Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 11 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 11 – Fork River

Mr. Mornington, of Neepawa, is spending the hunting season with John Robinson, of Mowat.
Several cars are being loaded with bailed hay at this point. The hay is of good quality.
David Briggs, of Brandon, and Ed. Briggs, of Souris, are visiting their brother, T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey during the hunting seasons.
John Tidsberry of Dauphin, spent a few days here on business lately.
John Clemens was lucky enough to get a noose and is now busy shipping grain from the elevator as farmers are busy drawing in grain this nice weather.
The municipal election is in full blast and the candidates are busy as bees.
Fred Cooper and W. Williams have returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The mayor, aldermen and several others of Winnipegosis, attended the nomination at Fork River. Everything passed off quietly.
Wm. Foley and Mr. Elliot were visitors here on Sunday last.
Nat Little and son are buying up another shipment of cattle.
Fork River has a blacksmith now. Once as been wanted for some time badly. Another new industry is a laundry.
The annual school meeting for Mossey River S.D. was held in the municipal office on Dec. 1st. A. Hunt the retiring trustee, was returned for another term. A school in the village is needed very much as the majority of the scholars have to travel a mile and a half from the village and often farther.
Wm. Northam has returned from a visit to Weyburn, Sask.

1919 Dec 11 – Two Fatal Accidents

Two accidents occurred at the weekend which resulted fatally. Oliver Trann, who was employed by Evans & McEwen at their sawmill in the Riding Mountain, was killed on Friday by a falling tree. He was a resident of Crystal City, Man., and 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children.
Peter Terresdale, aged 22 years, received he contents of a shotgun in the left hand and abdomen at McPherson’s camp on Saturday afternoon. He was removing a shotgun from a sleigh when it accidentally discharged. He was taken to the hospital and died there on Sunday afternoon. Deceased’s home in in Indiana.

1919 Dec 11 – Fork River

The Christmas tree arranged for to be held in Orange Hall on Christmas eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ Church, has been cancelled. The S.S. will have their Xmas tree in the church on Xmas eve, and the staff hopes to have a pleasant time with the scholars.
Rev. Mr. Roberts held service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 7th inst.
At the annual meeting of Purple Star L.O.L. No. 1765, the brethren decided to hold a ball on New Year’s Eve. Good music and supper. Admission, gents, $1.
The following officers of Purple Star, L.O.L., were elected: Bro. Fred. King, W.M.; H. Hunter, D.M.; M. Cooper, chaplain; W. King, R.S., reelected; A. Hunt, F.S. C.E. Bailey. Treas.; Edwin King, D of C.; F.F. Hafenbrak, lecturer; S. Reid, D.L.; F. Cooper, 1st com.; W. Russell, Fred. Armstrong, J. Bickel, committeemen.
A very interesting debate took place in All Saints’ Church on the evening of Dec. 3rd, under the auspices of the Sunday school. Subject of debate was, “Resolved, that a city boy has greater advantages than a country boy.” The captain for the affirmative was Mrs. A.J. Little; negative, Mr. Jarvis. Very interesting points where given on both sides although the negative won by five points. Chairman for the evening was W. King; critic, D.F. Wilson, Sr.; judges, Miss Hess, Mrs. E.V. Lockwood and D.F. Wilson, Jr. These regular Wednesday evening meetings are for the advancement of the Sunday school and any one interested in the work are invited. Meeting for Dec. 10th will be in the form of a parlor field meet and is in the hands of The Daniel’s Band, Mr. Lockwood’s class of boys.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 9 – 1915

1915 Dec 9 – Private Jas. Craig on Wrecked Steamer

Private James Craig was on the hospital boat that struck a mine in the English Channel recently and was wrecked. In a letter to his brothers here he gives a description of his thrilling experience as follows:
I would have written you before this but I didn’t know how long I might have been in the last place I was in or whether I would go back to my regiment. Instead of going to my regiment the doctor sent me to the base and then across to England so here I am in the hospital with some kind of disease in my joints, more especially in one of my knees and the experience I came through when coming across the Channel hasn’t helped me any. I have something to be thankful for in being here at all. I suppose you will have seen in the papers of that disaster to the hospital ship being sunk by a mine in the Channel an over 80 wounded soldiers were drowned. Well, I was on the boat at the time and I have to thank Providence that I was amongst the saved. He boat was sunk three miles from Dover. I was in the upper deck astern at the time she struck the mine. There must have been a big hole torn in her for she immediately began to sink ahead and listing to the portside. There was only one boat got away full. I got in the boat nearest me and when it was full nobody knew anything about how to lower it. We kept tugging and pulling at the block ropes but nothing wound work and thee was none of the crew to be seen to let us see or help us to get it launched, so we all got out again. By that time a lot of the fellows had jumped overboard and as the ship was still going though slower, they were left behind struggling in the water. It wasn’t long before a destroyer came along side so close that a number of men jumped on to it but it moved off for some reason. Later the boat came close in again and some more got on it.

JUMPED INTO THE SEA.
I was in the act of making a jump, but it was too far away at the time, so I stood for a minute or two thinking and taking in the situation. In thinking what would be best to do, I rushed down below and got hold of a lifebelt. When I got up I could hardly stand on deck there was so much list. Well, I took up a position ready to jump. I had thrown off my heavy overcoat and taken off my boots. I don’t know how long I stood there watching her gradually sinking; finally, I thought it was time for getting clear of her before she sunk so I jumped into the water and got several good mouthfuls of it for the sea was pretty choppy at the time. Before I jumped I saw some rowboats making for us so I struck out to meet them. I was picked up by one of them and put on destroyer. The ship that was nearest us at the time was coming to our assistance when she also struck a mine and sunk.
I left the ship none too soon, just two or three minutes after she went out of sight. There were some heartrending scenes that I won’t forget as long as I live. When I was in the water I could see the propellers still running above me and some ropes had got entangled around them and were making a terrible noise.

1915 Dec 9 – Private Izon Wounded

Mr. John Izon, of Dauphin Plains, received a little from his brother, Private Hubert Izon, this week. The letter contains the information that Hubert, who was in the trenches in France, was hit on the shoulder by a piece of shell; the shell driving the bone in for about three inches. He is at present in the hospital at Taplon, England, and slowly recovering from the wound.

1915 Dec 9 – Military Notes

J.W. Skinner, locomotive shop foreman of the C.N.R., has received his lieutenancy commission in the 53rd battalion. He will be quartered in Dauphin during the winter under Lt.-Col. Gillespie and starts on duty his week.
Et. Severn, of Winnipeg, one of Lt.-Col. Gillespie’s staff, arrived in town this week, to whip the Dauphin ???.
The recruits now number 45, and together with the staff of officers the total enlistment is about 50.

1915 Dec 9 – Fork River

Mr. E. Hunt, from Ontario, is a visitor to his brother Mr. A. Hunt for a couple of weeks.
Mrs. Sam Reid [1 line missing] a visit to friends in Winnipeg for a week.
Mrs. J. Chippey received word her mother was very sick and left on the train for a week’s visit at her home.
Mr. D. Scarth, of Hartney, is a visitor with Mr. T.N. Briggs during the hunting season.
Mrs. Little and daughter, Miss Grace are visitors to Winnipeg for a few days.
Mrs. Paul Wood and children of Sifton, are visiting Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the homestead in the Mossey.
Mr. Sam Reid left with his hay press for the old Hood ranch on Lake Dauphin having taken a contract to pressing hay for Shand & Thomas of Dauphin.
Mr. W. King received a letter from his son Edwin, of the 44th Batt., which is in England, who states that things are quite lively over there. The weather is wet and sloppy. This is quite a contrast to the dry winter weather of Manitoba, and the boys feel the change badly.
Several parties left on the 1st to take in the hunt for the big game.
Hunter Bros. shipped their first load of Lake Dauphin fish on Saturday.
Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, was here loading for 25 head of yearlings and two year olds which he will feed for winter.

1915 Dec 9 – Winnipegosis

There was a most successful skating carnival in the rink on Monday night, in aid of the Red Cross Society. The turnout was splendid and the door receipts were $??. The ladies served tea and coffee at ten cents a cup which will bring the total receipts up to a good figure. The prize winners were Miss Myrtle Grenon, Mr. ???, Mrs. ??? McMartin, Miss Geekie, Miss Crawford, Mr. R. Bradley, Miss Margaret Bradley, Miss A. Hechter, Miss Esther Hechter, Miss Beth MacAulay and ??? Cecil Paddock.
Sam Sanderson had the misfortune to lose a valuable team of horses last week in a crack in the ice.
John Redisk is all smiles these days – it is a baby girl.
Frank Hechter returned from Waterhen after spending a week there. He reports fishing good.
The new store across the ??? is doing a good business.
We are sorry to report the death of Mr. and Mrs. Dudley’s little baby girl, which took place on the 4th inst. The funeral was on the 7th.
The council had their regular monthly meeting on the ?th inst., and among other business they passed the herd law. A copy of same can be had at the clerk’s office.
Mr. L???, rancher of Waterhen, passed through here on his way to Winnipeg for a business visit.
C.L. White, fishing overseer, made a quick trip to River last week.
Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick left on Wednesday for the west on a hunting expedition.
W.R. Paddock, left for Pine River and Garland on business.
Threshing is now finished in this district and the crops have been very good.
The town is livening up now that the fish teams are coming in so steady.
The Municipal elections are over again for another year and everyone is happy.
New settlers still keep coming in here and we are glad to welcome them.
Mr. Kenny Morris, of the 79th Battalion, spent a few days leave of absence with friends here.
Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick, an old-timer, here took the service in the Methodist Church on Sunday last, and the church was crowded to its utmost capacity.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Dec 7 – Municipal Nominations

Reeve
Nominations for rural Municipalities throughout the province took place on Tuesday. In these municipalities two weeks elapse before election day.

MOSSEY RIVER.
Reeve – F.B. Lacey, acclamation.

COUNCILLORS.
Ward 2 – A. Hunt, acclamation.
Ward 4- J.S. Seiffert, acclamation.
Ward 6 – No nomination.

1911 Dec 7 – Fork River

An ice gang left here for the put up ice for the Armstrong Trading Co., Winnipegosis, composed of Messrs. Munro, Johnston, Gower and others.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis is to be opened for summer fishing again. It will be a great blunder if it is. As it is winter fishing is of great benefit to the resident fisherman and farmer, where as summer fishing is for the benefit of the 102 American companies and means clearing out the lake in about two seasons.
George Tilt left last week for Dauphin on a business trip.
Rev. Mr. Cruikshank held a service in the Methodist Church on Tuesday evening assisted by Mr. Malley, of Winnipegosis. A business meeting was held after service.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Breiver, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Armstrong.
Our trains here have not been on time more than twice for the last month. We were informed by a traveller from Winnipeg that instead of the train leaving Dauphin on time they had to wait while they manufactured a conductor and when he was manufactured they had to wait while he got some breakfast and then it did not matter when they started. Farmers wait hours for their mail and freight. Of course we sympathized with the traveller as we are used to waiting in Dauphin while they manufacture an engine to take a train out, but this is our first experience in making conductors. What’s next?
The office of the municipality will be closed from the 12th to 14th of the month. The Sec.-treasurer will be at the council chamber, Winnipegosis, during this period.

1911 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sec-treasurer of the municipality will be here at the council chamber Winnipegosis, from the 12th to the 14th of this month.

1916 Dec 7 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. J.L. Godkin, Minitonas, died of wounds. (John Laurence Godkin, 1897, 2382826 ??? (not found on virtual memorial))
Pte. J.T. Taylor, Winnipegosis, wounds. (???)

1916 Dec 7 – Death of Pte. Harold Curtis

Private Harold Curtis succumbed to his wounds last week. By his death Mrs. Curtis has sacrificed her tow and only sons on the alter of her country. The loss is inestimable, but the Empire must be saved, and many more such sacrifices will have to be made by mothers, fathers and some before the war is brought to a successful completion. Our deep sympathy goes out to the grief-stricken mother.

1916 Dec 7 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Northam has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin.
Metro Boyko has purchased he old ???.
W. Stonehouse, of Oak River, is in town.
Miss Leone Stonehouse has returned to Dauphin, after having spent the week-end with her mother.
F.F. and V. Hafenbrak, Fred and A. King and Jack Richardson, have returned from the deer chase with a bull moose each.
David Briggs has returned to Rathwell after a week’s visit to T.N. Briggs.
Thos. Barnard contractor of Dauphin, is busy plastering Will Northam’s new residence.
Mr. Kasmir has purchased a car of fat cattle for S.B. Levins, of Winnipeg.
The ladies of the Home Economics Society have sent a number of Xmas boxes to gladden the hearts of our soldier laddies at the front.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, and J.P. Grenon, of Winnipegosis, paid a short visit to W. King, P.M., when passing through Fork River to Dauphin.
The municipal nominations took place on Tuesday, Reeve Lacey is opposed by F.B. Venables. Mr. Venables is also running against G.E. Nicholson in Ward 1. Archie McDonnell was elected by acclamation in Ward 3, as also was John Namaka for Ward 5.

1916 Dec 7 – Sifton

We much regret the illness of our popular station agent, Mr. Oulette, who was removed to the Dauphin Hospital by special on Sunday morning. Mrs. Oulette returned, however, Monday with more reassuring news of her husband’s speedy recovery.
News from Lance-Corp. Walters this week informs us that he is fast recovering from his wounds, but the shock of the shell, which buried him, has in a great measure robbed him of hearing in his right ear.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore entertained this evening (4th) at their residence a large number of old friends on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of their marriage. Mrs. Ashmore decorated her table with the top tier of her wedding cake, which she hopes to have an evidence for her 25th. After Mr. Paul Wood had made the presentation of a cut glass service in ??? evening was spent in music and song, Mrs. Campbell presiding at the piano with her usual brilliancy.
Look out for Wycliffe School concert and dance Wednesday, 20th.

1916 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sunday school Christmas tree and concert will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 20th. This annual event has, in the past always been held in the Presbyterian Church but on the present occasion will be given in the Rex Hall. This change will given room for more stage effect and also better accommodation for the parents and friends, who have always filled the church to its utmost capacity. The programme will be a good one including a representation by the children of the famous Christmas story of Charles Dickens, entitled “The Christmas Carol.” The message of the carol is of universal interest Under the touch of the spirit of Christmas the selfish man is rid of his selfishness, plum pudding and roast beef are found to be indigestible without kindness, charity mercy, and forbearance. The story will be given in the form of a three-act play and several tableaux.
We ask everybody to reserve his evening and appreciate the efforts of the children by giving them a full house. This year the Christmas presents ??? Sunday school without the aid of gifts from the parents and friends. This is partly to save time and also to avoid the inequality in the gifts received by the children.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 4 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 4 – Fork River

The fowl supper and concert held in the Orange Hall on Friday night last, by the Methodist Church was a success. There was a large turnout and the ladies are to be congratulated on the way they handled the supper. A number came from Winnipegosis. After the concert the young folks hired the hall and a good time was spent the remainder of the night, all leaving for home in the wee small hours of the morning.
There was a fair turnout to the horse breeders meeting on Saturday night last. Much business was done. The choice of the horse went to the Shire breed, the choice being closely contested by admirers of the Punch Everything passed off in a very pleasant manner, after which the meeting adjourned to be called later on by the president. Those who wish to join should call on Secretary Wilson as soon convenient and help on the horse breeding industry of this district, as only members of the association are eligible for use of the horse. Fee for membership is one dollar per annum. Anyone can become a member.
Freddie Storrar is home after spending the summer in the west. He reports a very good time.
Mrs. George Tilt left for Dauphin, having spent a month among her relatives on the Mossey.
Mr. Rogy, collector for the Sawyer-Massey Co., has been here a few days on business.
Mrs. Watson, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Fred Cooper for a few days on the Fork River.
A. Hunt, F.B. Lacey and D.F. Wilson returned from attending he Municipal convention and report not only a good time but a profitable one.
Mr. Rowe, of Harding, left with his third shipment of cattle and hogs. The cattle business has been very brisk at this point of late, there being more stock shipped than in any other previous year.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove has left for a few days visit among friends at Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Brewer, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Wm. Armstrong.
Mr. Parser, surveyor, and men have left for Winnipeg after spending a week adjusting lines east of Lake Dauphin.
Wm. Davis and T.N. Briggs returned on the Fork River local, having spent a few days in Dauphin on business.
Garnet Lacey has returned home, having spent the summer in the west. He is looking fine.
Most of the male members of this burgh are hiking for the bush to get their annual share of big game. We hope the boys will have good luck.

1913 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

Bennie Hechter returned from Winnipeg on Monday looking very jubilant.
Dugald McAulay dispatched a carload of cattle and pigs to Winnipeg on Wednesday, himself travelling by the same train.
Mr. and Mrs. Watson have departed for a well-earned holiday and the dancing folk will greatly miss them as they were the mainstay in the musical line.
Messrs. Hechter and Ford returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday, most important business having called them there. They report that the city is a bit quitter than even Winnipegosis.
“Professor” Sutton has been recuperating his health here for a few days and greatly admires the salubrity of the atmosphere to this winter sanatorium. He made no public appearance to the regret of everyone and consequently sold none of his well-known concoctions.
Archie McKerchar arranged a small dance in the Victoria Hall on Tuesday evening but your correspondent not having been invited, no details are to hand.
Mr. McGinnis of the Winnipegosis hotel (nearest the lake) is having an addition made to his livery barn which will accommodate six more teams, or is it to be a store house for the game he has gone out to shoot in company Doctor Medd and Mr. Whale.
The first consignment of fish, consisting of ten loads, arrived on Friday from up the lake, so things should new commence to be busy, although up to the present it is not apparent, there still being some individuals in the town waiting for a job.
It is observed with extreme satisfaction to most people in town that Mr. Frank Hechter is standing as councilor for Ward 4, Mossey River municipality, in the forthcoming election, in opposition to Mr. Billy Walmsley, caused by the retirement of Mr. Seiffert, whose tenure of the office has expired. It is time we had somebody with Mr. Hechter’s business acumen to look after the ward as according to all reports things have slightly got mixed up lately and the candidate being the head of a large trading concern in town, matters would no doubt straighten out at once. It is known to everyone the great interest Frank takes in the town and district generally, being the patron of every object tending to the welfare of same, his genial disposition, and is always approachable by anyone seeking aid or advice. It is up to all his adherents to get him right there on this occasion, thereby showing their appreciation of his worth.

1919 Dec 4 – Bicton Heath

It is a good thing we don’t feel the cold during these dips.
Fred. Wenger is holding an auction sale on the 12th inst. Dan Hamilton is the auctioneer.
Mr. Seal has purchased the Marantz farm in this district.
The basket social, which was held at the schoolhouse on Nov. 21st, for the purpose of raising funds to purchase an organ for the school, was a great success, $74.50 being realized. The ladies were out in force with many baskets, tastefully gotten up, which were auctioned off by Jack Haywood, who wielded the hammer with good results.
Fred Sharp is visiting friends at Fork River.
Mr. Pearson has removed to the old Snelgrove farm at Fork River.

1919 Dec 4 – Fork River

A meeting of farmers in Fork River on Monday resulted in the formation of a branch of the Grain Growers to be known as the Mossey River Grain Growers’ Association. President Marcroft, of the South Bay local, filled the chair, and gave a short but interesting address. The following officers were elected for 1920:
President – E.F. Hafenbrak
Vice – D.F. Wilson, Jr.
Sec.- treasurer – Fred J. Tilt
These officers, with M. Gealsky, J.D. Robertson, D. Briggs, Max King and A. Hunt form the board of directors. The meeting was not as large as hoped for on account of the severe weather, but a start has been made and we look for some development in the near future. The association is formed to benefit the district both socially and educationally. Every farmer, farmer’s wife and the young folks should join and help the movement. Membership fee $2 annually.

1919 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

The date for the Union Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment has been changed from the 22nd to Friday the 19th December.
Seven carloads of fish have already been shipped. Fishing is reported good from all parts of the lake.
Archie McDonell’s snowplow and 20 teams left on Tuesday morning for the north end of the lake. They will be away about ten days.
The telephone system in the village is now in full working order. About fifty residents are connected. Hello, central! What’s the news?
H. Loire has sold his butcher business to J. Angus. Former customers of Mr. Loire will be welcomed with a broad grin at the one and only meat market.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 1 – 1910

1910 Dec 1 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson, clerk of the Municipality has been to Winnipeg this week to attend a conference of the different municipalities.
C. Parks opened up a grocery store in this village this week.
W. King returned from visiting several districts in Swan River Valley and seemed pleased with the trip and all that he saw.
The several school trustees are called to transact business in this district on December 5th at 10 o’clock sharp. All persons with children should make an effort to attend.
The nomination papers are out for the election of Reeve and Councillors for this district to be held at Winnipegosis, Dec. 6th.
W. Cooper’s hounds killed a wolf this week.
Charley Clarke paid Dauphin a visit last week.
J. Spearing, teacher of North Lake School, seemed to be getting on very well. He bought a farm just lately and erected a house on it. He speaks highly of the land in this district, but what is most needed is more settlers.
Mr. Barber from Winnipeg was up here this week on business.
D. Briggs killed three bears near here this week.

1910 Dec 1 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley held services as usual in the church at Winnipegosis and Fork River. His subject was “The Power of the Men of Vision.”
The weather here is mild, but skaters are not debarred the pleasure so much enjoyed by them. Dog trains are now arriving from time to time from up the lake, and it is expected that the ice will soon be strong enough for freighting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 13 – 1919

1919 Nov 13 – Soldiers Tendered Banquet

A year ago Tuesday the bells of the town were ringing and the whistles blowing. It was a day long to be remembered. The Germans had started the war with the object of conquering the world and had, after the great struggle, hoisted the white flag and asked for the cessation of hostilities. It was a different scene that greeted the eye as one entered the town hall on Tuesday night, November 11th, 1919. Here were tables stretched the full length of the hall, artistically arranged and simply groaning under the load of good things that weighed them down.
The occasion was a banquet tendered the returned boys, their wives and lady friends by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. and it was worthy of them. The members of the Auxiliary have been tireless workers for the welfare of the men and this banquet crowned their efforts.
There were between three and four hundred present.
During the dinner hour Major Skinner extended a welcome to all on behalf of the Auxiliary.
A vote of thanks was tendered the ladies on motion of Comrades Bates and Batty.
After the tables were cleared there was a short program followed by a dance. Those taking part were Mrs. Grobb, violin selection; Mrs. R. Hawkins, solo; Rev. H.P. Barrett, song; Miss H. Clarke, recitation. The McMurray orchestra furnished the music for the dance.

1919 Nov 13 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 10th.
Mr. Shield and bride arrived last week and have rented John Hayward’s residence on the Mossey River.
John Judge and Mr. Gourlay from Virden, have arrived. They have rented Briggs brothers’ buildings.
A basket social will be held in the school on the evening of Nov. 21st. The proceeds will be devoted to a fund for the purchase of an organ for the school.
The work on the road that leads to the school is still undone. Children from this district east of the muskeg have not been able to attend school of late on this account. The Dept. of Public-Works has provided a special grant from this road. In view of this it seems strange that an effort has not been made to have the work performed.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

A meeting of the directors of the Agricultural Society was held on the 5th inst. It was decided to pay the prize money at once. As this was the first show held by the society the directors are to be congratulated on its success.
Mrs. Rice, for a number of years was teacher at North Lake School has sold her property and has left the community. Mrs. Rice has lived a number of years in the district and has done good work as a teacher. Her departure from our midst is a matter of regret.
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of Hartney, Man., are visiting at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. The young people attended the banquet to the returned soldiers.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Briggs.
All Saints’ S.S. staff held a public meeting on the night of the 6th. About 50 were present. Rev. H.P. Barrett presided. Arrangements were made for the annual Christmas tree, and also to hold a social evening every Wednesday at which there will be a varied program.
A public meeting is called for Friday, 14th inst., for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Emma Rice wishes to thank all who were kind and considerate to her during her recent illness. She is now comfortably provided for in Dauphin and hops to be able to return to our midst within a short time.

LETTER OF APPRECIATIONS.
On behalf the returned boys of the Fork River district we wish to express our appreciation of the banquet tendered us, the gifts of watches and purses and the uniform kindness shown us upon all occasions. We further wish to acknowledge the efforts of the ladies in preparing the excellent supper provided us. The banquet was a most enjoyable event, the pleasure being shared by a number of friends from outside.
THE COMMITTEE.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 7 – 1912

1912 Nov 7 – Fork River

George King, of Dauphin, was here renewing old acquaintances between trains.
Miss Grant of Pine View was visiting her friends at Valley River during the weeks end.
Thos. Ramsay, P.M. of Sifton, was here on business with D. Kennedy.
Walter Clark has returned staying for a short time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Rev. H.H. Scrase, who has been visiting his brother at Swan River and attending the mission at Dauphin, returned on Saturday’s train.
S. Briggs, who was here renewing acquaintances for a short time, has returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy and family have returned after visiting friends at Ochre River and Dauphin.
Miss Olive Clark and miss Comber have returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Hallowe’en has passed, and to judge from the looks of the town next morning, those who too part in the the tricks, should be pleased with themselves if they call it fun. Even the church was made to pay toll, which is going the limit.
The elevator gang has left. The elevator is now open for business with Jack Clemens in charge.
What’s the matter with the Bay Centre correspondent of the Press. We must have touched him on a sore spot by the remarks he makes of the Fork River scribe. We would advise him to give up his Hooligan tactics of sandbagging people and to roost with the owls till it freezes up.
One of our enterprising citizens has surrounded his lot on Main Street with an ornamental fence.

1912 Nov 7 – The Fork River Settlement

Pretty much all the history of the Dauphin district dates from the advent of the C.N.R. The actual settlement of the northern part of the country, which includes Fork River and Winnipegosis, commenced in 1897, when the railway entered. It is true there were parties who squatted here and there, but the first settlement amounted to nothing when estimated in figures. It was not until three or four years later that the municipality of Mossey River, which comprises the territory described, was organized. Your correspondent spent a few house at Fork River the other day, and what is more important, spent them pleasantly. It is some fourteen years since the writer first visited the new thriving village of Fork River, and some of those he formed an acquaintance with then, were there to greet him last week. The village of Fork River is located on the Fork and Mossey Rivers, and within a mile or two of its centre, a considerable number of people reside. The land along the Mossey and Fork Rivers is as good as there is to be found anywhere on the American continent, which is saying much. It was but natural then that those who came in first selected the best farms, those along the rivers. The country about was at one time covered with a growth of timber, which included tamarack, spruce and poplar. The latter kind was the most frequently met with. Much of it, of course, has since disappeared before the axe of the lumberman and the wood chopper. Another destructive elements has been fire. In the early days wood had little value and no effort was made to preserve timber. Much timber was needlessly destroyed which would be of considerable value today. But most of us are like the German, if our foresight was as good as our hindsight, we would soon get rich. There is, however, much consolation in the fact that good land will soon produce enough grain to find money to purchase fuel. Like other new districts the Fork River settlement has been up against manta drawbacks, notably wet seasons and poor roads. But somebody remarks, are these not the condition which develop strong men? Yes, truly, but, at times, even the heart of the pioneer sinks. Take the present year as an example. Conditions were such as to try the metal most of us are made of. Even more, the loss of crop is bad enough, but add to this financial obligations incurred and can’t be met, and the burden seems too heavy to bear.
But enough of lamenting. Let us turn to the people themselves. We don’t know where one will find a finer band of pioneers than at Fork River. There is Tom Glendenning, who was there many a day before the railroad. A splendid specimen of the pioneer; good-hearted and a true friend.
Tom Briggs, another who was in the settlement before, we were going say, the war, but we mean before the railroad. The Briggs Bros., Dave and Tom, went though the worst of it, and still wear pleasant faces. Incidentally, it manta be mentioned that Dave is no longer following, like Cincinnatus, the low.
There’s Sam Bailey, who, while not in before the iron horse, has been there long enough to establish his sterling qualities. He’s a good fellow and one can’t meet too often.
Wm. King, pioneer farmer and stock breeder. Has faced difficulties, met them and overcame them. Besides farming on an extensive scale he is bending his energies to improve his own and other people’s stock. Truly a valuable man in any community.
D.F. Wilson – there’s no mistaking him; besides quality he’s got size, both important factors in a new country. He has farmed, is a breeder of stock and fills the important office of municipal clerk. Has also done his share to develop the district.
Nat Little, pioneer merchant. Has been there a long time, and, what’s better, has succeeded. A good fellow with a weakness for the Shetland pony.
Coun. Geo. Nicholson, too, has had the usual ups and downs, seen the rough and the smooth and is still staying with the job.
Reeve Lacey, not such an old-timer as some of the others, but has, in the time he’s been there established his worth and taken a willing hand in the work of development. For several years he has been in the council and is now its head.
W.T. Snelgrove can look quite a ways back. He has seen more than a little of the life of the pioneer. As a hunter he has quite a record in the deer line and can relate some interesting experiences. Some day, when we have time at our disposal and more space we may relate some of W.R.’s exploits.
While speaking of the Snelgroves its opportune to mention morally and Alf. There some pioneers, too.
Alex. Cameron is not exactly one of the prime old-timers, but has been in the distinct quite a few years. There is just this difference between Alex. and most of the other settlers, he had the “dough” and they didn’t. It don’t take long to tell this, but oh, what a world of meaning there is in it. Money is highly important to us all, but when we haven’t got any and need it, words fail to impress its importance on us. May every man who has a healthy pocketbook know how to use its contents as judiciously and generously as Alexander Cameron.
There are many others worthy of a word in this article, but space forbids. They have done their part and performed it well. What more can be said? There’s the Rowe brothers, A. Hunt, Geo. Tilt, W. Northam, C. Clark, F. Cooper, and Frank and Vivan Hafenbrak.
Then, what about the women? Are they, too, not pioneers in the true sense. Yes, indeed; they are worthy of a special article and even then justice could not be done them. They have taken their part, a part which carried its own burden. A burden, no matter how heavy, always cheerfully carried when the interest of their families and their homes was at stake.
Municipal organization should come in for a chapter. Its work is important in our advancement. The reeves and councillors help materially to make history. If they have done their part well and faithfully their names should be writ in large letters.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 30 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 30 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

The first accident to be reported from the north end of Lake Winnipegosis among the fishermen took place the latter end of last week when Ole Gelasson fell out of a boat and was drowned. Deceased was an able bodied man and a good swimmer. He was 28 years of age and leave a wife and two children. The body was recovered and brought to Winnipegosis village for interment.

1913 Oct 30 – Fork River

Peter Ellis, who is at Miles & Co.’s store at Kamsack, spent the week-end here with his family, and returned on Monday’s train.
Sidney F. Gower, who has been running a gasoline tractor at Morris all summer, returned, and is renewing old acquaintances in this vicinity for a few days.
Several teams are busy hauling timber from town to repair the Baily Bridge, which is in sad want of fixing the last 15 months.
T.N. Briggs returned from a trip to Dauphin on important business.
F. Cooper, who has been threshing south of the Fork River settlement, has returned home with his outfit.
J. Reid and a large number from Sifton, attended our annual children’s service here. There was a large turnout and the children’s choir sang, “Jesus Love Me” very nicely during the offertory, which was appreciated by all.
Nurse tilt, of Dauphin, is on a visit to her home on the Mossey River.

1913 Oct 30 – Winnipegosis

A cold blast from the northwest accompanied by a slight fall of snow dropped in on us Monday. It was a real taste of water.
The Manitou has left on her last trip to the north end of the late. The boat carried supplies.
I.H. Adams, one of the old-timers, arrived Saturday on a short visit with the intention he has here. Mr. Adams is now keeping store at Radville, Sask.
F. Hechter returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
Capt. Coffey went to Dauphin on Saturday.
Fred. McDonald has returned to our midst and is again in the employ of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co. He is the same old Fred and old friends are glad to welcome him back. At one time a report was about here that Fred. had made his “pile” in real estate and was in the millionaire class, but he says the rumour lacked confirmation, much to his regret.
Our thriving little burg is going to put aside its swaddling clothes and cut adrift from the rural municipality of Mossey River. And it is truly about time. About all we got now is the honour of paying in taxes. Besides, a rural council is not progressive enough. They do business on the “penny wise, pound foolish” basis. Any publicity Winnipegosis has received was entirely due to the efforts of the citizens. It would like to ask if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map?
Each train brings its quota of travellers. We like to see then as them are,
Peter McArthur and J.P. Grenon took the train on Monday for Dauphin and other points.
Ole Gelasson was drowned at the north end of the lake last week. The body was brought here for interment. Decreased was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.
Dick Richards and several others who went to the north end of the lake had quite a time of it, being unable to land for about three weeks. The party was about all in when they reached shore.

1919 Oct 30 – Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

1919 Oct 30 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has not been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavour.
An October cold dip is not uncommon, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

1919 Oct 30 – Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 23 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 23 – Committed Suicide

Douglas Casey, aged 27 years, was found dead in a bedroom in the King Edward hotel, Gilbert Plains, on Wednesday. The man had committed suicide by taking carbolic acid. Little is known about Casey. He worked during the fall for a Joseph Carbert and is supposed to hail from Vancouver.
Coroner Harrington went to Gilbert Plains and after hearing the facts of case decided an inquest was not necessary.

1913 Oct 23 – Sad Drowning Accident

Isaac, the three year old son of Wm. Miner, who lives three miles south-west of town, was drowned in the Vermillion River on Wednesday afternoon. The little fellow strayed to the river and in some way fell in.

1913 Oct 23 – Telephone Line to Winnipegosis

The Manitoba Government telephone line has been completed to Winnipegosis.

1913 Oct 23 – Fork River

Mrs. Albert Cooper left to meet her husband at a place where they will take up their residence for the winter months.
Mr. Rowe, of Rathwell, came in on Saturday’s train and rustled up two cars of stock. He left on Monday’s train. Mr. Rowe is a record buyer as he pays the price and gets the goods in short order.
Miss Cox. From Ontario is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Fred. Cooper, on the Fork River, for a short time.
Wm. Northam left for Weyburn, Sask., where he will spend a few months on business in connection with his trade.
Wm. Hunkins, assessor is busy these days traveling a round among the settles west.
The long distance government telephone has been installed in the post office
Several automobiles passed through here on Sunday. The cars were bound for Winnipegosis.
Mrs. J. Gunness and Mrs. I. Humphreys returned from a visit to the Lake Town and enjoyed the ride on the C.N.R. local express.
We notice W. King has a very nice bunch of Berkshire pigs from registered stock which he is clearing out at $5.00 a piece.
Wm. Houston has returned from Winnipegosis and intends assisting in the A.T. Co. store for the winter. “Scotty” is a real hustler behind the counter and we are glad to see him back.

1919 Oct 23 – Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 19 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 19 – Fork River

Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on Sunday. The church was tastefully decorated with flowers, grain and vegetables. The ladies and officers are to be congratulated on the fine display. The service was conducted by Mr. Littler, B.A.; Miss Nixon, organist. A large congregation took part in thanking the giver of all good things for a bountiful harvest.
Mr. Littler is leaving the mission to attend St. Johns College at Winnipeg. Mr. Harding of Algoma, will carry on the work in this mission this winter.
Our bonanza farmer, T.N. Briggs, is smiling. Wheat 37 1/2 bushels to the acre.
The C.N.R. should have an extra bonus for the grandly they handle our mail and express lately. It comes in an old box car with about two inches of coal dust all over the floor. Fancy mail bags and grapes with a nice coating of coal dust and baggage and express with syrup and dust. They might clean out the car but any old thing goes on this line.
John Newsdale is visiting his parents after spending the summer teaching in Saskatchewan.
Wm. Coultas’ team took a notion to run away the other day. The sudden stoppage in the river caused him to take a few graceful revolutions through the air. He received a good shaking up, however he is doing nicely.
Threshing is the order of the day this fine weather. There are four outfits working within two miles of town. The yield is very good.

1916 Oct 19 – Dauphin’s Population 3200

The recent census shows the population of the own to be 3200. Naturally this comes as a great disappointment. The falling off, however, can be to a large extent accounted for in the fact that over 1000 young men have been recruited from the town. The normal population must be close to the 4000 mark.

1916 Oct 19 – The Week’s Casualty List

Stuart Geekie, Winnipegosis, killed. (Stewart Geekie, 1893, 150410)
Wm. Patterson, Ochre River, killed. (???)
A. Stevenson, Minitonas, killed. (Albert Victor Stevenson, 1892, 425361)
Robin Cruise, Dauphin, killed. (Robert Wallace Cruise, 1899, 425650)
Jas. Brown, Dauphin, wounded. (James Evelyn Brown, 1896, 151554)
Pte. Younghusband, Dauphin, killed. (Francis Lloyd Younghusband, 1892, 81863)
Lance Corp. H.G. Alguire, wounded. (???)

1916 Oct 19 – Fork River

J. Schuchett and Mr. P. Zacks left for Winnipeg to arrange for taking over Mr. Zacks’ stock as he is leaving here. Zack brothers are taking three cars of potatoes to Winnipeg. They have purchased the spuds from the farmers here at 45 cents a bushel. The snow storm of Tuesday has delayed the thrashing for a few days. Farmers are busy loading grain from the platform and getting satisfactory results from their shipments. Wheat prices keep advancing. Truly the farmer is king this year.

1916 Oct 19 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J. Mossington and children have returned home from a long visit to friends in Toronto.
The tug “Isabelle” left on Sunday morning towing a barge load of supplies and W.B. Sifton’s log camp outfit. W. Johnston was also a passenger with his fishing outfit, and L. Schaldemose took his family up for the winter.
The “Manitou” returned Monday. She has one more trip to make before the close of navigation.
Mr. Wm. Sifton, of Minitonas, is visiting his daughter Mrs. A.S. Walker.
Last week some fines were imposed on account of liquor. Geo. Bickle, who is not a householder, was found guilty, and Ed. Chermok, a general merchant here, was fined for having liquor in his store. The authorities are on the watch for others who are suspected.
The Red Cross Society had a very successful meeting at Victoria Hall last Wednesday [1 line missing] the entertainment will be given by Mrs. Paddock and Mrs. White.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 10 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 10 – Fork River

Miss S. Lacey, of Oak Brae, returned from a short visit to Mrs. J. Spearing of Valley River.
Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, was a visitor with Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase at the vicarage.
Mrs. Wm. King returned home after a week’s say with her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, who is leaving for the north end of the lake for the winter.
J. Playford and Fleming Wilson were visitors here from Dauphin on business.
S. Biggs has given up the Mowat School and is leaving for Dauphin.
H.H. Benner, an old-timer, is travelling around for a few days in the educational chariot renewing acquaintances. We are all pleased to see Harcourt. He is now a regular walking encyclopaedia on real estate.
The C.N.R. bridge gang spent a few days here pile drying and fixing bridges.
Mr. Lampard, of Dauphin, is busy rounding up a car of fat cattle for shipment.
Duncan Briggs, Professor Robinson and Fred Storrar have left with T. Johnston for the winter’s fishing at Dawson’s Bay.
Mrs. D.F. Wilson, who has been spending a week with her daughter, Mrs. L. Humphreys, of Dauphin, returned home Saturday.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs arrived home from a month’s vacation spent with friends in Brandon.

1918 Oct 10 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. Albert Jackson Weir, Valley River, wounded. (Albert Jackson Weir, 1888, 2193343)
Pte. Douglas Wells Bentley, Dauphin, wounded. (Douglas Wells Bentley, 1897, 469933)
Stewart Widmeyer, Dauphin, wounded. (Stuart Robertson Widmeyer, 1895, 151343)
Pte. Robert Stanley Colebeck, Dauphin, wounded. (Robert Stanley Colbeck, 1896, 1072198)
Pte. Charles Winstanley Skinner, Dauphin, was wounded and taken to the dressing station. While being conveyed from the dressing station to the hospital he was struck by a bomb and killed. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 9 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 9 – Accidently Shot

Robt. Charlier, a young man 23 years of age, was brought from Ochre River on Monday to the hospital here. He was pulling a shotgun out of a wagon when it was accidently discharged, the contents lodged in his groin. He is reported progressing satisfactorily.

1913 Oct 9 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughters were visitors to the Lake Town with Mr. Theo. Johnston.
E. Williams returned from Dauphin after attending the rural deanery meeting at that point.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, was visiting friends at Fork River and returned home on the “All Saints” special.
The long distance telephone gang are busy here getting ready to put up the wire which will fill a long felt want.
The elevator is in full swing, with John Clements, in charge he having moved his family from Dauphin here for the winter.
Miss N. Millidge, organizer and managing secretary of the Church of England Women’s Auxiliary, gave an address in the church to the W.A. members, which was well attended
Miss Millidge is the guest of Mrs. W. King, president of the W.A. until Tuesday when they both drove to Winnipegosis to hold a meeting with the members of the W.A. at that point. A successful meeting was held.
Mr. Monnington, of Neepawa, arrived here for a few days chicken shooting and is the guest of his uncle, John Robinson on the Mossey.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. King and Mr. and Mrs. E.E. McKinstry and G.F. King paid our burg a visit in an automobile. They were after the fleet winged prairie chicken. The party were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dunc. Kennedy.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Winnipegosis, spent a short time with her aunt, Mrs. T.N. Briggs lately.
John Robinson and Mr. Monnington have returned from a pleasure trip to Winnipegosis. Both were delighted with that hustling town.
We hear that the government dredge Laurier, which was been under the water for three years, was resurrected. Why was the dredge not left where it was as it was less expense to the country under water, as the other dredge has been all summer poking around a little island that Pat and Mike would take away in a wheelbarrow in less time. The sooner there is a change in the present management the better the settlers will like it as we have competent men around here who are able to run this part of the bis.
Mr. Brandon & Sons, of Mowat, have purchased a large gasoline threshing outfit and are in the field for business. With the number of machines at work if the weather continues fine, the threshing will wind up in another week.

1919 Oct 9 – Fork River

Miss Millidge, organizer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican Church, was a visitor for a few days with Mrs. W. King.
Mrs. Vinning and daughter, of Winnipeg, have returned home after spending a week with Mrs. J. Reid.
T.N. Briggs has invested in an oil pull tractor. This power will turn over the land more rapidly. It’s more speed that counts these times.
Bert Little has taken a trip to Chicago. Fred Tilt is in charge of the store during his absence.
The Cypress River paper, in a recent issue contains the following item:
“Mr. and Mrs. N. Little both old time residents of Cypress River and town this week. They left home in May for an overseas tour, and visited the battlefields of France and Belgium, securing many photos of great interest. They sailed to New York on a French boat and went from there to Toronto near which city Mr. Little purchased a new model 1920 McLaughlin 6 cylinder car and motored to Cypress. They are now on their way home. The same cherry Nat as of old looking as young as ever.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 5 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 5 – Fork River

Mrs. C. Clark is visiting her son Harold, who is in the Dauphin Hospital with fever.
Mr. T. Shannon has purchased an up-to-date Sawyer & Massey separator.
Mr. J.G. Littler is visiting Sifton this week.
Mr. F. Wilson of Humphrey & Wilson, is up on a trip to his home.
Miss B Johnston who was visiting Mrs. D. Kennedy has returned to Dauphin to resume her duties at the hospital there.
We have not seen anything of our friend Joe, Liberal financier, since the 21st. We sincerely hope he is in good health.
The Liberal Conservative ball in the Orange Hall Friday night was a success. Dancing was kept up to about daylight. Premier Borden was ably assisted by Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Fielding, Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pugsley, Judge Wilson, Hon. T.N. Briggs, Senator Kennedy and other Honourables of all shades of politics and religion.
Harvest Festival in All Saints’ Anglican Church at three o’clock Sunday afternoon.

1916 Oct 5 – The Week’s Casualty List

Pte. S.F. Ferguson, of Melton, has been wounded. (Samuel Fremon Ferguson, 1894, 424783)
Lieut. Percy Willson is reported wounded. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)
Pte. Bert Blakely, Grandview, killed. (Albert Edward Blakely, 1897, 151543)
Pte. Wm. Gilbert, late of the Bank of Commerce staff, wounded. (William Alexander Gilbert, 1895, 150929)

1916 Oct 5 – Fork River

Mr. Shuckutt has returned after having spent the Jewish New Year in Dauphin with friends. Zack brothers merchants have removed their stock to the boarding house building on Main Street and are open for biz. Private Herman Godkin spent a few days visiting Mrs. Williams’ sister. His company expects to leave for overseas shortly. We wish him a safe return. W. King has received a letter from his son Private Maxwell King who is in the 14th general hospital with a shrapnel wound in the knee. He expects soon to be able to return to his company. The day before he went in the drive 5th September he had a talk with Lieutenant Worsey and Pete McCarty of Dauphin telephone man. Both had come through alright up to that time and wished to be remembered to all acquaintances at home.

1916 Oct 5 – Winnipegosis

We have been having a good deal of wind and there is snow in the air. The lake presents a very turbulent and unattractive aspect. Traveling by water just now is not very pleasant.
The “Manitou” is in and has brought down the summer fishermen with their boats and outfits. Preparations for winter fishing are rapidly going forward. If this weather continues we are likely to have and early closing of navigation. The 20th of October is considered as the safe limit.
The Red Cross Society held their regular monthly meeting on the evening of the 2nd. Mr. White finds it necessary to resign from the presidency but accepted the office of vice-president. Names were suggested for the office of the president and the matter of election is to be left in the hands of the executive committee. It is a marvel that so few come out to Red Cross business meetings. Every one claims to be interested in Red Cross work, and well they may be when over one hundred young men from this district have gone over to fight for us, while we sit securely at home beside a warm fire and a big lamp and read of their brass doings in Flanders and France. Come out to the monthly meetings on the first Monday of every month and then you will know what is being done and have a better chance to have a hand in it. The executive cannot get around and invite you personally and besides this is a public affair as much as the governing of your village, so come out and help; both men and women.
Miss Dolly Geekie has returned from Dauphin for a visit. Her many friends are pleased to see her.
Mrs. Frank Hechter had a cable that the 107th Battalion, in which her husband is an officer, had safely reached England.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 3 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 3 – Fined $50 and Costs

Fred Buchij, a Galician, had a row over cattle with another Galician at Valley River. In the melee Buchij ran a pitchfork into the other man. The case was tried before P.M. Munson on Wednesday and Buchij fined $50 and costs. He paid up.

1912 Oct 3 – Killed at Kamsack

Thos. Powell, formerly of Dauphin, was killed at Kamsack on Monday. He was a car repairer. He was working under a car when a train shunted on the track and shoved the car over him. He was badly crushed. Powell was at one time an employee in the railway shops here.

1912 Oct 3 – Threshing Progress

Threshing commenced in several parts of the district this week and will be general if the fine weather continues. A great deal of the grain is being stacked this fall with the object of going ahead with the plowing.

1912 Oct 3 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on the 25th Sept. All members present.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from Sarnia Bridge Co., Supt. Irwin, of C.N.R., the solicitors, the Highway Commissioner, J.P. Grenon and the Million for the Manitoba League.
A report of the public works committee condemning the Bailey Bridge unsafe for traffic was read.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Minster of Public Works be asked to send an engineer to examine the site of the Bailey Bridge and that government aid be asked for to construct it.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the clerk write Supt. Irwin, of the C.N.R., re ditch from Mossey River north to the Sanderson Creek and also re crossing on Cocker Road.
Seiffert – Nicholson – That the council pass a by-law to expropriate a roadway sixty six feet wide along the west side of the C.N. through the N.W. 18-30-18.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask that some of the members of its council meet Reeve Lacey and Coun. Robertson at the bridge across the Mossey River on the boundary line between the two municipalities to consider what is best to be done as the bridge is becoming unsafe.
Nicholson – Toye – That no action be taken towards collecting the price of the Shannon road from Thomas Shannon till Dec. 1st, 1913.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the declarations of Councillors McAuley, Toye and Nicholson for $13.80, $17.70 and $24.30 respectively for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Nicholson – Robertson – That no person be allowed to dump garbage within 200 yards of any residence, street or road in the village of Fork River, and that the Armstrong Trading Co., be notified to remove the refuse deposited by them behind the Orange Hall immediately.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the Minister of the Interior re memorialized to throw the swamp lands in the municipality open for the homesteads.
Hunt – Nicholson – That the C.N.R. be asked to place an agent at Fork River during the shipping season.
A by-law to establish the rate for 1912 was passed, the rates being municipal rate, 12 mills; municipal commissioner’s rate ½ a mill, and the general school rate 4 mills.
McAuley – Toye – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis on November 1st.

1912 Oct 3 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. Scrase visited Rural Dean Wiley and on his return visited Sifton on church business.
Thomas Shannon returned from a business trip to Winnipegosis.
The northern Elevator Co., has a gang here putting up an elevator. An elevator is needed here and it will fill a long felt want.
Archie McKerchar and W. Clarkson of Winnipegosis, spent Wednesday evening with the boys at the Orange Hall and report things booming among the fishermen there.
The cattle buyers are getting busy. One shipped part of a car of sheep last week.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Donnie, visited Mrs. J.E. Morris, of Winnipegosis, last week.
Mrs. H. Scrase returned from Winnipegosis after spending a few days with her friends and while there attended the installation of officers of the W.A. at the point.
A large number attended the council meeting but no miracles have been performed so far to the satisfaction of the people as promised year ago.
Mrs. C.L. White, of Winnipegosis, is visiting at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Jim Parker is now living on the old Parker farm and keeps his gang moving. We are always glad to see new faces among us.
Rev. H. Scrase will hold divine service in All Saints’ Church every Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Fork River and Winnipegosis school house every Sunday at 7.30 p.m. and at Sifton on Mondays and Tuesdays evening as will be arranged there by next Sunday.
Nat Little arrived home on the special Saturday evening from his trip south. Specials seem to be the order of the day. Nothing like lots of train service, if they only come the same day as advertised. Nuff said.

1912 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

Fine weather is again with us and our people are wearing pleasant faces. Do you know, people are a good deal like the weather, they change quickly. When the sun is shining all have pleasant faces; when it is dull and overcast long dismal countenance surround us. Give us the man who smiles whether it rains or shines. He’s the one worth while.

Friend, life will frequently grow
Dreary: no fortunate isles
Lie where time’s dun water flow
Give me the fellow who smiles.

Peter McArthur returned to town on Saturday from Dauphin.
All Saints’ Church was the scene of a pretty wedding on Monday, when William Christensen was united in the holy bond of wedlock to Marie Louise Lebel. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Derome of Makinak.
The “old-timers” sketches running in the Herald are quite interesting. Winnipegosis has a few men who are well worth writing up. They have seen the country under all conditions, and what’s more, have made good. We’ll name just a few. peter McArthur, Jos. Grenon, Sr., Tom Whale, and Hughie McKellar, the fish expert. To have Hughie tell the history of the little fishes from the cradle to the table, would prove a mighty interesting chapter. In a future issue of the herald Hugie will be asked to tell what he knows.
Capt. Coffey has been here during the past week. The Capt. is nothing if not optimistic. He looks for a good season fishing.

1918 Oct 3 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. T. Grenier, Makinak, killed in action. (Telesphore Joseph Grenier, 1895, 291698)
Pte. Chas. W. Skinner, Dauphin, wounded and missing. (Charles Winstanley Skinner, 1898, 1001047)
Pte. Harold Tomalin, Dauphin, killed in action. Pte. Tomalin was a fireman on the C.N.R. when he enlisted last January. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Tomalin, reside at Magnet, Man. (Harold Tomalin, 1896, 2129193)

1918 Oct 3 – Dramatic Meeting on Battle Front

One of the Dauphin boys writes the Herald of a dramatic meeting he had with another local boy at night. “We were,” he writes; “on the move and had come to a stop on account of the congestion of traffic. A fleet of Fritz’s planes came out and dropped about fifty bombs around us. Looking around by the light that the bombs made I saw another Dauphin boy about ten feet away. We only had time for a handshake and wish for “good luck” when the traffic moved on.

1918 Oct 3 – Fork River

Mr. Pettit, of Winnipeg, paid this burgh a visit in the interest of the new Victory War Bond campaign.
Mrs. Tait, of Indian Head, Sask., is visiting at her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Timewell.
Mr. Love has arrived from Lake Manitoba and has taken charge of the Salada School, west of town.
Max King was a visitor to Winnipeg for a few days on business with the Military branch.
We notice Dauphin merchants are closing their stores at 6.30 p.m. What a contrast to some of our stores in this burg which are kept open much longer hours and sometimes on Sundays. The latter should be stopped at once.
James McDonald has finished his residence and moved into it.
T.A. Briggs has received a shipment of horses for Bonanza farm. The man who is able to receive a bunch of horses these days must have a bonanza bank account.
Fork River farms are in demand a good prices. Several deals are likely to go through shorty.
A Herald subscriber tells your correspondent he is mistaken when he states that “King potato” has not been crowned. He sure is the crowned potentate of this part of the country at any rate.

1918 Oct 3 – Winnipegosis

RED CROSS NOTICE.
The annual meeting of the Red Cross Society will be held on Tuesday evening, the 8th of October, at 8 o’clock, in Rex Hall. Every member is requested to be present. A report of work done during the year will be made by the secretary, and officers will be elected for the coming year. It is for the purpose of electing officers that a full attendance is requested.
Don’t forget that this work is for the wounded men of our army and navy, who have been winning the victories we are so jubilant about just now.

E.L. MACARTHUR,
Sec.-Treasurer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 14 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 14 – Political Meetings at Fork River

Glen Campbell held a meeting at Fork River on the 8th inst., which was well attended and much enthusiasm shown. There was no Government speaker and the Grits were conspicuous by their absence.
On the night of the 11th, Mr. Cruise held his meeting supported by Messer. McKinstry and McDonald, and quite unexpectedly Mr. Campbell turned up just before the meeting began. The Orange Hall was well filled as the Conservatives of Fork River were not afraid to hear both sides of the question for they did not know that Glen would be at the meeting. Had they not attended Mr. Cruise’s meeting would have been a small one.

1911 Sep 14 – Fork River

Mr. A. Harvey, an old timer who still owns property in this district, is on a visit to Mr. S. Bailey and renewing acquaintances.
T.N. Briggs’ threshing outfit arrived on Tuesday’s train and is guaranteed to thresh anything in sight from pumpkins to gerkins.
Reciprocity seems to have upset even the clerk of the weather, as we are having very poor harvest weather and a slight tinge of frost.
Mr. Glen Campbell held a meeting in the Orange Hall on the 8th, which was well attended. There were over 100 farmers and a large number of ladies present. Mr. Campbell spoke on reciprocity from a farmer’s standpoint in a plain telling way. His arguments were convincing and plainly showed the audience the reciprocity pact in its true colour and that it would be to Canada’s disadvantage. Mr. Cruise was invited bout did not put in an appearance.
Mr. Forbes of Rivers, has been in the district a few days looking over the land. He is well satisfied with Fork River and is likely to invest in a farm.
The following are a few reasons why the scribe cannot support Cruise, the non-resident candidate and why he objects to the Laurier Government. Look them over and see how few of the ministers retain public confidence. Has there ever been anything worse than Mr. Pugsley in public life in Canada. The corruption exposed in his department exceeds the McGreevy scandal during the Conservative regime. Sir Wilfred has not retired Pugsley as Sir John Thompson retired Langevin. A commission of Liberals has declared the Marine Department under Mr. Broduer, corrupt from end to end, yet he has been retained and now goes not he Supreme Court Bench. The administration of the Militia Department has been as bad as any. The printing bureau scandals have been covered up. The Oliver charges were sidetracked by the dissolution of parliament, notwithstanding pledges given by the Government upon which an adjournment was secured. Sir Wilfred Laurier made the late Mr. Prefontaine, his minister of Marine, when he knew he was corrupt. In fact he had a national reputation for corruption. But Sir Wilfred gave him one of the big spending departments. Mr. Fielding allowed the Farmers’ Bank to open its doors when he had abundance of evidence that it was a crooked organization from its very inception. Look over the ministers in the Laurier Government as it appeals for supper in 1911 and compare the administration with that of 1896 and see how are they mighty fallen. What a descent from Sir Oliver Mowat to Pugsley; from Sir Louis Davis to Broduer; from Sir Henri Joly to Oliver. Sir Wilfred does not want such a comparison to be made. He has introduced the reciprocity issue to cover up the corruption of his colleagues. The Press would try to persuade farmers to vote for the Grit candidate and put back into power Laurier and the most corrupt Government in existence. They might fool a few Jackdaws. The scribe’s advance is turn them out and try a new broom which in our experience always sweeps clean.

1916 Sep 14 – Fork River

P. Zack, of Winnipeg, has purchased the stock of J.S. Nowosad and intends carrying on the business. Mr. Nowosad has accepted a position with the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Sergant, of Kamsack, and late of Dauphin, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. W. Coultas on the Fork River.
Miss Pearl Wilson is teaching the Pine View School for the present.
On Sunday morning Mrs. Archie McMillian passed away after a period of illness. Deceased was one of the old settlers. The last three years the family resided at Kindersley, Sask. Of late Mrs. McMillian has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
The harvest home festival services in All Saints’ Church were well attended and the services were interesting throughout. The church was tastefully decorated for the occasion with flowers, fruit and vegetables and those who took part deserve credit. Mr. Butler preached his farewell sermon. He left for Wycliffe College on Monday to take up his studies. His departure is regretted.
Rain has delayed thrashing operations.
The duck pond opposite the post office is increasing in area. There should be good shooting when the season opens.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 7 – Fork River

Pathmaster Briggs and his gang are busy laying a sidewalk from the post office to the station and stores, which is quite an improvement this muddy weather.
Mrs. H.H. Scrase and son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
The C.N. Ry. is building a stock yard here. We sincerely hope they will provide a raft to float them over the ditch to the shoot.
Mr. McLeod is busy buying cattle and shipping a car a week.
Mr. J.M. Littler returned from Gilbert Plains on Wednesday.
Mr. Glen Campbell, M.P., will hold a meeting in the Orange Hall on Friday night, September 8th.

1916 Sep 7 – Fork River

Mr. Ducker, engineer, was here for a few days inspecting roads and bridges.
Mrs. Dobson, of Winnipeg, returned home after a two weeks’ visit with Mrs. Cameron on the Mossey River.
Mr. E. Hunter, of Severn Bridge, Ont., is visiting his brothers, Harry and Tom Hunter at Lake Dauphin.
Mr. Joe McMillian, of Lac du Bonnett, returned home after a few days’ visit to his mother at Mrs. C. Bailey’s.
Mr. Hawkins, P.M. of Dauphin, and Mr. McCaul, of the Bank of Commerce, spent a short time touring the district in a motor lately.
Mr. W. Williams started thrashing on the farm of John Mushoski.
The heavy rain on Saturday night has stopped the harvesting and thrashing a couple of days.
Rev. Mr. Price, of Swan River, and rural dean of Dauphin, held Holy Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, which was well attended. He left in the evening for Winnipegosis.
The annual Harvest Festival service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock on September 10th. This will be Mr. Butler’s farewell sermon as he leaves for Wychiffe College, Toronto, on Monday. A cordial invitation to all to come and take part in this service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 5 – 1912

1912 Sep 5 – Heavy Rain

A heavy rain set in early this (Thursday) morning and canted for several hours. The rain has put a stop to harvesting operations for this week at least. Indications now point to better weather.

1912 Sep 5 – A Note of Warning

There has been issued, by direction of the Minister of Agriculture at Ottawa, a conspicuous poster calling the attention of potato growers to the importance of examining their crop to ascertain whether or not is infected with potato canker. The hanger shows in natural colours a potato plant the whole yield of which is affected by the ideas. It also shows the appearance of individual tubers in which the canker has started to work. Growers who discover suspicious symptoms of the ideas in their crop are requested to send affected specimens to the Dauphin Botanist, Experimental Farm, Ottawa. The poster is issued as farmers’ circular No. 3 of the Division of Botany and is being distributed by the Publications Branch of the Department of Agricultural.

1912 Sep 5 – Fork River

The crops around this district are now looking excellent and the binders are now busily at work. If only we have good weather from now on we shall have a good average. If this district had a good ditch made to let off the water from the west, the farmers would not have to complain of so much water on their land. Perhaps something will be done one of these days.
Miss Alderton, teacher of Mossey River School, spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Nat Little and his daughter, Gracie, are taking a little holiday in the States. We all hope they will have a pleasant time.
Wm. King is busy these days finishing off that new stable he has been building. It looks fine.
Mr. H.H. Scrase spent a few days visiting friends in Dauphin. He looks well.
Miss Fredrickson, of Winnipegosis, is now helping at the Armstrong Trading Co. in place of Miss Pearl Wilson resigned.
Mrs. F. Hafenbrak gave birth to a little son last week.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, came to Fork River, last Sunday and visited Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Scrase.
We are glad to see the ??? ??? the elevator and hope to see ??? this fall.
Mrs. S. Bailey, who spent a month with friends in Ontario, has returned reports having a pleasant time there.
John Stacey, of Snowflake, Man., is visiting at S. Bailey’s and renewing old acquaintances.
S.E. Briggs, who had the misfortune to lose his horse with fever, has purchased another driver.
Hugh Armstrong spent a few days at the Company’s store on his return from the Pas.
Sydney Gower, electrical engineer, was renewing old acquaintances for a few days.
Mrs. A. Snelgrove and family returned home after a visit to her home at Brandon.
Theodore Johnston has returned from the south and is staying a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Professor John Robinson has returned and is looking well. We expect to see the band out in full force in future.
[1 line is rubbed out] the position of municipal critic. Not at all; we just noted a few remarks that were brought to our notice ??? friend don’t seem to relish ???. Before he ??? into the council ??? [9-10 lines are rubbed out] and all is forgotten ??? ??? ??? then they strike ??? ???. “Anything else Tommy.” “Yes, dad says the taxes amount to a rent and there ain’t no ex-rays powerful enough to discover where they go.” “That will do Tommy, dear; you must have meant beaver instead of municipality, as the beaver’s head looks wise and his tail is to carry the mud. The M.C. goes on to say we should suggest something. What’s the use. Several grants were got for the south road and the M.C. sent a three page letter to the man in charge and stopped the work as laid out by the Government engineer because he was not in the council he was held up and yet the M.C. whines about not getting assistance to overcome these difficulties. Rats, keep quiet M.C. and things will be all right later on and we’ll meet you on the south road with the band.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 4 – 1913

1913 Sep 4 – Ethelbert

An extraordinary general meeting of the shareholders of the Ruthenian Trading Company, Limited, was held at two o’clock at Ethelbert, on the 28th day of August. The president, Mr. M. Pacholok was in the chair. The president explained that the meeting had been called for the purpose of considering the question of increasing the capital stock of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars by the creation and issue of six hundred new shares of the par value of twenty-five each. The matter was then left to the meeting for discussion. After a long discussion a by-law of the directors passed the 26th day of July, authorizing the increase of capital of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars was sanctioned and confirmed by special resolution of the shareholders.
The Ruthenian Literary Society, under the leadership of K.F. Slipetz, its president, arranged a programme of giving lectures to the farmers. The subjects that are taken up are: organization, economy and mixed farming. We shall be very glad to get particulars and, if possible, regulations of farmers’ societies. This need is very necessary for us. We, as farmers, don’t want to be left behind the other farmers but must struggle or the survival of the fittest for existence.
Mr. Hill, an Ethelbert pioneer, is renewing acquaintance here. We are always gad to see old friends.
Some of the prominent Ruthenian farmers at Garland are forming a company with the idea of buying up the other business there.
The construction of a Greek Catholic Church at Garland has been postponed on account of some members objecting to the transfer of the said church under the name of Bishop Budka.

1913 Sep 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Avid Briggs, of Brandon, is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Potts, of Neepawa, returned home after a week’s vacation with Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat.
Miss Gilanders and brother, of Brandon, returned home after spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lockhart.
John Mathews and Fred Storrar are assisting Mr. T.N. Briggs, the bonanza farmer, with his harvest.
We are pleased to hear the town orator has recovered from his recent illness. Some of the fair sex remarked he was becoming thin as its hard on the constitution sitting on the sidewalk without a sunshade.
Mrs. Fred Cooper and Miss Alice Godkin are visiting with friends at Dauphin.
Alfred Snelgrove, who has been on the dredge at Regina all summer, returned home and is of the opinion there are worse places than Fork River.
We notice the hum of Tom Shannon’s and King Bros.’ machinery threshing a few loads of grain. Fred Cooper and Billy Williams have their outfits ready to start as soon as the grain is fit.
Dr. Ross and W.H. Morison, of Dauphin, passed through here with their automobile on Tuesday. The roads north of here were so soft that they had to return and take the train from Fork River to Winnipegosis. The appropriation money for the north road must have miscarried.
Jack Angers, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end in town renewing acquaintances.
W. Howitson, of Winnipegosis, is clerking in A.T. Co. sore at this point for a time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 29 – 1912

1912 Aug 29 – Ethelbert

Miss Ada Willey, has come to take up her duties as teacher at the senior school.
The British American Elevator Co. is putting in a foundation for a 50 thousand bushel elevator.
Considerable rain has fallen here of late.
K. McLean is getting better day by day, which his friends will be glad to learn.

1912 Aug 29 – Fork River

Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, accountant for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a couple of days with D. Kennedy.
Edwin King left for Minnedosa for a short time on business.
We are informed one of our farmers is putting up hay with a sky pilot. That accounts for the showery weather no doubt.
Miss Annie Briggs and Miss Mabel Tindale returned from a visit to the Lake Town last week.
Mr. Combes, of the Fork, took a short vacation to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. Chapman and her daughter, who spent the last month with her brother, Wm. Coultas, has left for her home in Winnipeg.
Sam Hunter who spent the last two months in Ontario, has returned. He states Manitoba is good enough for him.
Courtney Wilson and E. Briggs are paying Dauphin a visit on business.
N. Little has cut his fall wheat and several others cut their wild oats some time ago. Don’t sow your wild oats in future.
Give Will Davis a call and he will put you in to something good in Texas farm lands for sale on easy terms.
Same Bailey paid Winnipegosis a flying visit on business, as also Herman Godkin, real estate agent.
We are sorry to hear our alderman had a lapse of memory for a short period lately and we trust it will return shortly, as Sammy Veller says its very convenient sometimes.
Can anyone explain how it costs forty cents to ship an article to Winnipegosis by express and a week after the same article came back by express costing only thirty cents. We give it up. No offence meant.
Looking over the Winnipegosis news in the Press of August 22nd it appears as if the correspondent wants this scribe’s scalp to add to his belt. We are amused at the statement. We of F.R. are not satisfied with the medical officer’s choice of residence. Does his conscience prick him. Ba! Read the article over again friends and you will not find any mention of residence. We stated nothing but plain facts and by the way he seems to dodge the issue. They are too plain for some one’s liking. If the matter had been attended to as was promised nothing further would have been said. Bluff won’t work any more and so get down ti biz. What the people want is the manure and rubbish taken further away and it’s the health officer’s place to see it done when it’s mentioned to him whoever he is and we advise the Winnipegosis correspondent to be careful of himself as he might see snakes next time and be under the hands of the M.D. Keep to facts in future if you have anything to say, “M.O.H.” whatever it means, we do not know, it might be member of hades or some other place. We’ll let it go at that. Ta, ta for the present.
The writer of the Mowat picnic seems to have bitten off more than he could chew and the more he tries to explain the further he gets in the mire. In our opinion he always had cold feet.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 22 – 1912

1912 Aug 22 – Ethelbert

P.G. Keays, assistant to the chief games guardian, was in Ethelbert for a couple of days lately to see the P.M. anent a recent case of shooting chickens out of season and went away satisfied that the party convicted had got off easy.
Kenneth McLean, we are glad to say, is improving in health, but slowly. The Dr. thinks he may be allowed to get up this week, all being favourable.
Mrs. A. Willy and Mrs. McViears are visiting at the home of the stations operator here. Mrs. Willy left for home the early part of the week.
Mr. Finnen is here trying to interest the people in the insurance business.
M. Troy, of the Massey-Harris Co., has been here for some days conferring with the agent.

1912 Aug 22 – Fork River

James McDonald, of Minitonas, is staying with his old friend, Nat Little.
Mr. Wade, of East Bay, was staying with W. Davis a few days and took several photographs of this part of the district, we are informed.
Wm. Stonehouse has been appointed constable by the council. They are to be contended for getting a wiggle on in this one case anyway.
Wm. Northam has taken a trip as far west as Weyburn, Sask., and intends stating their a short time.
Harold Shannon, returned from a short stay at Winnipeg.
We notice Joseph Grenon, Sr., has been given the management of the fish hatchery at Snake Island.
Rev. H.H. Scrase returned after a few days spent at Dauphin and Sifton on business.
Professor Millard, ventriloquist was here for a few days. A large crowd turned out to see his moving pictures in the Orange Hall. The show was well worth the money.
The young folks of this part enjoyed a very pleasant evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs, where they celebrated the coming of age of their son, Duncan.
Several carloads of timber are being unloaded for the elevator.
Mrs. J. McAuley, of Winnipegosis, returned home after a week spent with Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.