoski came to town to tender their mites for their country. Each gave a dollar towards the patriotic fund and also gave their promise to contribute a dollar a month each to the fund as long as the war lasted.

1914 Dec 17 – Fork River

Mr. W. Williams returned from a visit to Mrs. Williams who has been very sick for some time in the Dauphin Hospital. We are all pleased to hear that Mrs. Williams has recovered enough to be able to return home next week.
Mr. George O’Neill, of Mowat, returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and is delighted with the lake Town.
Mr. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, one of the candidates for the reeveship arrived in this burg in company with Mr. Steve Lytwyn, a representative of the Armstrong Trading Co. Mr. Lytwyn is assisting Mr. Hechter in his campaign to get control of the municipality.
Mr. Duncan Kennedy, late manager of the Armstrong Trading Company, has accepted a position with Mr. Hechter, of Winnipegosis. Mr. Kennedy has been here for the company for several years and attended strictly to business ear in year out. Although we are sorry to see Mr. Kennedy and his family leave, his friends wish him all kinds of good luck.
The box social under the auspices of All Saints’ Woman’s Auxiliary on the 11th, was fairly well attended. The boxes realized good prices in the hands of our friend, “Scotty,” who acted as auctioneer, and a nice sum was realized. It was, we believe, one of the most enjoyable times ever held in the hall. Credit us due the ladies for the nice display of boxes to tempt the boys. The social came to a close at 4.30 in the wee small hours.
There will be a public Christmas tree under the auspices of All Saints’ Sunday school on Wednesday evening, Dec. 23rd, to commence at 8.30 sharp. Everybody is invited to come and help give the kiddies a good time. Admission, adults 23 cents, children free. Proceeds to go towards maintaining the Sunday school.
Mr. Thomas, travelling Missionary of the Anglican Church, will preach in All Saints’ Church on Dec. 20th at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. Everyone invited.
Rev. Mr. Thomas will hold a meeting in All Saints’ Anglican Church on December the 19th, at 2.30 p.m. sharp. All members and those who are in sympathy


1914 Dec 17 – Sifton

The Grain Growers’ Patriotic concert held here last Friday met with great success. There was very good talent from Dauphin, also West Bay and Fairville. There was a very good attendance indeed from the outlying districts. The Sifton boys proved themselves very good in their little play, “Christmas night at the Front.”
Mr. Robt. Brewer shipped another car of stock on Monday. Quite a rustler is “Bobs.”
We all regret that Mr. William Birch, late station agent, has left town for good. We understand he is going to Invermay, Sask., and we all wish him the best of luck.
Mr. Caldwell, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town last week on business.
We understand that Mr. John Aller, of Fairville, is holding a social next Saturday in aid of the Red Cross Society. We trust it will be a success.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, are now busy canvassing orders as they expect their drilling outfit this week. They are deserving of success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 16 – 1915

1915 Dec 16 – Every Bone in Leg Broken

Tony, the 8-year-old son of Wm. Baylis, of Dublin Bay, had his left leg badly injured at the end of the week by a bolt, which was loaded with manure, going over it. When Dr. Culbertson examined it he found every bone in the leg broken.

1915 Dec 16 – Mossey River

Reeve – F.B. Lacey, re-elected.
Councillors – Ward 2 – Ab. Hunt, re-elected.
Ward 6 – Coun. S.B. Reid and John Bilinski.
Ward 4 – No nomination.

1915 Dec 16 – Sifton

The grand school concert at Wycliffe is on Dec. 23rd, when that delightful pastoral of Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” will be presented by the pupils of the school. The matter, scenery and music have been specially arranged and adopted by the principal. A Negro minstrel troupe is also a feature entertainment and many other pretty items will be given by the junior scholars. The evening will wind up with a dance. Light refreshments will be had from a buffet presided over by the ladies. The funds will be devoted to the wants of the Scouts of Sifton troupe, and the school children. Come in crowds and have a good time. Program holders will be given accommodation in the front seats, Price 25 cents. The program can be obtained through the school children. Return trains from Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 14 – 1916

1916 Dec 14 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. A.C. McPhee, Minitonas, killed. (Alexander Campbell McPhee, 1896, 425152)
Corp. H.A. Hickman, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. H.L. Pearson, Dauphin, missing. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)

1916 Dec 14 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little shipped a team of Shetland drivers to his daughter, Mrs. E. Cameron, at Neepawa.
The annual Christmas tree will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. on Friday night, Dec. 22nd. Everybody come and help the kiddies have a good time.
W. King, P.M., has received word from his son Edwin, who is a scout at headquarters in France, that he is well. Max, who is with the Scotch-Canadians, and was wounded at the Somme in September, is in the trenches again doing his bit. Aubrey the youngest son, is stationed in England, is reported getting on fine.
Mrs. Paul Wood has returned to her home at Sifton, after having spent a few days with Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. Birch, provincial constable, was here a week regarding the burning of A. Redurik’s stacks. P.M. Venables sentenced John Phycolo to $300 and to keep the peace for two years or six months in jail. John preferred the latter alternative.
Mr. Jasper, of Harding, Man., who has been visiting two weeks with Thos. Glendenning on his ranch, returned home on Thursday.
Messrs. Williams, Briggs, and Rowe, took a joy ride to Dauphin in “Billy’s automobilly.” They found the walking very good on the return trip from Valley River home.
Fred King and f. cooper are having a few days at Dauphin this week.
We are in the midst of a campaign for the reeveship. It is well to have our municipal affairs intelligently brought before the ratepayers every once in a while. It makes for a better condition of affairs.

1916 Dec 14 – Sifton

The Wycliffe School holds its Xmas concert and dance on Dec. 20th, Wednesday evening. The lunch will be in the form of a box social and promises to be a pleasing feature of the entertainment. The girls are busy making their boxes, so boys don’t forget the date. Everybody welcome. Program holders entitled to reserved seats. Come early and be prepared to revel in a good time. We present you with Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar tragedy, Red Riding Hood and all kinds of items suited to the varying hour.
Pte. Frank Mealing paid a flying visit to his home on Saturday to bid goodbye to his relations and friends here. At a previous visit his friends presented him with a handsome wristwatch, the time being visible in the dark. He carries with him our sincere best wishes for success at the front and a safe return.
Home Economic Society at the annual meeting five of the old officers with the addition of miss Munson were re-elected as follows:
Mrs. Paul Wood, president.
Miss Reid, vice.
Miss Baker, chairman of Red Cross committee.
Miss Munson, chairman program committee.
Mrs. J.A. Campbell, sec.-treasurer.
Mrs. Oulette kindly provided refreshments and she and Miss peal Ashmore gave musical selections.
The Society new has a membership of nineteen and regularly hold meetings for Red Cross work at different members’ homes. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. John Kennedy.
On Friday a social evening was given by the Society at the home of Mrs. Oulette, when the members have themselves up to unrestricted frivolities for one evening. The single ladies ran off with the prizes; the winners being Misses Munson, Baker and Wood.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1910

1915 Dec 8 – Shot for a Deer

What might have proved a fatal accident to a hunter occurred in the Riding Mountain south of Gilbert Plains on Friday last. William, the 18-year-old son of Jas. D. Sutherland was hunting in the mountain and was attired in white. He was coming through the scrub when the white of his legs was noticed by another hunter, by the name of Dimmick from Roblin, who at a distance of 2200 yards fired at him for a deer and hit him in the right leg, the ball breaking it. Sutherland immediately ell and yelled loudly which prevented Dimmick from again firing as he had the rifle to his shoulder a second time when he heard the yells. As the two men were a long distance away from any habitation, Dimmick had to carry the wounded man three miles to a farmer’s house when medical aid was procured and young Sutherland brought to the Dauphin Hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1915 Dec 8 – Fork River

Miss Lane, from Dauphin is spending a few days up here before proceeding to her home in Winnipeg.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of Mowat School was taken seriously ill last week and returned to Dauphin to be under the doctor’s hands. We all hope she will soon be herself again.
F. Storrar paid a visit Dauphin lately.
A Christmas tree and entertainment will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the English Church, on Friday evening, December 23rd, at eight o’clock. A good time is expected for the children. Admission all children free, but a charge for admission will be made to adults.
Mr. Letwin has been appointed as assistant to Mr. D. Kennedy in the Armstrong Store here.

1915 Dec 8 – Sifton

Bert Kennedy, of Canora, Sask., who was a patient in the Dauphin Hospital with typhoid, was a visitor to his brother John Kennedy for a few days before returning to his house at Canora.
Miss Scott, Neepawa, was a visitor at the Presbyterian mission house for a couple of days. Miss Scott is always welcomed at the mission house.
Rev. Johnston, of Gilbert Plains, held services here on Wednesday evening last. The sermon was well put and much appreciated.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held service on Thursday evening. Quite a large crowd congregated.
The moose shooting season is on again. Rudolph Spruhs is one of the number to leave for the haunts of the antlered monarch.
The Manitoba Government Telephones have a construction gang camped in the village doing construction work east of town.
On Tuesday Messrs. Buckwold & Levin shipped out three cars of cattle to Winnipeg.
The elevator of the British America Elevator Co. had to close down on Saturday for lack of cars to ship out. This is said to be the first experience of this kind since the elevator was erected. The opportune arrival of empty cars has now, however relieved the situation.
Rev. J.A. Sabourin is having a furnace and hot water heating system installed by M. Cardiff, of Dauphin, in his new building which is being rapidly completed. A new R.C. Church is expected to be erected next summer.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Melynik a few days ago a pair of twin girls. All three doing well.
With the late fall of snow the farmers are quickly taking advantage of the good sleighing and hustling their grain to market.

1915 Dec 8 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church, Winnipegosis, on Sunday next. Subject: The Call to Advance.
Teamsters here have been busy freighting fish from the various fishing grounds up the lake. They are impartment men and must needs be well catered for. Recognizing this fact the Misses Geekie and Black have opened a new restaurant at which good, solid, substantial meals are served at all hours. This is just what was needed in our busy little town. The fact that hot meals can be obtained at all hours, would see to be a guarantee of success. We wish them luck.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Dec 7 – Municipal Nominations

Reeve
Nominations for rural Municipalities throughout the province took place on Tuesday. In these municipalities two weeks elapse before election day.

MOSSEY RIVER.
Reeve – F.B. Lacey, acclamation.

COUNCILLORS.
Ward 2 – A. Hunt, acclamation.
Ward 4- J.S. Seiffert, acclamation.
Ward 6 – No nomination.

1911 Dec 7 – Fork River

An ice gang left here for the put up ice for the Armstrong Trading Co., Winnipegosis, composed of Messrs. Munro, Johnston, Gower and others.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis is to be opened for summer fishing again. It will be a great blunder if it is. As it is winter fishing is of great benefit to the resident fisherman and farmer, where as summer fishing is for the benefit of the 102 American companies and means clearing out the lake in about two seasons.
George Tilt left last week for Dauphin on a business trip.
Rev. Mr. Cruikshank held a service in the Methodist Church on Tuesday evening assisted by Mr. Malley, of Winnipegosis. A business meeting was held after service.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Breiver, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Armstrong.
Our trains here have not been on time more than twice for the last month. We were informed by a traveller from Winnipeg that instead of the train leaving Dauphin on time they had to wait while they manufactured a conductor and when he was manufactured they had to wait while he got some breakfast and then it did not matter when they started. Farmers wait hours for their mail and freight. Of course we sympathized with the traveller as we are used to waiting in Dauphin while they manufacture an engine to take a train out, but this is our first experience in making conductors. What’s next?
The office of the municipality will be closed from the 12th to 14th of the month. The Sec.-treasurer will be at the council chamber, Winnipegosis, during this period.

1911 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sec-treasurer of the municipality will be here at the council chamber Winnipegosis, from the 12th to the 14th of this month.

1916 Dec 7 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. J.L. Godkin, Minitonas, died of wounds. (John Laurence Godkin, 1897, 2382826 ??? (not found on virtual memorial))
Pte. J.T. Taylor, Winnipegosis, wounds. (???)

1916 Dec 7 – Death of Pte. Harold Curtis

Private Harold Curtis succumbed to his wounds last week. By his death Mrs. Curtis has sacrificed her tow and only sons on the alter of her country. The loss is inestimable, but the Empire must be saved, and many more such sacrifices will have to be made by mothers, fathers and some before the war is brought to a successful completion. Our deep sympathy goes out to the grief-stricken mother.

1916 Dec 7 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Northam has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin.
Metro Boyko has purchased he old ???.
W. Stonehouse, of Oak River, is in town.
Miss Leone Stonehouse has returned to Dauphin, after having spent the week-end with her mother.
F.F. and V. Hafenbrak, Fred and A. King and Jack Richardson, have returned from the deer chase with a bull moose each.
David Briggs has returned to Rathwell after a week’s visit to T.N. Briggs.
Thos. Barnard contractor of Dauphin, is busy plastering Will Northam’s new residence.
Mr. Kasmir has purchased a car of fat cattle for S.B. Levins, of Winnipeg.
The ladies of the Home Economics Society have sent a number of Xmas boxes to gladden the hearts of our soldier laddies at the front.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, and J.P. Grenon, of Winnipegosis, paid a short visit to W. King, P.M., when passing through Fork River to Dauphin.
The municipal nominations took place on Tuesday, Reeve Lacey is opposed by F.B. Venables. Mr. Venables is also running against G.E. Nicholson in Ward 1. Archie McDonnell was elected by acclamation in Ward 3, as also was John Namaka for Ward 5.

1916 Dec 7 – Sifton

We much regret the illness of our popular station agent, Mr. Oulette, who was removed to the Dauphin Hospital by special on Sunday morning. Mrs. Oulette returned, however, Monday with more reassuring news of her husband’s speedy recovery.
News from Lance-Corp. Walters this week informs us that he is fast recovering from his wounds, but the shock of the shell, which buried him, has in a great measure robbed him of hearing in his right ear.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore entertained this evening (4th) at their residence a large number of old friends on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of their marriage. Mrs. Ashmore decorated her table with the top tier of her wedding cake, which she hopes to have an evidence for her 25th. After Mr. Paul Wood had made the presentation of a cut glass service in ??? evening was spent in music and song, Mrs. Campbell presiding at the piano with her usual brilliancy.
Look out for Wycliffe School concert and dance Wednesday, 20th.

1916 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sunday school Christmas tree and concert will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 20th. This annual event has, in the past always been held in the Presbyterian Church but on the present occasion will be given in the Rex Hall. This change will given room for more stage effect and also better accommodation for the parents and friends, who have always filled the church to its utmost capacity. The programme will be a good one including a representation by the children of the famous Christmas story of Charles Dickens, entitled “The Christmas Carol.” The message of the carol is of universal interest Under the touch of the spirit of Christmas the selfish man is rid of his selfishness, plum pudding and roast beef are found to be indigestible without kindness, charity mercy, and forbearance. The story will be given in the form of a three-act play and several tableaux.
We ask everybody to reserve his evening and appreciate the efforts of the children by giving them a full house. This year the Christmas presents ??? Sunday school without the aid of gifts from the parents and friends. This is partly to save time and also to avoid the inequality in the gifts received by the children.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 6 – 1917

1917 Dec 6 – Over $400 000 000 Raised

Over $400 000 000 has been raised in the Dominion for the Victory Loan.
Dauphin town and rural municipality guaranteed over $400 000.

1917 Dec 6 – Fork River

Harry Hunter has returned from the hospital at Dauphin.
The “Whale” which appeared in the columns of the Herald last week, re the clerk’s absence, was duly noted here.
A number of prospective settlers from outside points are here looking over the district this week.
The elevators are all full up and no cars in sight.
The deer hunters are returning with poor bags.

1917 Dec 6 – Sifton

On the 23rd a “Hard Times” dance and box social were held at the Wycliffe School house. A large crowd assembled. No linen, jewellery or fashionable clothes were allowed and two constables were kept busy rounding up offenders who were promptly fined by Justice Spearman, assisted by P. Wood was clerk. The auction sale of boxes was very successful, the highest figure realized for a single box being $21. C. Brain, who had the cheapest box knocked down to him at $2.50, was promptly fined $1 for the offence and he paid just as promptly and cheerfully. S. Kitt and other kind helpers supplied the music, the floor being in charge of Mr. H. Woods. Dancing was kept up until 3 a.m. The handsome sum of $153 was realized and sent to the Red Cross.

1917 Dec 6 – Winnipegosis

The hauling of fish will commence in real earnest next week. Everyone is preparing for big business.
Mr. Groff a new stable is about completed and already is filled with teams.
The sad death of little Christine Johnson, seven-year-old daughter of Stoney Johnson occurred this week.
The Red Cross monthly meeting was held as usual in the old school. At this meeting the auxiliary was organized into a branch of the Red Cross Society of Canada, and officers and committee elected. Mr. Ketchison was again made president, and we feel confident he will be a very efficient one.
The weekly entertainment of the Red Cross last week was a great success. A very attractive programme of music, etc., was prepared. A chorus of school children was well received and Mrs. Litwin’s singing of Ukrainian songs, translated into English, was a unique item. A handsome Christmas cake donated by Mrs. Whale netted $17. Tickets were sold for a raffle and Mr. Kristinson was the winner, but very generously put it up for action. Mr. Rod Burrell finally carried it home in triumph having paid $20 for it. The total for the evening was $87.00.
A memorial service for the late “Joe” Johnston, who gave his life in the trenches for us at home, for his country and the cause of liberty, will be held in the Presbyterian Church on Sunday, the 16th. Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick, of Ochre River, will officiate.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 3 – 1914

1914 Dec 3 – Shot in Hand

A Galician named Lazar was brought to the hospital on Tuesday from the mountain with a bullet in his hand. The wound is not a dangerous one.

1914 Dec 3 – Boy Died

Sam, the 9-year-old son of S.J. Buchanan, of McCreary, was brought to the hospital on Monday, having been shot in the stomach and arm by a man who was hunting rabbits. The wound was a bad one and the boy died on Monday night. The remains were taken to McCreary on Tuesday for interment.

1914 Dec 3 – Soldiers Given Send Off

The departing soldiers on Monday morning were given a great send off at the station. The citizens turned out in large numbers and the town band was also present. Bunting and flags were displayed from all sides, and the military spirit was contagious. The special train the boys were to go odd on was over an hour late and this gave everyone an opportunity for a hand shake and chance to say good-bye. As the train steamed in with its long line of coaches the band struck up a popular air, and cheer followed cheer. The scene was one that will long be remembered.
During the short stay here the soldier boys from the west mingled with the crowd and the time was spent in a jolly way singing patriotic songs, waving flags and cheering.
As the train left the station the band played and the crowd simply went wild. Women shed tears, hats were thrown into the air flags and handkerchiefs were waved and cheer followed cheer.
It was a great send off the boys got and one not soon forgotten.

1914 Dec 3 – Sifton

We are glad to learn that miss Rowe, head nurse of the Presbyterian mission, is now on the way to recovery from a long illness.
Owing to bad roads there has been very little business done in the district of late.
The town will was completed last week and there is every indication of there being an abundance of water.
A party composed of our prominent business men paid a visit to Ethelbert last week with the view of inspecting the Kennedy Mercantile Co,’s new grist mill. They report the mill is running smoothly and doing excellent work.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz celebrated on Tuesday the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ida, to Prof. Matoff, which was witnessed by their many friends and relations of the various ???.
Mr. Joe Clarke, late Sawyer-Massey salesman, paid us a visit on Monday. He reports thing quiet at present but he says business will be humming in the near future. Hoe is sure no pessimist.
The teacher and children of the Wycliffe School gave a fine entertainment in the schoolhouse on Friday evening. The one entitled “War Scenes,” consisting of four parts, namely part I, soldiers fighting; 2nd, arrival of Red Cross nurses dressing the wounded on the battlefield; 3rd, hospital scene; 4th, soldiers and Red Cross nurses tenting on the battlefield, was certainly good. The other part of the programme included solos, readings and plays, consisting of “Henry VIII” and “Britannia.” Several patriotic songs were sung during the programme. A dance concluded the evening. The whole thing proved a great success.

1914 Dec 3 – Winnipegosis

California weather.
F. Hechter arrived home on Monday’s train from Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. and Miss McArthur left this week for Winnipeg, where they will reside for the winter.
Messrs. Thompson and St. John arrived last week from Portage for their annual big game shoot. J. McInnis and Walter Grenon accompanied them on the shoot.
Capt. Coffey spent the weekend at home at Dauphin returning on Monday.
Our train service is to be changed slightly. Instead of the train arriving on Saturday as heretofore, it will arrive on Friday, starting on the 4th inst., otherwise the schedule remains the same.
The fish are beginning to come in. The first loads arrived on the 25th, for the A.T.Co. From all reports the fishing is good.
Miss Emblem and miss Burrell spent the weekend at Snake Isle.
Doc. Medd, who has been attending the assizes at Portage, returned on Monday’s train.
Wm. Walmsley has been confined to the house through sickness. Better hurry, Bill, they’ve started curling.
Mr. Foley lost his residence through fire, last week, over heated stovepipes being the cause. Mr. Foley lost everything that was in the house, as the fire had gained too much head way before being discovered.
The entertainment and bazaar in the Methodist Church last Friday afternoon and evening was a grand success. The programme, though not a lengthy one, was of a classical nature and was fully appreciated by the large crowd present.
The municipal elections promise to cause some excitement, especially in Ward 5, where it is understood, “Old Reliable,” Tom Toye and J. Namarko will be the contestants.
The rink opened for skating and curling on Monday night. It is not every town of our size that has a curling and skating rinks open this winter. It should be fully appreciated and patronized by old and young, both skaters and curlers.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 28 – 1912

1912 Nov 28 – Fork River

The annual meeting of Mossey River School, No. 999 will be held at D.F. Wilson’s office on Monday, Dec. 2nd at 10 o’clock, for the closing of the year’s business and electing a trustee.
C. Clark spend Sunday at Dauphin among friends.
Rec. H.H. Scrase returned from a few days visit among his parishioners at Winnipegosis.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, accountant for the A.T. Co., spent a short time at the Co.’s store on business.
Several of our citizens collapsed the other morning and on investigating it was caused by trying to meet the train which arrived five minutes ahead of time from Dauphin, which was an unheard of thing before in this burgh. We trust they will keep it up instead of keeping the farmers in the cold two or three hours every day as heretofore.
Mr. Darroch, of Dauphin, was here for a short time on business.
Miss Olive Clark left for a short vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Mrs. Humpherys and family, of Dauphin, are staying at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson. They have the sympathy of the people of this community in their said bereavement in the death of Mr. Humphreys, who was held in ugh esteem in by all who knew him here.
Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, attended a hurried call to the home of Willis Miller of Mowat and we are pleased to hear Mrs. Miller is improving. The Dr. is under the impression that paying a night call over the new grade on the south road is equal to passing through a cyclone. As Dunk is used to travelling the north road and did not put the break on in time, things were well shaken before taken according to prescription for one.
The Orangemen of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, will have a grand masquerade ball on Dec. 13th, in the hall. Grand march at 9 o’clock. Supper provided. Admission tickets, gentlemen $1.00. Everybody welcome.
Nomination for reeve and councillors for the year 1913 will be held in the Municipal hall, Winnipegosis, on Tuesday, Dec. 3rd, between the hours of one and two, for Mossey River Municipality.

1912 Nov 28 – Sifton

The late fine weather has done much to help out conditions in this part of the country. Many farmers now have all the feed they will require.
From present indications it looks as if the output of wood this winter is going to be large.
General regret is felt here at the departure of Coun. Ogryslo for Dauphin. He’s a good councillor and a good fellow.
The question now is frequently asked, “Who is going to be our new councillor?” The names heard mentioned are John Kennedy, P. Wood and several of our prominent Galician residents. We hope it will be a good man as there is much work to do in Ward 6 the coming year.
With the crop not as good as usual the lower price of grain is more severely felt. It is becoming to be generally regarded that mixed farming is the sure and safe way to succeed. Batter, eggs and livestock find a good market all the time.
$1.00 pays for the Herald from now until the end of Dec. 1913.

1912 Nov 28 – Winnipegosis

The Christian League topic for this week is given out as “Anticipation.” A correspondent deems it permissible to remark, that, if it would retrace its steps and board the public it would perhaps more quickly realize its object and be in less danger of being overtaken by the ego.
The Card Circle last week entertained a guest, Mr. Wilson, of the Western Fancy Goody Co., who was delayed in town. Clem Bradley was somewhat consoled for his recent unlucky play in Dauphin, by winning fat prize in the first home game.
The entertainment intended to be given by the W.A. on the 6th. Dec. has to be postponed till the 20th, owing to the advent of a moving picture company for the first week of December, and a masquerade ball to be held in Fork River on the 13th.
The teachers are to attend the Dauphin convention, and Mrs. Ketcheson and Miss Bardley will ail themselves of a holiday in good company.
The school being closed for a week gives the children a chance of revelling in pond skating though minus 5 (sense).
The lake is new frozen over.
Miss Evelyn Burrell, who has been quite ill from the effects of a severe cold is able to be up again, but is still under the doctor’s case.
J.P. Grenon has returned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

1919 Nov 20 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. John Dobson and family, of Winnipeg, are visiting at the home of Reeve Venables.
D.F. Wilson, sec. treasurer is attending the Union of Municipalities convention at Winnipeg this week.
Milton Cooper, who has been in the Dauphin Hospital, is improving.
F.F. Haffenbrak is on a visit to Ninette, Man.
With the milder weather the attendance at Sunday school has increased. 42 were in attendance last Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 17 – 1910

1915 Nov 17 – Burglary at Sifton

On the night of November 8th, the office of Paul Wood, Sifton, was broken into and some $1500 in notes stolen. The lock was wrenched and broken from the door, showing how admittance was gained. As soon as the robbery was known, Provincial Constable Rooke was telegraphed for. Up to the present no clue has been found, but it is generally thought to have been done by someone familiar with the premises.

1915 Nov 17 – Fork River

Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister Mrs. Ivor Humphreys in Dauphin.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary of the English Church paid us a visit this week and gave an excellent magic lantern entertainment in the Orange Hall. The subjects given were views of Japan and Bunyan’s Pilgrims Progress etc. A large crowd turned out and all were satisfied with the evening’s enjoyment.
Mrs. M. Snelgrove paid Dauphin a visit this week.
The young people around this district are now busy skating and having a good time.

1915 Nov 17 – North Lake

John Strasdin was up before P.M. Munson last week, for shooting on Sunday. He is going around singing a song entitled “There will come a time some day.”
Inspector Walker visited the schools around here.
Although Councillor Lacey gets mixed up with missing Post Offices, we notice he did not get mixed up with missing the tamarac swamp, on sec. 17, this year for we can now get through it with ease.
W. Williams has finished threshing around here.
Thos. Glendenning shipped the finest car of wheat this year, that ever went out of Fork River. Tom says its better than “our’n” and we guess he’s rights.
Jack Robertson still knocks around although he had a nasty smash.

1915 Nov 17 – Sifton

About four inches of snow fell on Saturday night. The sleighs are making a good showing already.
Isaac Silverwood, Dauphin, who had the contract of moving the R.C. Greek Rite Chapel at Sifton has successfully complete moving it to its new foundation across the road from its former position.
Craig Bros., of Dauphin, who are building the new R.C. mission building, having the building well under way. It is quite a credit to the appearance of the village or will be when finished.
W. Hewey, of Dauphin, who was in this vicinity boring wells, returned to Dauphin last week after a couple of days at unsuccessful attempts at penetrating the earth’s crust.
A C.N.R. bridge gang outfit were here for a few days building a much needed stock yard which will be a great convenience to stock shippers.
The daily train service lately inaugurated on the Winnipeg Prince Albert line via Dauphin is being much appreciated and marks another accommodation and is a credit to the management.

1915 Nov 17 – Winnipegosis

The Council met at Winnipegosis last week when some important business was done.
Dr. Medd, who has been in this district for some time, residing at Winnipegosis, left here this week for pastures new.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Anglican Women’s Auxiliary, gave an entertainment, in the schoolhouse, which was attended by a large crowd. During the interval Miss Doris Hurst and Miss D. Parker sang some songs. Mrs. Bradley and several ladies of the local auxiliary had a chat with Miss Millidge.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 12 – 1914

1914 Nov 12 – Men for Second Contingent

The following have successfully passed the preliminary medical examination here this week conducted by Dr. Bottomley. The men are now drilling at the barracks under Sergeant-Major. Goodall and Sergeant Highfield. There are 50 men wanted from district No. 10., which territory is almost all in the Dauphin district, for the Second Contingent.
A.G. Cockrill, Dauphin. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
T. Boakes, Swan River. (Thomas Boakes, 1892, 81084)
A. Kerr, Swan River.
F. Conley, Benito.
S.J. Ellis, Dauphin.
W.J. Falconer, Dauphin. (William John Falconer, 1894, 106218 SGT)
J.L. Younghusband, Dauphin.
J.W. Cleaver, Dauphin. (John Wesley Cleaver, 1890, 106138)
Andrew Andrew, Dauphin. (Andrew Andrew, 1883, 81019 CSM)
J.W. Meek, Dauphin. (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578 QMS)
Glen H. Pettis, Dauphin. (Glen Haslome Pettis, 1893, 81704 SGT)
H. Knight, Dauphin.
A. Richmond, Swan River.
W.H.G. Cattermole, Grandview. (William Harry Gage Cattermole, 1879, 81140)
H. Wade, Dauphin.
D. Leigh, Ashville. (Duncan Blake Leigh, 1893, 106356)
A. Towns, Grandview. (Alfred Towns, 1893, 81894 LCP)
Jas. Walkey, Dauphin.

1914 Nov 12 – Fork River

Mr. R.M. Bell has left for a short vacation to Brandon and Russell.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Alexandria, Ont., are visiting their daughter, Mrs. A. Snelgrove.
Mrs. Joe Hunter left for home at Severn Bridge, Ont., after spending a few weeks with her sons, Sam and Harry.
The school was closed on Wednesday. The kids enjoy a holiday in the middle of the week or at any other time.
Mr. T.B. Venables has left for a vacation trip to Boissevain. Major Humphries is in charge of the farm during his absence.
Mr. Sam Hunter has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mr. Sydney Howlet, of Million, paid his friends of this burgh a visit, while passing through from Winnipegosis.
The Orangemen’s patriotic ball on November the 5th was admitted by all to be the best event of the kind ever held in this little burgh. There were fifty couple present, Dauphin, Dublin Bay, Sifton and Winnipegosis represented. The music was furnished by the Russell family and several others. From the opening at nine o’clock with the grand march till the “Home Sweet Home” waltz at 4:30, everything moved along pleasantly and most enjoyably. The ladies furnished a good supper. Speeches and songs were given during that interval. The song, “It’s a Long, Long, Way to Tipperary” by the three Russell children was well received. Ice cream was served by the ladies of the Women’s Auxiliary and a nice sum realized for the fund. The Orangemen wish to thank the public for the assistance given towards making it a success.

1914 Nov 12 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. Bradley is fast recovering from the effects of the burning she received on Hallowe’en night.
Mr. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Dr. Medd took Mrs. R.C. Birrell to Dauphin on Monday for treatment. Mrs. B. has been in unsatisfactory health for some time past.
Capt. Coffey arrived on Wednesday’s train.
We see that Charlie White has been appointed fishery overseer for the province. We hope that this does not mean that our old friend may have to pull up stakes and locate elsewhere.
What Winnipegosis would be without a curling club it is hard to say. It is truly our chief winter sport. A meeting was held recently to organize and the feeling prevails that the game will be as popular as ever this season. Dr. Medd is president and Fred McDonald secretary-treasurer. The curlers have taken over the rink from Mr. Whale, and will manage it themselves this winter.