Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 22, 1920

Ethelbert

We have been asked to publish a copy of telegram sent to the Acting Prime Minister at Ottawa by the Ruthenians of this vicinity. It is herewith:
“Canadians of Ukrainian descent, in mass meeting assembled at Ethelbert, unanimously protest against the brutal invasion of Ukrainian East Galicia by imperialistic Poland, against the decision of Peace conference of July 11th, sanctioning the invasion, and against the decision of Supreme Council of November 20th awarding to Polish invaders a mandate over Ukrainian East Galicia for twenty five years. We appeal through the Canadian Government to the Government of Great Britain and other allied governments and people to right great wrong done to four million Ukrainians of East Galicia. We urge governments to have polish invading armies withdrawn from Ukrainian East Galicia to have that territory occupied by inter-allied armies, and to compel Poland to make reparation for destruction of Ukrainian villages and towns, and to indemnify families of civilians murdered by Polish soldiery or robbed by Polish officials. We appeal to governments to settle East Galician question in accordance with wish of people concerned. We request the Canadian Government to convey this our appeal to the government of Great Britain and to British plenipotentiaries at Paris.”
The above protest shows clearly where the root of wrong is and what the Ukrainians demand.

Fork River

The first annual Grain Growers’ Masquerade Ball, which took place Friday evening, the 16th of January, was a huge success and the big event of the New Year. The costumes were varied and created a pretty color scheme. There were six prizes awarded. Miss Gertrude Cooper as a Japanese lady, and Mr. D. Briggs, as a soldier, were awarded the prize for the best dancers. Mrs. Charles Bailey, representing a Gypsy fortune teller, was awarded first prize for best lady’s costume; Miss Viola Rowe, representing a country maid with her quaint hat, dress and crook was awarded second prize. Dr. A.J. Little, representing a colored dude was awarded first prize for best gentleman’s costume. Mr. Milton Cooper as Pierrot, was awarded second prize. The prize for best comic costume was awarded to Mr. Norman Shannon, who represented a tramp. The judges were Mrs. T.B. Venables, Mrs. A.J. Little and Mr. Williamson. After the judging and unmasking at midnight refreshments were served.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rawson are moving to Winnipegosis.
Fork River Literary and Debating Society met at the home of Mrs. A.J. Little, Saturday evening last to discuss the next debate, which will be held Wednesday evening, Feb. 4.
Fork River Women’s Institute met at Mrs. Tuck’s Saturday afternoon for the election of officers and to appoint directors for Agricultural Society. Mrs. A.J. Little was elected Secretary to succeed Mrs. Ina Briggs, Mrs. T.B. Venables and Mrs. McEachern were elected directors.
Mr. Fleming Wilson, Mr. T.B. Venables, Mr. Duncan Briggs, delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention held at Brandon, gave their reports on Tuesday evening’s meeting.

Winnipegois

The Tennis Club is arranging to hold a masquerade ball on Friday, Feb, 18th. A ball is always popular and a masquerade ball doubly so. This dance promises to be the event of the season.
The fish catch has been exceptionally good this winter. The December catch was the largest in the history of the late. Many of the fishermen will return from the north early next month.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 18, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, 11th inst., some 70 of the comrades being in attendance. Applications were received from 28 retuned men for membership, all of whom were accepted. This brings the local branch membership up to 331.
The main business of the evening was the question as to the possibility and advisability of having quarters owned and operated by the association. After considerable discussion the following resolution was arrived at: That this branch of the association go before the public of Dauphin and the municipality and collect the necessary funds for the erection of a building to be run and owned by this branch of the association. Same to take the form of a club room and home for returned soldiers and that provision shall be made to have bed rooms for the use of the members and that it shall be so constructed and planned that it shall be self-supporting, i.e., that the ground floor shall be suitable for rental for offices, etc. The resolution was carried without further comment. A committee was then appointed to submit to the association the best way to raise the money necessary and the manner that we shall go after same; also to draft plans as to the nature of the building that the association has in mind.
The committee that as appoint by the meeting was carefully selected and men naturally adapted to work of this nature were asked to act. One o the main ideas of the building is to have one on much the same lines as the Y.M.C.A. buildings in Winnipeg, which would be an asset to the town and a token of its appreciation to the men that had served. While the idea that we have in view is of erecting a building of a distinctive type so that it shall be recognized as a soldiers’ building it is not by any means proposed to make this a memorial building, but to be built, owned and operated as a building devoted to the veterans use, which will be self-supporting so that in the future years we may not have to go before the public for its support. That the scheme will receive the response from the public that will be necessary, if we are to have such a building, is looked upon with confidence, for judging by the generosity that has been given to the men of this town in the past is excellent encouragement that the same will be given in the present case. The public will be further notified in the near future as to the plans of the veterans and the manner in which they propose raising the funds that will be required.
The comrades are pleased to welcome home Comrade Mackie and his bride. They have the best wishes of the branch for their future happiness.
Please remember the Castle Square Entertainers on the 19th. This is a first-class show and will please the most particular. After the show the orchestra will play for a dance. Come and give that building a little lift.
Forms have been received by the secretary from the Provincial Command re the re-establishment question. These are to be filled out by every returned solider and returned to the secretary. They will be posted at the first opportunity and should be returned with as little delay as possible. A supply is also on hand in the G.W.V.A. building and call be filled in there. By calling you will assist the secretary and help yourselves in getting the best terms possible. These forms are required to give the Association the facts necessary to place the case of the returned men before the commission which has been appointed to look into their requests.

Made Haul of Scotch Whiskey

A bootlegger met with lard luck at Ste. Rose village last week. He arrived in town with two valises well filled bottles containing Scotch whiskey and secured a room at the hotel. On leaving the hotel to go down street to work up a connection he locked the door of the room. On returning, after being away less than half an hour, he found the room had been broken into and the liquor removed from the valises. He then interviewed the magistrate who informed him that the quicker he made tracks out of town the better for his welfare.

To be Appointed Chief of Police

Mr. F.W. Little, turnkey at the jail, will be appointed to the position of chief of police made vacant by the resignation of Chief Bridle. Mr. Little has been a member of the London, Eng. Police force and a few years ago served on the local force with satisfaction to the council.

Fork River

Willard McPhedren, from Ethelbert, has arrived to take charge of our 2×4 station. It is about time the railway company built a new station with a platform large enough to accommodate the growing business of our district.
Thanksgiving harvest festival was held on Sabbath last. Wet weather interfered with the attendance.
Geo. B. Scriven, Anglican lay reader, left on Monday for Faribault, Minn., where he will attend college.
Sunday school will continue as usual at 2 p.m.
F.B. Lacey and son have invested in a tractor. The faithful plodding horse is no longer speedy enough for our progressive farmers.
E. Munro is wearing a pleasant smile. The arrival of a little dairy maid is the reason for so much joy in the household.
J. Reid, of Sifton, one of the oldtimers, was a visitor in town on Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15, 1919

Four Men Badly Injured

Mr. Arthur Fisher, who resides in the Burrow district, is erecting a large barn. Last Friday four men, John Neely, Frank Potter, John James and Geo. Smith were engaged erecting the rafters when a whirlwind came up suddenly collapsing the timbers. Neely, Potter and Smith were badly injured by the failing timbers. James, who was working on the top, jumped when the rafters commenced to fall, but was unable to clear himself and was struck and injured. Mr. Neely was so badly injured that his condition will not yet permit of his removal to town.

G.W.V.A.

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, May 8th, between 30 and 40 of the comrades being present. Owing to the unavoidable absence of the president, Capt. F. Scrase, Comrade G.F. Johnston, vice president, took the chair.
Applications were received from 13 returned soldiers for membership, all of which were accepted. This makes the membership of the local branch 195 and a considerable increase on this is expected in the near future.
The secretary has since this meeting been informed that a special meeting has been called by Premier Norrie to consider the memorial question for this province, on May 16th. It has, therefore, been decided to send a delegate to this meeting to represent this branch.
During the past week a donation of $112.65 was received from the citizens of the Ethelbert district, per Rev. G. Tymchuk. The thanks of the association are due to all the subscribers of the above mentioned donation.
A grant of $25 to this association has been received from the Dauphin Automobile club. This has been acknowledged and thanks are due to the members of the club for same.
On May 23rd and 24th the “Better ‘Ole” is being put on at the Star theatre. This is to be under the auspices of the G.W.V.A. Ask any returned man what he thinks of it and he will soon convince you, to say the least of it, that it will be well worth seeing, and at the same time give the association a lift.
A meeting was held on Friday, the 9th in connection with the G.W.V.A. Sports Day, to be held on 1st July, and arrangements made for appointing the various committees to make same a success. Posters are to be got out advertising same. The committee are requested to note that the next meeting will be held on Friday, may 16th, at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is essential.
Members are asked to note that the Manitoba Provincial Command have issued a weekly paper devoted to the returned solider. It is known as the Manitoba Veteran, and will be issued weekly. The rate is 5c per copy or $2 per year. Sample copies have been received and if the paper continues like the sample a bright future is assured. Subscriptions are taken by the local secretary of the G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Billy Tuck has gone to Dryden, Ont., for a short trip.
W.R. Snelgrove is around again after his illness. He has moved on to the Chase farm, having exchanged his Dauphin residence for the property.
Steve Warrawrork, of Volga, has purchased the Slobodizan farm from W.R. Snelgrove.
Corp. Duncan Briggs and Private Tom Briggs and H. Craighill have arrived from overseas. They are looking hale and hearty.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron and children, from Neepawa, are visiting at Mr. Nat Little’s house.
Robt. Rowe intends Fording it to town for the future, having purchased a Ford car from Nat Little.
Wm. Northam is busy fencing the farm be purchased south of town.
All Saints S.S. will meet as usual at 2 o’clock, Sunday, 18th inst.
Rain is falling as I write and it is welcome. All the wheat is about in. The season for work has been very favorable.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 8, 1919

Cow Gave Birth to Five Calves

A cow belonging to C. Hall, a farmer of Benito, Man., gave birth to five fully developed calves on Sunday, May 4th, in the pasture field. The calves died from cold before discovery. The weight of the calves was over 200 pounds.

Ethelbert

An enthusiastic meeting was held in the municipal hall on May 1st to consider how to promote the sale of thrift and war saving stamps in this municipality. After an interesting and instructive talk by Mr. Blackader, of Dauphin, the provisional director for Northern Manitoba, it was decided to form a district committee the following being appointed: District chairman, Bert Skaife, assistant postmaster: secretary, M. Mihaychuk, principal town school. Committee – J.A. Watson, manager Bank of Montreal; Dr. F.O. Gilvart, R. Skaife, N.A. Hryhorczuk, reeve; Geo. Hryhorczul, A.W. Magis, J.M. Shewchook, Peter Meinuchuk, Dan Vetzal, Geo. Vetzal, Wm. Herman, J. Popliusky, Frank Pelechatv, George Kalinchuk, Peter Kuzyk, Peter Melnyk, J. Masciuk, M. Sytnyk, J. Syrnyk, W. Monita, H. Hawryluk, Wm. Proshak, I. Sherval, Peter Pundy.

Winnipegosis

A meeting was held in the Rex theatre last Monday for the purpose of organizing a board of trade. The meeting was a successful one and a board was organized for Winnipegosis district. Dr. Medd was elected president and C.H. Dixon, secretary.
Building is brisk in town and quite a few houses are going up as well as stores being enlarged.
The ladies of the town are busy making roses for Mothers’ Day. They aim to make 300 within the next week. The proceeds of the sale of the roses will be applied on the church debt.
The ice is rapidly breaking up on the lake and the same will soon be open for navigation.
A dramatic society has been organized in town with the small membership fee of 50 cents. Exceptionally good talent exists as noticed in former plays. The society should prove a success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 13, 1919

Flogging Advocated

The problem of dealing with the small boy who smokes is troubling many of the teachers, the members of the school board and even the members of the town council, which body, at its last meeting appointed Coun. Houston and Katz to cooperate with the trustees as to the best means of remedying this undesirable sate of affairs.

Flogging Advocated
A correspondent writes: “We hear a great deal about the small boy who goes to school smoking and having tobacco on his person and the regrets expressed that the trouble can’t be remedied. If these boys attended school in England they would soon be disciplined, and in no namby-pamby style either. They would simply be flogged, and if one application was not sufficient the second strapping would effect the cure. But, after all is the small boy to blame when he sees the bigger boys parading the streets smoking both pipe and cigarette? Perhaps now that we have a committee to investigate they will bring in a report which will offer suggestions concerning the big boy as well as the small boy as to the bad effects of tobacco on the developing youth.”

Memorial Committee Busy

Chairman W. Rintoul, of the memorial committee, states that progress is being made. No definite plans have been considered as yet. A suggestion that an up to date skating and curing rink be built as a “memorial” is meeting with much favor in some quarters. Some favor a “community building,” others a monument, and so forth.

Opening G.W.V. Club Rooms

The new club rooms of the Great War Veterans will be opened on Tuesday evening next, the 18th inst. There will be a short musical program at which Mayor Bowman will preside. Later there will be dancing and cards. Refreshments will be served. The McMurray orchestra will furnish the music. The public are invited to attend.

“Still” Operators Fined

For some time past there has been an increasing supply of what is known as “domestic’ manufactured liquor. The manufacture was exclusively in the hands of the foreign element. Almost any tin vessel from a teapot to a ten gallon can was improvised as a “still.” And despite the crudeness of the particles used to manufacture the “liquor” a fairly good brand is said, by those who sampled it, to have ben produced in some cases. But the promoters’ dreams of accumulating wealth in an easy manner, were destined to failure. Collector Ball was soon wise to the operation of the “stills” and with the assistance of the local police, rounded up three parties who were either operating or connected with the enterprises.
The parties were Mike Torharczuk, Fred Moranczuk and M. Silverman. Informations were laid under the Inland Revenue act, and they appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday and were found guilty. Torharczuk and Moranczuk were each $200 and costs, and Silverman $250 and costs.

War Bride to Arrive

The first war bride that is to come to Dauphin is expected to arrive about the first of next week. During the month of December Sergt. Harold Crowe was married to a young lady in London. The young couple sailed on the Grampian, which was due to arrive at Halifax on Wednesday.

Fork River

Pte. Eales and his war bride have arrived from overseas. They are visiting at the home of H. Pearson.
The manager of the Northern Lumber Co. was a recent visitor to our town. The company may open a lumber yard here.
Mr. Osborne, municipal auditor, is auditing the books of the municipality. When he is through we shall expect the council to have the report printed. This is the only way the ratepayers have of knowing how their money is being spent and the law directs that the report be published.
Mr. Martin, homestead inspector, was here last week in connection with the applications of returned soldiers for land.
The stork visited the home of H. Little last week and left a wee girlie.
Wm. King is visiting Dauphin and Winnipeg this week.
Jack Richardson has purchased a registered Holstein bull, having sold his old sire to Thos. Toye, of Bicton Heath.
The committee which is looking after the interests of the returned soldiers has been organized and is now composed as follows: Owen Pruder, S.L. Gower, A. Hunt, J. Shuchett, J.D. Robertson, Thos. Briggs, F. Cooper, and W. King, sec.-treasurer.

Ethelbert

At a well attended meeting of the Ukrainian farmers held at Ethelbert on March 1st, the following resolution were unanimously passed. Over $100 was collected at the gathering which will be devoted to assisting the returned men.

RESOLUTION NO. 1
1. Having experienced the hardship of the newcomer, we therefore wish to help the returned men to settle with their families on the land. We are ready to volunteer at any time to graciously help any returned soldier settling in our district on the land by offering at least one day’s work on his farm in plowing or doing any required improvements, and will also arrange to have his family and luggage brought from the station to his respective land.
2. We also wish to assure such newcomers that friendly and neighborly assistance will always be at their disposal and that such returned men shall not suffer an want or hardship of a beginner. Carried.

RESOLUTION NO. 2
That we, as one of the Dominion Communities of Canada, do express our belief and faith in the principle of the League of Nations which has recently come into being at the Peace Conference at Paris.
That while believing in the self interim nation of nationalities, we cordially support the idea of human brotherhood and the new international order expressed in its terms.
That we look to the League as the ultimate solvent of the barriers which have hitherto divided mankind and plunged them in recurring strife.
That we also believe the protection of customs tariff the most potent and evil of all the barriers against the unity of mankind must be broken down to insure the permanence of political peace and the continued effectiveness of the League.
That we hold the Farmers’ platform as adopted by the Grain Growers’ conventions recently held in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, to be a welcome step in the direction of that universal free trade which must be chief buttress of a stable international order.
And also that we cordially support the other reforms contained in the same platform.

RESOLUTION NO. 3
That we wish that a committee be appointed whose duty it will be to help the returned men coming into our midst. Carried.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 24 – 1914

1914 Dec 24 – Twenty-Seven Recruits Accepted

The following recruits have been accepted for the third contingent which is at present being recruited. Twenty-seven have already enlisted. There are openings for 110.
A. Day (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013), R.D. Reeve (Robert Drury Reeve, 1882, 74195), W. Coleman (William Coleman, 1876, 424688), W.F. Percy (???), J.E. Welch (John Edward Welch, 1891, 74199), J.D. Munson (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039), G. Prieur (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219), E. Burnett (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323), W.J. Wallace (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200), T.M. Ray (T.M. Ray, ???, 74206), Wm. Donaldson (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188), F. Clark (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009), R. Smith (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196), W.C. Mitchell (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202), B.A. Whitmore (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, ??? A74750), H. Lys (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.), H.L. Pearson (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194), C.W. Shaw (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875, 424037 or A24015), A.G. Sanderson (???), Dauphin; A. Grove (???), Swan River; P.E. Millard (Percy Edward Millard, 1878, 74190), McCreary; A.H.G. Whitaker (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891, 424077 or 424245), Grandview; J.S. Blundell (James Stuart Blundell, 1893, 74201), Winnipegosis; H. Gardiner (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894, 424020), Kelwood; J. Gallant (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019), Asheville; I. Zufelt (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518), Gilbert Plains; G. McDonald (???).

1914 Dec 24 – Ethelbert

Mr. K.F. Slipetz house caught fire from the chimney on Wednesday morning and the interior in the vicinity of the roof was damaged.
We are all waiting for snow. Until it comes there will be very little wood marketed.
The Presbyterian Christmas tree entertainment on Tuesday night was largely attended. The programme was a good one.
Mr. and Mrs. W.H. White went to Dauphin on Wednesday to spend the Christmas holidays.

1914 Dec 24 – Fork River

Several men have left here to put up ice for the A.T. Fish Co.
Mrs. Williams has returned home from Dauphin Hospital.
Mr. Jean Rosald and Miss Christina were visitors to Dauphin this week.
Mr. Joe Johnston left for Winnipegosis, where he intends to reside in future.
Reeve King, Councillors Hunt and Lacey were present at the council meeting at Winnipegosis on Friday.
D.F. Wilson, clerk, has returned from a three day visit to Winnipegosis collecting taxes. The council decided to leave the rebate for taxes open till Dec. 31st.
Professor J. Robinson has returned from visiting in the States and is now satisfied that there are worse places than Fork River to live in.
Paul Delcourt and several others from here visited Winnipegosis recently.
The members of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, at their annual meeting decided to hold their annual New Year’s ball on January 1st. Grand march at 9 o’clock. Admission $1.00 a couple. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time.
The following officers were elected for L.O.L., No. 1765 for the year 1915:
W.M. – C.E. Bailey
D.M. – W. King, re-elected.
Chaplain – W. Northam, re-elected.
Recording-Secretary – Wm. King, re-elected.
Financial-Secretary – A. Hunt.
Treasurer – S. Bailey, re-elected.
Director of Ceremonies – F. Cooper, re-elected.
Lecturer – F.F. Hafenbrak.
2nd Lecturer – S. Reid.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 23 – 1915

1915 Dec 23 – News from War Front

Lieut. Denis Cockrill, who was recently wounded, has sufficiently recovered to return to the trenches. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
Private Jos. Gallant who enlisted at Dauphin last winter, has been recommended for the D.S. medal. He rescued two officers after they had been wounded by the Germans near their trenches. (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019)

1915 Dec 23 – Sixty now Enlisted

Recruiting for the battalion with headquarters at Dauphin is going on briskly. The officers and men here now total 60, and it is expected by the 1st of the New Year will be over 100 strong.
The officers state that the men enlisted are well suited for the service and are engaged drilling every day. Physical drill exercises are held in the town hall and platoon work at the agricultural grounds. The officers in command and privates are as follows:

OFFICERS
Lieut.-Col. R.A. Gillespie, O.C. (Robert Alexander Gillespie, 1881, xxx)
Capt. and paymaster, H. Hunter (Henry Cecil Hunter, 1888, 234232)
Lieut. V.N. Severn, keeper of records (Vernon Nicholl Severn, 1890, xxx)
Lieut. J.W. Skinner (Joseph Winstanley Sinner, 1875, xxx)
Sergt. M.A. Young (Martin Albert Young, 1880, 460218)
Sergt. A.C. Wade (Arthur Ca?ebourne Wade, 1871, 693015)

PRIVATES
F. Crowe (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
H.R. Tarzwell (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
R. Merrell (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Meader (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
J.C. Henwood (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
T.M. Jones (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
H.V. Cousans (Henry Victor Cousans, 1885, 1000003)
F. Kilborn (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
W. McClernon (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.E. Hooper (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
C.W. Elliott (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
H. Gardiner (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
C. Klyne (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
W.E. Demery (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
J. Gough (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
M. Jacobson (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
E. Sandgrew (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)
A. Douglas (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
J.W. Lane (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
R. Pollard (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
W. Hatt (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
J. Hickie (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
A.F. Tigg (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
T.G. Kirk (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
W. Greenshields (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
J.E. Donnelly (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
S. Hesson (Samuel Hesson, 1880, 1000071)
G. Montgomery (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W.J. Crittenden (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
J.F. Calder (???)
A.E. Taylor (Albert Edward Taylor, 1893, 1000063)
J.H. Codd (John Codd, ???, 1000064)
J. Love (John Love, 1877, 1000067)
A. Love (Andrew Love, 1883, 1000072)
J. Minnis (James Minnis, 1876, 1000073)
M.W. Primrose (Malberry Whittington Primrose, 1894, 1000077)
J. McLetchie (John McLetchie, 1885, 1000070)
F. Hicks (Fredrick Hicks, 1891, 1000080)
C. Benson (Christian Benson, 1887, 1000081)
J. Humphry (???)
W.F. Terrell (William Francis Terrell, 1890, 1000141)
M.J.T. Cathcart (William Joseph Tidmarsh Cathcart, 1898, 1000147)
G. Douglas (George Douglas, 1897, 1000148)
J.G. Cathcart (John George Cathcart, 1872, 1000146)
C. Wilkey (Charles Henry Wilkey, 1895, 1000149)
G. Wilkey (George Wilkey, ???, 1000155)

NOTES
Tuesday was pay day, and the bank tellers were given a heavy bombardment for an hour.
Marsh Cathcart has enlisted as regimental bugler.

1915 Dec 23 – Had Head Cut Off

Ochre River, Dec. 21 – A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, Dec. 21, about noon when Charlie Blackman, a farmer of this district was instantly killed by the bursting of a circular wood saw. Mr. Blackman had just returned from the poll where he had been recording his vote and was cutting wood
Deceased was an old resident of the district and leaves a wife and ten children, 5 sons and 5 daughters. The eldest being a son 17 years of age. The saw that Mr. Blackman was operating was known to be cracked, but had been working for some time in that condition.
Coroner Rogers, from Dauphin visiting the scene of the accident, and after learning the facts decided an inquest was not necessary.

1915 Dec 23 – Young Ruthenian Accidentally Shot

A young Ruthenian, 24 years of age, accidently shot himself at Ethelbert on Monday evening. He was hunting rabbits at the time, and pushed the butt end of the gun in a hole, discharging it, the contents entering his abdomen, making a bad wound. Drs. Culbertson and Bottomley were sent for and went to the northern town on Tuesday morning. They dressed the wound but have little hopes for the recovery for the young man.

1915 Dec 23 – Fork River

Mrs. N. Little and daughter, Grace have returned from two weeks’ trip south.
Mrs. A. Hunt and children left on Wednesday’s train for a two months’ vacation with her friends at Ottawa.
It seems to be the order of the day of late for the Dauphin train to arrive late and take a rest at Winnipegosis for from 4 to 3 hours while they catch a load of fish for the return ship. Passengers waiting to go to Dauphin have to hang around all day. How long will the suffering public have to put up with this kind of service?
Mrs. Craig, of Weyburn, is here on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Northam.
Mr. W. Williams, our lumber magnets, has a gang out on his Lake Dauphin limits preparing for the winter’s out of lumber.
The returned hunters report big game hard to get this year. They have not had the success of other years. In a few years, if the present slaughter goes on, there will be no big game left to hunt. To preserve these fine animals a close season of two or three years should be put in force at once by the government.
F.O. Murphy paid the burg a long visit between trains last week. Fred took a cargo of eggs with him as he says “Murphys” are not too bad an old time. The only thing that it takes the train so long to go to Dauphin the eggs might hatch out on the road and he would have to get a hen coop on his arrival.
The Orangemen of Fork River will [1 missing line] ball on December 31st in the Orange Hall. Admission, gents $1, ladies free. Good music and supper provided. An invitation is extended to all.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

A grand patriotic concert, including a ladies Indian Club display song tableaux, a dramatic dialogue and the orchestra will be held in the Rex Theatre, on Tuesday, Jan. 4th, 1915, at
Eddie Chermok’s new store is all ready for business now. His stock arrived last train.
Mrs. McEachern, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
The whist drive of the Cosmopolitan Club took place on Friday evening. The prize winners were Miss Margaret Goodman and Mr. Wiseman. The bobby prize went to Miss Bertha Magunson and Mr. J. Campbell.
The Xmas tree held n the Presbyterian Church was a great success and the turn out was the nest in the annals of the town. Miss Gracie Whale was presented with a prize for the best attendance at Sunday school for the yea and John Wallace won second prize. Santa Claus did not forget any of the children.
Jas. McInnes, Walter Grenon, Joe Mossington, and Capt. Buck, returned from their hunting ground and report a good time. They brought back some good specimens of the wild steers of the Northlands.
Settlers are still flocking into the vacant lands north of here. There is room for all comers yet.
The school is closed for the festive season and we regret to say that we are losing Miss Whitemore who will attend Normal at Winnipeg after holidays. Miss Whitore will be greatly missed as she has endeared herself to her pupils and her many friends alike in this town.
Miss McMartin left on Wednesday’s train for her home at Franklin to spend the holiday season.
D.S. Hatties’ rink beat E.R. Black’s rink by 9-7. The ladies are taking an active interest in curling this season and can throw as good a rock as many of the boys.
Harry Hunter, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
Mr. Goodman returned from a business trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday’s train.
Miss Augusta Crawford arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday’s train to spend Xmas at her home here.
If the mail gets any heavier Comf. will have to get a horse and rig. What price, Casey.
Mrs. Ben Hechter left on Wednesday’s train for Winnipeg on a visit.
F. Hechter left, for Waterhen on Tuesday afternoon.
We had a special train up for fish on Tuesday.
Don’t forget the Red Cross concert next week. Buy your ticket now.
The secretary treasurer of the village reports the taxes coming in very will and a great many took advantage of the discount up to the 15th Dec. The taxes are payable at par up to July 1st.
The Council of the Village meet in the Council Chambers at 2 p.m. on Monday, 3rd, of January.
Mrs. Ben Hechter and Miss Molly Hechter left on Wednesday for Winnipeg on a visit.
Ray Burley, Bert Arrowsmith, G. Johannason, A. Allan and Rev. Clixby are up from Brandon for the holidays.
On the night of the 21st inst. the Bicton Heath children were coming to Winnipegosis to the Xmas tree with Supt. Tom Toye as driver and on arriving inside the town limits a few of our children in happy spirits were singing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” which patriotic song so scared the wild quadrupeds that they bent it for the tall timbers leaving Supt. Toye and his whole school in the ditch singing “Will Ye Na Come Back Again?” However, nothing daunted by this little mishap Supt. Toye marched with his flock to the Presbyterian Church, where they enjoyed a most pleasant time.
Last week an old Frenchman at Waterhen left his nephew’s house to go to the house of a neighbour and got lost and froze to death.
Geo. Adam, of the Fishery spent Wednesday in town.
Jas. Alex and W. Walmeley returning from Waterhen Saturday and report fishing good.
Alex. Bickel arrived to town on Saturday with two loads of fish and returned from there Friday.
We are glad to report all well at Ed. Morris’ camp. The teams returned from there on Friday.
We regret to lose for a little while, and yet we are so proud to report that our worth citizen, Mr. Frank Hechter has enlisted for active service with the 107th Battalion and will be leaving us to join his regiment about the 10th of January. Frank will be badly missed but we hope to give him a royal welcome on his return. We understand he takes the rank of quarter-master sergeant. The business will be carried on by his brother, Ben Hechter until his return.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick returned last week from the hunting ground. Rev. Kirkpatrick got a nice elk.
The trains are very late in arriving and leaving lately.
Mr. Robertson, surveyor, is in town after inspecting the roads at Cowan and Camperville.
The snow low left for the north at the latter end of last week.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is spending a few days in town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 18 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 18 – Ethelbert

Postmaster Skaite is still confined to his home by illness. Mrs. S. is attending to the duties of the office during her husband’s absence.
The deer season is over and quite a few people here are dining on venison.
Sleighing is needed to give an impetus to the wood business.
Clerk K.F. Slipetz was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
A branch of the Grain Growers’ Association was organized here last week under favourable auspices. The branch starts of with a membership of 60 and the members are all enthusiastic. The following are the officers: President, M. Pacholok; vice, J. Pachkowski; sec.-treas., K.F. Slipetz.

1913 Dec 18 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon returned from a few days visit to Dauphin.
W. Williams has left with his outfit to take out lumber on his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Miss Bessy Wilson returned from a few weeks visit among friends in Sifton and Dauphin.
D. Kennedy has purchased a handsome pair well-bred colts for drivers.
Mrs. J. Parker and daughter left for Winnipeg for a short visit.
Mrs. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is having a week’s visit with her sister, D. Kennedy.
The Orangemen of Fork River appreciate very much the kindness shown them by the ladies in coming out and cleaning out their large hall gratis. The brethren wish to tender them a hearty vote of thanks for same.
D. Briggs, of Brandon, and Mr. Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, had the good luck to get a moose each.
Those who shot large game are, Harold Shannon, a fine elk; Fred King, moose; Frank Hafenbrak, moose; S. Munro, elk; J. Richardson, moose.
On Friday night the ladies of Fork River gave a ball in the Orange Hall. The ladies supplied the refreshments and paid a fee of 25 cents. The gentlemen were free. There was a large turnout and a most enjoyable evening.

1919 Dec 18 – Fork River

The Unity Christmas tree of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River will be held in the Orange Hall on the evening of Monday, 22nd inst. This promises to be the event of the season. A large attendance is requested as Santa is bringing Mrs. Santa. Admission, gentlemen 50 cents; ladies and children free.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 2 – 1915

1915 Dec 2 – Enlisting Continues Active

Enlisting is now progressing actively and there are some 32 on the roll at present. Col. Gillespie is expected back from Winnipeg at the end of the week with his staff of officers.
The following is a list of those who have enlisted together with the places they hail from.
F. Crowe, Dauphin. (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
R. Tarzwill, Dauphin. (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
J.N. Meader, Dauphin. (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
R. Marrell, Dauphin. (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Henwood, Gilbert Plains. (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
Trevor Jones, Dauphin. (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
R. Courier, Dauphin. (???)
F. Kilborn, Ochre River. (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith, Dauphin. (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
H. Gardiner, Gilbert Plains. (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
J. Hooper, Dauphin. (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
W. McClernon, Dauphin. (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.W. Demery, Winnipegosis. (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel, Winnipegosis. (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
M. Jacobson, Winnipegosis. (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
C. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
J. Gough, Laurier. (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
C.W. Elliott, Gilbert Plains. (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
Wm. Hatt, Portage la Prairie. (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan, New Brunswick. (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
R. Pollard, Dauphin. (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
A. Tigg, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
J. Hickie, Gilbert Plains. (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
T. Kirk, Ochre River. (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
A. Douglas, Dauphin. (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
– Donnelly, Gilbert Plains. (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
G. Montgomery, Dauphin. (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W. Greenshields, Gilbert Plains. (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
W.J. Crittenden, Dauphin. (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
E. Sandgrew, Dauphin. (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)

1915 Dec 2 – Had Foot Amputated

John Prefonowski had his left foot run over by a train at Ashville on Wednesday. He was brought to the hospital, where the foot was amputated.

1915 Dec 2 – Mossey River Council

Mossey River Council meeting was held a Fork River, Saturday Nov. 18th, all members present.
The new member, (D.G. McAulay), for Ward III was sworn in.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner; the Red Cross Society; St. Joseph’s Orphanage; Canadian Ingot Iron Co.; J.L. Bowman re Standard Lumber Co., account; J.N. McFadden; the Solicitor, re Shannon Road Judgement; the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; the Secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities; the Patriotic Fund; J. Bickle, Jr.; C.H. Bickle; Ethelbert Municipality, re Isolation Hospital; a petition asking for the formation of a new Union School District to be called Ferley and a communication re the proposed new School District of Don.
Hunt-Reid – That the plans of subdivisions of N.W. 3-13-18 submitted by J.N. McFadden be approved.
Yakavanka-Reid – That Mrs. J. Mylanchanka of N.E. 23-29-70 be given rebate of fifty percent off her taxes.
Hunt-Reid – That the Orange Hall at Fork River be charged only the same amount of taxes as in 1914.
Hechter-Reid – That the clerk write the Department of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to give estimates of a bridge across Fishing River between sections 1 and 2, Tp. 29, Rge. 19.
[1 line missing] son be appointed arbitrator in the matter of the establishment of the proposed Union School District of Ferley.
Hunt-Reid – That work done by Fred Cooper on the road allowance between sections 22 and 23 in Tp. 29, Rge. 19 be inspected and measured and paid for by Ward I as soon as the ward has money to its credit.
Hechter-Yakavanka – That the Reeve and Councillors Hunt and Reid be delegates to the Union of Manitoba Municipalities Convention to be held at Stonewall and that they be allowed $20, for expenses.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. McAulay be appointed to take the positions on the different committee left vacant by the resignation of Mr. Bickle.
Hechter-McAulay – That the declarations of the Reeve $12.00. Coun. Hunt 24.40 and Coun. Reid 26.20 for letting and inspecting work he paid.
A by-law establishing the School District of Don in Tp. 30, Rge. 17 was passed, also a by-law amending the license by-law by putting a license fee of $1.00 per head on all horses brought into the municipality for sale.
Hechter-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert Wedding

Mr. Kenneth McLean, of the town of Ethelbert, was on Oct. 27th, united in the bonds of matrimony with Miss E. Wray, who was head nurse at the Ethelbert Mission Hospital. The ceremony was performed at the home of her parents in Toronto where the young couple were the recipients of many valuable presents. After the marriage they went on a tour through the States visiting friends in Chicago and stopping at other important points. On returning to Ethelbert they were met by their many friends and in spite of their endeavours to evade the crowd, they came in contact with the usual shower of rice. They were afterwards escorted to the Mission house for tea. On Tuesday following a large reception was given the bride and groom at the town hall, where they were presented with a beautiful writing desk and bookcase combined; also a jardiniere stand. Beside this they were presented with other costly presents. The bride and groom both responded to the address and presentation in a very touching manner. After a well rendered programme, which was heartily enjoyed by all, the guest partook of refreshments provided by the ladies.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert

All here were glad to know old Jack Oshoost received his deserts in the court at Dauphin on Tuesday. It was a cowardly set to throw a bottle, which might have killed Finegold.
Wood is coming in only in small quantities so far.
Considerable quantities of wheat have been marked at this point this fall.
The new Presbyterian hospital is nearly completed. Mr. Josh Law, of Dauphin, is doing the painting.
Mr. Ben Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday to give evidence at the Finegold-Oshoost trial.
Mr. W.H. White is ??? ??? the year. [1 line missing] a term.

1915 Dec 2 – Fork River

Mr. Sam Reid is a visitor to Winnipeg for the week on business.
Mr. Cameron left for his home at Neepawa after having spent a week with friends at the point.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Hyde, of California, left for Carnduff, Sask., having spent two weeks with Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Mr. Hyde thinks this part of the country is all right, and he is sure right in his judgment.
Mr. Fred Cooper took a few days’ vacation at Dauphin last week.
Misses Bessie and Pearl Wilson paid Winnipegosis a short visit between trains.
“Main” street is quite lively with teams coming in with wheat to the elevator from all parts of the district, some coming 30 miles out. It gives us a glimpse of what the thriving village of Fork River will be when the district settled up and all the land [1 line missing] several elevators as well as many more business places. We have the land from which prosperous homes can be established once the right kind of men are in our midst.
Mr. Glandfield, lay reader, is paying Sifton a visit on his velocipede. Don’t you know it’s good healthy weather for wheeling.
The thresherman’s ball on Friday night was quite a success. Team loads from all parts came and a very pleasant night was spent.
A large number of the boys are busy cleaning their rifles and grinding up their butcher knives to do execution to the big game when the season opens.
Mr. Peach, of Swan River, school inspector, is visiting the several schools in this district this week.
We are sure in the banana belt when peaches are out on the street not frozen this time of year.

1915 Dec 2 – Winnipegosis

The Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in town for a few days last week.
The Cosmopolitan Club held a whist drive before their weekly dance last Friday evening.
Fish are coming in new and the town is livening up.
F. Hechter left for Waterhen Saturday.
Don’t forget the skating carnival on the rink on Monday next.
The rink opened for the season on Monday last and there was a good attendance.
Mr. Jas. McInnes and party left for a hunting trip Saturday.
G.L. Irwin, of Dauphin, is spending a few days hunting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 26 – 1914

1914 Nov 26 – Ethelbert Children Do Well

To the Editor of the Herald:
Please allow me some room in your paper to state how well the boys and girls in my room have done towards helping to relieve the suffering of the Belgium children. A little over a week ago I mentioned the subject to them and they immediately decided to try and do something. The result is that they have collected in the neighbourhood of $25. This, I think, is a credit to them and I am writing this to show how the boys and girls are willing to help if they are given the chance and how they will make good.
W.H. WHITE.
Principal Ethelbert School.

1914 Nov 26 – Soldiers Return Thanks

To the Editor of the Herald:
Sir – On behalf of the boys allow me, through the medium of your paper to thank all those very kind townspeople who have in such substantial and many ways subscribed to their welfare.
During the time of our enforced visit to Berlin or Constantinople we hope the town will prosper and so afford us some chance of again taking up a more peaceable occupation on our return.
Orders will be taken for scalps and other trophies.
ARTHUR C. GOODALL.
Reg. Serg. Maj., 32nd M.H.

1914 Nov 26 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Oct. 29th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Good Roads Association, the health officer, G.A. Warringon, C.E., the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and St. Joseph’s Orphanage.
Hechter-Lacey – That the clerk write Mr. McGilvray and ask him to come to this municipality and lecture on the Good Roads Act.
Lacey-Hunt – That in all cases where a contractor calls for inspection of work that is found incomplete, according to the terms of the contract, the contractor shall be charged with the cost of the inspection fees and mileage.
Lacy-Richardson – That the health officer’s livery account in connection with the diphtheria cases be certified to by Dr. Medd and paid, the said expense to be charged in the tax accounts of the parties involved.
Hechter-Lacey – That each councillor be authorized to collect voluntary subscriptions for the patriotic fund. All money so collected to be sent in to the treasurer of the municipality.
Toye-Bickle – That the clerk be instructed to credit Ward 1 with 23 pieces of tamarac pilling and charge the same to the public works account, the piles having been expended n the Bailey Bridge.
Hunt-Richardson – That all road commissioners’ certificates issued after this date be payable only to the parties to whom they are issued.
Lacey-Richardson – That any representatives of the council attending the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities be allowed $15.00 for expenses.
Bickle-Toye – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter be representatives to the Convention.
Hunt-Richardson – That Coun. Lacey take the place of J.D. Robertson, resigned, on the public works committee.
Lacey-Richardson – That the council suggest to the Minister of Public Works that in future all grants to the municipality be paid through the office of the municipality and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to our member, Mr. Hughes.
Toye-Lacey – That the clerk write the Minister of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to inspect the bridges recently completed over German Creek.
Hunt-Hechter – That the municipal collectors be bonded to the extent of $500 each.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hechter-Richardson – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work, T. Toye $25.30, C.H. Bickle $39.10 and A. Hunt $28.70, be passed.
Toye-Lacey – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Nov 26 – Fork River

Reeve W. King and D.F. Wilson are attending the convention of the Union Municipalities at St. Boniface this week. Coun. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, is also attending the convention.
The company’s auditor, assisted by Messrs. John Sieffert and Jas. Campbell, is taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co. store here this week.
A pie social was held at the home of Mrs. W. King for the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on the 18th inst. All report a pleasant time and the disposal of much pie.
Mr. Thomas, our grain buyer, is kept busy pretty much all the time. The quantity of what being marketed here this season is surprising considering the adverse conditions prevailing during part of the year.
Wood has started to come in since the snow arrived. It is expected that there will be considerable quantities brought in for shipment here this winter.
All old acquaintances hereabouts learned with regret of the misfortune which befell Thos. Glendenning last week in the burning of his barn last week. He had doors, windows and other material with which to erect a new house stored in the buildings when the fire occurred and all was burned. He also had about $1500 worth of grain burned. No insurance was carried on the building or the contents. With the true spirit of the pioneer he is starting to rebuild.
Many have taken out big game hunting licences and it looks as if the fleet-footed deer will have a warm time this season.
There is some talk of a contest for the reeveship. It seems only fair that the present reeve should have another term.
Mrs. Wm. Williams has just undergone a serious operation in the Dauphin Hospital.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 21 – 1912

1912 Nov 21 – Ethelbert

Kenneth McLean has fully recovered and has now taken a trip to Vancouver for a change, and whilst there, will look into the prospects as to Coquitlam’s progress.
The British American elevator, is now taking its share of the wheat offering, but owing to the unfavourable and late season there is not much being offered.
A case came up before the P.M. for cruelty to a calf, and was decided in favour of the defendant. During the evidence it developed that there were a great number of barking and chasing dogs and in many cases even biting at teams and pedestrians, as they passed. Owners such of such dogs, were warned, that unless the dogs were kept under, they would be liable to be destroyed upon short notice.
Postmaster Scaife was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
The Pundy case was thrown out on technical grounds; had it not been so the results to all concerned might have been very serious. It is time that these petty exhibitions of spite and I’ll will should cease. The motto should be, live and let live and fair play for all, whether he be Jew or Greek, Barbarian or free, or as some might put it, everyone for himself, and the d—– take the hindmost.
Snow feel in considerable quantities on the 10th and the winter is now fairly inaugurated with us.
The danger of the arrangement of the switch, were nearly leaving bad results. A train backing up quietly, was not noticed and as the mail contractor was getting the mail from the car, he turned quickly across to reach the platform, and was within a few inches of a moving flat car before it was noticed, and he drew back. It behooves people to be careful, but all the same, the present system is full of danger, and some better provision as to lights and signals are needed, to protect the public, whilst going or coming in by train. It is now a long time, since the Ethelbert people, were promised by the company to make radical changes as to the switch and station. It seems as if nothing will be done, until someone is killed, or there is a bad fire.
J. McLean has now closed up his store business, and J. Marantz, another Jew, now carries on the business.
The Rev. Father Kraney is now stationed at Ethelbert, and conducts the services for the Greek-Roman religionists.
There are quite a number of marriages here at present, which incidentally, indicates hopeful prospects for the future.

1912 Nov 21 – FROM ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT

Mr. Marantz is right into business. He indeed deserves credit as a store manager as he is already doing a thriving business.
Miss Ethel Marantz, of Sifton, spent the week-end in Ethelbert.
Alex Katz, who is at present with Campbell & Simpson, at Dauphin, visited Ethelbert on a business trip Saturday. He reports the town looking as good as ever.
Threshing is going on at a good rate and will soon be finished.
Galicians of Ethelbert and the surrounding district had a concert on Saturday night following which was a dance.
At a recent meeting of the council the reeve and one of the councillors had a lively set-to, in which blows were exchanged.

1912 Nov 21 – Winnipegosis

J.P. Grenon, manager for the Armstrong Trading Co., who has been away the past three weeks on an extended trip to Lower Canada via the States, is expected home on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Steele, who have charge of the branch store at Mafeking, are making their semi-yearly sojourn hear at present.
Rev. H.H Scrase, anglican minister, is spending a couple of days in town visiting his parishioners.
Our senior teacher, Mr. Hulme, is suffering from a protracted cold. We are pleased to note that his interest in his pupils is extend to music; no doubt some of whom will benefit from free lessons on the organ in the school-room.
Dr. Medd is feeling the benefit of a recent vacation.
The Winnipegosis Christian League holds its weekly meetings Thursday evening at 8 o’clock in the Methodist Church, so far the interest has been well maintained and we trust that it will be beneficial.
Miss Isabelle McArthur, who has been visiting in Winnipeg for the past few weeks, is expected home early this week.
Mr. Scott, of the Standard Lumber Co., has returned from a trip to the city.
A Winnipegosis card circle is being formed by the enthusiasts which we trust will prove to be a large one.
Donald Hattie’s gasoline circular saw is in great demand at present, though the present weather is not consuming much of its product. We regret the open season is so unpropitious for the fishermen.
The Hudson’s Bay Co.’s business has been permanently closed.

1912 Nov 21 – Death of Ivor Humphreys

Ivor Humphreys, after several weeks’ illness, passed away on Sunday afternoon last at the comparatively early age of 42 years. Deceased came to the district from Brandon some eight or nine years ago and worked at Sifton for some time, afterwards removing to Dauphin. He filled the position of bookkeeper for the Steen-Copeland Co. for a considerable time and later entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Fleming Wilson, under the firm name of Humphreys & Wilson, when they purchased the gents’ furnishing business of W.C. Turner. After continuing as a member of the firm for a couple of years, during which time his health was not good, he retired and accepted a position in the Dominion Lands office. This he filled until a few weeks ago when stricken down with his final illness.
The late Mr. Humphreys was of a retiring disposition but was held in esteem by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. He was a vocalist of conservable note and for several years was leader of the Presbyterian choir. He was a prominent Knight of Pythias and was one of the hardest works in No. 31, the first Pythian lodge organized here, and to his efforts much of its success is due. He was also one of the chief movers in instating the second Pythian lodge here, Empire No. 35.
The funeral took place on Monday and was held under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, the members of both lodges attending in a body, as also the members of the uniform rank. The members of the Sons of England lodge were too in attendance. The service was held in the Presbyterian Church, which was crowded to the docs. Rev. D. Flemming conducted the service and in his remarks paid a warm tribute to the worth of the deceased.
The pallbearers were all past chancellors of Lodge No. 31 – S. Cohen, E. Mayo, J.W. Johnston, F.R. Copeland, G.A. Nicholson and J. Watson.
A widow and two small children are left to mourn the loss of a loving husband and father.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1910

1915 Nov 3 – Before The P.M.

Robt. Machan Fined $50 and Costs Ethelbert Fire Case Dismissed – R. Spruhs fined for Sunday Hunting
On information laid by Constable Hillman, Robt. Machan, an interdict, was haled before P.M. Munson for being the worse for liquor, while Robt. was under the influence of the fiery element he made things lively, mixing up in no less than three fights. He would not divulge where he procured his jag and the magistrate gave him the full extent of the law. $50 and costs. We are glad to see the magistrate enforce the interdict law on suck strict lines, as it is the only means of protection women and children have in a licensed town.
The Ethellbert fire case tried Tuesday, created a good deal of interest. Last week there were heavy losses from fire at Ethelbert and the defendant, J. Mascuich was accused of starting the same. It seems the defendant set out a fire on his farm near Ethelbert to burn up some old potato tops and also the remains of an old straw stack. He carefully put out the potato top fire but the fire in the stack was left to smoulder and it was from this that the fire was alleged to have spread. There were numerous witnesses on the case. From the evidence taken it appears there were several other fires started in Mascuich’s neighbourhood on the same day. As the evidence did not show that the fire had been traced to Mascuich’s farm as the original cause, the case was dismissed.
Notwithstanding the result of this case, several suits will be brought before the county court for damages.
On information laid by Provincial Constable Rooke, R. Spruhs of Sifton, was tried Saturday for illegally hunting on Sunday and in close season. He pleaded guilty and was fined $10 and costs. This should be a warning to others.
Anna Kunka vs. F. Nankishowy, an assault case will be tired Friday. Both come from Pine River.

1915 Nov 3 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and his daughter Gracie paid Dauphin a visit last week.
The organising secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary, Miss Millidge, Winnipeg, will give a magic lantern entertainment in connection with All Saints Church on Nov 10th at 8 o’clock in the Orange Hall. Admission, adults 25c; children 15c.
Mr. Forbes went to Brandon last week.
Both stores seem to be doing some good business. Each train brings in quite a lot of freight.
Mr. Chase from Dauphin was up here visiting Mrs. Snelgrove, the roads around here are good for motors.
The time of service in the Methodist Church, will be 2 p.m., in future instead of 3 p.m.

1915 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the house of Mrs. Ballard. Owing to Mrs. Ballard shortly leaving the town she gave in her resignation of vice-president. A vote of thanks was passed to her for past services. A vote of the ladies present was taken to elect a president and Mrs. W. Parker was chosen.
Miss Millidge, organizing secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary will given a magic lantern entertainment in the school house on Nov. 9th at 8 o’clock.
The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church on Sunday next when the subject will be “The Thing that Matters.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 27 – 1910

1910 Oct 27 – Arthur Milner Dead

Arthur Milner, the young man who had his back broken some five weeks ago by the falling of a scaffold, died in the hospital on Wednesday. The funeral will take place this afternoon fro the residence of Mr. F. Clark with the Dauphin Citizens Band in charge.

1910 Oct 27 – Bullet Lodged in Tissues of Cheek

By the accidental discharge of a .22 calibre rifle on Sunday, a Galician lad was the victim of the bullet. The bullet went through one cheek knocking out a tooth and lodged in the tissues of the other cheek. The boy was brought to Dauphin Monday and the bullet extracted by Dr. Ross.

1910 Oct 27 – Destructive Fire at Ethelbert

A very destructive bush fire took place last week near Ethelbert. From what can be learned it appears that a farmer near sec. 7-29-21 had just finished threshing, the straw of which had been blown into some bush that he wished to clear. The readiest way seemed to him to be to burn the straw pile and bush at the same time. After a time the wind seemed favourable, and he set it going. Two of his neighbours, seeing the fire, remonstrated with him, and expressed their fear that it was very dangerous to set it on fire; to which it is said he replied, “Oh, t will not back up. Unfortunately the wind changed to the northeast, with the result that the fire rushed over part of sec. 18 and most of sec. 17. Hence about 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon it was noticed by the farmers on 17 hat the fire was gaining rapidly upon them.. H. Fekula began at once to try to check the fire by ploughing fire guards round his stacks of hay in the meadows (which run for a good distance northwards, between the colonization road and the road allowance between 17 and 18.) Jacob Mascuik was the next too see that his stacks were in danger, and his team and plough to turn over a few furrows to save his stacks. By this time the fire had got fairly going, and Jos. Mills and L.L. Katz came up at a run to save hat they could.

But alas, they were all too late, and only partly prevented the complete destruction of their stacks of hay. Jacob Mascuik lost six stacks valued at three hundred dollars, James Mills lost five stacks valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and H. Fekula lost three stacks. In the meantime the fire had widened out until thee was a rushing, roaring belt of flames a mile wide, and it seemed for a time as if a very serious disaster was about to take place. K. McLean rushed out of town, and calling at the school he impressed the older boys, and away they to see what could be done.

After going about a mile it was seen that the fire had got too good a hold, to stop it by ordinary means, and hence Mr. McLean could do nothing to save a hay stack of from sixty to seventy tons, from total destruction, which he had, had put up for winter feed. The fire continued its course until about ten o’clock, when through the strenuous efforts of the people it was checked a short distance from the Ethelbert school, after destroying about 1000 tons of hay. Thus during the night of Thursday we were allowed to sleep in peace, after a hard fight.

Unfortunately, Kenneth McLean, after leaving the scene of the fire, went home and being dead tired, as soon as he sat down in his easy chair, he went to sleep. The window was left open, with the result that he got a severe chill, which developed into pleurisy and he has been bedfast and under the doctor’s care ever since. However we are glad to say he has taken a turn for the better and hopes to be about again in a few days.

Well, it was thought the fire had been done with, but no siree. Bush fires do not die out so quickly as that, they smoulder and linger in rotten logs or tree stumps and given a fair chance, the fire will start up again in a fresh place, and that is just what it did do. On Friday morning the wind had changed again, blowing to the south. This soon fanned into flame the dying embers and away it went south and again ruin and disaster faced the settlers’ farms and stacks in the Mink Creek district. Fortunately Mink Creek was full of water, this combined wit the efforts of the people saved the mink Creek district from even a worse fate than had befell their neighbours to the south of them. But from all account it was close call. Whilst it is true that fire is a good servant, it is also true that it is a bad master, and if only reasonable precautions had been taken, much of this great loss might have been prevented. For instance, H.P. Nicholson had some hay in the fire zone, but his men had left it well fire-guarded, thus saving his stacks. The old proverb says: “A stitch in time saves nine.”

It is time that some steps were taken to prevent such terrible loss. As it is, there is no apparatus to fight fire if it should take place, neither is there a Fire Guardian to take the lead and call out and organize a band of fire fighters if needed, and it is needed at Ethelbert.

Do not wait until the horse is stolen before you lock the stable door. Now it is the time to get ready.

1910 Oct 27 – Immigration hall to be Closed

Dr. P.J. Beauchamp immigration officer at this point, has received notice from the Department of interior that the hall here will be closed and not again reopened. The hall under Officer Beauchamp has done an important work in providing accommodation while settlers are being located and regret is heard on all sides that the building is not to be reopened. The building and lots will be put up for public sale at an early date by the department.

1910 Oct 27 – Fork River

Nat Little paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis last week.
C. Parks from Winnipeg is visiting friends here.
The Children’s Day Service at the English Church was very well attended and one of the children Miss Marjorie Scrase, sang “Fair Waved the Golden Corn,” splendidly.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooper who have been here for a few months left here last week for Brantford where they will reside in future.
Carloads of pressed hay are being sent out from this point.
On Tuesday night the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy was gladdened by the arrival of a little baby girl.
Mr. F. Storrar paid a visit to Dauphin lately.
Harry Nicholson was up here this week doing business.
A meeting of the Orangemen of this district was held last Saturday when it was decided to have a ball on Nov. 4th to help pay off the debt on the hall.
Methodist Services will be held at 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings instead of at 3 o’clock.

1910 Oct 27 – Sifton

C. Genik of Winnipeg is the guest of his daughter Mrs. C.A. Jones.
W. Thirell of the C.P.R. land department has been in Sifton the past week collecting for that department.
Messrs. Marantz & Gorfin are dissolving partnership. R. Marantz will carry on the store business alone.

1910 Oct 27 – Winnipegosis

On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will preach in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church at 7.30 p.m. The subject will be “Soul Rest.”
On Sunday last October 23rd, the Methodists inaugurated a new Sunday School. The number of children present more than exceed all the anticipation of the promoters. With a fine equipment of teachers it is confidently expected that success will crown the new institution.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 17 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 17 – Committed for Trial

One night last week several windows were broken in the store of Katz & Brackman at Ethelbert. I.J. Katz, who happened to be in town, swore that he saw Peter Pundy and another party that he could not recognize in the dark, break the windows with an axe. Pundy was brought before Magistrate Skaife, on the charge, and after two nights were consumed in hearing and evidence, was committed for trial. F.E. Simpson appeared for the prosecution and J.L. Bowman for the defence.

1912 Oct 17 – Ethelbert

A preliminary hearing was held before Police Magistrate R. Skaife on the evenings of the tenth and eleventh of Oct. An information, charging Peter Pundy, was laid by H. Brachman of the firm of Katz & Brachman, with breaking four panes of glass and other damages, amounting to over $20, during the night of Oct. 10th, to their store on Main Street. Considerable interest was manifested by the Ruthenian population, the court being crowded each night until midnight and feeling ran high. Mr. Simpson, of Dauphin, put the case for prosecution, and Mr. Bowman for the defence. After a prolonged and careful hearing, it was thought by the magistrate, the charge needed further investigation and Pundy was remanded for trial at Portage la Prairie. He was allowed at large, after entering into bail himself in $200, and two others for $150 each, for his appearance at Portage to stand his trial.
The Elevator is nearing completion and will need only a few more days to make it ready to receive the crop.
Norman Booth, the buyer for the Elevator Co., went west a few days ago, where he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Olive Ward, the daughter of Cross Ward, postmaster of Deepdale. Mr. Booth and his wife have returned to Ethelbert, where they will reside until the grain season is over. Cross Ward is an old resident of Ethelbert and our hearty congratulations are given to the newly wed couple, that they may live long, and prosper in their new undertaking.
Geo. Marantz has commenced business in John McLean’s store, and is doing his best to attract customers by a good display of new goods in his windows.
J. McLean expects to transfer the balance of his stock still unsold at an early date. He retains the grist mill which he hopes to run as usual this winter.
The ever present and crying need of the hour, is now, and ever will be, good roads to move the crops.
There are rumours that something will be done, in this direction, by the Council availing themselves of the government’s offer to pay two-thirds of the cost of constructing main roads through the district.

1912 Oct 17 – Fork River

J. McCaulay, Massey-Harris travelling agent, was here a few days on business with D. Kennedy.
Peter Ellis, after spending the week-end with his family, has returned to Kamsack.
Samuel Bailey took a trip to Dauphin on business last week.
Clem Kennis, who has been at Prince Albert for some months, returned home and states the harvest very late all over the West.
Robertson & Snelgrove are shipping their threshing outfit to Yorkton for the season and Pat Powers is going along. Nothing like lots of “Power.”
Miss L. Clark, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents.
Rev. H.H. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit lately to meet some persons from Meadow Portage on church business.
Mrs. G. Tilt, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the farm on the Mossey.
Miss Margaret and Gertrude Kennedy are visiting with Mrs. Chas. Wilkes of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Scelly was up last week from Dauphin visiting Mr. Clemons.
Mr. Glendenning is visiting his uncle, Thos. Glendenning, on the Mossey for a few days.
Next Sunday, Oct. 20th, special children’s service at the English church at 3 o’clock, and on Sunday, Oct. 27th, the annual harvest festival service will be held and a suitable sermon for the occasion will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. All are welcome to the services.
Rev. Sam. Cruch, late of Glenella and family, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Kennedy for a few days on their way to Tullesford, Sask.

1912 Oct 17 – Sifton

Church of England services are held regularly every fortnight at Sifton (Tuesday evening) and also at other times by arrangement.

1912 Oct 17 – Winnipegosis

Harvest festival service will be held at Winnipegosis school house at 7.30 on Oct. 20th. Collection will be made for the Home Mission Fund. The sermon will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase, minister in charge.
J.R. Parker, of the Standard Lumber Co., has gone to Winnipeg to endeavour to secure men for work in the woods.
Jos. Birrell took his child to the hospital at Dauphin on Monday.
Active preparations are being made for the winter’s fishing. The prospects for fishing are said to be exceptionally poor.
The cattle industry in these parts is proving most profitable. Several shipments were recently made to Dauphin. Campbell Benson was the purchaser.

1918 Oct 17 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. William Alfred Cleland, Dauphin, killed. (William Alfred Cleland, 1894, 865829)
Pte. Chas. Gray, Dauphin, killed. (???)
Pte. Francis Ingram Rogers, Asheville, wounded. (Francis Ingram Rogers, 1899, 1001239)
Pte. Harold Allan Dunlop, Dauphin, wounded. (Harold Allan Dunlop, 1897, 718788)
Pte. Campbell, Winnipegosis, wounded. (???)
Pte. Chris Benson, Dauphin, wounded. (Christian T Benson, 1887, 1000081)
Pte. Orval Wood Struthers, Dauphin, gunshot wound in right leg. (Orval Wood Struthers, 1895, 151250)
Pte. J.H. Paulson, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Johann Hannibal Paulson, 1891, 2504017)
Pte. W.S. Hamilton, Dauphin, gassed. (???)
Pte. George Edward Buchannon, Dauphin, wounded. (George Edward Buchannon, 1894, 1000633)
Pte. Ray Neely, Dauphin, wounded. (Ray Neely, 1897, 1000556)
Pte. William Meldrum, Dauphin, wounded. (William Meldrum, 1897, 1000280)
Pte. Harry Hamilton Olson, Dauphin. (???)
Pte. E.N. Humphries, Dauphin, wounded. (???)

1918 Oct 17 – Churches and Schools Closed

By order of the health officer of the town all churches, schools and public places of amusement have been closed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

1918 Oct 17 – The Man of the Hour
Gen. Spanish Flu.

1918 Oct 17 – TOWN OF DAUPHIN
SPANISH INFLUENZA
WARNING TO THE PUBLIC

This disease is very prevalent in some parts of the world today, and has reached our Town. It is therefore advisable that people generally should know something about it, its symptoms, and the measure and method of its communicability; and should be advised as to the general rules for its restraint and cure.
Spanish Influenza is generally believed to be a variety of the old type of Influenza with which we have been long familiar, with in addition possibly some increase of virulence, due to the conditions and places in which this present epidemic had its origin.
It is a “Germ” disease, and is conveyed from one suffering from it to others, by the secretions of the mouth, nose, throat and lungs. The use of towels or cups in common will readily spread it. Coughing, spitting or sneezing by anyone who has it, in the company of others, will readily spread it. Crowded and ill ventilated living rooms and sleeping places, as well as ill ventilated and insanitary places of work are conductive to its dissemination.
The following are the symptoms which generally accompany an attack:
Fever, headache, backache, inflamed throat, and often bleeding from the nose. In addition to these symptoms, in more severe cases a troublesome cough with a sense of constriction in the chest follows. From these develop the case of Broncho-Pneumonia which is the feature of the disease mainly responsible for deaths.
If cases should come to your neighbourhood, think first of Prevention. Don’t go to any house or place in which there may be persons with the above symptoms. Don’t let any person suffering from these symptoms come to your home or place of business. Don’t use common towels or drinking cups in any place. Keep away from people who have the disease, if you do you won’t get it. If on the other hand, you mingle with people who have it there is no known method of disinfection which would prevention your taking it. Therefore stay away and keep in he open air and sunlight as much as possible.
If you should be attacked by the disease, go to bed at once. Rest and Warmth are very important factors in its cure. Take warm drinks, live on fluids, and send for your Physician. Having done these things promptly, there is usually little danger. Not doing them, and taking chance, may turn a very mild illness into a very serious and sometimes a fatal one.
Attendants on all cases should wear gauze masks.

E. BOTTOMLEY,
Health Officer, Town of Dauphin.

1918 Oct 17 – Fork River

Mr. Hanson, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a few days in town lately.
Leo Beck has purchased the threshing outfit of Charles Bugg and is making the straw fly.
There are now five outfits threshing within a radius of three miles so good progress is being made with the work.
Potatoes, yes sir. From a pound of Victory seed 50 lbs. were produced. When I comes to grain or vegetables Fork River district stands at the top.
Mrs. Moxam, from Winnipeg, is visiting at the home of Mr. Sam Reid.
So far the Spanish Flue has laid its hand lightly on us. However, we must not be behind the times or out of fashion, so that anyone from now on who gets a cold will claim to have had an encounter with His Nibbs King Flu. But, say, if we could only resort to the remedy of happy memory, hot toddy, wouldn’t the male portion of the population be suddenly afflicted.

1918 Oct 17 – Sifton

Sunday automobile travelling is just as prevalent as ever. The writer counted nine in town last Sunday. There are lots of places where yellow paint and rotten eggs could be used a plenty.
The foundations for the large Ruthenian hall has been laid and the material is on the ground.
It is about time the foreigners (and most of them are still foreigners and pride themselves on it) learned to take notice of our national statutory holidays. On Thanksgiving Day may loads of grain drove into market, the owners knowing nothing of the day, caring less, and most indignant at not being able to unload. But let an Anglo-Saxon try t hire one on a saint’s or holy day – nothing doing!
Philip Wood and Leslie Kennedy and Miss Lottie Isaacovitch and enjoying a short holiday here.
This district is not behind most of the districts in grain yields. Thirty bushels to the acre is quite common, and as high as 40 and even 50 bushels to the acre has been threshed.
W. Terin still delivers fresh fish to town, easing up the H.C.L.
An average of two car loads of live stock are shipped from here each week throughout the year, excepting possibly three months.
Several gas tractors have been sold at this point, with a promise of many more next season.
Our roads, and especially our culverts, are generally speaking, a disgrace. The wear and tear to rolling stock and automobiles, not to mention horse flesh, is beyond calculation. A culvert one foot or more above the grade was responsible for a small automobile wreck on Saturday in ward 6. The council will be asked to pay the damages.
Glorious Indian summer, with a forecast of winter within the next two months at least.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 30 – 1915

1915 Sep 30 – Threshing Held Up

Threshing operations have been suspended during the past week on account of wet weather. The returns coming in from the separators continue to be large.

1915 Sep 30 – Ethelbert

During the last four weeks I. Arnovitch has shipped eight carloads of cattle from this point.
The new Presbyterian mission hospital is nearing completion. It is going to be a commodious structure.
Threshing operations are entirely suspended owing to wet weather.
Mr. Ben Brachman, our enterprising merchant, was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.
Mr. Bert Kennedy and family have arrived from Canora and will reside here.
The wood market is commencing to be more active of late. Prices still remain at the old figure, but will advance as the weather gets colder.

1915 Sep 30 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Friday evening, which was well attended although the weather was so bad.
The Hon. Hugh Armstrong and Mrs. Armstrong are spending a few days in town.
Dr. Bottomley and Dr. Culberton, of Dauphin, were in town on Tuesday operating on Miss Pearl Paddock, who has been very ill with appendicitis. We are very glad to report. Miss Paddock a little better and trust soon to see her around again.
Mrs. Anderson left for Winnipeg on Saturday’s train accompanied by her sister, Miss Ruth Sanders.
Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Don’t forget court of revision on Oct. 9th. All complaints must reach the clerk ten days previous to that date and be duty filled by him.
Mr. Hall has accepted a position with the Standard Lumber Co., as successor to Mr. Barbour, who resigned to join the army.
H. Loiw, of Waterhen, is spending a few days in town.
Geo. Adam spent Saturday in town.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is a business visitor in town for a few days.
We hear fall fishing will soon be over and everyone will be getting in shape for outfitting for the winter. Where has our summer gone?
If looking for a good shave or hair cut don’t miss the red, white and blue post on Main Street.
There was a ten cent tea at the home of Mrs. Whale on Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 5 in and of a local family in want.
We are glad to see Jim McInnes around again after being laid up for a few days.
We are sorry to report the accident to Mrs. J.E. Parkers, who fell and broke her leg the other evening.
Geo. Lyons and D. Kennedy spent Wednesday in Fork River on municipal business and report crops already for threshing.
John Marshinsky has traded his boat for an automobile.
Ed. Chirmok is building a store next to the Methodist Church and intends starting business this fall.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 15 – 1910

1910 Sep 15 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 15 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 15 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 15 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 12 – 1912

1912 Sep 12 – Arm Broken in Runaway

A spirited team belonging to Geo. Lampard ran away on Wednesday afternoon. The driver, Thos. McKay, was thrown out of the rig and had his left arm broken.

1912 Sep 12 – Infantry for Dauphin

A movement is on foot in town to organize a military regiment. A preliminary meeting was held in Harvey & Bowman’s office on Monday evening, when Dr. Walker was appointed chairman and L. Shand secretary. It is proposed to have four companies if possible. A public meeting will be held shortly at which Col. Steele will be the speaker and afterwards officers selected.

1912 Sep 12 – Ethelbert

The awful thunderstorm, and the great rain of Wednesday has left things in very bad shape here, and unless we have a spell of fine weather the prospects are none too good.
K. McLean is still improving and is able to be up and about, but he is still very weak and thin.
All the material and engine for the elevator are on the ground, but as yet no signs of the builders. They will have to get a hustle on.
There were two cases before R. Skaife on Saturday. Mrs. J. Rewniak asked that her husband, J. Rewniak, be bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months. The evidence went to show that John had been persistently ill-treating her ever since their marriage over two years ago, and that he had very recently threatened to shoot her father, an old man who is close on seventy, with the handle of a hay fork twice on the arm, making it black because he tried to protect her. He was bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months or forfeit $100.
The next case was a mixed up affair. Marko Dubyk sold a pig to N. Tkatchzuk, for five dollars, the pig to be delivered as soon as possible. Marko brought the pig to town, met some friends; they went and had drinks together, and entrusted the pig to Olexa Stassuk, to take to Tkatchzuk, but instead he took it home. Then he have it to S. Basaraba, who put it in his stye, and kept it for some weeks. Ultimely Olexa asked $3 for Tkatchzuk, and he should have his pig. This Tkatchzuk refused to give, but instead he wanted the pig, and $5.50 as a sort of fine for them keeping the pig. The case was decided as follows: Basaraba was ordered to take the pig to Tkatchzuk, and without any compensation for the feed of the pig. O. Stassuk had to pay the costs of the court, as his share of the fun, and Tkatchzuk as told that it was only the magistrate who had the privilege of extracting penalties.
Later Rewniak wanted the magistrate to order his wife to go back to him, but he was advised to treat her kindly in future, and then perhaps she might go back. But Maru says no, never.
The station has got the name “Ethelbert” printed in bold letters at both ends of the building, so that all who run can read.

1912 Sep 12 – Fork River

Sydney Howlett, of E. Million, spent a few days here and took a trip to Winnipegosis on business.
Garent Lacey has returned home after a few months vacation south looking for a high spot.
“Bishop” McCartney took a trip to Winnipegosis hunting his carriage. “Bejiggered if they get it again,” says the Bishop.
Nat Little has returned from a week’s visit to the States.
Our Mowat friend seems surpassed to see a gasoline boat about the size of a coffee pot, go from Winnipegosis to Lake Dauphin and return, and pats himself on the back, as its the dredge that did the trick. Why good sized boats loaded with freight passed up and down the Mossey, fifteen and twenty years ago.
Mrs. Wm. King who has been visiting at Vancouver and California. She says the Fork looks more like home.
D. Kennedy has purchased another “gee gee” for his delivery wagon. Just see the dust fly.
Duck shooting is the order of the day. It’s hard on the feathers.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from a visit to Dauphin and Sifton.
Thomas Shannon has been treating fall wheat for the farmers for seed and several have commenced sowing it.
We are informed some one is looking for a schooner to find the levels after the storm and he is not alone. There’s schooners and schooners.
Lost or strayed, the minutes of three or four council meetings.
Teacher, “What is it Tommy.” “Dad says we will get them all right if we had an assistant. We must not expect too much after such an electric storm. It’s so depressing.”
John Clements and family of Dauphin, arrived to take off his crop in the Chase farm.
Nat Little has put on a new wagon for delivering cream at the station.
The planer has started up again, and Billy Williams is making the shavings fly.

1912 Sep 12 – Sifton

Stephen Kosy’s stable was struck by lightening last Thursday. There were in the stable, a team of horses, harness and fifty hens. Fortunately the horse broke the board and ran out but the harness and hens were burned. Stephen had his stable insured.
On the same date Hnat Skarnpa’s stable was burned, lightening being the cause.
The harvest has been checked for a few days by bad weather.
Four of our well-known citizens have formed a company and will build a big store. Our Fedor of Blue Store does not like to see any more stores in own. He would rather buy out Pinkas and have the while business to himself.
The rumour is abroad that in a short time some of the Ruthenians intend to organize a co-operative store. Building is to begin next week.
Thos. Ramsay is busy building a new postoffice and boarding house.
Paul Wood has bought three lots in block one from Nicola Haschak.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 10 – 1910

1910 Sep 10 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 10 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 10 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 10 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 4 – 1913

1913 Sep 4 – Ethelbert

An extraordinary general meeting of the shareholders of the Ruthenian Trading Company, Limited, was held at two o’clock at Ethelbert, on the 28th day of August. The president, Mr. M. Pacholok was in the chair. The president explained that the meeting had been called for the purpose of considering the question of increasing the capital stock of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars by the creation and issue of six hundred new shares of the par value of twenty-five each. The matter was then left to the meeting for discussion. After a long discussion a by-law of the directors passed the 26th day of July, authorizing the increase of capital of the company from ten thousand dollars to twenty-five thousand dollars was sanctioned and confirmed by special resolution of the shareholders.
The Ruthenian Literary Society, under the leadership of K.F. Slipetz, its president, arranged a programme of giving lectures to the farmers. The subjects that are taken up are: organization, economy and mixed farming. We shall be very glad to get particulars and, if possible, regulations of farmers’ societies. This need is very necessary for us. We, as farmers, don’t want to be left behind the other farmers but must struggle or the survival of the fittest for existence.
Mr. Hill, an Ethelbert pioneer, is renewing acquaintance here. We are always gad to see old friends.
Some of the prominent Ruthenian farmers at Garland are forming a company with the idea of buying up the other business there.
The construction of a Greek Catholic Church at Garland has been postponed on account of some members objecting to the transfer of the said church under the name of Bishop Budka.

1913 Sep 4 – Fork River

Mrs. Avid Briggs, of Brandon, is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.N. Briggs on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Potts, of Neepawa, returned home after a week’s vacation with Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat.
Miss Gilanders and brother, of Brandon, returned home after spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lockhart.
John Mathews and Fred Storrar are assisting Mr. T.N. Briggs, the bonanza farmer, with his harvest.
We are pleased to hear the town orator has recovered from his recent illness. Some of the fair sex remarked he was becoming thin as its hard on the constitution sitting on the sidewalk without a sunshade.
Mrs. Fred Cooper and Miss Alice Godkin are visiting with friends at Dauphin.
Alfred Snelgrove, who has been on the dredge at Regina all summer, returned home and is of the opinion there are worse places than Fork River.
We notice the hum of Tom Shannon’s and King Bros.’ machinery threshing a few loads of grain. Fred Cooper and Billy Williams have their outfits ready to start as soon as the grain is fit.
Dr. Ross and W.H. Morison, of Dauphin, passed through here with their automobile on Tuesday. The roads north of here were so soft that they had to return and take the train from Fork River to Winnipegosis. The appropriation money for the north road must have miscarried.
Jack Angers, of Winnipegosis, spent the week-end in town renewing acquaintances.
W. Howitson, of Winnipegosis, is clerking in A.T. Co. sore at this point for a time.