Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 29, 1919

C.N.R. Shopmen Drop Tools

The big strike is assuming greater proportions every day, and the universal question is, “Where is it going to end?” The railway mail clerks went on strike on Wednesday and there is practically no mail for outside points moving.
The men in the C.N.R. shops here struck at 10 o’clock this (Thursday) morning. This move will do much to cripple the operations of the company. The best of order, however, prevails.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Meeting of the above association, held Thursday, May 22nd, Comrades F. Scrase and G.F. Johnston both being away, Comrade Roy Armstrong took chair for the meeting.
Seven applications were received for membership. All were accepted.
Comrade Roy Armstrong reported on his trip to Winnipeg in connection with the question of memorial. He reports that Winnipeg is anxious to get a provincial memorial erected in Winnipeg, funds to be raised throughout the province. This does not meet with the approval of outside points, which desire memorials at local points. The question was referred to a committee, and another meeting will be held. He also stated that the general feeling favored a community hall.
The thanks of the association were tendered to Comrade Neeley for erecting doors for club room.
The Ladies’ Aid have turned over a balance of $100 to the association, and our thanks are due them.
The Sports Day committee met Friday, May 23rd. Citizens of the tow have generously supported the committee, and one of the best Sports day should result.
The Veterans’ baseball team played the C.N.R. on the 26th, and went under. More practice is needed to ensure better success.

“Ivens, the Terrible”

Recv. “Bill” Ivens is one of the leading figures on the labor side in the big strike. He was on the Ochre River circuit for several years and while there kept things going. During a recent visit the returned soldiers refused to permit him to speak. The Winnipeg Free Press refers to him as “Ivens, the Terrible.”

Married

READER-STORRAR – At the Parsonage, Dauphin, on May 27th, by the Rev. J.A. Haw. Alex. Reader to Eva May Storrar, both of Fork River.

Record Hot Weather

He hot weather for the past ten days is unprecedented for the month of May. The records in existence show nothing to equal it. The registering of the government thermometer since May 22nd is as follows:
May 22 …. 95 deg.
May 23 …. 92 deg.
May 24 …. 95 deg.
May 25 …. 95 deg.
May 26 …. 93 deg.
May 27 …. 95 deg.

Fork River

Pte. Alex. Reader has returned from overseas and, what do you think, came all the way to Fork River to pick out a wife. He was married at Dauphin on Tuesday to Eva May Storrar.
We are supposed to have a herd law at Fork River, but not withstanding many animals roam at will about the street at night.
John H. Richarson and Frank Hafenbrak made the trip to Dauphin on Tuesday by car. They report the roads good.
Fred Tilt has been appointed a justice of the peace. He will balance the scales evenly.
Adolf Rudinski has purchased a Clydesdale stallion from E.E. McKinstry, of Dauphin. The introduction of a better clam of stock in our district is what is needed.
Strike or no strike the Herald came to hand as usual last week. The large circulation of the paper at this point is evidence of the appreciation of the people.
When Mr. W.J. Osborne, municipal auditor, was here he assured a number of ratepayers hat he would have the auditor’s report printed this year. So far as can be learned the report has not yet made its appearance.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15, 1919

Four Men Badly Injured

Mr. Arthur Fisher, who resides in the Burrow district, is erecting a large barn. Last Friday four men, John Neely, Frank Potter, John James and Geo. Smith were engaged erecting the rafters when a whirlwind came up suddenly collapsing the timbers. Neely, Potter and Smith were badly injured by the failing timbers. James, who was working on the top, jumped when the rafters commenced to fall, but was unable to clear himself and was struck and injured. Mr. Neely was so badly injured that his condition will not yet permit of his removal to town.

G.W.V.A.

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, May 8th, between 30 and 40 of the comrades being present. Owing to the unavoidable absence of the president, Capt. F. Scrase, Comrade G.F. Johnston, vice president, took the chair.
Applications were received from 13 returned soldiers for membership, all of which were accepted. This makes the membership of the local branch 195 and a considerable increase on this is expected in the near future.
The secretary has since this meeting been informed that a special meeting has been called by Premier Norrie to consider the memorial question for this province, on May 16th. It has, therefore, been decided to send a delegate to this meeting to represent this branch.
During the past week a donation of $112.65 was received from the citizens of the Ethelbert district, per Rev. G. Tymchuk. The thanks of the association are due to all the subscribers of the above mentioned donation.
A grant of $25 to this association has been received from the Dauphin Automobile club. This has been acknowledged and thanks are due to the members of the club for same.
On May 23rd and 24th the “Better ‘Ole” is being put on at the Star theatre. This is to be under the auspices of the G.W.V.A. Ask any returned man what he thinks of it and he will soon convince you, to say the least of it, that it will be well worth seeing, and at the same time give the association a lift.
A meeting was held on Friday, the 9th in connection with the G.W.V.A. Sports Day, to be held on 1st July, and arrangements made for appointing the various committees to make same a success. Posters are to be got out advertising same. The committee are requested to note that the next meeting will be held on Friday, may 16th, at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is essential.
Members are asked to note that the Manitoba Provincial Command have issued a weekly paper devoted to the returned solider. It is known as the Manitoba Veteran, and will be issued weekly. The rate is 5c per copy or $2 per year. Sample copies have been received and if the paper continues like the sample a bright future is assured. Subscriptions are taken by the local secretary of the G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Billy Tuck has gone to Dryden, Ont., for a short trip.
W.R. Snelgrove is around again after his illness. He has moved on to the Chase farm, having exchanged his Dauphin residence for the property.
Steve Warrawrork, of Volga, has purchased the Slobodizan farm from W.R. Snelgrove.
Corp. Duncan Briggs and Private Tom Briggs and H. Craighill have arrived from overseas. They are looking hale and hearty.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron and children, from Neepawa, are visiting at Mr. Nat Little’s house.
Robt. Rowe intends Fording it to town for the future, having purchased a Ford car from Nat Little.
Wm. Northam is busy fencing the farm be purchased south of town.
All Saints S.S. will meet as usual at 2 o’clock, Sunday, 18th inst.
Rain is falling as I write and it is welcome. All the wheat is about in. The season for work has been very favorable.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 19 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 19 – Fork River

Herman Godkin, real estate agent of Dauphin, spent a few days with W. Williams.
We have been informed that Mr. Walter Clark was fortunate to get a moose. The head is said to be the finest seen in these parts with a spread of forty-four inches.
Sid. Gower, engineer, returned from Dauphin and intends working with W. Williams this winter.
We were pleased to meet Peter Robinson, an old-timer, in town. He is spending a short time with his parents on the Mossey River.
The C.N. telegraph gang is here renewing the poles, which work was needed.
The Newell moving picture show that was booked for Tuesday and Wednesday did not come off at the orange Hall for lack of accommodation. We need a good boarding house here for the travelling public.
There was not a very large turner to the masquerade ball in the Orange Hall on account of the farmers being busy threshing.
Mr. McIntosh, of Valley River, was here on business.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase will hold a Xmas service in the school house, Winnipegosis on Xmas morning at eleven o’clock, and in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, in the evening at eight o’clock.

1912 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Malley, from Brandon, arrived in town Tuesday. We trust the weather will be favourable for his trip up the lake.
The municipal elections are on now. May we hope that the wiser promises made by the candidates be fulfilled by the successful ones. We certainly need more passable roads, and here be it remarked that if our church wardens finds transportation between here and Fork River too difficult to accomplish in the future, the vision of the rectory, seen here, will have to materialize.
A Christmas morning service will be held in the school house 11 a.m. Come and help sing the carols insuring a “Merry Christmas.”
The Santa Claus fund seems to be a popular one. Perhaps it is because he is such an adept of minding his own business. He is remembering our bachelors with many plum puddings.
The Card Circle will be closed this week for the year. It is a matter of serious consideration if it should be reopened as so many lovers of the game do not enter before 9 p.m., which is near the time when wise and honest heads seek their rest; besides beige started to while pleasantly away a couple of hours, thus inviting congenial spirits, and finding ourselves entertained by a stranger proves a mental lack which should more advantagely be supplied at home, nevertheless we trust for a closing game this week that will reveal its true merit and may the winners of the prizes make good use of them. A certain Mr. Webber is to be thanked for the gentleman’s, which is a gun metal watch.
If we hurt ourselves as much by falling when climbing up hill, as we would so doing when running down hill, no one could be blamed for refusing to climb; but one of nature’s mercies is that we cannot.
The Christian League held a very successful meeting ask week.
The hunting season being closed may the stronger sex once more settle down to “the daily round.”
No moose, no heads, no tales.
Wm. Parker, of this Armstrong Trading Co. is up the lake or out to Pine Creek auditing books.
The young people of our town have a bond of sympathy with Dauphin ones in the difficulty (met here) of preparing a skating rink – see the lake.

1918 Dec 19 – Had Both Legs Crushed

Orval McInnes, a boy about 15 years of age, met with a bad accident at Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The boy was assisting to put ice in an ice house when the block that was being raised slipped from the grippers and fell on his legs, crushing them badly. He was brought to the hospital here the same afternoon.

1918 Dec 19 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Dec. 14.
Heath Officer Dr. Medd was through this district this week and has closed the school for the time being as some of the scholars are down with influenza.
D. Crerar has sold the Hudson’s Bay farm for a good figure. What about the herd law now?
Mr. Laidlaw has finished threshing. The cattle will have a chance to feed considerable land next spring.
Hechter Bros.’ gasoline tractor has arrived and they intend to turn over considerable land next spring.
W. Paddock has broke considerable land this year. Steam and gasoline engines materially aid in preparing the land for crop.
Mr. Winger has sold his flock of sheep to Mr. Venables for a good figure. There is no doubt but sheep pay well and in the future more will be kept in the district.
Mr. Waddell, from Missouri, is the new teacher engaged for the Bicton Heath School. It is up to us to “show Mr. Waddell.”
F. Sharp has completed his house and stable. The buildings are the right type for the farmers and we hope to see more of them erected.
Thos. Toye, our local weather prophet, says the winter will be a mild one. Tom, it may be said, does not make his observations from charts, but seeks his weather lore from wild animals, such as the muskrat, which he says you can depend on.

1918 Dec 19 – Fork River

Chas. Bugg, of Ochre River, was in town lately renewing acquaintances.
Pte. Arthur Shannon is home, having received his discharge.
The election is over and we are now already to shake hands and enter into the Christmas spirit, good will toward all men.

1918 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

The Dominion Government is making headway with the cutting of a canal at Meadow Portage which, when completed, will open up a waterway with Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Manitoba. The land through which the canal will run has already been cleared and boarded and in the spring about 600 men will be employed doing excavation work.
A card party, in aid of the Red Cross, is being held every Wednesday evening in the Rex theatre. A good musical program is provided and refreshments are served.
A special Xmas service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 22nd, in the Union Church. Special Xmas hymns and solos will help to make the service attractive. Subject will be “The Brotherhood of Man.” A hearty welcome is extended to all.
On the afternoon of Xmas day a Xmas tree entertainment will be held in the above church and a huge tree loaded with toys and decorations will be exhibited to delight the hearts of the children. Santa Claus has arranged to give every child a present from the tree.
A bank will shortly be established at Winnipegosis.
A recent traveller on the Dauphin and Winnipegosis express complains bitterly of having to have an extra washing day in the same week owning to the dirty condition of the train.
The Armstrong Independent Fisheries is sending ten teams up the lake this week to bring in fish. Other companies also have teams employed bringing down fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1910

1915 Dec 8 – Shot for a Deer

What might have proved a fatal accident to a hunter occurred in the Riding Mountain south of Gilbert Plains on Friday last. William, the 18-year-old son of Jas. D. Sutherland was hunting in the mountain and was attired in white. He was coming through the scrub when the white of his legs was noticed by another hunter, by the name of Dimmick from Roblin, who at a distance of 2200 yards fired at him for a deer and hit him in the right leg, the ball breaking it. Sutherland immediately ell and yelled loudly which prevented Dimmick from again firing as he had the rifle to his shoulder a second time when he heard the yells. As the two men were a long distance away from any habitation, Dimmick had to carry the wounded man three miles to a farmer’s house when medical aid was procured and young Sutherland brought to the Dauphin Hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1915 Dec 8 – Fork River

Miss Lane, from Dauphin is spending a few days up here before proceeding to her home in Winnipeg.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of Mowat School was taken seriously ill last week and returned to Dauphin to be under the doctor’s hands. We all hope she will soon be herself again.
F. Storrar paid a visit Dauphin lately.
A Christmas tree and entertainment will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the English Church, on Friday evening, December 23rd, at eight o’clock. A good time is expected for the children. Admission all children free, but a charge for admission will be made to adults.
Mr. Letwin has been appointed as assistant to Mr. D. Kennedy in the Armstrong Store here.

1915 Dec 8 – Sifton

Bert Kennedy, of Canora, Sask., who was a patient in the Dauphin Hospital with typhoid, was a visitor to his brother John Kennedy for a few days before returning to his house at Canora.
Miss Scott, Neepawa, was a visitor at the Presbyterian mission house for a couple of days. Miss Scott is always welcomed at the mission house.
Rev. Johnston, of Gilbert Plains, held services here on Wednesday evening last. The sermon was well put and much appreciated.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held service on Thursday evening. Quite a large crowd congregated.
The moose shooting season is on again. Rudolph Spruhs is one of the number to leave for the haunts of the antlered monarch.
The Manitoba Government Telephones have a construction gang camped in the village doing construction work east of town.
On Tuesday Messrs. Buckwold & Levin shipped out three cars of cattle to Winnipeg.
The elevator of the British America Elevator Co. had to close down on Saturday for lack of cars to ship out. This is said to be the first experience of this kind since the elevator was erected. The opportune arrival of empty cars has now, however relieved the situation.
Rev. J.A. Sabourin is having a furnace and hot water heating system installed by M. Cardiff, of Dauphin, in his new building which is being rapidly completed. A new R.C. Church is expected to be erected next summer.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Melynik a few days ago a pair of twin girls. All three doing well.
With the late fall of snow the farmers are quickly taking advantage of the good sleighing and hustling their grain to market.

1915 Dec 8 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church, Winnipegosis, on Sunday next. Subject: The Call to Advance.
Teamsters here have been busy freighting fish from the various fishing grounds up the lake. They are impartment men and must needs be well catered for. Recognizing this fact the Misses Geekie and Black have opened a new restaurant at which good, solid, substantial meals are served at all hours. This is just what was needed in our busy little town. The fact that hot meals can be obtained at all hours, would see to be a guarantee of success. We wish them luck.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 5 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 5 – Fork River

Miss M.B. Nixon left for Winnipeg, for a weeks visit among friends.
Miss Muriel Alterton, of Mossey River, and Miss Grant, of Pine View Schools attended the convention at Dauphin.
Mrs. Geo. Shannon and Mrs. Kennedy returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Wm. King expressed to E. Walker, of Dauphin, a trio of Mammoth Bronze turkeys for breeding purposes.
Fred Cooper, W. Williams and T. Shannon’s threshing outfits are busy these days.
D.F. Wilson, F.B. Lacey and J. Seiffert, members of the council, returned from a week’s trip to the Municipal Convention at Winnipeg.
Miss Lizze Clark returned to Dauphin after spending a few days at her home.
Mr. Monington, of Neepawa, is staying with J. Robinson for the hunting season.
Duncan Kennedy has received two shipments of pure bred Plymouth Rocks from Portage la Prairie last week and is now in the market with pure bred roosters.
Joe Lockhart was elected trustee for Mossey River School for the coming term in place of Wm. King, who retires this term.
Looking over the Herald we notice the annual statement of receipts and expenditures for ten months of the municipality of Mossey River. Just the same old two by four statement. Why not publish in book form in detail like Dauphin. Our council seems to be behind the times in this respect. Year after year we are asking for this to see where our money is expended and this year we cannot see where any of it has been expended on the roads.

1912 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

The annual school meeting was held in the school house on Monday, a large number of ratepayers being present. Messrs. Grenon, Whale and Thomas were elected as trustees for the coming year and Mr. Shear continues as sec.-treasurer. Mr. Hulme’s engagement is for the year. The master of a new school to be erected was discussed. The lots have already been secured, as we hope it will not be long till they are build on.
Rev. H.H. Scrase remained in town from Sunday’s service till Tuesday.
Harry Grenon is preparing to open a business in the late Hudson’s Bay post.
The Misses Paddock had a party last night to entertain Miss Hazel Coffey who has been visiting the Misses Whale while Mr. and Mrs. Whale made a trip to Dauphin.
We are pleased to see certain patients are able to be out again.
The young people’s enjoyment on the lake will be curtailed since the snow has come.
A few of the men from the fishing camps took advantage of the recent glistening ice to make a trip back to town, an enviable one “on their steely feet so bright.”
Mrs. Bradley has enjoyed a most delightful visit from her sister, Mrs. Armstrong. Miss Charlotte accompanies her aunt back to Portage.
Mr. and Mrs. Hippesley, of South Bay, have returned from a trip to Dauphin. Regret is felt at the probability of their moving West to B.C.
A visit to Mrs. Johnston’s home would assure anyone of the benefit on illness to be gained by sojourning there.
Miss Hayes reports an interesting convention held in Dauphin.
Hunters are arriving in town in pursuit of the fleet footed game of the woods.

1918 Dec 5 – Blew Out His Brains

Telesphore Gagnon, who resided with his two sons at Valpoy, 15 miles northeast of Ste. Rose, committed suicide last week by blowing out his brains with a shotgun. Gagnon lost his wife a year ago, and also suffered lose to his property by fire. These matters preyed on him until his mind became unbalanced and led him to commit the rash act. He was 60 years of age.

1918 Dec 5 – Had Arm Amputated

Thos. Switzer, who resides in the Sandringham district, had the misfortune to accidentally discharge his rife, the bullet entering his left arm. He was brought to the hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the arm below the elbow.

1918 Dec 5 – Major Barker Critically Ill

A cablegram from France to Mr. G. Barker at the end of the week states that the condition of his son William is critical.

1918 Dec 5 – Military Funeral

Pte. Wilbur Olsob, of the 226th Batt., who died of influenza, was accorded a military funeral, he arrangements being in the hands of the G.W.V.A. The funeral cortege assembled at 2.30 p.m. at Farrell’s undertaking parlours on Friday afternoon, where a service was conducted by Rev. J.A. Haw, who also officiated at the graveside. About 50 members of the association, under command of Capt. Scrase, attended. Lieut. Clark and Sergt. Chambers were in charge of he firing party.

1918 Dec 5 – Rural Nominations

MOSSEY RIVER
Reeve – T.B. Venables, F.B. Lacey, J.D. Robertson
Ward 1 – J. Yakavanka
Ward 3 – E.A. Marcroft
Ward 5 – J. Namaka

1918 Dec 5 – Victoria Cross for Barker

Major Wm. G. Barker has been awarded the highest honour possible for distinguished service at the front, the Victoria Cross.
Other Dauphin boys who have been decorated, include:
Military Cross – Lawrence Shand
Military Medals – Stuart R. Widmeyer (deceased), G.A. Jackson, Geo. F. King, N. Chard, A. Douglas and J. Fletcher

1918 Dec 5 – Fork River

Mrs. M. Angus has returned to Winnipeg after spending two weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Craighill.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Brewer are patients in the hospital at Dauphin.
W. King, I.H.C. agent, has just finished a warehouse in which to store implements.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Northam have taken up their residence in the parsonage for the winter.
H. Swartwood, of Dauphin, was a recent visitor in our midst.
Sid Frost has left for Rathwell. Before leaving Wm. King, on behalf of Sid’s many friends here, presented him with a valuable violin and case in recognition of his services in a musical way.
Wm. Williams was a Dauphin visitor on Tuesday.
F.B. Lacey, T.B. Venables and J.D. Robertson are the nominees for the reeveship.
The Fork River, Mossey River and Pine View Schools are still closed.
Several of the hunters have returned. Which one shot the steer?

Pte. N. MacCauley, of Winnipegosis, was among the returned soldiers from overseas this week.

1918 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

A special peace thanksgiving service was held in the Union Church on Dec. 1st. The church was well decorated with flags of the Allies, and was packed to overflowing. The hymns were of a joyful, patriotic and military character, and were heartily sung. The Rev. A.E. Hook conducted the service and took on his subject, “Trusting in God.” He gave a vivid description of the terrible struggle which had lasted over four years, and spoke of the murmurings which had sometimes arising during the war. People had doubted if there was a God and if there was he was not a righteous God. The termination of the war, however, had vindicated God as a righteous God. He said that we had many things to be thankful for because of the war. He mentioned principally that drink and practically been abolished and that nations had been awakened into prayer in a manner they had never done before.
The ban, which had closed down all public gatherings during he epidemic of influenza, was lifted last week and there are no cases in town, though there are a few in the rural districts.
The first load of fish from the lake arrived in town on Tuesday. The fishing has been delayed somewhat on account of the mild weather, but the prospects of a large catch are good.
D. Roy Grenon skated into town today from Waterhen, a distance of over 25 miles.
Winnipegosis reports over two crowns to its credit in the Victory Loan Drive.
Two carloads of wheat were shipped out of town this week.
The fishermen have started to put up ice for summer use.
The collectors report that subscriptions to the Mercantile Sailors’ Fund are coming in well.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 28 – 1912

1912 Nov 28 – Fork River

The annual meeting of Mossey River School, No. 999 will be held at D.F. Wilson’s office on Monday, Dec. 2nd at 10 o’clock, for the closing of the year’s business and electing a trustee.
C. Clark spend Sunday at Dauphin among friends.
Rec. H.H. Scrase returned from a few days visit among his parishioners at Winnipegosis.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, accountant for the A.T. Co., spent a short time at the Co.’s store on business.
Several of our citizens collapsed the other morning and on investigating it was caused by trying to meet the train which arrived five minutes ahead of time from Dauphin, which was an unheard of thing before in this burgh. We trust they will keep it up instead of keeping the farmers in the cold two or three hours every day as heretofore.
Mr. Darroch, of Dauphin, was here for a short time on business.
Miss Olive Clark left for a short vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Mrs. Humpherys and family, of Dauphin, are staying at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson. They have the sympathy of the people of this community in their said bereavement in the death of Mr. Humphreys, who was held in ugh esteem in by all who knew him here.
Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, attended a hurried call to the home of Willis Miller of Mowat and we are pleased to hear Mrs. Miller is improving. The Dr. is under the impression that paying a night call over the new grade on the south road is equal to passing through a cyclone. As Dunk is used to travelling the north road and did not put the break on in time, things were well shaken before taken according to prescription for one.
The Orangemen of Purple Star, L.O.L., 1765, will have a grand masquerade ball on Dec. 13th, in the hall. Grand march at 9 o’clock. Supper provided. Admission tickets, gentlemen $1.00. Everybody welcome.
Nomination for reeve and councillors for the year 1913 will be held in the Municipal hall, Winnipegosis, on Tuesday, Dec. 3rd, between the hours of one and two, for Mossey River Municipality.

1912 Nov 28 – Sifton

The late fine weather has done much to help out conditions in this part of the country. Many farmers now have all the feed they will require.
From present indications it looks as if the output of wood this winter is going to be large.
General regret is felt here at the departure of Coun. Ogryslo for Dauphin. He’s a good councillor and a good fellow.
The question now is frequently asked, “Who is going to be our new councillor?” The names heard mentioned are John Kennedy, P. Wood and several of our prominent Galician residents. We hope it will be a good man as there is much work to do in Ward 6 the coming year.
With the crop not as good as usual the lower price of grain is more severely felt. It is becoming to be generally regarded that mixed farming is the sure and safe way to succeed. Batter, eggs and livestock find a good market all the time.
$1.00 pays for the Herald from now until the end of Dec. 1913.

1912 Nov 28 – Winnipegosis

The Christian League topic for this week is given out as “Anticipation.” A correspondent deems it permissible to remark, that, if it would retrace its steps and board the public it would perhaps more quickly realize its object and be in less danger of being overtaken by the ego.
The Card Circle last week entertained a guest, Mr. Wilson, of the Western Fancy Goody Co., who was delayed in town. Clem Bradley was somewhat consoled for his recent unlucky play in Dauphin, by winning fat prize in the first home game.
The entertainment intended to be given by the W.A. on the 6th. Dec. has to be postponed till the 20th, owing to the advent of a moving picture company for the first week of December, and a masquerade ball to be held in Fork River on the 13th.
The teachers are to attend the Dauphin convention, and Mrs. Ketcheson and Miss Bardley will ail themselves of a holiday in good company.
The school being closed for a week gives the children a chance of revelling in pond skating though minus 5 (sense).
The lake is new frozen over.
Miss Evelyn Burrell, who has been quite ill from the effects of a severe cold is able to be up again, but is still under the doctor’s case.
J.P. Grenon has returned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 21 – 1912

1912 Nov 21 – Ethelbert

Kenneth McLean has fully recovered and has now taken a trip to Vancouver for a change, and whilst there, will look into the prospects as to Coquitlam’s progress.
The British American elevator, is now taking its share of the wheat offering, but owing to the unfavourable and late season there is not much being offered.
A case came up before the P.M. for cruelty to a calf, and was decided in favour of the defendant. During the evidence it developed that there were a great number of barking and chasing dogs and in many cases even biting at teams and pedestrians, as they passed. Owners such of such dogs, were warned, that unless the dogs were kept under, they would be liable to be destroyed upon short notice.
Postmaster Scaife was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
The Pundy case was thrown out on technical grounds; had it not been so the results to all concerned might have been very serious. It is time that these petty exhibitions of spite and I’ll will should cease. The motto should be, live and let live and fair play for all, whether he be Jew or Greek, Barbarian or free, or as some might put it, everyone for himself, and the d—– take the hindmost.
Snow feel in considerable quantities on the 10th and the winter is now fairly inaugurated with us.
The danger of the arrangement of the switch, were nearly leaving bad results. A train backing up quietly, was not noticed and as the mail contractor was getting the mail from the car, he turned quickly across to reach the platform, and was within a few inches of a moving flat car before it was noticed, and he drew back. It behooves people to be careful, but all the same, the present system is full of danger, and some better provision as to lights and signals are needed, to protect the public, whilst going or coming in by train. It is now a long time, since the Ethelbert people, were promised by the company to make radical changes as to the switch and station. It seems as if nothing will be done, until someone is killed, or there is a bad fire.
J. McLean has now closed up his store business, and J. Marantz, another Jew, now carries on the business.
The Rev. Father Kraney is now stationed at Ethelbert, and conducts the services for the Greek-Roman religionists.
There are quite a number of marriages here at present, which incidentally, indicates hopeful prospects for the future.

1912 Nov 21 – FROM ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT

Mr. Marantz is right into business. He indeed deserves credit as a store manager as he is already doing a thriving business.
Miss Ethel Marantz, of Sifton, spent the week-end in Ethelbert.
Alex Katz, who is at present with Campbell & Simpson, at Dauphin, visited Ethelbert on a business trip Saturday. He reports the town looking as good as ever.
Threshing is going on at a good rate and will soon be finished.
Galicians of Ethelbert and the surrounding district had a concert on Saturday night following which was a dance.
At a recent meeting of the council the reeve and one of the councillors had a lively set-to, in which blows were exchanged.

1912 Nov 21 – Winnipegosis

J.P. Grenon, manager for the Armstrong Trading Co., who has been away the past three weeks on an extended trip to Lower Canada via the States, is expected home on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Steele, who have charge of the branch store at Mafeking, are making their semi-yearly sojourn hear at present.
Rev. H.H Scrase, anglican minister, is spending a couple of days in town visiting his parishioners.
Our senior teacher, Mr. Hulme, is suffering from a protracted cold. We are pleased to note that his interest in his pupils is extend to music; no doubt some of whom will benefit from free lessons on the organ in the school-room.
Dr. Medd is feeling the benefit of a recent vacation.
The Winnipegosis Christian League holds its weekly meetings Thursday evening at 8 o’clock in the Methodist Church, so far the interest has been well maintained and we trust that it will be beneficial.
Miss Isabelle McArthur, who has been visiting in Winnipeg for the past few weeks, is expected home early this week.
Mr. Scott, of the Standard Lumber Co., has returned from a trip to the city.
A Winnipegosis card circle is being formed by the enthusiasts which we trust will prove to be a large one.
Donald Hattie’s gasoline circular saw is in great demand at present, though the present weather is not consuming much of its product. We regret the open season is so unpropitious for the fishermen.
The Hudson’s Bay Co.’s business has been permanently closed.

1912 Nov 21 – Death of Ivor Humphreys

Ivor Humphreys, after several weeks’ illness, passed away on Sunday afternoon last at the comparatively early age of 42 years. Deceased came to the district from Brandon some eight or nine years ago and worked at Sifton for some time, afterwards removing to Dauphin. He filled the position of bookkeeper for the Steen-Copeland Co. for a considerable time and later entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Fleming Wilson, under the firm name of Humphreys & Wilson, when they purchased the gents’ furnishing business of W.C. Turner. After continuing as a member of the firm for a couple of years, during which time his health was not good, he retired and accepted a position in the Dominion Lands office. This he filled until a few weeks ago when stricken down with his final illness.
The late Mr. Humphreys was of a retiring disposition but was held in esteem by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. He was a vocalist of conservable note and for several years was leader of the Presbyterian choir. He was a prominent Knight of Pythias and was one of the hardest works in No. 31, the first Pythian lodge organized here, and to his efforts much of its success is due. He was also one of the chief movers in instating the second Pythian lodge here, Empire No. 35.
The funeral took place on Monday and was held under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, the members of both lodges attending in a body, as also the members of the uniform rank. The members of the Sons of England lodge were too in attendance. The service was held in the Presbyterian Church, which was crowded to the docs. Rev. D. Flemming conducted the service and in his remarks paid a warm tribute to the worth of the deceased.
The pallbearers were all past chancellors of Lodge No. 31 – S. Cohen, E. Mayo, J.W. Johnston, F.R. Copeland, G.A. Nicholson and J. Watson.
A widow and two small children are left to mourn the loss of a loving husband and father.