Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 21 – 1912

1912 Nov 21 – Ethelbert

Kenneth McLean has fully recovered and has now taken a trip to Vancouver for a change, and whilst there, will look into the prospects as to Coquitlam’s progress.
The British American elevator, is now taking its share of the wheat offering, but owing to the unfavourable and late season there is not much being offered.
A case came up before the P.M. for cruelty to a calf, and was decided in favour of the defendant. During the evidence it developed that there were a great number of barking and chasing dogs and in many cases even biting at teams and pedestrians, as they passed. Owners such of such dogs, were warned, that unless the dogs were kept under, they would be liable to be destroyed upon short notice.
Postmaster Scaife was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
The Pundy case was thrown out on technical grounds; had it not been so the results to all concerned might have been very serious. It is time that these petty exhibitions of spite and I’ll will should cease. The motto should be, live and let live and fair play for all, whether he be Jew or Greek, Barbarian or free, or as some might put it, everyone for himself, and the d—– take the hindmost.
Snow feel in considerable quantities on the 10th and the winter is now fairly inaugurated with us.
The danger of the arrangement of the switch, were nearly leaving bad results. A train backing up quietly, was not noticed and as the mail contractor was getting the mail from the car, he turned quickly across to reach the platform, and was within a few inches of a moving flat car before it was noticed, and he drew back. It behooves people to be careful, but all the same, the present system is full of danger, and some better provision as to lights and signals are needed, to protect the public, whilst going or coming in by train. It is now a long time, since the Ethelbert people, were promised by the company to make radical changes as to the switch and station. It seems as if nothing will be done, until someone is killed, or there is a bad fire.
J. McLean has now closed up his store business, and J. Marantz, another Jew, now carries on the business.
The Rev. Father Kraney is now stationed at Ethelbert, and conducts the services for the Greek-Roman religionists.
There are quite a number of marriages here at present, which incidentally, indicates hopeful prospects for the future.

1912 Nov 21 – FROM ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT

Mr. Marantz is right into business. He indeed deserves credit as a store manager as he is already doing a thriving business.
Miss Ethel Marantz, of Sifton, spent the week-end in Ethelbert.
Alex Katz, who is at present with Campbell & Simpson, at Dauphin, visited Ethelbert on a business trip Saturday. He reports the town looking as good as ever.
Threshing is going on at a good rate and will soon be finished.
Galicians of Ethelbert and the surrounding district had a concert on Saturday night following which was a dance.
At a recent meeting of the council the reeve and one of the councillors had a lively set-to, in which blows were exchanged.

1912 Nov 21 – Winnipegosis

J.P. Grenon, manager for the Armstrong Trading Co., who has been away the past three weeks on an extended trip to Lower Canada via the States, is expected home on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Steele, who have charge of the branch store at Mafeking, are making their semi-yearly sojourn hear at present.
Rev. H.H Scrase, anglican minister, is spending a couple of days in town visiting his parishioners.
Our senior teacher, Mr. Hulme, is suffering from a protracted cold. We are pleased to note that his interest in his pupils is extend to music; no doubt some of whom will benefit from free lessons on the organ in the school-room.
Dr. Medd is feeling the benefit of a recent vacation.
The Winnipegosis Christian League holds its weekly meetings Thursday evening at 8 o’clock in the Methodist Church, so far the interest has been well maintained and we trust that it will be beneficial.
Miss Isabelle McArthur, who has been visiting in Winnipeg for the past few weeks, is expected home early this week.
Mr. Scott, of the Standard Lumber Co., has returned from a trip to the city.
A Winnipegosis card circle is being formed by the enthusiasts which we trust will prove to be a large one.
Donald Hattie’s gasoline circular saw is in great demand at present, though the present weather is not consuming much of its product. We regret the open season is so unpropitious for the fishermen.
The Hudson’s Bay Co.’s business has been permanently closed.

1912 Nov 21 – Death of Ivor Humphreys

Ivor Humphreys, after several weeks’ illness, passed away on Sunday afternoon last at the comparatively early age of 42 years. Deceased came to the district from Brandon some eight or nine years ago and worked at Sifton for some time, afterwards removing to Dauphin. He filled the position of bookkeeper for the Steen-Copeland Co. for a considerable time and later entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Fleming Wilson, under the firm name of Humphreys & Wilson, when they purchased the gents’ furnishing business of W.C. Turner. After continuing as a member of the firm for a couple of years, during which time his health was not good, he retired and accepted a position in the Dominion Lands office. This he filled until a few weeks ago when stricken down with his final illness.
The late Mr. Humphreys was of a retiring disposition but was held in esteem by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. He was a vocalist of conservable note and for several years was leader of the Presbyterian choir. He was a prominent Knight of Pythias and was one of the hardest works in No. 31, the first Pythian lodge organized here, and to his efforts much of its success is due. He was also one of the chief movers in instating the second Pythian lodge here, Empire No. 35.
The funeral took place on Monday and was held under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, the members of both lodges attending in a body, as also the members of the uniform rank. The members of the Sons of England lodge were too in attendance. The service was held in the Presbyterian Church, which was crowded to the docs. Rev. D. Flemming conducted the service and in his remarks paid a warm tribute to the worth of the deceased.
The pallbearers were all past chancellors of Lodge No. 31 – S. Cohen, E. Mayo, J.W. Johnston, F.R. Copeland, G.A. Nicholson and J. Watson.
A widow and two small children are left to mourn the loss of a loving husband and father.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 10 – 1910

1915 Nov 10 – MGR. JOST SUICIDES

The Well Known and Popular Manager of Union Bank Suicides while Temporarily Insane
The people of the town were shocked Sunday afternoon when the news spread that George N. Jost, manager of the Union Bank had committed suicide by shooting himself. During the past few days he had been complaining of not feeling well, and on Saturday night consulted a doctor, who told him that his temperature was high, and that it indicated typhoid fever and that he would arrange to have him placed in the hospital. The friend with whom he was staying left the premises for a short time, and during this period Mr. Jost procured a gun and retired to the stable, where he managed to discharge the gun by stooping over it and pulling the trigger. The charge entered the upper part of the abdomen over the left side of the stomach. When found he was still alive, but expired after a few minutes.

Coroner Harrington held an inquest Sunday afternoon and the verdict of the jury was that Jost came to his death by a gunshot wound while in a state of temporary insanity brought on by a high state of temperature in the early stages of typhoid fever.

Mr. Jost was about 28 years of age, and came to Dauphin three months ago from Kindersley, Sask., to assume the management of the Union Bank branch here. His home is in Guysboro, N.S. where his parents live. He was a popular young man and stood well with the business public. The remains were taken to Guysboro for interment.

1915 Nov 10 – Fork River

Editor King of the Dauphin Press paid us a visit last Saturday.
Professor Sutton gave an entertainment in the Hall last Saturday. Quite a number attended.
Mr. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit this week.
E. Clawson who has been away all summer returned from Rothwell last week.
W. Clark who has been away for some time returned last week.
Ten quarter sections of land were sold here last week for taxes.
Mr. Little left here last week for a two weeks holiday in the States.
Paul Wood from Sifton spent Thanksgiving Day here visiting D.F. Wilson.
Archie Stewart from Winnipegosis was here last week.
Quite a lot of damage has been done in this district by forest fires.
E. Clawson and A. Forbes paid Dauphin a visit.

1915 Nov 10 – To the Herald: –

SIR – Re Oak Brae P.M., F.B. Lacey’s reply to a correspondent of Fork River, re Fishing River p.o. and elevator at Fork River says it is a concoction of misrepresentations. Our O.B. friend does not like the truth. At a Burrows meeting at Fork River during the last Dominion election, our O.B. friend was asked by a large number of Fishing River farmers, to explain the reason the p.o. petitioned for was not given to some one of them and why one was established at O.B. instead. He replied that he was in a hurry but as soon as the train left he would explain. They waited, the train left, and our O.B. P.M. was conspicuous by his absence. No explanation. Shortly after our O.B. friend was sent to Winnipeg and we saw him no more till after the election at Fishing River.

If the P.M. appointed at Fishing River had left, there were plenty of other settlers left to take it. He states as an excuse the train did not stop at Fishing River. It does not stop at Oak Brae but he got a post office there and we never heard of a petition asking for one for Lacey P.O.

A post office was established at Fishing River Oct. 1st, 1910, and the mail is carried from Sifton, and not on the same date as the Lacey post office was established (September 25, 1905) as our Oak Brae friend would lead the public to believe in his letter, “A Misrepresentation.” Was a P.O. lost, strayed or stolen for the period of five yeas? The new P.M. has lived eight years there; he should have had it sooner. True he was a supporter of Glen Campbell at the last Dominion election, but he did not get the P.O. then, no Tories need apply. He, I believe, supported the Grits at the last Provincial election and got a P.O. in short order, which shows to get post offices keep in with the postmaster general at Oak Brae. He kicks because the people are tired of the O.B. mail coming in and going out at any old time and carried by every Tom, Dick or Harry. Our O.B. friend told us some time ago it is well to remind people of their duty as they get careless, so we are only giving our friend his own medicine.

Regarding the clique at Fork River, they are doing nicely, the place is booming in the absence of our friend. As for the champions of the Provincial Government, we have a great deal to thank them for in bridges and roads. They have always kept their promises to the people here.

Re the elevator that the O.B. P.M. is worrying about being lost, strayed or style. He is the only man we heard say that the government promised one this fall. True we need one at this point and we sent a petition for one, but the government has no say. There is an Elevator Commission appointed and I have no doubt they will build us one as soon as possible.

Our friend mentions the 9th of June often. His must have had an attack of the Hipocketzotic them. He reminds one of the little boy who stuck a pin in his toy balloon left after the wind escaped.

A Fork Riverite

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 7 – 1912

1912 Nov 7 – Fork River

George King, of Dauphin, was here renewing old acquaintances between trains.
Miss Grant of Pine View was visiting her friends at Valley River during the weeks end.
Thos. Ramsay, P.M. of Sifton, was here on business with D. Kennedy.
Walter Clark has returned staying for a short time at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
Rev. H.H. Scrase, who has been visiting his brother at Swan River and attending the mission at Dauphin, returned on Saturday’s train.
S. Briggs, who was here renewing acquaintances for a short time, has returned to Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy and family have returned after visiting friends at Ochre River and Dauphin.
Miss Olive Clark and miss Comber have returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Hallowe’en has passed, and to judge from the looks of the town next morning, those who too part in the the tricks, should be pleased with themselves if they call it fun. Even the church was made to pay toll, which is going the limit.
The elevator gang has left. The elevator is now open for business with Jack Clemens in charge.
What’s the matter with the Bay Centre correspondent of the Press. We must have touched him on a sore spot by the remarks he makes of the Fork River scribe. We would advise him to give up his Hooligan tactics of sandbagging people and to roost with the owls till it freezes up.
One of our enterprising citizens has surrounded his lot on Main Street with an ornamental fence.

1912 Nov 7 – The Fork River Settlement

Pretty much all the history of the Dauphin district dates from the advent of the C.N.R. The actual settlement of the northern part of the country, which includes Fork River and Winnipegosis, commenced in 1897, when the railway entered. It is true there were parties who squatted here and there, but the first settlement amounted to nothing when estimated in figures. It was not until three or four years later that the municipality of Mossey River, which comprises the territory described, was organized. Your correspondent spent a few house at Fork River the other day, and what is more important, spent them pleasantly. It is some fourteen years since the writer first visited the new thriving village of Fork River, and some of those he formed an acquaintance with then, were there to greet him last week. The village of Fork River is located on the Fork and Mossey Rivers, and within a mile or two of its centre, a considerable number of people reside. The land along the Mossey and Fork Rivers is as good as there is to be found anywhere on the American continent, which is saying much. It was but natural then that those who came in first selected the best farms, those along the rivers. The country about was at one time covered with a growth of timber, which included tamarack, spruce and poplar. The latter kind was the most frequently met with. Much of it, of course, has since disappeared before the axe of the lumberman and the wood chopper. Another destructive elements has been fire. In the early days wood had little value and no effort was made to preserve timber. Much timber was needlessly destroyed which would be of considerable value today. But most of us are like the German, if our foresight was as good as our hindsight, we would soon get rich. There is, however, much consolation in the fact that good land will soon produce enough grain to find money to purchase fuel. Like other new districts the Fork River settlement has been up against manta drawbacks, notably wet seasons and poor roads. But somebody remarks, are these not the condition which develop strong men? Yes, truly, but, at times, even the heart of the pioneer sinks. Take the present year as an example. Conditions were such as to try the metal most of us are made of. Even more, the loss of crop is bad enough, but add to this financial obligations incurred and can’t be met, and the burden seems too heavy to bear.
But enough of lamenting. Let us turn to the people themselves. We don’t know where one will find a finer band of pioneers than at Fork River. There is Tom Glendenning, who was there many a day before the railroad. A splendid specimen of the pioneer; good-hearted and a true friend.
Tom Briggs, another who was in the settlement before, we were going say, the war, but we mean before the railroad. The Briggs Bros., Dave and Tom, went though the worst of it, and still wear pleasant faces. Incidentally, it manta be mentioned that Dave is no longer following, like Cincinnatus, the low.
There’s Sam Bailey, who, while not in before the iron horse, has been there long enough to establish his sterling qualities. He’s a good fellow and one can’t meet too often.
Wm. King, pioneer farmer and stock breeder. Has faced difficulties, met them and overcame them. Besides farming on an extensive scale he is bending his energies to improve his own and other people’s stock. Truly a valuable man in any community.
D.F. Wilson – there’s no mistaking him; besides quality he’s got size, both important factors in a new country. He has farmed, is a breeder of stock and fills the important office of municipal clerk. Has also done his share to develop the district.
Nat Little, pioneer merchant. Has been there a long time, and, what’s better, has succeeded. A good fellow with a weakness for the Shetland pony.
Coun. Geo. Nicholson, too, has had the usual ups and downs, seen the rough and the smooth and is still staying with the job.
Reeve Lacey, not such an old-timer as some of the others, but has, in the time he’s been there established his worth and taken a willing hand in the work of development. For several years he has been in the council and is now its head.
W.T. Snelgrove can look quite a ways back. He has seen more than a little of the life of the pioneer. As a hunter he has quite a record in the deer line and can relate some interesting experiences. Some day, when we have time at our disposal and more space we may relate some of W.R.’s exploits.
While speaking of the Snelgroves its opportune to mention morally and Alf. There some pioneers, too.
Alex. Cameron is not exactly one of the prime old-timers, but has been in the distinct quite a few years. There is just this difference between Alex. and most of the other settlers, he had the “dough” and they didn’t. It don’t take long to tell this, but oh, what a world of meaning there is in it. Money is highly important to us all, but when we haven’t got any and need it, words fail to impress its importance on us. May every man who has a healthy pocketbook know how to use its contents as judiciously and generously as Alexander Cameron.
There are many others worthy of a word in this article, but space forbids. They have done their part and performed it well. What more can be said? There’s the Rowe brothers, A. Hunt, Geo. Tilt, W. Northam, C. Clark, F. Cooper, and Frank and Vivan Hafenbrak.
Then, what about the women? Are they, too, not pioneers in the true sense. Yes, indeed; they are worthy of a special article and even then justice could not be done them. They have taken their part, a part which carried its own burden. A burden, no matter how heavy, always cheerfully carried when the interest of their families and their homes was at stake.
Municipal organization should come in for a chapter. Its work is important in our advancement. The reeves and councillors help materially to make history. If they have done their part well and faithfully their names should be writ in large letters.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 31 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 31 – Hotel Sold

The Lake View hotel, owned by Frank Hechter, at Winnipegosis, has been sold to H.M. Hicks, of Winnipeg. The hew proprietor will take possession at once. Mr. Foster, the manager for Mr. Hechter, is leaving for other parts.

1912 Oct 31 – Hallowe’en Ball

What holds more charms and spells for the young than the Scotch superstitions and customs regarding Hallowe’en? Burns in his poem, “Hallowe’en” describes to us filly the traditions of his country. Those interesting customs are more or less exploded now, and Hallowe’en with its mystic rites is fast dying out. So it was with much curiosity and interest that those who love to trip the light fantastic looked forward to the Hallowe’en ball given by the G.I.A. to the B. of L.E. on Tuesday evening of this week. Nor were any of the seventy-five couples present disappointed. Unique decorations appropriate to the occasion were carried out, with pumpkins, black cats, bats and other Hallowe’en favours. A brilliant headlight on the stage with one of the pumpkin lanterns on top, and two on either side supplied the light for the popular twilight waltz. At the entrance of the hall the word welcome was formed with flag pennants. The black cats ands bats showed up effectively on the sidewalls. The call for supper came after the strains of the soft dreamy melody of the twilight waltz had died away. It was served in the fire hall and reflected much credit on the efforts of the ladies to provide an appetizing repast.
Mrs. J.W. Johnston was master of ceremonies, and acquitted himself as always, in a most creditable manner. The music, which was supplied by the McMurray Orchestra was all that could be desired. The selections for the extras provided by Mrs. W.H. Sutherland were much appreciated by all.
The committee in charge of the ball were as follows:
Management – Mesdames D.A. Roberge, A. Thomson, F.L. Ball, J. McKeever, Mrs. R.M. Smith.
Reception – Mesdames W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, F.L. Ball, A. Thomson.
Decorations – Mesdames J. McKeever, W.H. Sutherland, D.A. Roberge, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.
Floor – Brothers W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, A. Thomson, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.

1912 Oct 31 – Tag Day at Winnipegosis

A Tag Day was held at Winnipegosis and the Dauphin Hospital Ladies’ Aid is indebted to the ladies of that place for the proceeds amounting to fifteen dollars.

1912 Oct 31 – Fork River

Mrs. Isaac Armstrong has returned from visiting her daughter at Gilbert Plains.
Mrs. S. Bailey was a visitor to Dauphin on a land deal so we are informed.
Thomas Shannon returned from a short trip to friends at Canora.
Miss Peal Wilson left for Dauphin with her brother, Fleming Wilson.
Mrs. S. Reid and children returned from Rathwell after spending a week with her friends.
The ladies of the Leap Year committee have invited the gentlemen to a farewell ball in the Orange Hall on Friday night, November 1st. The ladies will supply refreshments, the boys are simply to look pleasant.
Mr. Swartwood, superintendent of the International Harvester Co., was taking stock at D. Kennedy this week.
The Northern Elevator Co. have about finished their up-to-date elevator at this point and it is quite an improvement to the looks of the town.
Mrs. B. Tate of Dauphin, visited Mr. and Mrs. Tom Bailey on the Mossey this week.
All Saints’ Church was very tastefully decorated for the Harvest Festival held on Sunday last. Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very appropriate sermon and a large congregation attended from Sifton, Mowat and the surrounding country.
Miss Gertrude Cooper is spending the week with her parents on the Fork River.

1912 Oct 31 – Sifton

Mr. Russell, principal of Wycliffe School, is building a house for himself. The present house in which he resided was bought by John Kennedy.
There’s a great dissatisfaction amongst the ratepayers of Sifton S.D. The taxes of said school are at the rate of 36 mills on the dollar and the trustees are expected to give an explanation why they have found it necessary to put the estimate so high. In comparison with the taxes of other school districts this is certainly a very high rate.
The Roman Catholic Polish Church has a new priest who is to take charge of said church. The present pastor, the Rev. Plocmski, is leaving the church.
The new Mercantile Co.”s store is expected to open its business in two weeks’ time.
Mr. Reid, section foreman, says that the road bed of the C.N.R. over his section was never in better condition.
Mr. Souborin, late Greek and Roman Catholic priest here but now of Montreal, is visiting with friends here.
An old country Greek Catholic priest is to be located at Ethelbert permanently. Last Sunday he was a visitor to Sifton.
Miss P. Malkowicz has been appointed principal of Sifton School by the school board for the next twelve months.
J. Holland, teacher of Mink River School has brought his wife from Rossburn. John has been batching it for nearly two months.

1918 Oct 31 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. Karl McFarlane, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. A. McQueen, Grandview, wounded. (Arthur McQueen, 1894, 2418348)
Pte. G.P. Norman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Gisli Peterson Norman, 1895, 294050)
Pte. Andrew Baldwin, Dauphin, wounded. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74183)
L. Corp. K.R. Young, Ochre River, missing. (???)
Pte. J.O. Plante, McCreary, wounded. (Joseph Ovide, Plante, 1897, 2381123)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 27 – 1910

1910 Oct 27 – Arthur Milner Dead

Arthur Milner, the young man who had his back broken some five weeks ago by the falling of a scaffold, died in the hospital on Wednesday. The funeral will take place this afternoon fro the residence of Mr. F. Clark with the Dauphin Citizens Band in charge.

1910 Oct 27 – Bullet Lodged in Tissues of Cheek

By the accidental discharge of a .22 calibre rifle on Sunday, a Galician lad was the victim of the bullet. The bullet went through one cheek knocking out a tooth and lodged in the tissues of the other cheek. The boy was brought to Dauphin Monday and the bullet extracted by Dr. Ross.

1910 Oct 27 – Destructive Fire at Ethelbert

A very destructive bush fire took place last week near Ethelbert. From what can be learned it appears that a farmer near sec. 7-29-21 had just finished threshing, the straw of which had been blown into some bush that he wished to clear. The readiest way seemed to him to be to burn the straw pile and bush at the same time. After a time the wind seemed favourable, and he set it going. Two of his neighbours, seeing the fire, remonstrated with him, and expressed their fear that it was very dangerous to set it on fire; to which it is said he replied, “Oh, t will not back up. Unfortunately the wind changed to the northeast, with the result that the fire rushed over part of sec. 18 and most of sec. 17. Hence about 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon it was noticed by the farmers on 17 hat the fire was gaining rapidly upon them.. H. Fekula began at once to try to check the fire by ploughing fire guards round his stacks of hay in the meadows (which run for a good distance northwards, between the colonization road and the road allowance between 17 and 18.) Jacob Mascuik was the next too see that his stacks were in danger, and his team and plough to turn over a few furrows to save his stacks. By this time the fire had got fairly going, and Jos. Mills and L.L. Katz came up at a run to save hat they could.

But alas, they were all too late, and only partly prevented the complete destruction of their stacks of hay. Jacob Mascuik lost six stacks valued at three hundred dollars, James Mills lost five stacks valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and H. Fekula lost three stacks. In the meantime the fire had widened out until thee was a rushing, roaring belt of flames a mile wide, and it seemed for a time as if a very serious disaster was about to take place. K. McLean rushed out of town, and calling at the school he impressed the older boys, and away they to see what could be done.

After going about a mile it was seen that the fire had got too good a hold, to stop it by ordinary means, and hence Mr. McLean could do nothing to save a hay stack of from sixty to seventy tons, from total destruction, which he had, had put up for winter feed. The fire continued its course until about ten o’clock, when through the strenuous efforts of the people it was checked a short distance from the Ethelbert school, after destroying about 1000 tons of hay. Thus during the night of Thursday we were allowed to sleep in peace, after a hard fight.

Unfortunately, Kenneth McLean, after leaving the scene of the fire, went home and being dead tired, as soon as he sat down in his easy chair, he went to sleep. The window was left open, with the result that he got a severe chill, which developed into pleurisy and he has been bedfast and under the doctor’s care ever since. However we are glad to say he has taken a turn for the better and hopes to be about again in a few days.

Well, it was thought the fire had been done with, but no siree. Bush fires do not die out so quickly as that, they smoulder and linger in rotten logs or tree stumps and given a fair chance, the fire will start up again in a fresh place, and that is just what it did do. On Friday morning the wind had changed again, blowing to the south. This soon fanned into flame the dying embers and away it went south and again ruin and disaster faced the settlers’ farms and stacks in the Mink Creek district. Fortunately Mink Creek was full of water, this combined wit the efforts of the people saved the mink Creek district from even a worse fate than had befell their neighbours to the south of them. But from all account it was close call. Whilst it is true that fire is a good servant, it is also true that it is a bad master, and if only reasonable precautions had been taken, much of this great loss might have been prevented. For instance, H.P. Nicholson had some hay in the fire zone, but his men had left it well fire-guarded, thus saving his stacks. The old proverb says: “A stitch in time saves nine.”

It is time that some steps were taken to prevent such terrible loss. As it is, there is no apparatus to fight fire if it should take place, neither is there a Fire Guardian to take the lead and call out and organize a band of fire fighters if needed, and it is needed at Ethelbert.

Do not wait until the horse is stolen before you lock the stable door. Now it is the time to get ready.

1910 Oct 27 – Immigration hall to be Closed

Dr. P.J. Beauchamp immigration officer at this point, has received notice from the Department of interior that the hall here will be closed and not again reopened. The hall under Officer Beauchamp has done an important work in providing accommodation while settlers are being located and regret is heard on all sides that the building is not to be reopened. The building and lots will be put up for public sale at an early date by the department.

1910 Oct 27 – Fork River

Nat Little paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis last week.
C. Parks from Winnipeg is visiting friends here.
The Children’s Day Service at the English Church was very well attended and one of the children Miss Marjorie Scrase, sang “Fair Waved the Golden Corn,” splendidly.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooper who have been here for a few months left here last week for Brantford where they will reside in future.
Carloads of pressed hay are being sent out from this point.
On Tuesday night the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy was gladdened by the arrival of a little baby girl.
Mr. F. Storrar paid a visit to Dauphin lately.
Harry Nicholson was up here this week doing business.
A meeting of the Orangemen of this district was held last Saturday when it was decided to have a ball on Nov. 4th to help pay off the debt on the hall.
Methodist Services will be held at 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings instead of at 3 o’clock.

1910 Oct 27 – Sifton

C. Genik of Winnipeg is the guest of his daughter Mrs. C.A. Jones.
W. Thirell of the C.P.R. land department has been in Sifton the past week collecting for that department.
Messrs. Marantz & Gorfin are dissolving partnership. R. Marantz will carry on the store business alone.

1910 Oct 27 – Winnipegosis

On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will preach in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church at 7.30 p.m. The subject will be “Soul Rest.”
On Sunday last October 23rd, the Methodists inaugurated a new Sunday School. The number of children present more than exceed all the anticipation of the promoters. With a fine equipment of teachers it is confidently expected that success will crown the new institution.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 26 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 26 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Howlett and Max and Roland King are among those leaving for winter fishing up the lakes.
Mr. Nat Little has made the sale of a J.I. Case’s threshing outfit composed of a 6 horse power engine and an all steel separator; 18 inch cylinder and 36 inch gear. It was tested here before taking out and did first class work for so small a machine. I goes to a Ruthenian east of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Harold Clark has returned home from the Dauphin Hospital. We are pleased to see him around again.
Our Mowat friend is on the warpath again; the scribe seems to have touched him in a tender spot; the cap seems to fit and we have no objection to him wearing it. The downfall of the Laurier government will be a little inconvenience to some, no doubt, as the vision of a good fat wad over the garden wall will vanish; still the acrobatically training of some will serve them in good stead, especially those who have been trying a two-handed game; but will it work? Our Mowat friend ends up his correspondence as usual by quoting about wickedness and holiness from the good Book. We haven’t much doubt but what our Mowat friend has a good share of the former and is not overburdened with the latter. His Satanic majesty will have a high old time eating to him later on for taking affidavits is any good he will do the old fellow out of his situation sure.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ and there was a large turnout of children and parents. Mr. Littler delivered a very appropriate address to the children and Miss Marjory Scrase sang “Jesus loves me.” The S.S. children helped in the chorus, which was nicely rendered.
D.F. Wilson, Municipal clerk is taking a trip to Dauphin to attend immigration meeting there.

1911 Oct 26 – North Lake

J. Cordon is renovating the front of Armstrong’s store these days with a coat of paint.
We noticed an item in the Press of Oct. 12th, sent in by the Mowat correspondent, re: scarlet fever scare at North Lake falling through and only two or three slight cases and that before the scare occurred they were convalescent. When the Mowat correspondent was at one of the quarantined houses about 10 days after the doctor was called he saw one or two convalescent cases at this particular house where the health officer found 6 cases all ripe and sound scarlet fever. That brings our moat friend a little not.
At two other houses there were two cases, at another 3 more convalescent, making a total of 11 cases. We have no doubt if the Mowat correspondent would only get the health officer’s word as to exactly how many cases he really found on Sept. 21st, he would find that the scare he quotes as fallen through was such as to call for strict measures and create a scare where there are so many children. For ourselves we prefer to stand by Dr. Medd’s inspection and decision than by our Mowat correspondent.
Jack Strasdin expects to be around here with his threshing outfit at freeze up.

1916 Oct 26 – Fork River

Miss Ashcroft, nurse of the Provincial Health Department, spent a week here visiting the different schools.
Roy Frost left for his home at Rathwell, having spent the summer months time with Mr. S. Reid. As there will be less “frost” we look for Indian summer.
Miss Bessie Wilson has left for Winnipeg to take a three-month course at the Agricultural College.
Frank Warshasky has shipped a car of fat stock to Winnipeg.
Joe Parker intends putting in the winter fishing with Joe Burrell on Lake Winnipegosis.
Pte. A. King, of the A.M.C., dept. No. 10, spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Aubrey expects to leave for England in a few days.
Mr. Robertson, R.R. commissioner, was here as a station agent. It is time one was appointed.

1916 Oct 26 – Winnipegosis

The “Manitou” left on her last trip on Tuesday. She is bound for Long Point. There was a little ice in the river but she expects to make a quick trip and weather prophets say there will be open water for ten days yet.
The death of Karl Goodmanson under mysterious circumstances is giving the authorities some trouble. An inquest and post mortem examination have been held and suspicions are strong. Liquor is at the bottom of it. Goodmanson is spoken of as a good neighbour and a “First rate” fellow as long as liquor was out of his reach. The question is where did the liquor come from?
The sad death occurred at Edmonton of Mrs. Welcome Morris. Pte. Morris sailed for England with the 107th. Mrs. Morris, Sr., has gone to Edmonton and will return with her grandchild.
Donald Hattie has rented his boarding house and has taken a job with Capt. W.B. Sifton is the log camp for the winter.
Capt. Mspes’ family have left for their winter home on Hill Island for the winter fishing season. Joe Burrell and family have also gone for the fishing season.
Dunc. Kennedy is assisting the station agent during the rush.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 20 – 1910

1910 Oct 20 – Chapter of Accidents

Wm. Cruise has Ribs Broken
Wm. Ashmore Leg Broken
Gun Accident
Wm. Ashmore of Sifton, met with a serious accident Saturday. While felling a beef, the animal made an unexpected plunge and fell on one of Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking two bones below the knee. He was brought to the hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1910 Oct 20 – Had Ribs Broken

Robt. Cruise, who recently invested in a power gang plough and why is busy ploughing his farm south of the town, has among the crew operating the plough his son William, aged 17 years. On Saturday night, William attempted to jump from the engine to the plough and was thrown under the wheel and the weight of the plough passing over him, breaking four ribs and slightly injuring him internally. We are glad to report that the young man is now on a fair way recovery.

1910 Oct 20 – Arm Amputated

John Kolodichook of Pine River, was accidentally shot Sunday morning in the left forearm, which resulted in amputation of same just below the elbow. Mr. K was out shooting and had climbed a tree to see if there were any ducks on a nearby pond. Before climbing he laid his gun against the trunk of the tree. When part of the way up the tree he slipped and fell, discharging the gun with the above result. The unfortunate man had no attention for three hours after the accident, and bled from eleven o’clock in the morning until the arrival of Dr. Lineham that evening at seven. He was brought to Dauphin on a special Sunday evening, and taken to the hospital.

1910 Oct 20 – Fork River

Mrs. Lipsky and Mr. Shaffer, from St. Louis, are staying at Mrs. Clawson’s in this village.
Mr. Dallas having disposed of his farm intends to have a sale on November 2nd. Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
A large congregation attended the English Church last Sunday night for Harvest Festival, when a very appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. The church was very prettily decorated by Mrs. Rowe, Mrs. Scrase, Miss Collins, Miss Gracie Little and Mr. King, Churchwarden.
Mr. Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P for Portage la Prairie and Provincial Secretary, paid us a visit last week and was accompanied by Mr. J. Grenon and Mr. D.F. Wilson looking over land in this district.
Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
Mrs. Crouch and children who have been visiting Mrs. Kennedy, left for Winnipeg last week.
Mrs. Morris, who has been staying here for some time left for Winnipegosis last week.
Mrs. Johnson, from Winnipegosis, is staying with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.

1910 Oct 20 – Sifton

Rev. Dr. Carmichael of Winnipeg and Dr. McLaren, of Toronto, stopped off at Sifton on Saturday on their way east.
Mark Cardiff, Dauphin, paid us a business visit last week.
Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P., passed through here a week ago on his way home from Winnipegosis.
J.G. Harvey, M.P.P., Robt. Hunt, and A.J. Rawson, Dauphin, were among the visitors to Sifton on Sunday.
Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie started up their flour mill on Monday for another season’s operations.
Wm. Ashmore met with a rather serious accident on Saturday last while felling a beef. The animal made an unexpected plunge forward, falling on Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking both bones below the knee in one leg. He was taken to the Dauphin General Hospital for treatment.
Everybody took advantage of the prevailing fine weather and drove in to the Ruthenian Church Services held by His Reverence Archbishop Sczeptycki, of the Greek Orthodox Church, on behalf of the adherents of that rite. The gathering was the largest in Sifton for years.
Mrs. Wm. Ashmore and John Kennedy were visitors to Dauphin on Sunday.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held services at the mission on Sunday, also Rev. Father Perhach at he Greek Orthodox Church.
Rev. Archbishop Scztepski and staff, left Monday evening for Prince Albert.

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In your issue of Oct. 6th, I noticed something about a missing post-office at Fishing River and a P.M. Re the missing P.O. That said P.O. was called Sobeiski and a man named Demko Kasczuk was duly appointed but owing to his moving to Sifton he would not accept that appointment therefore the post office was never opened so I fail to see where it was missing. Re the elevator. We heard a great deal about it in June but since then it has been hors de combat. Re the mail bag. I was always under the impression that the P.M. at the distributing office had the locking up of all mail bags leaving his office so as to prevent such things as tacks etc., getting mixed up with the mail and if that is so the mail carrier would be ignorant of what the mail bag contained.

A Subscriber

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In reply to, and for the information of, “A Fork River Correspondent” whose concoction of misrepresentations appeared in your issue of Oct. 6th, I beg to be allowed to state the following facts regarding the establishing of a post office at Fishing River. That on Sept. 25th, 1905, the post office that the farmers of Fishing River petitioned for on N.W. ¼ 33-28-19 west P. mer. was established under the name of “Sobieski,” and that Demko Kasczuk who was mentioned in the petition as a fit and proper person, was appointed as Postmaster. That the necessary papers, etc., for opening the office were taken to Kasczuk’s place of business at Fishing River, and it was found that Kasczuk had departed for Sifton and had barred the doors and windows, and that he did not intend to return to Fishing River to do business because the R.R. Company would not stop their trains at that point. That as there was no other person asking to take the office over, the matter was allowed to drop for a time; so it will appear that it was the postmaster that was lost, and not the post office as stated. I would also state that a postmaster has been found since in the person of one of Mr. Glen Campbell’s workers at last Dominion election, and that the Fishing River P.O. is in operation. Also on the same date (Sept. 25th, 1905) “Lacey” P.O. was established (since named Oak Brae) 5½ miles east of “Sobieski” and Fred Lacey was appointed Postmaster and still survive, much to the annoyance, it seems, of the Fork Riverite whose letter appeared on Oct. 6th. As to tacks and sugar being put into Oak Brae mail at Fork River, I may say that I am not responsible for what is put into the mail bag at Fork River. I would advise him to complain to Fork River postmaster or to the postmaster general at Ottawa, and state what damage has been done and I am confident he will get satisfaction, also if this correspondent will find out and inform me as to time of making up mail for Winnipegosis at Fork River I will try and get in on time and thus please him has he is the only one who seems to worry about the matter, we have yet to receive the first complaint on this score from any one who has mailed a letter from this office to Winnipegosis. If “A Fork River Correspondent” will call at Oak Brae I will produce documentary evidence to support the statement re establishment of post office which I am certain will convince this reckless individual.

Not many years ago we had in the British House of Commons a set of politicians known as “Little Englanders.” They were opposed to the progress and expansion of the empire and it seems to me that one or two of that party must have got their quietus in the old land and turned up at Fork River, for whenever anything is said or done having for its object the improvement and development of this part of Manitoba, this “Little Fork Riverite” and his kindred spirits oppose it, and set to work to frustrate any movement for the betterment of this country. We remember when a siding was asked for by the farmers of Fishing River district the “Little Fork Riverite clique saw ruination for Fork River in it, and suggested that something ought to be done to prevent that siding being constructed. The farmers of Fishing River and Fork River were encouraged to sign a petition just previous to the election last June, asking the Government to erect an elevator and were told again and again that an elevator would be erected this fall at Fork River is the Roblin Government was returned to power, have we got one? Not on your life and I charge that the action of the “Fork Riverite” clique has discouraged any of the Elevator companies from erecting an elevator at Fork River. I do not bow the knee to the Roblin Government but I signed the petitions for the erection of a Government Elevator and advised others to do the same and intended if it was built, to patronize it because it would be built with the people’s money and it is good policy the patronize any institution that our money is invested in and endeavour to get the best we can out of the investment, there are thousands of bushels of grain in our district this season and we have no local market, I repeat that the Government Elevator is lost to Fork River district and the famers have been fooled once again and I ask the disappointed farmers to become “knockers” along with me and we will get the elevator along with a lot of other good things such as post offices etc., etc.

Fred Lacey,
Post Master, Oak Brae.

1910 Oct 20 – Winnipegosis

On Monday last the “Manitou” left the landing stage at Winnipegosis, heavily laden with fishermen and their equipment. Part of this equipment, and one would think a very important part, consisted of the wives and children of some of the fishermen. Although so many have left the town, the toll of departure is not yet complete but it is expected that this week all the people occupied during the winter in fishing, will have left the town. We wish them luck.
On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will conduct the service in the Fork River Methodist Church at 11 o’clock in the morning instead of 3 p.m.
On Sunday next the Methodist pulpit at Winnipegosis will be occupied by the Rev. Jas. Malley. The subject will be “Buried alive by Devils.”