Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 8, 1920

Fork River

Miss Ina Briggs and Miss Hess, teachers of the Fork River school, are spending the Easter holidays at their respective homes.
The father and son banquet has been postponed.
Several of our farmers are investing in the better breeds of cattle, pigs and poultry this spring. Among the purchasers are F. Hafenbrak a pure bred sow and Rhode Island Red poultry, and H. Little a bull.
Tenders are being called through the columns of the Herald for our proposed new brick school. The new building should be worthy of our growing village and district.
W. King has disposed of all his barred rock cockerels, but still has a few white rock cockerels left.

Winnipegosis

The question of the day, “is the cold weather ever going to let up?”
On Saturday, April 3rd, the Ladies’ Sewing Circle of the United Church held a sale of homemade cooking at Mrs. Houchin’s ice cream parlor, was kindly pleased at their disposal for the occasion. Tea was served from 3 to 5 p.m., and the total amount realized was $31.70.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 11, 1920

Fork River

A joint meeting of the Women’s Institute and the U.F.M. was held in the Orange Hall on Tuesday evening, the 2nd inst., Prof. I. Williamson in the chair. Mrs. A.J. Little, delegate to the Winnipeg convention, gave her report, which was in the form of a splendid address. Mr. H.P. Nicholson addressed the meeting on the farmers’ movement. Both addresses were well received by the large audience. Miss Briggs and Mr. W. Russell entertained the audience with music and Mrs. Lockwood and Mr. Marcroft in elocution.
On Saturday afternoon a meeting in the Anglican Church was addressed by Miss Strang and Mr. McQuay, of Dauphin – Miss Stang on the work of the Women’s Section and Mr. McQuay on the national Policy of the U.F.M. It is hoped the Fork River people will hear those two speakers again in the near future.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 12, 1920

Fined $200

On Tuesday, the 10th, Inland Revenue Officer J.A. Hall made a raid on certain parties at Winnipegosis suspected of illegal whiskey manufacturing. A quantity of mash and large still were discovered and as a result E.D. Philibelt appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday and was fined $200 and costs.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Comrade R.B. Maxwell, vice-president of the Dominion Command, was a visitor at last Thursday’s meeting. He came to Dauphin for the purpose of explaining some aspects of the reestablishment proposals, with which many members of the association and the general public are unfamiliar. Comrade Maxwell proved to be an instructive and entertaining speaker, and his address was very much appreciated.
At the next regular meeting, which will be held on Thursday, Feb. 19th, the course of action with regard to acquiring permanent quarters for the association will be decided upon.

Oil Boom

Oil has been discovered on the farm of Mr. McKay across Lake Dauphin, sec. 16, tp. 28, range 18, and for the past two or three days there has been a rush at the Dominion Lands office to enter claims.

Fork River

A very pleasant time was spent Friday evening, February 6th, in taking a trip around the world. All parties having gathered at the Union Station, Fork River, first special train left at 8 o’clock and each 20 minutes thereafter. First stop was made at China, where the guests were treated to all the dainties China can produce, also the costumes and customs of the people were a great treat to all. Next stop was made at India, where all were treated with the greatest courtesies by the natives and came away with a great impression of the people, also the fare they had to eat. Last stop was made at Japan where the tourists were feasted with all the delicacies of that wonderful nation. They were struck by the beauties of the quaint little people and advise that the missionaries have done a great work there. On arrival back in Canada the homesick people were given a grand reception by those at home and gave a pleasant account of their trip. The reception consisted of songs by Rev. Roberts, music by Mrs. Little, recitation by Mrs. Lockwood, also instrumentals by the Russell boys, and Miss Ina Briggs. The nice sum of $58 was made by the United Church of Canada.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 5, 1920

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Feb. 2.
The political committee of the United Grain Growers met at Winnipegosis on Jan. 19th to transact business.
The G.G. held their annual meeting on Jan. 23rd, when officers for the present year were elected. There was a good turnout and prospects for the year look good. A committee of three was appointed to interview Mr. Bickle re threshing outfit. The next meeting will be held at Winnipegosis on Feb. 7th. This change has been made for the purpose of giving the members who reside at Winnipegosis a chance to attend the meetings. After the regular business was finished nominations were called for. The following were elected: President, Thos. Toye; vice, Duncan Crerar; sec.-treasurer, Frank Sharp. Directors – James Laidlaw, J. Haywood, A. Dumas, F. Girling, C. Bradley, G. Godkin. At this meeting the ladies’ section was well represented and refreshments were served.
By the way, what about the corduroy road leading to Bicton Heath school? There are fourteen children on the east side of the muskeg who will be compelled to go without any education another year if this work is not done immediately. It is high time that some of our worthy councillors should be getting busy?

Fork River

Miss McIntyre, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of Mr. Cooper.
E.V. Lockwood is spending the week in Dauphin.
The question is frequently asked, what has become of the Member for Gilbert Plains. The people here never see him.
Donnie McEachern is spending the week in Dauphin with his mother, who is in the hospital at Dauphin.
Feed is scarce and all available will be needed for the stock at home.
The mid-week meeting in All Saints’ Church, January 28th, was in charge of the school teachers. The program was commenced with a solo from Mrs. A.J. Little and a story by Miss G. Cooper. The Fork River School debate, “Resolved, that a horse is better than a cow,” in charge of the teacher, Miss Ian Briggs followed. The members of the affirmative side were David Nowasod, Percy and Mildred Carlson, and the negative side Ben Schuckett, Bob Williams and Betty Williamson. Judges, Mrs. Lockwood, Miss Cooper and Miss Hess. Critic Professor J. Williamson. Decision was given in favour of the affirmative side. The debate was a lively one and a credit for school boys and girls, and was greatly appreciated by the large audience present. The evening was brought to a close with a piano solo by Mrs. A.J. Little, reading by Miss Cooper and the singing of the National Anthem.
The Debating Society is preparing something lively for Wednesday, February 11th. W. King, chairman.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 29, 1920

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members are requested to remember the meeting called for Thursday, Feb. 5th, in the rooms. Comrades Bowler and Wilton, of the Provincial Command, will address the meeting.
The association would be glad to receive any discarded magazines or books.

Fork River

Peter Ellis and son Ray, of Kamsack, spent last week here. He had Dun Hamilton sell his homestead effects. The goods off and sold well.
Robt. Hunt, homestead inspector, spent several days in the district last week. Bob is one of the old-timers and we are always glad to see him.
Max. King was a visitor to the Peg last week.
The funeral of the late John Basham took place on Sunday.
The Literary Society had the meeting in All Saints’ Church on the 20th inst. It was magazine night, Mrs. Ina Briggs, editor, had charge of the adult portion of the program. Mrs. A.J. Little gave a selection on the piano. The papers by the juveniles were very good. There were ??? by Prof. Williamson and his pupils, W. and A. Russell. Mrs. I. Briggs accompanied on the piano. There was a ten minute talk by Mr. Lockwood. There was a good ??? and all enjoyed the excellent program. W. King was chairman, Wednesday next, the 28th, the program will be in charge of the school teachers.
More snow has fallen of late. An abundance of snow always means sufficient moisture and good crops.
It seemed a little odd to be without the daily papers of late, but I suppose one has to get used to anything these days when the times are out of joint.

Sifton

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wood and family, who have gone to Florida, are greatly missed by their many friends and we wish them every success in their new home.
There is very little wheat coming to the elevator now. The most of it has been already marketed.
W.C. Wellborn was in town a few days ago and says the fishing on the lake is fairly good this winter.
The trains are running all hours these days.
Mike Poloski is in Winnipeg attending college this winter.
Ed. Woods, of Dubin Bay, is spending the winter with Mr. Willison.
The stock is wintering fairly well although feed is very scarce.
Mr. Fred Kitt spend a few days in Winnipeg lately.
Mr. Ramsey, who has been under the weather for some time, is improving in health.
The roads are good and the town is full of famers every day.
Brigham Young is again in our midst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 22, 1920

Ethelbert

We have been asked to publish a copy of telegram sent to the Acting Prime Minister at Ottawa by the Ruthenians of this vicinity. It is herewith:
“Canadians of Ukrainian descent, in mass meeting assembled at Ethelbert, unanimously protest against the brutal invasion of Ukrainian East Galicia by imperialistic Poland, against the decision of Peace conference of July 11th, sanctioning the invasion, and against the decision of Supreme Council of November 20th awarding to Polish invaders a mandate over Ukrainian East Galicia for twenty five years. We appeal through the Canadian Government to the Government of Great Britain and other allied governments and people to right great wrong done to four million Ukrainians of East Galicia. We urge governments to have polish invading armies withdrawn from Ukrainian East Galicia to have that territory occupied by inter-allied armies, and to compel Poland to make reparation for destruction of Ukrainian villages and towns, and to indemnify families of civilians murdered by Polish soldiery or robbed by Polish officials. We appeal to governments to settle East Galician question in accordance with wish of people concerned. We request the Canadian Government to convey this our appeal to the government of Great Britain and to British plenipotentiaries at Paris.”
The above protest shows clearly where the root of wrong is and what the Ukrainians demand.

Fork River

The first annual Grain Growers’ Masquerade Ball, which took place Friday evening, the 16th of January, was a huge success and the big event of the New Year. The costumes were varied and created a pretty color scheme. There were six prizes awarded. Miss Gertrude Cooper as a Japanese lady, and Mr. D. Briggs, as a soldier, were awarded the prize for the best dancers. Mrs. Charles Bailey, representing a Gypsy fortune teller, was awarded first prize for best lady’s costume; Miss Viola Rowe, representing a country maid with her quaint hat, dress and crook was awarded second prize. Dr. A.J. Little, representing a colored dude was awarded first prize for best gentleman’s costume. Mr. Milton Cooper as Pierrot, was awarded second prize. The prize for best comic costume was awarded to Mr. Norman Shannon, who represented a tramp. The judges were Mrs. T.B. Venables, Mrs. A.J. Little and Mr. Williamson. After the judging and unmasking at midnight refreshments were served.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rawson are moving to Winnipegosis.
Fork River Literary and Debating Society met at the home of Mrs. A.J. Little, Saturday evening last to discuss the next debate, which will be held Wednesday evening, Feb. 4.
Fork River Women’s Institute met at Mrs. Tuck’s Saturday afternoon for the election of officers and to appoint directors for Agricultural Society. Mrs. A.J. Little was elected Secretary to succeed Mrs. Ina Briggs, Mrs. T.B. Venables and Mrs. McEachern were elected directors.
Mr. Fleming Wilson, Mr. T.B. Venables, Mr. Duncan Briggs, delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention held at Brandon, gave their reports on Tuesday evening’s meeting.

Winnipegois

The Tennis Club is arranging to hold a masquerade ball on Friday, Feb, 18th. A ball is always popular and a masquerade ball doubly so. This dance promises to be the event of the season.
The fish catch has been exceptionally good this winter. The December catch was the largest in the history of the late. Many of the fishermen will return from the north early next month.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 8, 1920

Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bailey, of Bowsman, spent the holidays with Mr. and Mrs. S. Bailey.
Stanley King, of Togo, was home for Christmas dinner. It was a happy gathering of the King family on the old farm, with the four sons at home who had been at the war.
The Unity Christmas tree and concert was held in the Orange hall on the 22nd, was a decided success. The entertainment part of the program was in the hands of the teachers of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River, was a very well rendered and showed that the teachers were alive to the splendid talent in their several districts. Mr. Venables moved a vote of thanks and complimented the different committees on the success of their work. After lunch was served, the children enjoyed games, and later the older ones a dance.
The Grain Growers’ first annual ball will be held in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Jan. 16th. This will be a masquerade but not necessarily a fancy dress one. Prizes will be given.
I have been informed that the next debate of the Literary Society will be “Horses vs. Tractors for Farm Work”, to be held on Wednesday, Jan. 17th. This should prove an interesting debate. The society is to be congratulated upon the success of their efforts.
The Women’s Institute held a meeting in the Orange Hall, Jan. 3rd, in conjunction with the Grain Growers’ to discuss the engagement of a district nurse or a doctor for the district. There was a fair attendance and after a speech by Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, it was decided to take the matter up with the council. A committee from each organization will be appointed for the purpose and we look for results in the near future.
The Grain Growers’ appointed T.B. Venables, Mrs. D.F. Wilson, Jr., and Duncan Briggs as delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention at Brandon. Their report will be given to the public on the night of the ball, Jan. 16th.
Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, will hold service in All Saints’ Church on Jan. 11th, at 3 p.m.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 30, 1919

Can a Doctor Sell Liquor?

Dr. Wilmot, of Roblin, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, on several charges preferred by the inspector for selling liquor contrary to the provisions of the act. One charge was dismissed and decision reserved in the others.

Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

Daughters of Empire Rally

The rally of the Daughters of the Empire here on Tuesday, the 28th inst., was largely attended, every Chapter being represented, which included the Pas, Grandview and Gilbert Plains. The meeting was held in the town hall and was presided over by the Rev. J.A. Cormie.
Mrs. Aldridge was the first speaker and she spoke in the interest of the establishment of a hospital for the people of Servia. She related in a pathetic and impressive manner the great sufferings of these people and the heroic way in which they had faced and overcome every difficulty. Mrs. Aldridge spent much time in Servia during the war and incidents she related were from personal experience.

Details of War Memorial

In explaining the war memorial, Mrs. G.H. Smith, National Educational secretary of the order, told the meeting that in detail the plan of the I.O.D.E. is to establish ideals of patriotism and give the children in the schools a truly British education by acquainting them with the ideals, the traditions and the institutions of Britain. Illustrated lectures on the history and geography of the Empire will be given in schools. All non-English will be supplied with one of I.O.D.E. British historical libraries within the next few years. A lecture fund for the teaching and study of British history will be established and some eminent lecturer brought to Canada at least once a year. Pictures of Canada’s part in the war will be given to 1000 schools, 100 schools in Manitoba to be among the number. Travelling scholarships to the extent of $1200 to university graduates in history will be awarded to each province. A second scholarship of greater value may then be established for these nine scholarship winners. An endowment fund of $500,000 is being collected for this purpose.
On rising to speak, Ms. Colin H. Campbell, provincial president, was warmly greeted. After expressing her great pleasure at having the privilege of again speaking to a Dauphin audience, se made a strong appeal on behalf of the Victory Loan. She pointed out that it was the duty of everyone to the best of their ability to assist the country at this time by subscribing what they could. Mrs. Campbell also spoke for a few minutes on the war memorial.
During the evening Mrs. Rogers sang a solo and miss Pear M. Tucker and Miss Irma Struthers contributed instrumentals.
At the conclusion of the meeting the visitors and the members of the chapter repaired to the rest room, where refreshments were served, and a couple of hours spent in social intercourse.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has bot been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavor.
An October cold dip is not common, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 23, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

Regular meeting of the above association was held on the 9th inst. about 40 comrades being in attendance. Application for membership was received from 9 returned men, all of whom were accepted.
The committee appointed to consider the question of building a home for the returned men reported that they had approved a design for a veterans’ home as presented to them by Mr. H. Payton, the architect, this sketch being placed before the comrades for approval. Instructions have been given to Mr. Payton to finish the design and it is hoped to have these drawings shortly to place before the public so that when an appeal is made for help in the construction there will be no doubt in the mind of anyone as to where the money is going. It is also felt that the plans under consideration will not only meet the needs of the veterans but will meet with the approval of the community and be a credit to the town of Dauphin and district, and will give those interested in the welfare of the returned men the opportunity of expressing their appreciation.
The members of the above mentioned committee are as follows: Comrades J.D. Neeley, H. Oliphant, F. Neeley, F. Bumstead, D. Kitney, J.W. Skinner, W.F. Terrell, W. Wright, C. Lane, H.H. Olson, E.C. Batty (chairman) and J.M. Chalmers (secretary). Any of the afore-mentioned committee will be only too pleased to go into the matter of the building and give all the information that is desired.
We are informed that the Ladies’ Auxiliary intend putting on a dance on Hallowe’en Eve (Oct 31st). Some very fine prizes have been donated, and all are asked to bear the date in mind and come and have a good time.
I have been asked to state that Comrade R.H. Elliott has lost his service button. The number of which is 163371. Anyone finding same will please return it to the G.W.V.A. rooms or to the above mentioned. These buttons cannot be replaced and also that it is a criminal offence to be in possession of one unless the certificate belonging to same is also in the possession of the bearer.
On Thursday, 14th, the Victorian Serenaders performed at the town hall under the auspices of this Association. The show was as usual good, and the music after for the dance was generally conceded to be first rate. The house was not as good as might have been hoped, but this was in a large measure due to the weather and the fact that there have been several other attractions during the month. However it was a well-paying proposition and the proceeds will be used in the furtherance of the building proposition.
On Nov. 3rd the third of the series of the concerts to be run under the auspices of this association will be placed on at the town hall. This time it is the Canadian Juveniles and it will not be necessary to say a great deal about these as they are well known to the residents here. The Gray Girls, who are travelling with this company, have already established a reputation for themselves in Winnipeg second to none; the same also applying to Charlie Wright. We would strongly recommend this entertainment to all and would ask that we be given the usual support of the public and so enable us to bring that home for the veterans a little nearer to a possibility.
Members are asked to note that the regular meeting will be on the 23rd inst., and a full attendance is requested. Now that the bulk of the farm work for the season is through, there is no reason why the members should not attend, and it is only by so doing that we can accomplish anything for the bettermen in general of the returned men.

Sir Henry Drayton to Speak

The Victory Loan Committee have their organization completed and the canvases for both town and rural will commence Monday, Oct. 27th. A public meeting will be held at Dauphin on Oct., 29th, at which Sir Henry Drayton, Minister of Finance, is expected to speak.

Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 9, 1919

Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Fork River Fair Prize Winners

The following is a list of the prizes awarded at the Fork River fair, held on the 26th ult.:
HORSES.
Draft stallion, A. Rudkanvitch. Pair draft mares or geldings, P. Toperasky. Draft filly or gelding, Fred King. Pair agricultural, mares or geldings, Fred King; J. Bodnarchuk 2nd. Brood mare, J. Bodnarchuk. Agricultural, 2-year-old, mare or gelding, M. Bayko; T.B. Venables, 2nd. One-year-old, mare or gelding, Chas. Pereski. Foal, John Bodnarchuk. T.B. Venables’ special, foal by Baron Regal, W. Williams. Pair of drivers, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
Beef cattle (pure-bred), bull over 1 year, 1 and 2, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
T.B. Venables took first prize for cow 3 years and over, 2 year-old heifer, bull calf, and heifer calf.
Grade cattle (beef type), heifer, 1 year old, S. Narvasod; W. Williams 2.
Dairy cattle (pure-bred), bull, 1 year old and over, F.F. Hafenbrak. Grade dairy cattle, cow 3 years old, 1 and 2, D.F. Wilson and Sons.
Fat cattle, yearling steer, W. Williams.
Sheep—Ram, 1 year and over, D.F. Wilson and Sons; T.B. Venables 2nd. Pair of ewes D.F. Wilson and Sons; T.B. Venables 2nd. D.F. Wilson and Sons took first and 2nd prizes for pair shearling ewes, pair ewe lambs and pair fat sheep. Ram, any age, P. Soloman.
Pigs, bacon types—Boar under 1 year, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Sow, under 1 year, D.F. Wilson and Sons, 1st and 2nd. Pair pigs, under 6 months, F.F. Hafenbrak. Lard type—Boar under 1 year, F.F. Hafenbrak. Pair pigs, under 6 months, F.H. Richardson; F.F. Hafenbrak, pair pigs by boar Gladstone, J.H. Richardson.

POULTRY
Wyandottes, white. D.F. Wilson, jr. Buff, 1st and 2nd, D.F. Wilson, sr. Plymouth Rocks, barred, W. King. White, W. King. Leghorns, white, F.H. Benner. Brown, T.B. Venables. Rhode Island Reds, F.F. Hafenbrak. Any other variety, W. King; 2nd, S. Narvasod. Pair spring chickens, any variety, D.F. Wilson, jr; 2nd, W. King. Pair geese, D.F. Wilson; 2nd, T.B. Venables. Pair ducks, S. Narvasod; 2nd, M.A. Munroe. Best collection of poultry, W. King.

DOMESTIC AND DAIRYY PRODUCE.
Homemade bread, Mrs. Pruden; 2nd Mrs. Rawson. Twelve buns, Mrs. A. Rowe. Homemade pickles, Mrs. Rawson; 2nd, Mrs. F.F. Hafenbrak. Collection of preserved and canned fruit, Mrs. Brunsden; 2nd, Mrs. King. 5lbs butter, Mrs. Shiels; 2nd, Mrs. King. Home cured bacon, D.F. Wilson; home cured ham, D.F. Wilson.

GARDEN PRODUCE.
Potatoes, white, G.H. Tilt; 2nd F.H. Benner. Colored, W.H. Johnson; 2nd, T.B. Venables. Turnips, P. Solomon; 3rd W. King. Carrots, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Beets, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd G.H. Tilt. Mangels, T.B. Venables; 2nd, N.H. Johnston, Cabbage, R. Senieuk; 2nd G.H. Tilt; Cauliflowers, Charles Pereski; 2nd, G.H. Tilt. Pumpkins or squash, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd W. King. Cucmbers, W. King; 2nd, R. Senieuk. Corn, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd W. King. Tomatoes, F.F. Hafenbrak; 2nd W. King. Parsnips, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Celery, D.F. Wilson and Sons; 2nd G.H. Tilt. Onions, G.H. Tilt. Rhubarb, D.F. Wilson and Sons. Lettuce, S. Narvasod. Beans, T.B. Venables 2nd W. King. Peas, W. King.
Grain and Grana—Sheaf of barley—H. Harrineuk; 2 nd J. Smiduke. Sheaf of oats, L.V. Hafenbrak. Sheaf of rye, F.H. Bennes. Sheaf of flax. H. Herrineuk.

LADIES’ WORK.
Tray cloth, Mrs. Rowe; 2nd Mrs. Eales. Tea cosy, Mrs. McEcheran; 2nd, Ms. A. Rowe. Table centre, Mrs. McEcheran; 2nd Miss K.E. Briggs. Table mats, Miss S. Briggs; 2nd, Mrs. A. Rowe. Eyelet embroidery, Mrs. A. Rowe; 2nd Miss K. E. Briggs. Punch work, Mrs. A. Rowe. Handmade pillow cases, Miss S. Briggs. Homemade towels, Miss S. Briggs. Handmade bedspread, Miss K.E. Briggs. Homemade ladies’ underwear, Miss K. Briggs. Homemade corset cover, Mrs. Pruden; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Sofa cushion, Miss K.E. Briggs; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Fancy workbag, Miss K.E. Briggs; 2nd Miss S. Briggs. Knitted stockings, Mrs. Venables; 2nd Miss Lacey.

The baby show brought out 12 entries, Mrs. A. Rowe taking first honors and Mrs. Garnet Lacey second.

Winnipegosis

The Anglican church held a successful entertainment at the Rex hall last week. The programme consisted of a whist drive, musical entertainment and a tombola. Mrs. Paddock won the lady’s prize at whist and Mr. T. Johnason the gentleman’s. Miss E McArthur and Mr. J Campbell’s songs were especially good. Mrs. Campbell’s playing of the violin was greatly applauded. A large crowd was present and the church netted $125. After paying the church debts there is a balance of $75.00 left, which will form a nucleus for a building fund.
The fishermen have pulled up their nets a few days ago on account of the fish being dropped in price. The men subsequently promised that the price would be raised and returned to work and the companies obtained a week’s extension of the fishing period from the Government.
An epidemic of broken legs and arms is going around. Three children and an adult have met with such accidents in the past month.
Hechter Bros. have sold their store to M. Popenski.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 21, 1919

Movement to Dam Mossey River

A movement is on foot to have the Dominion Government build a dam on the Mossey River on Lake Dauphin. This year the water in the lake is at its lowest point, and navigation for even small boats is almost impossible. The hay lands are to be reclaimed the depth of water in the lake has to be greatly increased. By building a dam the water could be raised several feet which would permit of navigation and increase the productiveness of the hay lands by hundreds of thousands of tons.

Nat Little Writes About France After War

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Little, of Fork River, are touring France. Mr. Little, in the following letter, describes, in an interesting manner, has visit to the battlefields:
To fulfill my promise to you I write these few lines on my trip to date. After seeing Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales, these countries having been described so often there is no use repeating. We crossed from Folkestone to Bolonge and on to Paris, said to be the most beautiful city in the world. We made Paris our headquarters, going out to some one of the battlefields each day and returning at night on account of there being no accommodation in the country. We have been over every battlefield except Ypres. Tourists will be allowed into Belgium some time in August. All battlefields look alike—nothing but ruin and destruction. Artois and Arras, were first visited on account of the valiant part taken by our Canadian soldiers. We crossed from Arras to Lens by motor and on foot, following Vimy Ridge, and passing through Souchez, Givenchy, Carency and Mount St. Eloi, or the remains of these places. On the ridge a large monument has been erected to the fallen Canadians.

Little Black Crosses

Soldiers’ graves are everywhere, many of the little black crosses bearing no inscription and having only the hero’s helmet placed on top to show his nationality. German prisoners under French guards are busy collecting these scattered bodies and placing them in cemeteries where the shell holes and trenches have been filled it. Everywhere are piles of barbed wire and dumps of empty shell cases round the gun positions. There are camps here and there, pacing sentries, heavy motor lorries carrying rusty guns and Nissen huts. On top of the slope are lying several belts of German machine gun ammunition and a vast stack of cartridges, undoubtedly a well chosen nest for some Hun sniper.

“Booby Traps” Numerous

Dugouts are intact, but the tourist is advised not to touch anything, for not all the “booby-traps” have been discovered, and there are still “duds” and grenades lying about. The whole area is dotted with shell holes and trenches, and the very ridges seem to have been blown away. But where are the places themselves? If you did not read the tragic epitaphs written on some of them you would pass without notice the grave of what was only a few years ago a happy cluster of houses and blooming gardens nesting around a church.
Some cities had 30,000 inhabitants and more; nothing now remains of them. Is there any possible future for these towns and their fellow-sufferers? They say it would cost $1,250,000 to clear out the ruins of each town. Let it be added that there are in these ruins 100,000 unexploded shells, and that according to recent statistics one out of ten is sure to burst in the hands of the workers! A thousand accidents have already occurred in the past few months. After the terrible loss of human life in France is it wise to risk new ones for such a doubtful result? Would it not be better to build a new city close by and leave the ruins as a terrible avenging witness of the war German willed and waged.
German prisoners—fat, sturdy and rosy-face are standing in line and hand to each other quietly and methodically bricks from the rubbish heaps. A Frenchman in our party, his hat at the back of his head, suddenly raised his clenched fist and said, “Ah, ces bandits de Boches!” The Germans answered this outburst with an expressionless animal stare, but I perceived just an ironical twinkle in the eye of a feldwebel (sergeant).

Threshing Commenced

Threshing operations have commenced in all parts of the district. This is the earliest on record for threshing. The grain is in good shape for the separator. The returns in some parts are larger than were expected, although it is too early yet to form anything like a correct estimate a to what the yield will be. The grade is not expected to be very high on account of the unevenness of growth.

Fork River

Mr. Gilmore, of the Canadian Northern Townsite Co., spent two days here with the intention of putting ore of the townsite property on the market. Fred Tilt has been appointed townsite agent.
Miss Ina Briggs has returned from her holidays and started duty as teacher of the Fork River school on the 18th inst.
Wheat threshing has started.
The Agricultural Society’s exhibition was postponed on account of the heavy rain on the selected day, Friday, the 15th. The show will now be held on the same date as the Boys’ and Girls’ Club fair, which date will be announced next week.
Rev. Harry P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s church, Dauphin, will hold holy communion and baptismal services in All Saints’ church at three in the afternoon of Sunday, August 24th. All are invited to attend the services.
Mrs. Terrin and children, of Dauphin, spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey, on the Mossey.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 10, 1919

Police Court Cases

P.M. Hawkins, Presiding
On information laid by Constable Coleridge, John Goik appeared before the police magistrate on the charge of “non-registration under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $5 costs. Urko Chorny also appeared on the charge of “removing without permit under Alien Enemy Act.” He was found guilty and fined $10 and $9 costs or 30 days hard labor. Urko elected to take the 30 days.
On information laid by Chief Bridle several boys were assessed $2 and costs each, for bicycle riding on sidewalks.
Wm. Bell faced the magistrate on Monday on two charges. First, that of “driving a motor while intoxicated,” second, for “having liquor I place other than private dwelling.” On the first charge he was fined $25 and $5 costs, and on the second count he was assessed $200 and $5 costs.

Saturday July 19th, Peace Day

Saturday, July 19th, has been proclaimed Peace Day, and a statutory holiday.

Fork River

Miss Ina and Stella Briggs left for their homes in Southern Manitoba to spend the holidays.
Pte. Miller has returned from overseas and is visiting at the home of his father, Charles Miller.
Pte. Merko and his war bride have arrived from overseas and are visiting with friends here.
Max Gashina has returned from overseas and is visiting at his home before going north to homestead.
The members of the Purple Star L.O.L. will hold their 17th annual basket picnic on July 12th at Fork River. Sports of all kinds.
The late heavy rains have proved of immense benefit to the district. The crops now promise well.
The auditor’s report is now in the hands of the clerk and will be perused with much interest. The ratepayers are entitled to know how the business of the municipality is conducted, and the council should let its light shine so that all may see its good work.
The question of the hour: “Are we to have the new school?” It is up to the ratepayers to say yea or nay.

Mossey River School Exams.

Results of exams: Examinations at Mossey River School No. 999:
Grade VII—Blanche Hunt 77.
Grade VI—Louise Rowe 63.
Grade V, Sr—Viola Rowe 76, Willie Thompson 73, Lorne Shannon, Gordon Atkins.
Grade V, Jr—Beatrice Rowe 79, Pearl Reid 67, Irene Bailey 65, Mary Briggs 64, Verna Reid 62, May Shaw 56.
Grade III—Lulu Thompson 87, Bernard Hunt 84, Percy Shannon 75.
Grade II—Ivy Hunt 92, Danny Wilson 69, Ivor Humphries 63, Alvin Bailey 59.
Grade I—Horace Thompson, Courtney Humphries, Albert Shannon.
Grade I, Jr—Charlie Rowe, Clara Pearson, Walter Pearson, Reggie Wilson.
K.E. Briggs, teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 22, 1919

G.W.V.A.

Regular meeting of the above mentioned association held Thursday, May 15th, some 30 of the Comrades being in attendance.
Application for membership received from 16 returned soldiers. All of these were accepted.
Moved by Comrade R. Armstrong, seconded by Comrade T. Boyce, that this branch endorse the resolution prepared by the Winnipeg branch of the G.W.V.A. and remain neutral with regard to the strike that is on at Winnipeg, and it was also resoled that should such occasion arise the G.W.V.A. in this town place their services at the disposal of the authorities to maintain order.
Moved by Comrade Price, seconded by Comrade Cocking, that a separate fund in connection with the work of this branch of assisting sick comrades and their dependents. And that in the future all grants under this heading shall be paid from that account and that moneys donated to this association shall be placed at their credit of same and shall not be used for any other purpose.
Moved by Comrade Percy, seconded by Comrade C. Lane, that this branch appoint a delegate in the Dominion convention to be held at Vancouver on June 8th. Vote taken and Comrade G.F. Johnston was appointed delegate.
General committee in charge of the G.W.V.A. sports day met Friday, 16th, to make further arrangements on this project. These committees are now completed and they were instructed to commence operations at once in the preparation of a program.
The association begs to acknowledge receipt of the sum of $64.20, raised at a box social held in Dauphin last Saturday evening, under the management of F. Tacuik.
Owing to the strike in Winnipeg the Better ‘Ole has been postponed. The new dates are Monday and Tuesday, June 2nd and 3rd.

The Strike Situation

The greatest strike in the history of Canada was declared in Winnipeg last Thursday. It is outcome of differences between employers and employees which include several matters besides the question of wages. Shorter hours and the recognition of the principle of bargaining are among these. It will be realized that it is not an easy matter to settle matters of this nature offhand. It is somewhat of a revolution; but there are days of revolutions and the issues must be squarely faced. In the meantime the public are not only suffering in convenience, but loss.
There have been no daily papers for the past week from Winnipeg and the absence of the papers is keenly felt. The last copies of the papers to be received was Friday and the newsy on the train sold these at from 10 to 25 cents each. It proved a bonanza for the agent.
There has been no mail going to Winnipeg for a week and during the past two or three days none south of the boundary.
The express service south and west have been discontinued for a week.
The managers of the moving picture theatre are obliged to go to Winnipeg to or three times a week to get the films. But this is better than having to close up.
The price of eggs has declined as there is no means of sending the hen fruit to outside markets.
Senator Robertson, Minister of Labor, was billed to arrive in Winnipeg on Wednesday. The outcome of his visit will be waited with much interest.

Fork River

Pte. A.E. Eales has purchased the n.w. ¼ 6-30-18, and intends improving the property.
The Returned Soldiers’ Committee will meet on the 24th to arrange for a banquet and transact other business. The ladies are invited to attend.
Rev. H.P. Barrett, rector of St. Paul’s Dauphin, will hold service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, June 8th, at 3 o’clock.
Max King has started breaking on the home farm with a 10-20 Titan and a 20 inch breaker. He is doing good work.
All Saints’ Sunday School has been reorganized and started on Sunday with W. King as superintendent, and Mrs. A. Russell, Mrs. McEachern, Miss I. Briggs and Miss S. Briggs as teachers.
Service was held in the Methodist Church by Rev. Mr. Hook on Sunday afternoon. There was a good attendance.
The dance given by the Returned Soldiers’ recently was well patronized and all who attended had a good time.
Edwin King, weed inspector for the municipality, has started on his rounds. Winn is some hustler, but he will have to go some if he keeps ahead of the fast growing weeds these days.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15, 1919

Four Men Badly Injured

Mr. Arthur Fisher, who resides in the Burrow district, is erecting a large barn. Last Friday four men, John Neely, Frank Potter, John James and Geo. Smith were engaged erecting the rafters when a whirlwind came up suddenly collapsing the timbers. Neely, Potter and Smith were badly injured by the failing timbers. James, who was working on the top, jumped when the rafters commenced to fall, but was unable to clear himself and was struck and injured. Mr. Neely was so badly injured that his condition will not yet permit of his removal to town.

G.W.V.A.

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, May 8th, between 30 and 40 of the comrades being present. Owing to the unavoidable absence of the president, Capt. F. Scrase, Comrade G.F. Johnston, vice president, took the chair.
Applications were received from 13 returned soldiers for membership, all of which were accepted. This makes the membership of the local branch 195 and a considerable increase on this is expected in the near future.
The secretary has since this meeting been informed that a special meeting has been called by Premier Norrie to consider the memorial question for this province, on May 16th. It has, therefore, been decided to send a delegate to this meeting to represent this branch.
During the past week a donation of $112.65 was received from the citizens of the Ethelbert district, per Rev. G. Tymchuk. The thanks of the association are due to all the subscribers of the above mentioned donation.
A grant of $25 to this association has been received from the Dauphin Automobile club. This has been acknowledged and thanks are due to the members of the club for same.
On May 23rd and 24th the “Better ‘Ole” is being put on at the Star theatre. This is to be under the auspices of the G.W.V.A. Ask any returned man what he thinks of it and he will soon convince you, to say the least of it, that it will be well worth seeing, and at the same time give the association a lift.
A meeting was held on Friday, the 9th in connection with the G.W.V.A. Sports Day, to be held on 1st July, and arrangements made for appointing the various committees to make same a success. Posters are to be got out advertising same. The committee are requested to note that the next meeting will be held on Friday, may 16th, at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is essential.
Members are asked to note that the Manitoba Provincial Command have issued a weekly paper devoted to the returned solider. It is known as the Manitoba Veteran, and will be issued weekly. The rate is 5c per copy or $2 per year. Sample copies have been received and if the paper continues like the sample a bright future is assured. Subscriptions are taken by the local secretary of the G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Billy Tuck has gone to Dryden, Ont., for a short trip.
W.R. Snelgrove is around again after his illness. He has moved on to the Chase farm, having exchanged his Dauphin residence for the property.
Steve Warrawrork, of Volga, has purchased the Slobodizan farm from W.R. Snelgrove.
Corp. Duncan Briggs and Private Tom Briggs and H. Craighill have arrived from overseas. They are looking hale and hearty.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron and children, from Neepawa, are visiting at Mr. Nat Little’s house.
Robt. Rowe intends Fording it to town for the future, having purchased a Ford car from Nat Little.
Wm. Northam is busy fencing the farm be purchased south of town.
All Saints S.S. will meet as usual at 2 o’clock, Sunday, 18th inst.
Rain is falling as I write and it is welcome. All the wheat is about in. The season for work has been very favorable.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 1, 1919

Clubb Sentenced to One Year

Norman Clubb and Fred Beach, the two boys who pleaded guilty to breaking into Benedickson’s store, came up for sentence before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday. Clubb, who has a bad record was sentenced to one year in jail. Beach was let off on suspended sentence.

G.W.V.A.

All members of the above association and other returned soldiers wishing to exercise their soldier rights with regard to the land scheme are requested to attend a meeting to be held on Thursday, May 1st, at 8.30 p.m. Important information will be imparted.
(Signed)
J.M. Chalmers,
Sec. G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Sowing and ploughing is the order of the day. The land is in good shape and there will be a large acreage sown if the fine weather continues.
Mr. Andy Rowe received an Easter gift. It’s a wee daughter.
Miss Stella and Ina Briggs, teachers of Pine View and Mossey River Schools, returned from their Easter holidays to Winnipeg and Rathwell.
The stork left a little girl at the home of Robert Rowe the other evening.
Mr. J.H. Lowes has returned from Makinak.
This is to be clean up week around the village by the order of the health officer. All should join heartily in the good work.
On Friday evening last, April 25th, the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.B. Lacey, at Oak Brae, on the Mossey, was besieged and taken possession of for the evening by about eighty old-time friends of Private L.H. Lacey, late of 226th Battalion and who enlisted in Dauphin in April 1916. He went overseas with the battalion and later joined the 44th Battalion and was sent to France. He was at Vimy Ridge and after at Lens where he was taken prisoner on the 23rd of August, 1917. He remained a prisoner to the close of the war. On April 5th last he had the pleasure of stepping off the local at Fork River to be greeted by 84 old-time friends. Previous to this a committee had been formed and about one year ago they appointed canvassers to collect fund for the purpose of providing a suitable present to every boy that had enlisted from Fork River and the southern portion of the municipality. It was arranged that the sum of $50, or its equivalent, should be presented to each of the boys after their return in recognition of their services overseas. A public reception has taken place as a rule and the presentation has been made, but owing to the frail condition of Lorne’s mother and out of deference to her, the presentation of a valuable gold watch was made to him at his home. Mr. Wm. King, (whose three sons were “over there” and did their bit gallantly), is the sec.-treasurer of the fund, and who with other members of the committee, drove in from Fork River and at about 10 p.m. Mr. King called for Lorne and presented him with an inspiring address and a gold watch as a token from the people. Young and old had a good time that night over one of the returned, but we thought that night of the many anxious mothers that are still waiting for those they love, and many that wait until the resurrection for their loved ones.
Mrs. and Mr. F.B. Lacey desire to thank Mr. King and the committee for their kindness and consideration in acceding to their wishes and making the presentation at their home.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 13, 1919

Flogging Advocated

The problem of dealing with the small boy who smokes is troubling many of the teachers, the members of the school board and even the members of the town council, which body, at its last meeting appointed Coun. Houston and Katz to cooperate with the trustees as to the best means of remedying this undesirable sate of affairs.

Flogging Advocated
A correspondent writes: “We hear a great deal about the small boy who goes to school smoking and having tobacco on his person and the regrets expressed that the trouble can’t be remedied. If these boys attended school in England they would soon be disciplined, and in no namby-pamby style either. They would simply be flogged, and if one application was not sufficient the second strapping would effect the cure. But, after all is the small boy to blame when he sees the bigger boys parading the streets smoking both pipe and cigarette? Perhaps now that we have a committee to investigate they will bring in a report which will offer suggestions concerning the big boy as well as the small boy as to the bad effects of tobacco on the developing youth.”

Memorial Committee Busy

Chairman W. Rintoul, of the memorial committee, states that progress is being made. No definite plans have been considered as yet. A suggestion that an up to date skating and curing rink be built as a “memorial” is meeting with much favor in some quarters. Some favor a “community building,” others a monument, and so forth.

Opening G.W.V. Club Rooms

The new club rooms of the Great War Veterans will be opened on Tuesday evening next, the 18th inst. There will be a short musical program at which Mayor Bowman will preside. Later there will be dancing and cards. Refreshments will be served. The McMurray orchestra will furnish the music. The public are invited to attend.

“Still” Operators Fined

For some time past there has been an increasing supply of what is known as “domestic’ manufactured liquor. The manufacture was exclusively in the hands of the foreign element. Almost any tin vessel from a teapot to a ten gallon can was improvised as a “still.” And despite the crudeness of the particles used to manufacture the “liquor” a fairly good brand is said, by those who sampled it, to have ben produced in some cases. But the promoters’ dreams of accumulating wealth in an easy manner, were destined to failure. Collector Ball was soon wise to the operation of the “stills” and with the assistance of the local police, rounded up three parties who were either operating or connected with the enterprises.
The parties were Mike Torharczuk, Fred Moranczuk and M. Silverman. Informations were laid under the Inland Revenue act, and they appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday and were found guilty. Torharczuk and Moranczuk were each $200 and costs, and Silverman $250 and costs.

War Bride to Arrive

The first war bride that is to come to Dauphin is expected to arrive about the first of next week. During the month of December Sergt. Harold Crowe was married to a young lady in London. The young couple sailed on the Grampian, which was due to arrive at Halifax on Wednesday.

Fork River

Pte. Eales and his war bride have arrived from overseas. They are visiting at the home of H. Pearson.
The manager of the Northern Lumber Co. was a recent visitor to our town. The company may open a lumber yard here.
Mr. Osborne, municipal auditor, is auditing the books of the municipality. When he is through we shall expect the council to have the report printed. This is the only way the ratepayers have of knowing how their money is being spent and the law directs that the report be published.
Mr. Martin, homestead inspector, was here last week in connection with the applications of returned soldiers for land.
The stork visited the home of H. Little last week and left a wee girlie.
Wm. King is visiting Dauphin and Winnipeg this week.
Jack Richardson has purchased a registered Holstein bull, having sold his old sire to Thos. Toye, of Bicton Heath.
The committee which is looking after the interests of the returned soldiers has been organized and is now composed as follows: Owen Pruder, S.L. Gower, A. Hunt, J. Shuchett, J.D. Robertson, Thos. Briggs, F. Cooper, and W. King, sec.-treasurer.

Ethelbert

At a well attended meeting of the Ukrainian farmers held at Ethelbert on March 1st, the following resolution were unanimously passed. Over $100 was collected at the gathering which will be devoted to assisting the returned men.

RESOLUTION NO. 1
1. Having experienced the hardship of the newcomer, we therefore wish to help the returned men to settle with their families on the land. We are ready to volunteer at any time to graciously help any returned soldier settling in our district on the land by offering at least one day’s work on his farm in plowing or doing any required improvements, and will also arrange to have his family and luggage brought from the station to his respective land.
2. We also wish to assure such newcomers that friendly and neighborly assistance will always be at their disposal and that such returned men shall not suffer an want or hardship of a beginner. Carried.

RESOLUTION NO. 2
That we, as one of the Dominion Communities of Canada, do express our belief and faith in the principle of the League of Nations which has recently come into being at the Peace Conference at Paris.
That while believing in the self interim nation of nationalities, we cordially support the idea of human brotherhood and the new international order expressed in its terms.
That we look to the League as the ultimate solvent of the barriers which have hitherto divided mankind and plunged them in recurring strife.
That we also believe the protection of customs tariff the most potent and evil of all the barriers against the unity of mankind must be broken down to insure the permanence of political peace and the continued effectiveness of the League.
That we hold the Farmers’ platform as adopted by the Grain Growers’ conventions recently held in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, to be a welcome step in the direction of that universal free trade which must be chief buttress of a stable international order.
And also that we cordially support the other reforms contained in the same platform.

RESOLUTION NO. 3
That we wish that a committee be appointed whose duty it will be to help the returned men coming into our midst. Carried.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 20, 1919

Given Three Months

Wm. Utbanowich and Stephen Negrycz appeared before P.M. Hawkins last week charged with shooting a neighbor’s cattle found in their field last August. They were found guilty. Urbanowich was sentenced to three months in jail with hard labour. Negrycz was let off on suspended sentence. It should be explained., however, that Negrycz had already paid more than the value of the cattle to the owner.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Feb. 17.
The weather this winter is ideal. His cold enough to keep from thawing and bright enough to keep everyone in good humor.
Wm. Russell is engaged pressing hay. Why more hay is not pressed and shipped out from this part is a mystery as prices are remunerative.
Robert Toye has purchased Geo. Lyon’s pure bred Holstein stock.
Our municipal weed inspector Geo. Lyons condemned grain fields in the northern part of this district last summer. Now it is up to George to see that his instructions are carried out as it is impossible for a farmer to keep his farm clear of weeds when his neighbors are careless about attending to weeds growing on their farms.
Thos. Toye has bought a machine for making rope. Some of Tom’s neighbors are making enquires if this can be the machine that is going to make the rope that ex-Reeve Lacey hopes to see old Kaiser Bill dangling at the end of.

Fork River

The Pine View School has opened again with Miss S. Briggs, of Rathwell, wielding the rod of correction for the term.
Harry Little shipped a few head of his Galloways to a customer in the south last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Morris and family have returned from the winter fishing on Lake Winnipegosis and spent the weekend with Mrs. W. King on the homestead.
The farmers of the district are moving to secure the erection of another elevator. We need better grain handing facilities here.
Several of the boys have returned from the fishing camps. They report the catch light this winter.

Winnipegosis

UNION CHURCH
On Sunday next, Feb. 23 rd, the Rev. A.P. Lather, B.A., of Toronto, will preach in the above church in the morning at 11 a.m.; evening 7:30. The reverend gentlemen is travelling the west on behalf of Belgium refugees. Everybody is given a hearty welcome to the service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 23, 1919

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Jan. 20th.
William Little was a visitor at the home of Tom Toye. Seems like old times to see Bill around again.
Mr. Lonn has bought the Seiffert farm on the Mossey. He has also bought section 11, the Grenon farm, and has bought his seed from the Bicton Heath seed farm for the coming season.
James Playford is going to turn the land upside down on the Hudson Bay holding. This land has been waiting for just such treatment for a long time.
James Laidlaw is busy hauling logs on to his homestead to build. Jim is a hustler and we would like to see a few more of his kind come to this district.
What about the corduroy leading to the Bicton Heath School? Is has not yet been completed. Does this mean that the children living on the east of this swamp are going to have another summer holiday? It is about time that the government stepped in and saw the work done.
Co-operative Grain Growers’ meeting will be held at the Bicton Heath schoolhouse on Wednesday, January 29th, at 7. Every farmer should be present.
Mr. Dumas, from North Dakota, has bought John McAuley’s farm in this district, and will be here in the early spring.
George Lyons was through this district this week. George is a good fellow, but is not always welcome in his capacity as tax collector.
Frank Sharp will leave shortly for Winnipeg. Frank says that there will be no mistake this time.

Fork River

Miss Katie Robertson has left on a visit to Neepawa.
Reeve Venables and Coun. Hunt are attending the convention of the Union of Municipalities at Winnipeg this week. Mrs. Venables accompanied Mr. Venables to the city.
Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, was a recent visitor to our town.
F.F. Hafenbrak, M. Cooper and H. Hunter went to Dauphin to attend the degree meeting of Coronation lodge, L.O.L.
Mrs. D. McEachren and son Donnie are visiting in Winnipeg.
Ed. Humphreys has returned to town. He is still smiling.
Miss Nellie Briggs, of Hartney, is a visitor at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs.
Mr. D. McLean and Miss Birdie McLean have gone to Regina. Birdie intends to spend the rest of the winter with her aunt, Mrs. Vance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 2, 1919

Big German Gun for Dauphin

While nothing has been definitely settled regarding the disposition of much of the spoils of war captured from the Germans enough is known that Dauphin will have the refusal of one of the big cannons. The railway board, it is understood, is willing to grant sufficient of the right-of-way in front of the Grand View Hotel for a foundation upon which to mount the monster.

Reeve Lacey Wants the Kaiser Shot

To the Editor of the Herald:
SIR—The following is an extract from a letter received from a relative in English since the signing of the armistice and return of the prisoners of war from Germany:
“There have been several boys of Penarth, returned prisoners of war, and some of them have been treated most cruel. One has an eagle branded on each side of his face, his teeth knocked out, and a piece cut off his tongue. Another with an eagle and “God Blast England,” or some such words as that, and a torpedo on his forehead. There are quit a lot of Germans prisoners here and when one sees them one cannot help using strong language when you know they have had such fiendish thins done to our prisoners by these Germans.”
The above is one instance that is recorded out of thousands that are unfortunately too true. God grant that our representatives at the peace conference may not forget the horrible tortures inflicted on those French and Belgian women and children, and, on the noble men of the Allied armies and navies who voluntarily offered their liberty, limbs and lives by thousands to save the world from German bondage. We shall be robbed of victory if those fiendish war lords are not stripped of all they possess and led out and shot by some of the boys they have tortured. Let us back up our army and navy and insist on a death punishment for the Kaiser and his war lords: otherwise there will be no lasting peace.
Fed B. Lacey
Fork River.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on December 18th, all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read on motion of Coun. Hunt, seconded by Coun. Namaka.
Communications were read from St. Joseph’s Orphanage, the Bank of Commerce, the fire guardian, J. Rosenthal (re: sale of bridge), P.J. Robertson and T.N. Briggs (re: flooding of land next spring), the Navy League (re: grant), tax accounts of F. Thorsteinson and N. Syder, Lawrence municipality (re: boundary road) and the inspector of legal offices.
McDonell-Reid – That a grant of $250 be made to the Navy League of Canada.
Hunt-Yakavanka – That Constable Lyon push proceedings with a view to having the stable removed from the lane in block 1, Fork River.
Hunt-McDonell – That a rebate of taxes for 1918 of $13.60 be made on the Orange Hall property.
Reid-Yakavanka – That the accounts of Coun. McDonell ($134) and Hunt ($34.50) for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That the account for culverts to be used on the Dauphin-Mossey River boundary of $195.20, at present charged to Ward 1 be transferred to the public works account and applied on the work for which the government grant is given.
Yakavanka-Reid – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That Wards 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 be credited with $230 each of the Government grant, with the understanding that the money be spent on the main roads through the Wards.
Yakvanka-Paddock – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be authorized to obtain material for a bridge across Fishing River, on the west side of 2-29-19.
Reid-McDonell – That the Reeve and Coun. Hunt be delegates to the municipal convention to be held in Winnipeg on January 21st, 22nd, and 23rd.
McDonell-Reid – That the clerk put up notices asking for applications for the position of sec.-treasurer, and also advertise in the Dauphin Herald.
Hunt-Reid – That the council tender Reeve Lacey a hearty vote of thanks for his services to the municipality and wish them every success in the future.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has returned from a two weeks’ visit to Weyburn, Sask.
The Chute brothers from Dauphin passed through here recently wit their teams. They intend to haul fish during the winter on Lake Winnipegosis. This is a local industry which puts an honest dollar within reach of our farmers.
Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, was a recent visitor at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. He has been in poor health for some time past and is going to the hospital for treatment.
Sid Gower is wearing that broad smile that won’t come off. It’s a Daughter of the Empire.
Mr. F. Cooper was a recent visitor to Dauphin.
Coun. Archie McDonell paid Dauphin a visit at the weekend. The genial Archie has just recovered from the flu.
Edwin King has gone to Winnipeg to take a business course.
The new council will assume office on the 7th inst. Your correspondent will watch carefully the moves of our representatives and note them for the Herald. Progress should be the watchword. There is a lot of work awaiting the activity of the council and we all hope they will prove equal to the occasion.

Winnipegosis

At the annual meeting of the Home Economics Society the officer elected were as follows:
President – Mrs. Houchin, re-elected.
Vice – Mrs. Dennett.
Secretary – Mrs. Spence, re-elected.
Treasurer – Miss R. Whale.
With the New Year we have a library of about 100 books belonging to the society and we hope to add another hundred books before the year is out. The January meeting will take the form of a social evening when each member is asked to bring a friend along.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 20 – 1917

1917 Dec 20 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. W.R. Watson, Magnet, Man., killed in action. (Robert William Watson, 1891, 424075 ???)
Pte. W. Lee, Dauphin, killed in action. (Wilford Lee, 1897, 100095)

1917 Dec 20 – Fork River

W.R. Snelgrove has sold his farm on the Mossey River and is intending going east for the winter.
E. Hunter and Sid Frost have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
The C.N.R. bridge gang are driving piles for a new bridge over the Fork River at the town.
A pile bridge is being built over Mink Creek at P. Solomon’s. It appears to your correspondent that the time has arrived for the municipality to put in concrete abutments in new bridges it intends erecting.
T.N. Briggs has received word from Walter Clark, who is doing his bit in the trenches, that he is well.
Post office hours on Christmas Day, 10 to 12 a.m.
The train service, if you can dignify by such a name, is to say the least, erratic. The train may arrive, and then again, it may not. But I guess there is nothing to do but grin and bear it.
We wish the herald staff a merry Christmas.
We understand that our Pro-German resident now intends taking a trip south.

1917 Dec 20 – Winnipegosis

The shipping of fish is in full swing. Teams are hauling from every point and the catch seems to be good. Six cars were shipped out on Saturday the 15th, and as many more will likely go on Tuesday.
The memorial service on Sunday was well attended. The names of seven of our noble men who have died at the front were read out. Miss F. Grenon played “Consolation” as a voluntary, and Miss McArthur sang “Rock of Ages” by request.
The Red Cross entertainment of Wednesday, 12th, under the management of Mrs. Paddock’s committee, netted $42.
Owing to the general interest in Red Cross work and the lack of assistants the Presbyterian Sunday school will not give their usual concert. Instead he members of the school will take part in an entertainment, from 3 to 6 o’clock on the afternoon of Monday the 24th. A silver collection will be taken at the door, and a 10c fishpond will be arranged. The tree, of course, will be the chief attraction, and each child will receive a bag of candy.
Mrs. Theodore Johnston wishes to thank all friends and others who, by their presence at the memorial service held in honour of her son, showed their sympathy with her in her sad bereavement.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 18 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 18 – Ethelbert

Postmaster Skaite is still confined to his home by illness. Mrs. S. is attending to the duties of the office during her husband’s absence.
The deer season is over and quite a few people here are dining on venison.
Sleighing is needed to give an impetus to the wood business.
Clerk K.F. Slipetz was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
A branch of the Grain Growers’ Association was organized here last week under favourable auspices. The branch starts of with a membership of 60 and the members are all enthusiastic. The following are the officers: President, M. Pacholok; vice, J. Pachkowski; sec.-treas., K.F. Slipetz.

1913 Dec 18 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon returned from a few days visit to Dauphin.
W. Williams has left with his outfit to take out lumber on his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Miss Bessy Wilson returned from a few weeks visit among friends in Sifton and Dauphin.
D. Kennedy has purchased a handsome pair well-bred colts for drivers.
Mrs. J. Parker and daughter left for Winnipeg for a short visit.
Mrs. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is having a week’s visit with her sister, D. Kennedy.
The Orangemen of Fork River appreciate very much the kindness shown them by the ladies in coming out and cleaning out their large hall gratis. The brethren wish to tender them a hearty vote of thanks for same.
D. Briggs, of Brandon, and Mr. Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, had the good luck to get a moose each.
Those who shot large game are, Harold Shannon, a fine elk; Fred King, moose; Frank Hafenbrak, moose; S. Munro, elk; J. Richardson, moose.
On Friday night the ladies of Fork River gave a ball in the Orange Hall. The ladies supplied the refreshments and paid a fee of 25 cents. The gentlemen were free. There was a large turnout and a most enjoyable evening.

1919 Dec 18 – Fork River

The Unity Christmas tree of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River will be held in the Orange Hall on the evening of Monday, 22nd inst. This promises to be the event of the season. A large attendance is requested as Santa is bringing Mrs. Santa. Admission, gentlemen 50 cents; ladies and children free.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 14 – 1916

1916 Dec 14 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. A.C. McPhee, Minitonas, killed. (Alexander Campbell McPhee, 1896, 425152)
Corp. H.A. Hickman, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. H.L. Pearson, Dauphin, missing. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)

1916 Dec 14 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little shipped a team of Shetland drivers to his daughter, Mrs. E. Cameron, at Neepawa.
The annual Christmas tree will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of All Saints’ S.S. on Friday night, Dec. 22nd. Everybody come and help the kiddies have a good time.
W. King, P.M., has received word from his son Edwin, who is a scout at headquarters in France, that he is well. Max, who is with the Scotch-Canadians, and was wounded at the Somme in September, is in the trenches again doing his bit. Aubrey the youngest son, is stationed in England, is reported getting on fine.
Mrs. Paul Wood has returned to her home at Sifton, after having spent a few days with Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
Mr. Birch, provincial constable, was here a week regarding the burning of A. Redurik’s stacks. P.M. Venables sentenced John Phycolo to $300 and to keep the peace for two years or six months in jail. John preferred the latter alternative.
Mr. Jasper, of Harding, Man., who has been visiting two weeks with Thos. Glendenning on his ranch, returned home on Thursday.
Messrs. Williams, Briggs, and Rowe, took a joy ride to Dauphin in “Billy’s automobilly.” They found the walking very good on the return trip from Valley River home.
Fred King and f. cooper are having a few days at Dauphin this week.
We are in the midst of a campaign for the reeveship. It is well to have our municipal affairs intelligently brought before the ratepayers every once in a while. It makes for a better condition of affairs.

1916 Dec 14 – Sifton

The Wycliffe School holds its Xmas concert and dance on Dec. 20th, Wednesday evening. The lunch will be in the form of a box social and promises to be a pleasing feature of the entertainment. The girls are busy making their boxes, so boys don’t forget the date. Everybody welcome. Program holders entitled to reserved seats. Come early and be prepared to revel in a good time. We present you with Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar tragedy, Red Riding Hood and all kinds of items suited to the varying hour.
Pte. Frank Mealing paid a flying visit to his home on Saturday to bid goodbye to his relations and friends here. At a previous visit his friends presented him with a handsome wristwatch, the time being visible in the dark. He carries with him our sincere best wishes for success at the front and a safe return.
Home Economic Society at the annual meeting five of the old officers with the addition of miss Munson were re-elected as follows:
Mrs. Paul Wood, president.
Miss Reid, vice.
Miss Baker, chairman of Red Cross committee.
Miss Munson, chairman program committee.
Mrs. J.A. Campbell, sec.-treasurer.
Mrs. Oulette kindly provided refreshments and she and Miss peal Ashmore gave musical selections.
The Society new has a membership of nineteen and regularly hold meetings for Red Cross work at different members’ homes. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. John Kennedy.
On Friday a social evening was given by the Society at the home of Mrs. Oulette, when the members have themselves up to unrestricted frivolities for one evening. The single ladies ran off with the prizes; the winners being Misses Munson, Baker and Wood.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 11 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 11 – Fork River

Mr. Mornington, of Neepawa, is spending the hunting season with John Robinson, of Mowat.
Several cars are being loaded with bailed hay at this point. The hay is of good quality.
David Briggs, of Brandon, and Ed. Briggs, of Souris, are visiting their brother, T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey during the hunting seasons.
John Tidsberry of Dauphin, spent a few days here on business lately.
John Clemens was lucky enough to get a noose and is now busy shipping grain from the elevator as farmers are busy drawing in grain this nice weather.
The municipal election is in full blast and the candidates are busy as bees.
Fred Cooper and W. Williams have returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The mayor, aldermen and several others of Winnipegosis, attended the nomination at Fork River. Everything passed off quietly.
Wm. Foley and Mr. Elliot were visitors here on Sunday last.
Nat Little and son are buying up another shipment of cattle.
Fork River has a blacksmith now. Once as been wanted for some time badly. Another new industry is a laundry.
The annual school meeting for Mossey River S.D. was held in the municipal office on Dec. 1st. A. Hunt the retiring trustee, was returned for another term. A school in the village is needed very much as the majority of the scholars have to travel a mile and a half from the village and often farther.
Wm. Northam has returned from a visit to Weyburn, Sask.

1919 Dec 11 – Two Fatal Accidents

Two accidents occurred at the weekend which resulted fatally. Oliver Trann, who was employed by Evans & McEwen at their sawmill in the Riding Mountain, was killed on Friday by a falling tree. He was a resident of Crystal City, Man., and 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children.
Peter Terresdale, aged 22 years, received he contents of a shotgun in the left hand and abdomen at McPherson’s camp on Saturday afternoon. He was removing a shotgun from a sleigh when it accidentally discharged. He was taken to the hospital and died there on Sunday afternoon. Deceased’s home in in Indiana.

1919 Dec 11 – Fork River

The Christmas tree arranged for to be held in Orange Hall on Christmas eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ Church, has been cancelled. The S.S. will have their Xmas tree in the church on Xmas eve, and the staff hopes to have a pleasant time with the scholars.
Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 7th inst.
At the annual meeting of Purple Star L.O.L. No. 1765, the brethren decided to hold a ball on New Year’s Eve. Good music and supper. Admission, gents, $1.
The following officers of Purple Star, L.O.L., were elected: Bro. Fred. King, W.M.; H. Hunter, D.M.; M. Cooper, chaplain; W. King, R.S., reelected; A. Hunt, F.S. C.E. Bailey. Treas.; Edwin King, D of C.; F.F. Hafenbrak, lecturer; S. Reid, D.L.; F. Cooper, 1st com.; W. Russell, Fred. Armstrong, J. Bickel, committeemen.
A very interesting debate took place in All Saints’ Church on the evening of Dec. 3rd, under the auspices of the Sunday school. Subject of debate was, “Resolved, that a city boy has greater advantages than a country boy.” The captain for the affirmative was Mrs. A.J. Little; negative, Mr. Jarvis. Very interesting points where given on both sides although the negative won by five points. Chairman for the evening was W. King; critic, D.F. Wilson, Sr.; judges, Miss Hess, Mrs. E.V. Lockwood and D.F. Wilson, Jr. These regular Wednesday evening meetings are for the advancement of the Sunday school and any one interested in the work are invited. Meeting for Dec. 10th will be in the form of a parlor field meet and is in the hands of The Daniel’s Band, Mr. Lockwood’s class of boys.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.