Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 4 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 4 – Fork River

The fowl supper and concert held in the Orange Hall on Friday night last, by the Methodist Church was a success. There was a large turnout and the ladies are to be congratulated on the way they handled the supper. A number came from Winnipegosis. After the concert the young folks hired the hall and a good time was spent the remainder of the night, all leaving for home in the wee small hours of the morning.
There was a fair turnout to the horse breeders meeting on Saturday night last. Much business was done. The choice of the horse went to the Shire breed, the choice being closely contested by admirers of the Punch Everything passed off in a very pleasant manner, after which the meeting adjourned to be called later on by the president. Those who wish to join should call on Secretary Wilson as soon convenient and help on the horse breeding industry of this district, as only members of the association are eligible for use of the horse. Fee for membership is one dollar per annum. Anyone can become a member.
Freddie Storrar is home after spending the summer in the west. He reports a very good time.
Mrs. George Tilt left for Dauphin, having spent a month among her relatives on the Mossey.
Mr. Rogy, collector for the Sawyer-Massey Co., has been here a few days on business.
Mrs. Watson, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Fred Cooper for a few days on the Fork River.
A. Hunt, F.B. Lacey and D.F. Wilson returned from attending he Municipal convention and report not only a good time but a profitable one.
Mr. Rowe, of Harding, left with his third shipment of cattle and hogs. The cattle business has been very brisk at this point of late, there being more stock shipped than in any other previous year.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove has left for a few days visit among friends at Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Brewer, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Wm. Armstrong.
Mr. Parser, surveyor, and men have left for Winnipeg after spending a week adjusting lines east of Lake Dauphin.
Wm. Davis and T.N. Briggs returned on the Fork River local, having spent a few days in Dauphin on business.
Garnet Lacey has returned home, having spent the summer in the west. He is looking fine.
Most of the male members of this burgh are hiking for the bush to get their annual share of big game. We hope the boys will have good luck.

1913 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

Bennie Hechter returned from Winnipeg on Monday looking very jubilant.
Dugald McAulay dispatched a carload of cattle and pigs to Winnipeg on Wednesday, himself travelling by the same train.
Mr. and Mrs. Watson have departed for a well-earned holiday and the dancing folk will greatly miss them as they were the mainstay in the musical line.
Messrs. Hechter and Ford returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday, most important business having called them there. They report that the city is a bit quitter than even Winnipegosis.
“Professor” Sutton has been recuperating his health here for a few days and greatly admires the salubrity of the atmosphere to this winter sanatorium. He made no public appearance to the regret of everyone and consequently sold none of his well-known concoctions.
Archie McKerchar arranged a small dance in the Victoria Hall on Tuesday evening but your correspondent not having been invited, no details are to hand.
Mr. McGinnis of the Winnipegosis hotel (nearest the lake) is having an addition made to his livery barn which will accommodate six more teams, or is it to be a store house for the game he has gone out to shoot in company Doctor Medd and Mr. Whale.
The first consignment of fish, consisting of ten loads, arrived on Friday from up the lake, so things should new commence to be busy, although up to the present it is not apparent, there still being some individuals in the town waiting for a job.
It is observed with extreme satisfaction to most people in town that Mr. Frank Hechter is standing as councilor for Ward 4, Mossey River municipality, in the forthcoming election, in opposition to Mr. Billy Walmsley, caused by the retirement of Mr. Seiffert, whose tenure of the office has expired. It is time we had somebody with Mr. Hechter’s business acumen to look after the ward as according to all reports things have slightly got mixed up lately and the candidate being the head of a large trading concern in town, matters would no doubt straighten out at once. It is known to everyone the great interest Frank takes in the town and district generally, being the patron of every object tending to the welfare of same, his genial disposition, and is always approachable by anyone seeking aid or advice. It is up to all his adherents to get him right there on this occasion, thereby showing their appreciation of his worth.

1919 Dec 4 – Bicton Heath

It is a good thing we don’t feel the cold during these dips.
Fred. Wenger is holding an auction sale on the 12th inst. Dan Hamilton is the auctioneer.
Mr. Seal has purchased the Marantz farm in this district.
The basket social, which was held at the schoolhouse on Nov. 21st, for the purpose of raising funds to purchase an organ for the school, was a great success, $74.50 being realized. The ladies were out in force with many baskets, tastefully gotten up, which were auctioned off by Jack Haywood, who wielded the hammer with good results.
Fred Sharp is visiting friends at Fork River.
Mr. Pearson has removed to the old Snelgrove farm at Fork River.

1919 Dec 4 – Fork River

A meeting of farmers in Fork River on Monday resulted in the formation of a branch of the Grain Growers to be known as the Mossey River Grain Growers’ Association. President Marcroft, of the South Bay local, filled the chair, and gave a short but interesting address. The following officers were elected for 1920:
President – E.F. Hafenbrak
Vice – D.F. Wilson, Jr.
Sec.- treasurer – Fred J. Tilt
These officers, with M. Gealsky, J.D. Robertson, D. Briggs, Max King and A. Hunt form the board of directors. The meeting was not as large as hoped for on account of the severe weather, but a start has been made and we look for some development in the near future. The association is formed to benefit the district both socially and educationally. Every farmer, farmer’s wife and the young folks should join and help the movement. Membership fee $2 annually.

1919 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

The date for the Union Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment has been changed from the 22nd to Friday the 19th December.
Seven carloads of fish have already been shipped. Fishing is reported good from all parts of the lake.
Archie McDonell’s snowplow and 20 teams left on Tuesday morning for the north end of the lake. They will be away about ten days.
The telephone system in the village is now in full working order. About fifty residents are connected. Hello, central! What’s the news?
H. Loire has sold his butcher business to J. Angus. Former customers of Mr. Loire will be welcomed with a broad grin at the one and only meat market.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 1 – 1910

1910 Dec 1 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson, clerk of the Municipality has been to Winnipeg this week to attend a conference of the different municipalities.
C. Parks opened up a grocery store in this village this week.
W. King returned from visiting several districts in Swan River Valley and seemed pleased with the trip and all that he saw.
The several school trustees are called to transact business in this district on December 5th at 10 o’clock sharp. All persons with children should make an effort to attend.
The nomination papers are out for the election of Reeve and Councillors for this district to be held at Winnipegosis, Dec. 6th.
W. Cooper’s hounds killed a wolf this week.
Charley Clarke paid Dauphin a visit last week.
J. Spearing, teacher of North Lake School, seemed to be getting on very well. He bought a farm just lately and erected a house on it. He speaks highly of the land in this district, but what is most needed is more settlers.
Mr. Barber from Winnipeg was up here this week on business.
D. Briggs killed three bears near here this week.

1910 Dec 1 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley held services as usual in the church at Winnipegosis and Fork River. His subject was “The Power of the Men of Vision.”
The weather here is mild, but skaters are not debarred the pleasure so much enjoyed by them. Dog trains are now arriving from time to time from up the lake, and it is expected that the ice will soon be strong enough for freighting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 13 – 1919

1919 Nov 13 – Soldiers Tendered Banquet

A year ago Tuesday the bells of the town were ringing and the whistles blowing. It was a day long to be remembered. The Germans had started the war with the object of conquering the world and had, after the great struggle, hoisted the white flag and asked for the cessation of hostilities. It was a different scene that greeted the eye as one entered the town hall on Tuesday night, November 11th, 1919. Here were tables stretched the full length of the hall, artistically arranged and simply groaning under the load of good things that weighed them down.
The occasion was a banquet tendered the returned boys, their wives and lady friends by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. and it was worthy of them. The members of the Auxiliary have been tireless workers for the welfare of the men and this banquet crowned their efforts.
There were between three and four hundred present.
During the dinner hour Major Skinner extended a welcome to all on behalf of the Auxiliary.
A vote of thanks was tendered the ladies on motion of Comrades Bates and Batty.
After the tables were cleared there was a short program followed by a dance. Those taking part were Mrs. Grobb, violin selection; Mrs. R. Hawkins, solo; Rev. H.P. Barrett, song; Miss H. Clarke, recitation. The McMurray orchestra furnished the music for the dance.

1919 Nov 13 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 10th.
Mr. Shield and bride arrived last week and have rented John Hayward’s residence on the Mossey River.
John Judge and Mr. Gourlay from Virden, have arrived. They have rented Briggs brothers’ buildings.
A basket social will be held in the school on the evening of Nov. 21st. The proceeds will be devoted to a fund for the purchase of an organ for the school.
The work on the road that leads to the school is still undone. Children from this district east of the muskeg have not been able to attend school of late on this account. The Dept. of Public-Works has provided a special grant from this road. In view of this it seems strange that an effort has not been made to have the work performed.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

A meeting of the directors of the Agricultural Society was held on the 5th inst. It was decided to pay the prize money at once. As this was the first show held by the society the directors are to be congratulated on its success.
Mrs. Rice, for a number of years was teacher at North Lake School has sold her property and has left the community. Mrs. Rice has lived a number of years in the district and has done good work as a teacher. Her departure from our midst is a matter of regret.
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of Hartney, Man., are visiting at the home of Mr. T.N. Briggs. The young people attended the banquet to the returned soldiers.
Mrs. Gordon Weaver, of Magnet, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Briggs.
All Saints’ S.S. staff held a public meeting on the night of the 6th. About 50 were present. Rev. H.P. Barrett presided. Arrangements were made for the annual Christmas tree, and also to hold a social evening every Wednesday at which there will be a varied program.
A public meeting is called for Friday, 14th inst., for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers’ Association.

1919 Nov 13 – Fork River

Mrs. Emma Rice wishes to thank all who were kind and considerate to her during her recent illness. She is now comfortably provided for in Dauphin and hops to be able to return to our midst within a short time.

LETTER OF APPRECIATIONS.
On behalf the returned boys of the Fork River district we wish to express our appreciation of the banquet tendered us, the gifts of watches and purses and the uniform kindness shown us upon all occasions. We further wish to acknowledge the efforts of the ladies in preparing the excellent supper provided us. The banquet was a most enjoyable event, the pleasure being shared by a number of friends from outside.
THE COMMITTEE.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 7 – 1912

1912 Nov 7 – Fork River

George King, of Dauphin, was here renewing old acquaintances between trains.
Miss Grant of Pine View was visiting her friends at Valley River during the weeks end.
Thos. Ramsay, P.M. of Sifton, was here on business with D. Kennedy.
Walter Clark has returned staying for a short time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Rev. H.H. Scrase, who has been visiting his brother at Swan River and attending the mission at Dauphin, returned on Saturday’s train.
S. Briggs, who was here renewing acquaintances for a short time, has returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy and family have returned after visiting friends at Ochre River and Dauphin.
Miss Olive Clark and miss Comber have returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Hallowe’en has passed, and to judge from the looks of the town next morning, those who too part in the the tricks, should be pleased with themselves if they call it fun. Even the church was made to pay toll, which is going the limit.
The elevator gang has left. The elevator is now open for business with Jack Clemens in charge.
What’s the matter with the Bay Centre correspondent of the Press. We must have touched him on a sore spot by the remarks he makes of the Fork River scribe. We would advise him to give up his Hooligan tactics of sandbagging people and to roost with the owls till it freezes up.
One of our enterprising citizens has surrounded his lot on Main Street with an ornamental fence.

1912 Nov 7 – The Fork River Settlement

Pretty much all the history of the Dauphin district dates from the advent of the C.N.R. The actual settlement of the northern part of the country, which includes Fork River and Winnipegosis, commenced in 1897, when the railway entered. It is true there were parties who squatted here and there, but the first settlement amounted to nothing when estimated in figures. It was not until three or four years later that the municipality of Mossey River, which comprises the territory described, was organized. Your correspondent spent a few house at Fork River the other day, and what is more important, spent them pleasantly. It is some fourteen years since the writer first visited the new thriving village of Fork River, and some of those he formed an acquaintance with then, were there to greet him last week. The village of Fork River is located on the Fork and Mossey Rivers, and within a mile or two of its centre, a considerable number of people reside. The land along the Mossey and Fork Rivers is as good as there is to be found anywhere on the American continent, which is saying much. It was but natural then that those who came in first selected the best farms, those along the rivers. The country about was at one time covered with a growth of timber, which included tamarack, spruce and poplar. The latter kind was the most frequently met with. Much of it, of course, has since disappeared before the axe of the lumberman and the wood chopper. Another destructive elements has been fire. In the early days wood had little value and no effort was made to preserve timber. Much timber was needlessly destroyed which would be of considerable value today. But most of us are like the German, if our foresight was as good as our hindsight, we would soon get rich. There is, however, much consolation in the fact that good land will soon produce enough grain to find money to purchase fuel. Like other new districts the Fork River settlement has been up against manta drawbacks, notably wet seasons and poor roads. But somebody remarks, are these not the condition which develop strong men? Yes, truly, but, at times, even the heart of the pioneer sinks. Take the present year as an example. Conditions were such as to try the metal most of us are made of. Even more, the loss of crop is bad enough, but add to this financial obligations incurred and can’t be met, and the burden seems too heavy to bear.
But enough of lamenting. Let us turn to the people themselves. We don’t know where one will find a finer band of pioneers than at Fork River. There is Tom Glendenning, who was there many a day before the railroad. A splendid specimen of the pioneer; good-hearted and a true friend.
Tom Briggs, another who was in the settlement before, we were going say, the war, but we mean before the railroad. The Briggs Bros., Dave and Tom, went though the worst of it, and still wear pleasant faces. Incidentally, it manta be mentioned that Dave is no longer following, like Cincinnatus, the low.
There’s Sam Bailey, who, while not in before the iron horse, has been there long enough to establish his sterling qualities. He’s a good fellow and one can’t meet too often.
Wm. King, pioneer farmer and stock breeder. Has faced difficulties, met them and overcame them. Besides farming on an extensive scale he is bending his energies to improve his own and other people’s stock. Truly a valuable man in any community.
D.F. Wilson – there’s no mistaking him; besides quality he’s got size, both important factors in a new country. He has farmed, is a breeder of stock and fills the important office of municipal clerk. Has also done his share to develop the district.
Nat Little, pioneer merchant. Has been there a long time, and, what’s better, has succeeded. A good fellow with a weakness for the Shetland pony.
Coun. Geo. Nicholson, too, has had the usual ups and downs, seen the rough and the smooth and is still staying with the job.
Reeve Lacey, not such an old-timer as some of the others, but has, in the time he’s been there established his worth and taken a willing hand in the work of development. For several years he has been in the council and is now its head.
W.T. Snelgrove can look quite a ways back. He has seen more than a little of the life of the pioneer. As a hunter he has quite a record in the deer line and can relate some interesting experiences. Some day, when we have time at our disposal and more space we may relate some of W.R.’s exploits.
While speaking of the Snelgroves its opportune to mention morally and Alf. There some pioneers, too.
Alex. Cameron is not exactly one of the prime old-timers, but has been in the distinct quite a few years. There is just this difference between Alex. and most of the other settlers, he had the “dough” and they didn’t. It don’t take long to tell this, but oh, what a world of meaning there is in it. Money is highly important to us all, but when we haven’t got any and need it, words fail to impress its importance on us. May every man who has a healthy pocketbook know how to use its contents as judiciously and generously as Alexander Cameron.
There are many others worthy of a word in this article, but space forbids. They have done their part and performed it well. What more can be said? There’s the Rowe brothers, A. Hunt, Geo. Tilt, W. Northam, C. Clark, F. Cooper, and Frank and Vivan Hafenbrak.
Then, what about the women? Are they, too, not pioneers in the true sense. Yes, indeed; they are worthy of a special article and even then justice could not be done them. They have taken their part, a part which carried its own burden. A burden, no matter how heavy, always cheerfully carried when the interest of their families and their homes was at stake.
Municipal organization should come in for a chapter. Its work is important in our advancement. The reeves and councillors help materially to make history. If they have done their part well and faithfully their names should be writ in large letters.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 30 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 30 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

The first accident to be reported from the north end of Lake Winnipegosis among the fishermen took place the latter end of last week when Ole Gelasson fell out of a boat and was drowned. Deceased was an able bodied man and a good swimmer. He was 28 years of age and leave a wife and two children. The body was recovered and brought to Winnipegosis village for interment.

1913 Oct 30 – Fork River

Peter Ellis, who is at Miles & Co.’s store at Kamsack, spent the week-end here with his family, and returned on Monday’s train.
Sidney F. Gower, who has been running a gasoline tractor at Morris all summer, returned, and is renewing old acquaintances in this vicinity for a few days.
Several teams are busy hauling timber from town to repair the Baily Bridge, which is in sad want of fixing the last 15 months.
T.N. Briggs returned from a trip to Dauphin on important business.
F. Cooper, who has been threshing south of the Fork River settlement, has returned home with his outfit.
J. Reid and a large number from Sifton, attended our annual children’s service here. There was a large turnout and the children’s choir sang, “Jesus Love Me” very nicely during the offertory, which was appreciated by all.
Nurse tilt, of Dauphin, is on a visit to her home on the Mossey River.

1913 Oct 30 – Winnipegosis

A cold blast from the northwest accompanied by a slight fall of snow dropped in on us Monday. It was a real taste of water.
The Manitou has left on her last trip to the north end of the late. The boat carried supplies.
I.H. Adams, one of the old-timers, arrived Saturday on a short visit with the intention he has here. Mr. Adams is now keeping store at Radville, Sask.
F. Hechter returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
Capt. Coffey went to Dauphin on Saturday.
Fred. McDonald has returned to our midst and is again in the employ of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co. He is the same old Fred and old friends are glad to welcome him back. At one time a report was about here that Fred. had made his “pile” in real estate and was in the millionaire class, but he says the rumour lacked confirmation, much to his regret.
Our thriving little burg is going to put aside its swaddling clothes and cut adrift from the rural municipality of Mossey River. And it is truly about time. About all we got now is the honour of paying in taxes. Besides, a rural council is not progressive enough. They do business on the “penny wise, pound foolish” basis. Any publicity Winnipegosis has received was entirely due to the efforts of the citizens. It would like to ask if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map?
Each train brings its quota of travellers. We like to see then as them are,
Peter McArthur and J.P. Grenon took the train on Monday for Dauphin and other points.
Ole Gelasson was drowned at the north end of the lake last week. The body was brought here for interment. Decreased was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.
Dick Richards and several others who went to the north end of the lake had quite a time of it, being unable to land for about three weeks. The party was about all in when they reached shore.

1919 Oct 30 – Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

1919 Oct 30 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has not been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavour.
An October cold dip is not uncommon, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

1919 Oct 30 – Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 23 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 23 – Committed Suicide

Douglas Casey, aged 27 years, was found dead in a bedroom in the King Edward hotel, Gilbert Plains, on Wednesday. The man had committed suicide by taking carbolic acid. Little is known about Casey. He worked during the fall for a Joseph Carbert and is supposed to hail from Vancouver.
Coroner Harrington went to Gilbert Plains and after hearing the facts of case decided an inquest was not necessary.

1913 Oct 23 – Sad Drowning Accident

Isaac, the three year old son of Wm. Miner, who lives three miles south-west of town, was drowned in the Vermillion River on Wednesday afternoon. The little fellow strayed to the river and in some way fell in.

1913 Oct 23 – Telephone Line to Winnipegosis

The Manitoba Government telephone line has been completed to Winnipegosis.

1913 Oct 23 – Fork River

Mrs. Albert Cooper left to meet her husband at a place where they will take up their residence for the winter months.
Mr. Rowe, of Rathwell, came in on Saturday’s train and rustled up two cars of stock. He left on Monday’s train. Mr. Rowe is a record buyer as he pays the price and gets the goods in short order.
Miss Cox. From Ontario is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Fred. Cooper, on the Fork River, for a short time.
Wm. Northam left for Weyburn, Sask., where he will spend a few months on business in connection with his trade.
Wm. Hunkins, assessor is busy these days traveling a round among the settles west.
The long distance government telephone has been installed in the post office
Several automobiles passed through here on Sunday. The cars were bound for Winnipegosis.
Mrs. J. Gunness and Mrs. I. Humphreys returned from a visit to the Lake Town and enjoyed the ride on the C.N.R. local express.
We notice W. King has a very nice bunch of Berkshire pigs from registered stock which he is clearing out at $5.00 a piece.
Wm. Houston has returned from Winnipegosis and intends assisting in the A.T. Co. store for the winter. “Scotty” is a real hustler behind the counter and we are glad to see him back.

1919 Oct 23 – Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.