Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 16, 1919

Accidentally Killed

A telegram from Edmonton this week stated that Thos. Watson, tinsmith, had been accidentally killed. Deceased was for a number of years in business in Dauphin and only returned during the summer from overseas.

District Chairmen of Victory Loan

Fork River – Owen Pruden
Ethelbert – G. Tymchuk
Makinak and Ochre River – J.N. Campbell

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 2, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Sept. 25th. Only a small turnout was registered, this without a doubt being due to the fact that the majority were busy threshing, still, all the same, there could and should have been more and the comrades are earnestly asked to remember the meeting on October 9th. A full attendance is desired and, in fact, must be had, and all are asked to make a special effort to attend. Matters of great importance to the association will be dealt with and it is the desire of the executive that a representative meeting give its ruling on these matters.
On the 14th inst. the second entertainment arranged by the Veterans will be placed on at the town hall, viz., The Victorian Serenaders. There will be a dance after the same as the previous show an the co operation of all to secure a good house is asked. Little need be said as to the merits of the company as same is well known to the majority, but it will fully maintain the reputation established by the Castle Squares and good value for money is assured.
We would draw the attention of the reader to the special appeal from the G.W.V.A. in this edition of the paper and ask that they give the proposition their support. This will be the first time that a general appeal has been made in this district by the returned men and we are confident that we shall not ask in vain, but that the public will respond in the same spirit as the men did in the past four years.
Comrades, keep the 9th October in your “bean” and attend the meeting that night.

Presented With Meerschaum Pipe

The employees of the town met at the hall on Wendesday afternoon and presented ex-Chief Bridle with an address and valuable meerschaum pipe. Mr. Bridle and family left on the early morning train for British Columbia.

Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork River did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Chraighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 5, 1919

Dominion Day Celebration

The Great War Veterans’ association intend holding a big celebration on Tuesday, July 1st (Dominion Day). The programme provides for an elaborate Calithumpain and automobile parade in the forenoon, and splendid sports—baseball, football, track and children’s races in the afternoon. Suitable prizes given in all events. A grand ball will be given in the evening in the town hall.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains unchanged but late news from Winnipeg is hopeful of a settlement being reached. Locally the number of strikers has increased. The freight handlers, car checkers and call boys are the latest to join the strikes.
Supt. R.C. Brown was up from Portage on Tuesday and met the telephone operators, but the conference has not altered the situation and the exchange remains closed.
The best of order, however prevails throughout the town.

Winnipegosis Elections

Winnipegosis village, which has a charter of its own, held their elections on the 30th ult. There were three candidates for the Major’s chair. The vote stood: J.C. Adam 57, J.P. Grenon 19 and S. Sieffert 10. The following councilors were elected: Geo. Lyons Ward 1, Ed. Cartwright Ward 2, Jos. Burrell Ward 3, Sid Dennett Ward 4.

A Returned Soldier’s Lament

We are the boys who have done our bit,
But when we came back we were very hard hit.
The girls of Dauphin say we are tough!
I guess we are, all right enough.

We don’t mind the slams we get from either man or girl.
We just laugh at them, till their minds are in a whirl.
They call us boys instead of men,
But we took our stand with the best of them.

We fought in Belgium and in France,
And we made the wily and brutal Hun dance,
To the tune of the cannon, machine gun and bomb
We boys helped the Hun on the way to his home.

When we went o’er the top we had the best of luck.
Every blessed soldier boy filled with vim and pluck.
Thinking of the girls at home land of the brave and free!
Fight, even unto death, for the dame of Liberty.

Now, comrades, you all will agree with me
That some of these girls are as tough as we
So let us all strive to forgive and forget.
That we may learn to become men yet.

Winnipegosis

Pte. A. Clyne has returned to town from overseas after seeing two years active service.
While Mr. F.G. Shears and a few friends were motoring back from Dauphin they met with an accident. Mr. Archie McDonell was slightly injured.
The Ladies Aid of the Union Church held a very successful picnic on the school grounds. Refreshments and ice cream were served and an interesting baseball game was played between Winnipeg and Fork River, the latter winning by one side score. A crowd was in attendance from Dauphin and Fork River.
A.H. Steele has returned from Mafeking, where he has been fighting bush fires for three days.
C.H. Dixon was in Camperville for three days on business.
J.P. Grenon has taken about 20 fishermen to the Pas to fish in the lakes near Sturgeon, being mile 239 on the Hudson Bay Railway.
Mrs. G.W. Mullhearn and children came on Tuesday’s train to visit Mrs. A.H. Steele for the summer.
Miss A. Wilson has returned from an extended visit to the coast, and has resumed her work at the post office.
Long Shaw house has been burned out through bush fires.
The body of Helger Johnson, who was drowned in the lake six months ago, has just been recovered and was brought to town by Dorie Stevenson, on the boat Odinak.
The municipal election for mayor has just closed. It was a 3cornered contest and was hotly contested. Courad Adam was elected. The vote stood Adam 57, Grenon 19, Sieffert 10.

52 Ancestors – Week 4 – Mary Moxam

Better late than never I decided to participate in the 52 Ancestors Challenge this year. This is the fourth article in “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: 2015 Edition.”

This week’s theme is “Closest to your birthday,” which is June 21.

Out of the 2139 relatives that I have documented so far in my tree I was only able to find two relatives who shared the same birth date as mine (but it is important to note that there are many relatives who are still missing records to confirm).

Both are female and neither lived to see the age of thirty. I will only be focusing on one of these ladies as she is a closer relation than the second.

Mary Moxam (1877-1900) is my second cousin 3x removed. She was born to Emmanuel Moxam and Ann Johnston on Jun 21, 1877, in Bromley, Renfrew North and was the eldest of eight other siblings. This branch of the Moxam family would remain in the Renfrew area of Ontario until moving out west to Winnipeg in the early 1900s where they settled in Winnipeg.

On Dec 6, 1897, Mary married Arthur Henry McClurg (1870-1943), a blacksmith, and would have two children with him before her early demise. A daughter would be born on Oct 3, 1898, named Annie Margaret McClurg and later a son.

Mary died on Sep 22, 1900, of blood poisoning after three weeks of suffering. As she bore a son on Sep 2, William Emanuel McClurg, I make the safe assumption that the blood poisoning, also called sepsis, was caused from complications of giving birth. This could have been a result from a prolonged or obstructed birth, an infection following delivery, or illnesses during birth such as influenza.

Even today with better standards in health practice it is still possible for women to die of sepsis and it requires early detection and appropriate treatment.

52 Ancestors – Week 8 – William George Washington Johnston (a 71-year-old mystery)

For this week in Amy Johnson Crow’s genealogist challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, I would like to present a 71-year-old family mystery that has yet to be solved.

Throughout my genealogical research one of the topics that I’ve enjoy the most is learning about family members who have served in war. This is especially true for two of my direct Johnston relatives, consequently, both named William.

William Henderson Johnston was the brother of my great-grandfather, James Washington Johnston. He was born 18 May 1890, in Black River, Michigan and died ‘in action’ just outside of Arras, France on 29 Mar 1917. While not mentioned by name, based on the 31st Alberta Battalion war diary for that day, I’ve concluded that he might have been killed by artillery fire.

Two other ranks are unaccounted for, but I think that it is established that they were struck by a shell when crossing “NO MAN’S LAND” escorting three prisoners. Major Seaton states that he saw a shell strike in the middle of a party that he took to be three prisoners and two of our men, and two others bear witness to having seen such a party. (31st (Alberta) Battalion Order No.138. – 29-3-17.)

I digress, William Henderson is not the subject of this post, that honour belongs to his nephew, my grandfather’s brother, William G.W. Johnston. I wanted to give some brief history of William’s uncle for a note further below.

William George Washington Johnston was born 10 Jun 1917, to parents James Washington Johnston (1876-1967) and Sophia Harriett Basham (1890-1959). A brother to my grandfather, James Henderson Johnston (1913-1981), he was my great uncle, and like many of my relatives he was one that I will never get to meet in this lifetime.

c. 1929 (Ern, Jim, Bill)

c. 1927 (Ern, Jim, Bill)

Like his siblings, he attended, Mowat School where he completed seven and a half years of classes and can be found in the school records from 1924 to 1931. In the image below, the 1929 Mowat December Attendance Record, you can see that Bill is 12 years old and in Grade 6 while his older brothers are in Grade 7 and Grade 9.

c. Dec 1929 (Mowat School Attendance)

c. Dec 1929 (Mowat School Attendance)

My great aunt wrote a bit about her step-brother, “Brother Bill was a born farmer. But World War II was just around the corner and life changed for all of us.” The two photos below are some of my favourites; I love the poses and the clothing they’re wearing. I wish I had a better copy of the tractor photo.

c. 1939 (Bill, Jim, Ern)

c. 1939 (Bill, Jim, Ern)

c. 1939 (Ern, Jim, Bill)

c. 1939 (Ern, Jim, Bill)

On 15 June, 1942, Bill was called up to the Canadian Military in Winnipeg, MB. On the occupational history form he listed his occupation as a farm labourer and he wished to return to this type of work when the war was over. He completed 60 days of basic training as well as 60 days of advanced training with the Winnipeg Light Infantry.

On 11 January, 1943, he was interviewed in W.L.I. Vernon, B.C. The interviewer noted a few interesting things about Bill, “Doesn’t smoke and drinks very little. He would like to be in the heavy artillery because he thinks he’d like it. Dull type, average physique, and not particularly interested in anything. Limited learning ability and no particular liking for Carrier Pl. Unlikely to improve greatly.” He was recommended as either an infantry rifleman or a carrier pl. (Bren Gunner).

Bill was admitted to the Vernon Military Hospital on 11 July, 1942, and was discharged on the 31st. He was then granted sick furlough from 1st of August to the 22nd. His sick leave was extended to 5 September and he returned on the 4th of September.

On 1 March, 1943, a transport warrant #A362, 085 d/17 Feb 43 was issued.
S.O.S. W.L.I. on t’fer to 3rd ??? BN Regina Rifles on 23 July, 1943.
S.O.S. for A-P 3 rd Regina Riles on 17 August, 1943.
T.O.S. for A-P 2nd Airfield Defence Bn. (Regina Rifles) on 18 August, 1943.
Attached for a/p ex pay to #12 Dist Depot (Farm Duty) on 31 August, 1943.
Ceases to be att’d f.a.p. on retuning to Unit 17 October, 1945.
S.O.S. F.A.P. on transfer to 31st (Alberta) Recce Regiment on 5 November, 1943.
T.O.S. 31st (Alberta) Recce. Regiment on transfer from 2nd Airfield Defence Bn. (R.R.) on 6 November, 1943. Rank is now a trooper.
Granted leave and furlough with R.A. to 3 December, 1943. TWA547586
Att. for rations and qtrs. to KORC(CA) Victoria to 7 December, 1943.

Bill never made it to any battlefields. The record of military service indicates that he was listed as being A.W.L. at 2200 hours of 27 February, 1944. He was never seen alive again.

Sadly, with special grief to Jim and our mother, Bill had died while in the army…Bill of the blue, blue eyes and the kind and honest heart.

On 10 February, 1945, Bill’s body was found in brush outside of Chiliwack, B.C. The causality notification form indicated that the presumed date of death was the day he went missing on 27 February, 1944. A letter was sent from G.S. Perrin, Brigadier, of the Department of National Defence Army, to my great grandmother, Sophia Johnston, that indicated the body of her son had no evidence of bone fractures and because of the advanced state of decomposition the coroner was unable to record the actual cause of the death.

Winnipeg Free Press

Winnipeg Free Press (13 Feb 1945)

Bill’s body was discovered wholly by accident when an 18-year-old boy, Gerald Walsynuk, found it in a remote spot of Oscar Hotchkiss’ Farm near Lickman Road. The body was found lying behind a log, under some cedar trees, near a stream of water. The body was fully dressed in battle dress including black coveralls and a black tam on the head.

The British Colombia Police report sent along with military records from LAC is able to fill in a few questions. Lieut. Chet Woods, who was attached to the 41st. Alberta reconnaissance Regiment, Vedder Crossing, B.C., while talking to a Miss A. Flynn, informed her that a private of that unit had gone insane and wandered away from the camp and that they had searched for the man but without success. If the above is true then it is possible that William G.W. Johnston is the man in question. Capt. Mooney was there that night and might be able to shed some light on the matter.

This is where the report ends abruptly. I do not know whether the police were able to get a hold of Capt. Mooney or whether they were able to conclude the report. I contacted the Chilliwack RCMP office but to no avail as their records only go as far back as 1971 and anyone who might have known if there were earlier records have either died or retired. The Chilliwack Archives were able to provide me with a few newspaper articles but they also do not provide a conclusive answer. My next step is to contact Canada National Defence to determine whether they have an archives department that might hold something. I also want to contact the Canadian Military Education Centre Museum to see if they have any ideas on where I should turn next, however, their hours of operation are limited and I have not had the time to contact them.

I have no idea what happened to my grandfather’s brother and I don’t know if I ever will. Was the pressure of his post too much for him? Did he loose his mind and commit suicide or was he a victim of homicide? I wonder if a more conclusive answer would have been made if his body was found sooner. It seems like such a bizarre set of circumstances I really don’t know what to make of it. Based on my current knowledge of Johnston family we have no obvious history of mental illness. The closest instance I can think of is that Jane Atchison (1854-1893), William’s grandmother, died of asphyxiation during an epithetic fit.

Chilliwack Newspaper (7 Mar 1945)

Chilliwack Newspaper (7 Mar 1945)

Bill was buried on 5 March, 1945, with full Military Honours in the Canadian Legion Cemetery in Chilliwack, B.C. Row C, plot 57. He is one of 9 individuals buried there. After the death of William George Washington there was some superstitious feelings on naming any further Johnston babies William in case further tragedy might befall the family again. Consequently I have no uncles, cousins, or nephews named William.

52 Ancestors – Week 4 – Joseph Pelletier (the Carnegie Hero)

This week in Amy Johnson Crow’s genealogist challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, I am going to write about my mother’s side of the family. Being the ‘baby’ of the family I have missed meeting many of my older relatives simply because I am the age of many of my nephews and nieces, as a consequence, many events that my siblings have been privy to have happened long before I was born.

Today, I am going to write about one of my uncles, Joseph Pelletier (1947-1973). Joey was born the second last of my mother’s siblings, eleven children in total. My mother and her siblings, including Joey, grew up on a Blackfoot reserve in southern Alberta.

Being Aboriginal children in the 1930s-1960s they would have been required to have attended Indian Residential School. I do not know much about their lives during their childhood and youth as there are only three of the eleven siblings alive today, including my mother, and I believe this reflects on the harsh lives they lived. I can only speculate, based on my studies and work with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, on the treatment of my mother’s siblings in the residential school system. My mother is lucky, she can remember mostly good memories of her time at Crowfoot IRS either because her experience was better than most or because she has blocked any painful memories out for good reason. Anyway I am getting off topic- more on Indian Residential Schools in a future post.

On the morning of 29 Jul 1973, while swimming in the Bow River, 10-year-old Thelma A. Wells, became caught in the revolving current over a hole in the river bottom and called for help. Joey, my uncle, having heard her cries, entered the water fully clothed and swam to her. A struggle ensued; and both were submerged briefly several times. Joey called for assistance. His younger brother, Robert, entered the water and swam to them. While Robert was able to take Thelma safely to the bank, Joey floundered in the spinning current over the hole and drowned before help reached him.

The Carnegie Hero Fund Commission awarded Joey the bronze Carnegie Medal in recognition of his outstanding act of heroism. The purpose of the Carnegie Hero Fund is to award individuals in the United States and Canada who risk their lives to an extraordinary degree saving or attempting to save the lives of others.

pelletier joey newspaper

c.1973 (Calgary)

Above is a clipping from a newspaper, most likely from Calgary, that was with the Carnegie award certificate in our basement. I do not know what has happened to the bronze metal itself because we do not have it. I can only hope one of my aunts have it in their possession otherwise it has been lost, most likely when the government seized my grandmother’s property when she passed away in 1990. I am tempted to contact the Carnegie Hero Fund to see whether a replacement medal can be given to the family again. Couldn’t hurt to ask anyway.

c. 1962

c. 1962

While I do not know much of my uncle Joey this act of bravery makes me wish I could have known him during his brief life. One of the rare photos I have in my possession shows a smiling young man full of life– even a bit of a comedian, but who isn’t at 15? I wish I had more photos of him as well as other members of my family whose faces are now lost to memory and time. This is why I treasure the photos, documents, and artifacts I am able to get my hands on. It is important to me to discover and uncover as much information as I can about my family- the more I get to know them the more I get to know myself.