Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 22, 1920

G.W.V.A. Notes

We wish all comrades to note that before they can make entry on Dominion Lands, both homestead and soldiers grant, they must have attestation certificates. If they will look after this matter before time of making entry, it will save them a lot of trouble and delay.
We note that Comrade Roy Armstrong is now with the Soldier Settlement Board as supervisor and takes in the district of Winnipegosis, Ochre River and Makinak.
At the last meeting of the Association we had a very fair attendance to hear Comrade Batty give his report of Montreal convention. He gave a general outline of the work done at the convention. We hope to see an increased interest in the meetings. Come out to them. The matter of the War Veterans’ home was up before the meeting and some discussion took place. We are still waiting on the results of the work of the Memorial Committee before making any public campaign for funds for our building. In the meantime we are getting all the money we can gather toward our building fund.
Comrade Herman, of Ashville, who has been in the hospital, is convalescent.
Comrade Garth Johnston has gone to Prairie River to start operations on his farm.
Hugh Lys and E.R. Bewell, supervisors for the S.S.B., are out on soldier settlement work.
We have had a number of men make use of the rooms this month while passing through and who appreciate same very much.

Bicton Health

Winnipegosis, April 20.
The rain Tuesday was welcome. Warmer weather is now assured. Don’t let us be impatient; you know we are promised seedtime and harvest as long as the world lasts.
The United Famers of the district held a meeting on the 17th at the home of Mr. Dumas. Important business was transacted. A resolution was passed requesting the Grain Growers to build an elevator at Winnipegosis the coming summer. The question of taking political action was brought up and discussed. A vote showed the meeting to be in favor of such a move.
The corduroy road leading to the school is nearly complete.
James Laidlaw is drawing his house and stable over to the homestead.
Frank Sharp has purchased a fine team of horses from Mr. Pruder.
A meeting will be held in the Orange Hall, Fork River, on the 27th inst. and it is expected that delegates from every local in the Ethelbert constituency will be present and it will then be decided whether a farmers’ candidate will be placed in the field.

Fork River

Father and Son Banquet—Boys’ work has come right into the limelight in Fork River with the introduction of the Canadian standard efficiency training under a local advisory council composed of Messrs. W. King, J. Williamson, A.J. Little, Fred. Cooper, C.E. Bailey and Milton Cooper.
A Trail Rangers’ camp has been formed with E.V. Lockwood as mentor, Robt. Williams chief ranger; Arthur Jameson, sub ranger Nathan Schucett, tally, and Ben Schucett, cache.
So interested are the boys that the ladies of the district, to encourage them, supplied a splendid banquet on Friday night last at which some 43 fathers and sons sat down and enjoyed the substantial repast. When the eating was finished the chief ranger bade them toast “The King,” which was done with musical honors.
The following toasts were enthusiastically honored: “Canada,” proposed by Arthur Jameson; “Tuxis Boys,” by N. Schuchett; “Our Dads,” by B. Schuchett; “Our Sons,” by W. King. A very nice little speech by D. Robertson on the “Kind of Dad I Like,” was responded to with excellent advice to boys on the “Kind of Son I Like,” by D.F. Wilson. “Our Homes” was given by Mr. Lockwood, and this was followed by three sort addresses by Prof. Williamson on the advantages of an education; Tuxis boys at large by Rev. H.P. Barrett and the boy and the church by Rev. E. Roberts. Votes of thanks to boys, ladies, speakers and officers were proposed by W. King, D. Lockwood, E.V. Lockwood and Rev. H.P. Barrett. The national anthem brought to a close an evening long to be remembered in the annuals of Fork River.

CORRESPONDENT CRITICIZED.
To the Editor of the Dauphin Herald:

SIR:—
O’wad some power the giftie gie us
To see ourselves as others see us.
So wrote the poet long years ago and we hope the writer of the article in your last issue entitled, “Fork River,” will be given that blessed gift, it may reach him sometime that it is very bad form to wash his dirty linen in public and still worse to do it in such a way as to convey the impression that it is editorial news.
Have very good first hand information as to all that happened at the returned soldiers “get together” in Fork River on a recent Saturday night and I suggest that the moralist who penned the account in the paper would be better employed in taking an active and religious interest in the welfare of the young folk of the district than in writing scurrilous articles under the cover of anonymity.
I am dear sir, yours faithfully,
HARRY P. BARRETT,
Priest in charge of Fork River.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Women’s Institute was held on Friday evening, April 16th, in the Union Church. A large number of the members were present. After the business was finished. Dr. Medd gave an interesting and most instructive address on “Child Welfare,” which was greatly appreciated by all present. The social part of the evening consisted in songs and a recitation, which were much enjoyed. Tea was served by the refreshment committee. The proceeds of the evening were placed to the credit of the Library fund.
The Fisherman’s ball, held last Thursday at the Rex Hall, was a great success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 8, 1920

Fork River

Miss Ina Briggs and Miss Hess, teachers of the Fork River school, are spending the Easter holidays at their respective homes.
The father and son banquet has been postponed.
Several of our farmers are investing in the better breeds of cattle, pigs and poultry this spring. Among the purchasers are F. Hafenbrak a pure bred sow and Rhode Island Red poultry, and H. Little a bull.
Tenders are being called through the columns of the Herald for our proposed new brick school. The new building should be worthy of our growing village and district.
W. King has disposed of all his barred rock cockerels, but still has a few white rock cockerels left.

Winnipegosis

The question of the day, “is the cold weather ever going to let up?”
On Saturday, April 3rd, the Ladies’ Sewing Circle of the United Church held a sale of homemade cooking at Mrs. Houchin’s ice cream parlor, was kindly pleased at their disposal for the occasion. Tea was served from 3 to 5 p.m., and the total amount realized was $31.70.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 1, 1920

Fork River
Death of Nat Little

Nathan Little, one of our best known residents, passed away suddenly on the 18th ult. Deceased was 63 years of age, and was born in Bowmanville, Ont. He came west to Cyprus River in 1879. After remaining there for a time he moved to Monticello, Minnesota. After spending a few years there he returned to Canada and located at Fork River 19 years ago and carried on a general store. He is survived by Mrs. Little, two daughters and a son. The daughters are Mrs. Robert Rowe and Mrs. Ed Cameron, Neepawa, and Mr. Harry Little, Fork River. The body was interned in the local cemetery.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 11, 1920

Fork River

A joint meeting of the Women’s Institute and the U.F.M. was held in the Orange Hall on Tuesday evening, the 2nd inst., Prof. I. Williamson in the chair. Mrs. A.J. Little, delegate to the Winnipeg convention, gave her report, which was in the form of a splendid address. Mr. H.P. Nicholson addressed the meeting on the farmers’ movement. Both addresses were well received by the large audience. Miss Briggs and Mr. W. Russell entertained the audience with music and Mrs. Lockwood and Mr. Marcroft in elocution.
On Saturday afternoon a meeting in the Anglican Church was addressed by Miss Strang and Mr. McQuay, of Dauphin – Miss Stang on the work of the Women’s Section and Mr. McQuay on the national Policy of the U.F.M. It is hoped the Fork River people will hear those two speakers again in the near future.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 19, 1920

Jail Sentences in Future

Jail sentences, with no option of a fine, will be imposed on all persons guilty of breach of the Manitoba Temperance Act in future, according to the amendment to the Act, which was brought before the legislature this week by the Hon. Thomas H. Johnson, Attorney-General.

Fork River

Mr. Maine is the new teacher at Fork River School and Miss U. Harlowe at Pine View. We’re forever changing teachers. “We’re forever changing teachers.”
Wm. King, Milton Cooper and H. Hunter attended the meeting of the Dauphin Country Orange lodge at Dauphin last week.
Fork River chicken fanciers were not represented at the recent poultry show at Dauphin. This is to be regretted as there are some good strains of stock in this district. Poultry raising should be developed to a much greater extent than it is.
Some of our farmers are drawing hay 25 miles. This illustrates the importance of conserving feed for the opening of spring work.
Wolves are fairly numerous this winter and some fine pelts are being brought to town. It pays to join in the fun of the chase when you can get $25 for a skin.
The debate on the night of the 11th inst., proved of more than ordinary interest. The topic was, “Resolved, That married life is preferable to single life.” The following championed the affirmative: Miss. E. Carlson, captain; L. Lacey, M. Shannon and Miss Carlson. Negative – Mr. C. Bailey, captain; Mrs. A.J. Little, F. Wilson, Jr., and Mrs. C. Bailey. The affirmative won. The critic was Mr. A. Hunt, and in his review he ably dealt with the arguments pro and con. The judges were Mrs. F. Cooper, Mr. Main and D.F. Wilson, Sr.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 12, 1920

Fined $200

On Tuesday, the 10th, Inland Revenue Officer J.A. Hall made a raid on certain parties at Winnipegosis suspected of illegal whiskey manufacturing. A quantity of mash and large still were discovered and as a result E.D. Philibelt appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday and was fined $200 and costs.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Comrade R.B. Maxwell, vice-president of the Dominion Command, was a visitor at last Thursday’s meeting. He came to Dauphin for the purpose of explaining some aspects of the reestablishment proposals, with which many members of the association and the general public are unfamiliar. Comrade Maxwell proved to be an instructive and entertaining speaker, and his address was very much appreciated.
At the next regular meeting, which will be held on Thursday, Feb. 19th, the course of action with regard to acquiring permanent quarters for the association will be decided upon.

Oil Boom

Oil has been discovered on the farm of Mr. McKay across Lake Dauphin, sec. 16, tp. 28, range 18, and for the past two or three days there has been a rush at the Dominion Lands office to enter claims.

Fork River

A very pleasant time was spent Friday evening, February 6th, in taking a trip around the world. All parties having gathered at the Union Station, Fork River, first special train left at 8 o’clock and each 20 minutes thereafter. First stop was made at China, where the guests were treated to all the dainties China can produce, also the costumes and customs of the people were a great treat to all. Next stop was made at India, where all were treated with the greatest courtesies by the natives and came away with a great impression of the people, also the fare they had to eat. Last stop was made at Japan where the tourists were feasted with all the delicacies of that wonderful nation. They were struck by the beauties of the quaint little people and advise that the missionaries have done a great work there. On arrival back in Canada the homesick people were given a grand reception by those at home and gave a pleasant account of their trip. The reception consisted of songs by Rev. Roberts, music by Mrs. Little, recitation by Mrs. Lockwood, also instrumentals by the Russell boys, and Miss Ina Briggs. The nice sum of $58 was made by the United Church of Canada.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – February 5, 1920

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Feb. 2.
The political committee of the United Grain Growers met at Winnipegosis on Jan. 19th to transact business.
The G.G. held their annual meeting on Jan. 23rd, when officers for the present year were elected. There was a good turnout and prospects for the year look good. A committee of three was appointed to interview Mr. Bickle re threshing outfit. The next meeting will be held at Winnipegosis on Feb. 7th. This change has been made for the purpose of giving the members who reside at Winnipegosis a chance to attend the meetings. After the regular business was finished nominations were called for. The following were elected: President, Thos. Toye; vice, Duncan Crerar; sec.-treasurer, Frank Sharp. Directors – James Laidlaw, J. Haywood, A. Dumas, F. Girling, C. Bradley, G. Godkin. At this meeting the ladies’ section was well represented and refreshments were served.
By the way, what about the corduroy road leading to Bicton Heath school? There are fourteen children on the east side of the muskeg who will be compelled to go without any education another year if this work is not done immediately. It is high time that some of our worthy councillors should be getting busy?

Fork River

Miss McIntyre, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of Mr. Cooper.
E.V. Lockwood is spending the week in Dauphin.
The question is frequently asked, what has become of the Member for Gilbert Plains. The people here never see him.
Donnie McEachern is spending the week in Dauphin with his mother, who is in the hospital at Dauphin.
Feed is scarce and all available will be needed for the stock at home.
The mid-week meeting in All Saints’ Church, January 28th, was in charge of the school teachers. The program was commenced with a solo from Mrs. A.J. Little and a story by Miss G. Cooper. The Fork River School debate, “Resolved, that a horse is better than a cow,” in charge of the teacher, Miss Ian Briggs followed. The members of the affirmative side were David Nowasod, Percy and Mildred Carlson, and the negative side Ben Schuckett, Bob Williams and Betty Williamson. Judges, Mrs. Lockwood, Miss Cooper and Miss Hess. Critic Professor J. Williamson. Decision was given in favour of the affirmative side. The debate was a lively one and a credit for school boys and girls, and was greatly appreciated by the large audience present. The evening was brought to a close with a piano solo by Mrs. A.J. Little, reading by Miss Cooper and the singing of the National Anthem.
The Debating Society is preparing something lively for Wednesday, February 11th. W. King, chairman.