Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 31 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 31 – Hotel Sold

The Lake View hotel, owned by Frank Hechter, at Winnipegosis, has been sold to H.M. Hicks, of Winnipeg. The hew proprietor will take possession at once. Mr. Foster, the manager for Mr. Hechter, is leaving for other parts.

1912 Oct 31 – Hallowe’en Ball

What holds more charms and spells for the young than the Scotch superstitions and customs regarding Hallowe’en? Burns in his poem, “Hallowe’en” describes to us filly the traditions of his country. Those interesting customs are more or less exploded now, and Hallowe’en with its mystic rites is fast dying out. So it was with much curiosity and interest that those who love to trip the light fantastic looked forward to the Hallowe’en ball given by the G.I.A. to the B. of L.E. on Tuesday evening of this week. Nor were any of the seventy-five couples present disappointed. Unique decorations appropriate to the occasion were carried out, with pumpkins, black cats, bats and other Hallowe’en favours. A brilliant headlight on the stage with one of the pumpkin lanterns on top, and two on either side supplied the light for the popular twilight waltz. At the entrance of the hall the word welcome was formed with flag pennants. The black cats ands bats showed up effectively on the sidewalls. The call for supper came after the strains of the soft dreamy melody of the twilight waltz had died away. It was served in the fire hall and reflected much credit on the efforts of the ladies to provide an appetizing repast.
Mrs. J.W. Johnston was master of ceremonies, and acquitted himself as always, in a most creditable manner. The music, which was supplied by the McMurray Orchestra was all that could be desired. The selections for the extras provided by Mrs. W.H. Sutherland were much appreciated by all.
The committee in charge of the ball were as follows:
Management – Mesdames D.A. Roberge, A. Thomson, F.L. Ball, J. McKeever, Mrs. R.M. Smith.
Reception – Mesdames W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, F.L. Ball, A. Thomson.
Decorations – Mesdames J. McKeever, W.H. Sutherland, D.A. Roberge, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.
Floor – Brothers W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, A. Thomson, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.

1912 Oct 31 – Tag Day at Winnipegosis

A Tag Day was held at Winnipegosis and the Dauphin Hospital Ladies’ Aid is indebted to the ladies of that place for the proceeds amounting to fifteen dollars.

1912 Oct 31 – Fork River

Mrs. Isaac Armstrong has returned from visiting her daughter at Gilbert Plains.
Mrs. S. Bailey was a visitor to Dauphin on a land deal so we are informed.
Thomas Shannon returned from a short trip to friends at Canora.
Miss Peal Wilson left for Dauphin with her brother, Fleming Wilson.
Mrs. S. Reid and children returned from Rathwell after spending a week with her friends.
The ladies of the Leap Year committee have invited the gentlemen to a farewell ball in the Orange Hall on Friday night, November 1st. The ladies will supply refreshments, the boys are simply to look pleasant.
Mr. Swartwood, superintendent of the International Harvester Co., was taking stock at D. Kennedy this week.
The Northern Elevator Co. have about finished their up-to-date elevator at this point and it is quite an improvement to the looks of the town.
Mrs. B. Tate of Dauphin, visited Mr. and Mrs. Tom Bailey on the Mossey this week.
All Saints’ Church was very tastefully decorated for the Harvest Festival held on Sunday last. Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very appropriate sermon and a large congregation attended from Sifton, Mowat and the surrounding country.
Miss Gertrude Cooper is spending the week with her parents on the Fork River.

1912 Oct 31 – Sifton

Mr. Russell, principal of Wycliffe School, is building a house for himself. The present house in which he resided was bought by John Kennedy.
There’s a great dissatisfaction amongst the ratepayers of Sifton S.D. The taxes of said school are at the rate of 36 mills on the dollar and the trustees are expected to give an explanation why they have found it necessary to put the estimate so high. In comparison with the taxes of other school districts this is certainly a very high rate.
The Roman Catholic Polish Church has a new priest who is to take charge of said church. The present pastor, the Rev. Plocmski, is leaving the church.
The new Mercantile Co.”s store is expected to open its business in two weeks’ time.
Mr. Reid, section foreman, says that the road bed of the C.N.R. over his section was never in better condition.
Mr. Souborin, late Greek and Roman Catholic priest here but now of Montreal, is visiting with friends here.
An old country Greek Catholic priest is to be located at Ethelbert permanently. Last Sunday he was a visitor to Sifton.
Miss P. Malkowicz has been appointed principal of Sifton School by the school board for the next twelve months.
J. Holland, teacher of Mink River School has brought his wife from Rossburn. John has been batching it for nearly two months.

1918 Oct 31 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. Karl McFarlane, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. A. McQueen, Grandview, wounded. (Arthur McQueen, 1894, 2418348)
Pte. G.P. Norman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Gisli Peterson Norman, 1895, 294050)
Pte. Andrew Baldwin, Dauphin, wounded. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74183)
L. Corp. K.R. Young, Ochre River, missing. (???)
Pte. J.O. Plante, McCreary, wounded. (Joseph Ovide, Plante, 1897, 2381123)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 28 – 1915

1915 Oct 28 – Almost Fatal Shot

Peter Nykolak, a young Ruthenian living at Sifton, had a love affair which he took to heart very much. The young lady of his affections proved fickle and Peter sought consolation by the suicide route on Saturday morning last. He used a large revolver in trying to commit the act, the bullet entering the lower part of his chin and came out near the bridge of his nose. The blood flowed freely from the wound and it looked for a time like the final act in Peter’s career. When Dr. Harrington arrived he found the wound a dangerous one, but not necessarily fatal.
The injured man was brought to the hospital here and is now on a fair way towards recover.

1915 Oct 28 – Fined at Winnipegosis

The Winnipegosis Fox Ranch Co., was fined $35 and costs on Tuesday by Mr. P.M. Whale. The company was charged with buying moose meat for their foxes on the ranch.
Sam Sanderson, a halfbreed was fined $10.00 for selling moose meat. He was also found guilty of having moose meat in his possession. For this charge he was left off on suspended sentence. Game guardian Joyce prosecuted.

1915 Oct 28 – Recruiting to Start at Once

Dauphin has been created by the Militia Dept. headquarters for a detachment area and provincial battalion. Recruiting will start at once with Major Walker as recruiting officer.

1915 Oct 28 – Fork River

Mrs. William Allan, of Grandview, is visiting at her daughter’s, Mrs. T. Dewsberry.
Section Foreman Dewberry has quite a broad smile these days. It’s all owing to the “wee new section foreman.” Nurse Tilt says he’s a bouncer.
Mr. Beatty, traveller for the Mooney Confectionery Co., of Winnipeg, was busy here on Monday taking orders.
The err has commenced in earnest that no more are to be had for grain. The stook threshing is finished and the stacks are fast disappearing. The yield is fair, but prices are low and the grade is poor owning to early frost.
Nat Little is fitting around in his auto. It is running all the better for having a prolonged rest.
Mr. Rowe, of Arden, is busy here buying up a shipment of cattle for his farm.
We had our first fall of snow on Monday, the 25th, which is a gentle reminder to prepare for winter.
Felix Marantz, merchant of Sifton, arrived here this week in his auto and spent a short time with Mr. Shuchett on business.
Mr. and Mrs. Sid Gower arrived home from their honeymoon on Saturday, which was spent at Dauphin. We whish them long life and happiness.
Mr. Woods, post office inspector of Winnipeg, spent sometime here last week going into post office affairs. He found everything O.K.
Mr. Frank Hechter, councilor for ward 4, was a visitor here on business last week. Frank generally wears a smile; he finds it costs no more than a grouch.
Private Alex. Reader, of the 45th battalion, was here renewing acquaintances last week. He has returned to Sewell.
Jack Chipley and family are off on a visit to friends at Metton for a week.

1915 Oct 28 – Sifton

Presentation to Mr. Wm. Walters on his departure from Sifton to join “The Colours,” Oct. 19th, 1915, Canadian Expeditionary Force – Allies vs. Germany, etc.
Mr. Walters – On behalf of a few friends of Sifton, Dublin Bay and the district you have served so faithfully in the past, we have the pleasure in presenting you with this wrist watch as a little token of our esteem and regard for your good fellowship, ready courtesy and obliging manner. We trust, as its hands mark the fleeing hours, the time will bring yourself nearer to a safe and happy return to take up your duties once amongst us.
The boy scouts presented themselves at the early morning train as a guard of honour to wave their last farewell to Mr. Walters, who cordially shook hands with each scout, hoping he would soon come back to them again.
A large number of the friends of Mr. Walters met for a farewell supper at Mr. Ashmore’s to make him a presentation address. Thirty-two sat down to supper and the evening was spent in a convivial manner, whiling away the house with laughter and song to the strains of music some of the best local talent being present.
Football – The Boy Scouts played their return match on Father Sabourin’s grounds with the boys of his school. The whole of he Wycliffe School children were present to see the match. There were also many other spectators who vociferously harangued the scouts. Although the Catholic School team was much heavier than the Scouts, their grounds very cramped, and a high wind blowing, the game resulted in a draw. It was a tough game and the Catholic boys pressed hard for a score towards the finish, but the gallant little fellows responded to the rush and held their own with courage and determination seldom found in boys of tender years.
Trafalgar Day – The Sifton scouts were very busy on Trafalgar Day, responding to the British Appeal through H.R.H., the Duke of Connaught, chief scout of Canada, in collecting for the Red Cross Fund. By their untiring efforts it is expected to forward over $50 from Sifton and district. The scouts would be glad to take this opportunity of thanking most cordially their many patrons for their kindness to them; also Mr. Paul Wood, who lent his team to take the troop out east.
The provincial assistant and organizer, Mr. A.T. Macintosh, will visit the Sifton scouts this week.
Miss Reid and Mrs. (Rev.) Scott, [1 line missing] Presbyterian Mission House here, paid a visit to ??? ??? ??? on the labours to renew acquaintances with their old pupils. They were pleased to visit the Wycliffe Schools, where they were shown round and entertained by pleasing songs from the school children.

1915 Oct 28 – Winnipegosis

The grand masquerade ball in the Rex Hall last Friday was a roaring success, and the costumes were a credit to our northern town. The hall was filled to its utmost capacity and the proceeds, after paying all expenses, amounted to $17.25, which includes a donation of $3.00 from Mr. Sid. Coffey, and goes to the Patriotic Fund. Much credit is due the management for the arrangement, and for such a happy evening. The prize winners were: lady’s best representative costume, 1st., “Britannia,” Miss McMartin; gentlemen’s best representative costume, 1st, “Cavalier,” J.P. Grenon; lady’s second prize, “French Doll,” Mrs. McInnes; gentlemen’s second prize, “Bullfighter,” Mr. Adams, Sifton; third prize, “Turk,” W. Morton; gentlemen’s first prize, comic, “Uncle Sam,” D. Kennedy; lady’s first prize, comic, “Folly,” Miss Bertha Magnasson; gentlemen’s second prize, comic, “Clown,” Harry Grenon; lady’s second prize, comic, “Coaster woman,” Miss C. Bradley. The judges were Miss E. MacArthur, Mrs. Dennett and Dr. Medd, and much praise is due these ladies and the doctor for the able manner in which the judging was done. Miss MacArthur presented the prizes.
W. Morton left on Monday’s train for a two weeks’ vacation to Winnipeg and eastern points.
Mr. F. Partridge is in charge of the station during Mr. Morton’s absence.
Mr. Joyce, game guardian, is again with us on business.
Fred Clarke, the fur traveller, is spending a few days in town and we are always glad to see his merry smile.
D.G. Macaulay left on Monday for Chicago and eastern cities on business.
Mr. Andrews and friends left on Sunday [1 line missing].
We understand quite a few more recruits have enlisted from here and will be leaving us on Wednesday. This town has done well for he size of it. We are proud of our boys.
Mrs. Burrell (grandma) left us on Monday for her old home in Collingwood, Ont., for an extended visit and she will be greatly missed by us all. Mrs. Comf. Burrell accompanied her to Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 27 – 1910

1910 Oct 27 – Arthur Milner Dead

Arthur Milner, the young man who had his back broken some five weeks ago by the falling of a scaffold, died in the hospital on Wednesday. The funeral will take place this afternoon fro the residence of Mr. F. Clark with the Dauphin Citizens Band in charge.

1910 Oct 27 – Bullet Lodged in Tissues of Cheek

By the accidental discharge of a .22 calibre rifle on Sunday, a Galician lad was the victim of the bullet. The bullet went through one cheek knocking out a tooth and lodged in the tissues of the other cheek. The boy was brought to Dauphin Monday and the bullet extracted by Dr. Ross.

1910 Oct 27 – Destructive Fire at Ethelbert

A very destructive bush fire took place last week near Ethelbert. From what can be learned it appears that a farmer near sec. 7-29-21 had just finished threshing, the straw of which had been blown into some bush that he wished to clear. The readiest way seemed to him to be to burn the straw pile and bush at the same time. After a time the wind seemed favourable, and he set it going. Two of his neighbours, seeing the fire, remonstrated with him, and expressed their fear that it was very dangerous to set it on fire; to which it is said he replied, “Oh, t will not back up. Unfortunately the wind changed to the northeast, with the result that the fire rushed over part of sec. 18 and most of sec. 17. Hence about 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon it was noticed by the farmers on 17 hat the fire was gaining rapidly upon them.. H. Fekula began at once to try to check the fire by ploughing fire guards round his stacks of hay in the meadows (which run for a good distance northwards, between the colonization road and the road allowance between 17 and 18.) Jacob Mascuik was the next too see that his stacks were in danger, and his team and plough to turn over a few furrows to save his stacks. By this time the fire had got fairly going, and Jos. Mills and L.L. Katz came up at a run to save hat they could.

But alas, they were all too late, and only partly prevented the complete destruction of their stacks of hay. Jacob Mascuik lost six stacks valued at three hundred dollars, James Mills lost five stacks valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and H. Fekula lost three stacks. In the meantime the fire had widened out until thee was a rushing, roaring belt of flames a mile wide, and it seemed for a time as if a very serious disaster was about to take place. K. McLean rushed out of town, and calling at the school he impressed the older boys, and away they to see what could be done.

After going about a mile it was seen that the fire had got too good a hold, to stop it by ordinary means, and hence Mr. McLean could do nothing to save a hay stack of from sixty to seventy tons, from total destruction, which he had, had put up for winter feed. The fire continued its course until about ten o’clock, when through the strenuous efforts of the people it was checked a short distance from the Ethelbert school, after destroying about 1000 tons of hay. Thus during the night of Thursday we were allowed to sleep in peace, after a hard fight.

Unfortunately, Kenneth McLean, after leaving the scene of the fire, went home and being dead tired, as soon as he sat down in his easy chair, he went to sleep. The window was left open, with the result that he got a severe chill, which developed into pleurisy and he has been bedfast and under the doctor’s care ever since. However we are glad to say he has taken a turn for the better and hopes to be about again in a few days.

Well, it was thought the fire had been done with, but no siree. Bush fires do not die out so quickly as that, they smoulder and linger in rotten logs or tree stumps and given a fair chance, the fire will start up again in a fresh place, and that is just what it did do. On Friday morning the wind had changed again, blowing to the south. This soon fanned into flame the dying embers and away it went south and again ruin and disaster faced the settlers’ farms and stacks in the Mink Creek district. Fortunately Mink Creek was full of water, this combined wit the efforts of the people saved the mink Creek district from even a worse fate than had befell their neighbours to the south of them. But from all account it was close call. Whilst it is true that fire is a good servant, it is also true that it is a bad master, and if only reasonable precautions had been taken, much of this great loss might have been prevented. For instance, H.P. Nicholson had some hay in the fire zone, but his men had left it well fire-guarded, thus saving his stacks. The old proverb says: “A stitch in time saves nine.”

It is time that some steps were taken to prevent such terrible loss. As it is, there is no apparatus to fight fire if it should take place, neither is there a Fire Guardian to take the lead and call out and organize a band of fire fighters if needed, and it is needed at Ethelbert.

Do not wait until the horse is stolen before you lock the stable door. Now it is the time to get ready.

1910 Oct 27 – Immigration hall to be Closed

Dr. P.J. Beauchamp immigration officer at this point, has received notice from the Department of interior that the hall here will be closed and not again reopened. The hall under Officer Beauchamp has done an important work in providing accommodation while settlers are being located and regret is heard on all sides that the building is not to be reopened. The building and lots will be put up for public sale at an early date by the department.

1910 Oct 27 – Fork River

Nat Little paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis last week.
C. Parks from Winnipeg is visiting friends here.
The Children’s Day Service at the English Church was very well attended and one of the children Miss Marjorie Scrase, sang “Fair Waved the Golden Corn,” splendidly.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooper who have been here for a few months left here last week for Brantford where they will reside in future.
Carloads of pressed hay are being sent out from this point.
On Tuesday night the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy was gladdened by the arrival of a little baby girl.
Mr. F. Storrar paid a visit to Dauphin lately.
Harry Nicholson was up here this week doing business.
A meeting of the Orangemen of this district was held last Saturday when it was decided to have a ball on Nov. 4th to help pay off the debt on the hall.
Methodist Services will be held at 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings instead of at 3 o’clock.

1910 Oct 27 – Sifton

C. Genik of Winnipeg is the guest of his daughter Mrs. C.A. Jones.
W. Thirell of the C.P.R. land department has been in Sifton the past week collecting for that department.
Messrs. Marantz & Gorfin are dissolving partnership. R. Marantz will carry on the store business alone.

1910 Oct 27 – Winnipegosis

On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will preach in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church at 7.30 p.m. The subject will be “Soul Rest.”
On Sunday last October 23rd, the Methodists inaugurated a new Sunday School. The number of children present more than exceed all the anticipation of the promoters. With a fine equipment of teachers it is confidently expected that success will crown the new institution.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 26 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 26 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Howlett and Max and Roland King are among those leaving for winter fishing up the lakes.
Mr. Nat Little has made the sale of a J.I. Case’s threshing outfit composed of a 6 horse power engine and an all steel separator; 18 inch cylinder and 36 inch gear. It was tested here before taking out and did first class work for so small a machine. I goes to a Ruthenian east of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Harold Clark has returned home from the Dauphin Hospital. We are pleased to see him around again.
Our Mowat friend is on the warpath again; the scribe seems to have touched him in a tender spot; the cap seems to fit and we have no objection to him wearing it. The downfall of the Laurier government will be a little inconvenience to some, no doubt, as the vision of a good fat wad over the garden wall will vanish; still the acrobatically training of some will serve them in good stead, especially those who have been trying a two-handed game; but will it work? Our Mowat friend ends up his correspondence as usual by quoting about wickedness and holiness from the good Book. We haven’t much doubt but what our Mowat friend has a good share of the former and is not overburdened with the latter. His Satanic majesty will have a high old time eating to him later on for taking affidavits is any good he will do the old fellow out of his situation sure.
Sunday was children’s day at All Saints’ and there was a large turnout of children and parents. Mr. Littler delivered a very appropriate address to the children and Miss Marjory Scrase sang “Jesus loves me.” The S.S. children helped in the chorus, which was nicely rendered.
D.F. Wilson, Municipal clerk is taking a trip to Dauphin to attend immigration meeting there.

1911 Oct 26 – North Lake

J. Cordon is renovating the front of Armstrong’s store these days with a coat of paint.
We noticed an item in the Press of Oct. 12th, sent in by the Mowat correspondent, re: scarlet fever scare at North Lake falling through and only two or three slight cases and that before the scare occurred they were convalescent. When the Mowat correspondent was at one of the quarantined houses about 10 days after the doctor was called he saw one or two convalescent cases at this particular house where the health officer found 6 cases all ripe and sound scarlet fever. That brings our moat friend a little not.
At two other houses there were two cases, at another 3 more convalescent, making a total of 11 cases. We have no doubt if the Mowat correspondent would only get the health officer’s word as to exactly how many cases he really found on Sept. 21st, he would find that the scare he quotes as fallen through was such as to call for strict measures and create a scare where there are so many children. For ourselves we prefer to stand by Dr. Medd’s inspection and decision than by our Mowat correspondent.
Jack Strasdin expects to be around here with his threshing outfit at freeze up.

1916 Oct 26 – Fork River

Miss Ashcroft, nurse of the Provincial Health Department, spent a week here visiting the different schools.
Roy Frost left for his home at Rathwell, having spent the summer months time with Mr. S. Reid. As there will be less “frost” we look for Indian summer.
Miss Bessie Wilson has left for Winnipeg to take a three-month course at the Agricultural College.
Frank Warshasky has shipped a car of fat stock to Winnipeg.
Joe Parker intends putting in the winter fishing with Joe Burrell on Lake Winnipegosis.
Pte. A. King, of the A.M.C., dept. No. 10, spent the week-end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Aubrey expects to leave for England in a few days.
Mr. Robertson, R.R. commissioner, was here as a station agent. It is time one was appointed.

1916 Oct 26 – Winnipegosis

The “Manitou” left on her last trip on Tuesday. She is bound for Long Point. There was a little ice in the river but she expects to make a quick trip and weather prophets say there will be open water for ten days yet.
The death of Karl Goodmanson under mysterious circumstances is giving the authorities some trouble. An inquest and post mortem examination have been held and suspicions are strong. Liquor is at the bottom of it. Goodmanson is spoken of as a good neighbour and a “First rate” fellow as long as liquor was out of his reach. The question is where did the liquor come from?
The sad death occurred at Edmonton of Mrs. Welcome Morris. Pte. Morris sailed for England with the 107th. Mrs. Morris, Sr., has gone to Edmonton and will return with her grandchild.
Donald Hattie has rented his boarding house and has taken a job with Capt. W.B. Sifton is the log camp for the winter.
Capt. Mspes’ family have left for their winter home on Hill Island for the winter fishing season. Joe Burrell and family have also gone for the fishing season.
Dunc. Kennedy is assisting the station agent during the rush.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 20 – 1910

1910 Oct 20 – Chapter of Accidents

Wm. Cruise has Ribs Broken
Wm. Ashmore Leg Broken
Gun Accident
Wm. Ashmore of Sifton, met with a serious accident Saturday. While felling a beef, the animal made an unexpected plunge and fell on one of Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking two bones below the knee. He was brought to the hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1910 Oct 20 – Had Ribs Broken

Robt. Cruise, who recently invested in a power gang plough and why is busy ploughing his farm south of the town, has among the crew operating the plough his son William, aged 17 years. On Saturday night, William attempted to jump from the engine to the plough and was thrown under the wheel and the weight of the plough passing over him, breaking four ribs and slightly injuring him internally. We are glad to report that the young man is now on a fair way recovery.

1910 Oct 20 – Arm Amputated

John Kolodichook of Pine River, was accidentally shot Sunday morning in the left forearm, which resulted in amputation of same just below the elbow. Mr. K was out shooting and had climbed a tree to see if there were any ducks on a nearby pond. Before climbing he laid his gun against the trunk of the tree. When part of the way up the tree he slipped and fell, discharging the gun with the above result. The unfortunate man had no attention for three hours after the accident, and bled from eleven o’clock in the morning until the arrival of Dr. Lineham that evening at seven. He was brought to Dauphin on a special Sunday evening, and taken to the hospital.

1910 Oct 20 – Fork River

Mrs. Lipsky and Mr. Shaffer, from St. Louis, are staying at Mrs. Clawson’s in this village.
Mr. Dallas having disposed of his farm intends to have a sale on November 2nd. Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
A large congregation attended the English Church last Sunday night for Harvest Festival, when a very appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. The church was very prettily decorated by Mrs. Rowe, Mrs. Scrase, Miss Collins, Miss Gracie Little and Mr. King, Churchwarden.
Mr. Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P for Portage la Prairie and Provincial Secretary, paid us a visit last week and was accompanied by Mr. J. Grenon and Mr. D.F. Wilson looking over land in this district.
Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
Mrs. Crouch and children who have been visiting Mrs. Kennedy, left for Winnipeg last week.
Mrs. Morris, who has been staying here for some time left for Winnipegosis last week.
Mrs. Johnson, from Winnipegosis, is staying with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.

1910 Oct 20 – Sifton

Rev. Dr. Carmichael of Winnipeg and Dr. McLaren, of Toronto, stopped off at Sifton on Saturday on their way east.
Mark Cardiff, Dauphin, paid us a business visit last week.
Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P., passed through here a week ago on his way home from Winnipegosis.
J.G. Harvey, M.P.P., Robt. Hunt, and A.J. Rawson, Dauphin, were among the visitors to Sifton on Sunday.
Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie started up their flour mill on Monday for another season’s operations.
Wm. Ashmore met with a rather serious accident on Saturday last while felling a beef. The animal made an unexpected plunge forward, falling on Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking both bones below the knee in one leg. He was taken to the Dauphin General Hospital for treatment.
Everybody took advantage of the prevailing fine weather and drove in to the Ruthenian Church Services held by His Reverence Archbishop Sczeptycki, of the Greek Orthodox Church, on behalf of the adherents of that rite. The gathering was the largest in Sifton for years.
Mrs. Wm. Ashmore and John Kennedy were visitors to Dauphin on Sunday.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held services at the mission on Sunday, also Rev. Father Perhach at he Greek Orthodox Church.
Rev. Archbishop Scztepski and staff, left Monday evening for Prince Albert.

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In your issue of Oct. 6th, I noticed something about a missing post-office at Fishing River and a P.M. Re the missing P.O. That said P.O. was called Sobeiski and a man named Demko Kasczuk was duly appointed but owing to his moving to Sifton he would not accept that appointment therefore the post office was never opened so I fail to see where it was missing. Re the elevator. We heard a great deal about it in June but since then it has been hors de combat. Re the mail bag. I was always under the impression that the P.M. at the distributing office had the locking up of all mail bags leaving his office so as to prevent such things as tacks etc., getting mixed up with the mail and if that is so the mail carrier would be ignorant of what the mail bag contained.

A Subscriber

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In reply to, and for the information of, “A Fork River Correspondent” whose concoction of misrepresentations appeared in your issue of Oct. 6th, I beg to be allowed to state the following facts regarding the establishing of a post office at Fishing River. That on Sept. 25th, 1905, the post office that the farmers of Fishing River petitioned for on N.W. ¼ 33-28-19 west P. mer. was established under the name of “Sobieski,” and that Demko Kasczuk who was mentioned in the petition as a fit and proper person, was appointed as Postmaster. That the necessary papers, etc., for opening the office were taken to Kasczuk’s place of business at Fishing River, and it was found that Kasczuk had departed for Sifton and had barred the doors and windows, and that he did not intend to return to Fishing River to do business because the R.R. Company would not stop their trains at that point. That as there was no other person asking to take the office over, the matter was allowed to drop for a time; so it will appear that it was the postmaster that was lost, and not the post office as stated. I would also state that a postmaster has been found since in the person of one of Mr. Glen Campbell’s workers at last Dominion election, and that the Fishing River P.O. is in operation. Also on the same date (Sept. 25th, 1905) “Lacey” P.O. was established (since named Oak Brae) 5½ miles east of “Sobieski” and Fred Lacey was appointed Postmaster and still survive, much to the annoyance, it seems, of the Fork Riverite whose letter appeared on Oct. 6th. As to tacks and sugar being put into Oak Brae mail at Fork River, I may say that I am not responsible for what is put into the mail bag at Fork River. I would advise him to complain to Fork River postmaster or to the postmaster general at Ottawa, and state what damage has been done and I am confident he will get satisfaction, also if this correspondent will find out and inform me as to time of making up mail for Winnipegosis at Fork River I will try and get in on time and thus please him has he is the only one who seems to worry about the matter, we have yet to receive the first complaint on this score from any one who has mailed a letter from this office to Winnipegosis. If “A Fork River Correspondent” will call at Oak Brae I will produce documentary evidence to support the statement re establishment of post office which I am certain will convince this reckless individual.

Not many years ago we had in the British House of Commons a set of politicians known as “Little Englanders.” They were opposed to the progress and expansion of the empire and it seems to me that one or two of that party must have got their quietus in the old land and turned up at Fork River, for whenever anything is said or done having for its object the improvement and development of this part of Manitoba, this “Little Fork Riverite” and his kindred spirits oppose it, and set to work to frustrate any movement for the betterment of this country. We remember when a siding was asked for by the farmers of Fishing River district the “Little Fork Riverite clique saw ruination for Fork River in it, and suggested that something ought to be done to prevent that siding being constructed. The farmers of Fishing River and Fork River were encouraged to sign a petition just previous to the election last June, asking the Government to erect an elevator and were told again and again that an elevator would be erected this fall at Fork River is the Roblin Government was returned to power, have we got one? Not on your life and I charge that the action of the “Fork Riverite” clique has discouraged any of the Elevator companies from erecting an elevator at Fork River. I do not bow the knee to the Roblin Government but I signed the petitions for the erection of a Government Elevator and advised others to do the same and intended if it was built, to patronize it because it would be built with the people’s money and it is good policy the patronize any institution that our money is invested in and endeavour to get the best we can out of the investment, there are thousands of bushels of grain in our district this season and we have no local market, I repeat that the Government Elevator is lost to Fork River district and the famers have been fooled once again and I ask the disappointed farmers to become “knockers” along with me and we will get the elevator along with a lot of other good things such as post offices etc., etc.

Fred Lacey,
Post Master, Oak Brae.

1910 Oct 20 – Winnipegosis

On Monday last the “Manitou” left the landing stage at Winnipegosis, heavily laden with fishermen and their equipment. Part of this equipment, and one would think a very important part, consisted of the wives and children of some of the fishermen. Although so many have left the town, the toll of departure is not yet complete but it is expected that this week all the people occupied during the winter in fishing, will have left the town. We wish them luck.
On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will conduct the service in the Fork River Methodist Church at 11 o’clock in the morning instead of 3 p.m.
On Sunday next the Methodist pulpit at Winnipegosis will be occupied by the Rev. Jas. Malley. The subject will be “Buried alive by Devils.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 19 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 19 – Fork River

Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on Sunday. The church was tastefully decorated with flowers, grain and vegetables. The ladies and officers are to be congratulated on the fine display. The service was conducted by Mr. Littler, B.A.; Miss Nixon, organist. A large congregation took part in thanking the giver of all good things for a bountiful harvest.
Mr. Littler is leaving the mission to attend St. Johns College at Winnipeg. Mr. Harding of Algoma, will carry on the work in this mission this winter.
Our bonanza farmer, T.N. Briggs, is smiling. Wheat 37 1/2 bushels to the acre.
The C.N.R. should have an extra bonus for the grandly they handle our mail and express lately. It comes in an old box car with about two inches of coal dust all over the floor. Fancy mail bags and grapes with a nice coating of coal dust and baggage and express with syrup and dust. They might clean out the car but any old thing goes on this line.
John Newsdale is visiting his parents after spending the summer teaching in Saskatchewan.
Wm. Coultas’ team took a notion to run away the other day. The sudden stoppage in the river caused him to take a few graceful revolutions through the air. He received a good shaking up, however he is doing nicely.
Threshing is the order of the day this fine weather. There are four outfits working within two miles of town. The yield is very good.

1916 Oct 19 – Dauphin’s Population 3200

The recent census shows the population of the own to be 3200. Naturally this comes as a great disappointment. The falling off, however, can be to a large extent accounted for in the fact that over 1000 young men have been recruited from the town. The normal population must be close to the 4000 mark.

1916 Oct 19 – The Week’s Casualty List

Stuart Geekie, Winnipegosis, killed. (Stewart Geekie, 1893, 150410)
Wm. Patterson, Ochre River, killed. (???)
A. Stevenson, Minitonas, killed. (Albert Victor Stevenson, 1892, 425361)
Robin Cruise, Dauphin, killed. (Robert Wallace Cruise, 1899, 425650)
Jas. Brown, Dauphin, wounded. (James Evelyn Brown, 1896, 151554)
Pte. Younghusband, Dauphin, killed. (Francis Lloyd Younghusband, 1892, 81863)
Lance Corp. H.G. Alguire, wounded. (???)

1916 Oct 19 – Fork River

J. Schuchett and Mr. P. Zacks left for Winnipeg to arrange for taking over Mr. Zacks’ stock as he is leaving here. Zack brothers are taking three cars of potatoes to Winnipeg. They have purchased the spuds from the farmers here at 45 cents a bushel. The snow storm of Tuesday has delayed the thrashing for a few days. Farmers are busy loading grain from the platform and getting satisfactory results from their shipments. Wheat prices keep advancing. Truly the farmer is king this year.

1916 Oct 19 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J. Mossington and children have returned home from a long visit to friends in Toronto.
The tug “Isabelle” left on Sunday morning towing a barge load of supplies and W.B. Sifton’s log camp outfit. W. Johnston was also a passenger with his fishing outfit, and L. Schaldemose took his family up for the winter.
The “Manitou” returned Monday. She has one more trip to make before the close of navigation.
Mr. Wm. Sifton, of Minitonas, is visiting his daughter Mrs. A.S. Walker.
Last week some fines were imposed on account of liquor. Geo. Bickle, who is not a householder, was found guilty, and Ed. Chermok, a general merchant here, was fined for having liquor in his store. The authorities are on the watch for others who are suspected.
The Red Cross Society had a very successful meeting at Victoria Hall last Wednesday [1 line missing] the entertainment will be given by Mrs. Paddock and Mrs. White.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 17 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 17 – Committed for Trial

One night last week several windows were broken in the store of Katz & Brackman at Ethelbert. I.J. Katz, who happened to be in town, swore that he saw Peter Pundy and another party that he could not recognize in the dark, break the windows with an axe. Pundy was brought before Magistrate Skaife, on the charge, and after two nights were consumed in hearing and evidence, was committed for trial. F.E. Simpson appeared for the prosecution and J.L. Bowman for the defence.

1912 Oct 17 – Ethelbert

A preliminary hearing was held before Police Magistrate R. Skaife on the evenings of the tenth and eleventh of Oct. An information, charging Peter Pundy, was laid by H. Brachman of the firm of Katz & Brachman, with breaking four panes of glass and other damages, amounting to over $20, during the night of Oct. 10th, to their store on Main Street. Considerable interest was manifested by the Ruthenian population, the court being crowded each night until midnight and feeling ran high. Mr. Simpson, of Dauphin, put the case for prosecution, and Mr. Bowman for the defence. After a prolonged and careful hearing, it was thought by the magistrate, the charge needed further investigation and Pundy was remanded for trial at Portage la Prairie. He was allowed at large, after entering into bail himself in $200, and two others for $150 each, for his appearance at Portage to stand his trial.
The Elevator is nearing completion and will need only a few more days to make it ready to receive the crop.
Norman Booth, the buyer for the Elevator Co., went west a few days ago, where he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Olive Ward, the daughter of Cross Ward, postmaster of Deepdale. Mr. Booth and his wife have returned to Ethelbert, where they will reside until the grain season is over. Cross Ward is an old resident of Ethelbert and our hearty congratulations are given to the newly wed couple, that they may live long, and prosper in their new undertaking.
Geo. Marantz has commenced business in John McLean’s store, and is doing his best to attract customers by a good display of new goods in his windows.
J. McLean expects to transfer the balance of his stock still unsold at an early date. He retains the grist mill which he hopes to run as usual this winter.
The ever present and crying need of the hour, is now, and ever will be, good roads to move the crops.
There are rumours that something will be done, in this direction, by the Council availing themselves of the government’s offer to pay two-thirds of the cost of constructing main roads through the district.

1912 Oct 17 – Fork River

J. McCaulay, Massey-Harris travelling agent, was here a few days on business with D. Kennedy.
Peter Ellis, after spending the week-end with his family, has returned to Kamsack.
Samuel Bailey took a trip to Dauphin on business last week.
Clem Kennis, who has been at Prince Albert for some months, returned home and states the harvest very late all over the West.
Robertson & Snelgrove are shipping their threshing outfit to Yorkton for the season and Pat Powers is going along. Nothing like lots of “Power.”
Miss L. Clark, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents.
Rev. H.H. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit lately to meet some persons from Meadow Portage on church business.
Mrs. G. Tilt, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the farm on the Mossey.
Miss Margaret and Gertrude Kennedy are visiting with Mrs. Chas. Wilkes of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Scelly was up last week from Dauphin visiting Mr. Clemons.
Mr. Glendenning is visiting his uncle, Thos. Glendenning, on the Mossey for a few days.
Next Sunday, Oct. 20th, special children’s service at the English church at 3 o’clock, and on Sunday, Oct. 27th, the annual harvest festival service will be held and a suitable sermon for the occasion will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. All are welcome to the services.
Rev. Sam. Cruch, late of Glenella and family, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Kennedy for a few days on their way to Tullesford, Sask.

1912 Oct 17 – Sifton

Church of England services are held regularly every fortnight at Sifton (Tuesday evening) and also at other times by arrangement.

1912 Oct 17 – Winnipegosis

Harvest festival service will be held at Winnipegosis school house at 7.30 on Oct. 20th. Collection will be made for the Home Mission Fund. The sermon will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase, minister in charge.
J.R. Parker, of the Standard Lumber Co., has gone to Winnipeg to endeavour to secure men for work in the woods.
Jos. Birrell took his child to the hospital at Dauphin on Monday.
Active preparations are being made for the winter’s fishing. The prospects for fishing are said to be exceptionally poor.
The cattle industry in these parts is proving most profitable. Several shipments were recently made to Dauphin. Campbell Benson was the purchaser.

1918 Oct 17 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. William Alfred Cleland, Dauphin, killed. (William Alfred Cleland, 1894, 865829)
Pte. Chas. Gray, Dauphin, killed. (???)
Pte. Francis Ingram Rogers, Asheville, wounded. (Francis Ingram Rogers, 1899, 1001239)
Pte. Harold Allan Dunlop, Dauphin, wounded. (Harold Allan Dunlop, 1897, 718788)
Pte. Campbell, Winnipegosis, wounded. (???)
Pte. Chris Benson, Dauphin, wounded. (Christian T Benson, 1887, 1000081)
Pte. Orval Wood Struthers, Dauphin, gunshot wound in right leg. (Orval Wood Struthers, 1895, 151250)
Pte. J.H. Paulson, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Johann Hannibal Paulson, 1891, 2504017)
Pte. W.S. Hamilton, Dauphin, gassed. (???)
Pte. George Edward Buchannon, Dauphin, wounded. (George Edward Buchannon, 1894, 1000633)
Pte. Ray Neely, Dauphin, wounded. (Ray Neely, 1897, 1000556)
Pte. William Meldrum, Dauphin, wounded. (William Meldrum, 1897, 1000280)
Pte. Harry Hamilton Olson, Dauphin. (???)
Pte. E.N. Humphries, Dauphin, wounded. (???)

1918 Oct 17 – Churches and Schools Closed

By order of the health officer of the town all churches, schools and public places of amusement have been closed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

1918 Oct 17 – The Man of the Hour
Gen. Spanish Flu.

1918 Oct 17 – TOWN OF DAUPHIN
SPANISH INFLUENZA
WARNING TO THE PUBLIC

This disease is very prevalent in some parts of the world today, and has reached our Town. It is therefore advisable that people generally should know something about it, its symptoms, and the measure and method of its communicability; and should be advised as to the general rules for its restraint and cure.
Spanish Influenza is generally believed to be a variety of the old type of Influenza with which we have been long familiar, with in addition possibly some increase of virulence, due to the conditions and places in which this present epidemic had its origin.
It is a “Germ” disease, and is conveyed from one suffering from it to others, by the secretions of the mouth, nose, throat and lungs. The use of towels or cups in common will readily spread it. Coughing, spitting or sneezing by anyone who has it, in the company of others, will readily spread it. Crowded and ill ventilated living rooms and sleeping places, as well as ill ventilated and insanitary places of work are conductive to its dissemination.
The following are the symptoms which generally accompany an attack:
Fever, headache, backache, inflamed throat, and often bleeding from the nose. In addition to these symptoms, in more severe cases a troublesome cough with a sense of constriction in the chest follows. From these develop the case of Broncho-Pneumonia which is the feature of the disease mainly responsible for deaths.
If cases should come to your neighbourhood, think first of Prevention. Don’t go to any house or place in which there may be persons with the above symptoms. Don’t let any person suffering from these symptoms come to your home or place of business. Don’t use common towels or drinking cups in any place. Keep away from people who have the disease, if you do you won’t get it. If on the other hand, you mingle with people who have it there is no known method of disinfection which would prevention your taking it. Therefore stay away and keep in he open air and sunlight as much as possible.
If you should be attacked by the disease, go to bed at once. Rest and Warmth are very important factors in its cure. Take warm drinks, live on fluids, and send for your Physician. Having done these things promptly, there is usually little danger. Not doing them, and taking chance, may turn a very mild illness into a very serious and sometimes a fatal one.
Attendants on all cases should wear gauze masks.

E. BOTTOMLEY,
Health Officer, Town of Dauphin.

1918 Oct 17 – Fork River

Mr. Hanson, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a few days in town lately.
Leo Beck has purchased the threshing outfit of Charles Bugg and is making the straw fly.
There are now five outfits threshing within a radius of three miles so good progress is being made with the work.
Potatoes, yes sir. From a pound of Victory seed 50 lbs. were produced. When I comes to grain or vegetables Fork River district stands at the top.
Mrs. Moxam, from Winnipeg, is visiting at the home of Mr. Sam Reid.
So far the Spanish Flue has laid its hand lightly on us. However, we must not be behind the times or out of fashion, so that anyone from now on who gets a cold will claim to have had an encounter with His Nibbs King Flu. But, say, if we could only resort to the remedy of happy memory, hot toddy, wouldn’t the male portion of the population be suddenly afflicted.

1918 Oct 17 – Sifton

Sunday automobile travelling is just as prevalent as ever. The writer counted nine in town last Sunday. There are lots of places where yellow paint and rotten eggs could be used a plenty.
The foundations for the large Ruthenian hall has been laid and the material is on the ground.
It is about time the foreigners (and most of them are still foreigners and pride themselves on it) learned to take notice of our national statutory holidays. On Thanksgiving Day may loads of grain drove into market, the owners knowing nothing of the day, caring less, and most indignant at not being able to unload. But let an Anglo-Saxon try t hire one on a saint’s or holy day – nothing doing!
Philip Wood and Leslie Kennedy and Miss Lottie Isaacovitch and enjoying a short holiday here.
This district is not behind most of the districts in grain yields. Thirty bushels to the acre is quite common, and as high as 40 and even 50 bushels to the acre has been threshed.
W. Terin still delivers fresh fish to town, easing up the H.C.L.
An average of two car loads of live stock are shipped from here each week throughout the year, excepting possibly three months.
Several gas tractors have been sold at this point, with a promise of many more next season.
Our roads, and especially our culverts, are generally speaking, a disgrace. The wear and tear to rolling stock and automobiles, not to mention horse flesh, is beyond calculation. A culvert one foot or more above the grade was responsible for a small automobile wreck on Saturday in ward 6. The council will be asked to pay the damages.
Glorious Indian summer, with a forecast of winter within the next two months at least.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 7 – 1915

1915 Oct 7 – Fork River

Mr. Lorne Tilt has returned from the States and is visiting with his parents on the old homestead.
Mr. Ben Warshosky, horse and cattle buyer, left last week for Winnipeg with 2 carloads of fat cattle.
Fred Puluk, merchant of Oak Brae, was in town for a consignment of goods shipped here for his store.
Private F.J. Storrar is home from Sewell camp for a few days visiting his friends and looks quite spruce in his khaki.
Last winter the government officials advised the farmers to put in all the wheat they could and in many instances land was sown that should have been summer fallowed. Now the bad weather stops threshing and no plowing can be done. The government now comes out with the warning “Don’t thresh too soon.” Advice is cheap. It’s cheap money the farmer wants to be able to borrow. Interest at 8 to 12 percent, which is put up to us by the manufacturer when our crops are a failure by frost or otherwise are no good.
Mr. Shuchell, general merchant, is spending a few days at the Peg rustling bargains for his customers hereabouts.
Mr. John Chipley has returned from Hamiota, having spent a month harvesting.
Several men, who went out to harvest, are returning on account of the bad weather. Work is at a standstill lately.
Mr. Geo. Lyons, municipal tax collector, is busy these days. The job seems to agree with him.
W. King, J.P., received word that his appointment has been rescinded. “Billy” remarked with a smile, “that it knocked Doe Bryant’s yarn into a cocked hat when he (the doc) remarked that the Grits were always willing to wack up with a good Conversation.”
[1 line missing] Winnipegosis, was a visitor here inspecting the safe with the intention of moving it to Winnipegosis for the use in the clerk office.
Mr. A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned from a business trip to Dauphin at the week-end.

1915 Oct 7 – Sifton

Mr. Walters, of the Standard Lumber Co., joins the colours.
It was with regret that the young people of Sifton heard of the departure of Mr. Walters to join the colours. Mr. Walters has always identified himself with the best interests of the young people of the town, and has acted as scout master of the 1st Sifton patrol of Boy Scouts, which he was largely instrumental in forming. The patrol, in recognition of his kind work among them, met at his office in full dress uniform and presented him with a gold mounted cigarette holder. Mr. Bousfield, school principal, made the presentation and after a brief resume of the good work and happy reminiscences with the patrol, congratulated Mr. Walters and assured him of the party good [1 line missing] Sifton for his safe return among the heroes of a well-won fight.

1915 Oct 7 – Winnipegosis

The fishermen all arrived from their camps per the S.S. Manitou on Saturday morning, as the fall fishing is over. They will never get in shape for going up the lake for the winter.
We are glad to report Miss Pearl Paddock making rapid progress to recover.
Private Joe Johnston, Sid. King, Wm. Wright and Bert Arrowsmith are spending their leave of absence at their homes here. They are looking well and in uniform are a credit to the army.
Thomas Toye had a narrow escape from a serious accident Wednesday, when his horse took fright and bolted. A bunch of dogs got fighting under the horse and rig. These dogs want to be tied up before some one gets seriously hurt.
The council passed an early closing by-law at their last meeting; which comes into force on Oct. 8th.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. Whale was well attended and the proceeds amounted to $7.00.
Geo. Adams, of Waterhen, spent Sunday in town.
Mr. Derachers, of Pine Creek, is spending a few days in town.
A ten-cent tea will be held at the home of Mrs. White on Wednesday, Oct. 6th, in aid of a local family.
Frank Hechter spent a few days in Winnipeg on business last week, returning Monday.
We are getting three trains a week steady new and what is sill better news three mails also.
Mr. W.D. King, of Dauphin, is spending a few days in town at the home of her mother, Mrs. Theo. Johnston.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 6 – 1910

1910 Oct 6 – First Automobile Accident

The first automobile accident in town to write of happened Friday evening. Eric Nicholson driving his father’s (H.P. Nicholson) horse on Vermillion Street, collided with J.W. Johnston’s automobile just as it was coming over the crossing at his lane on the ave, N.W., Mr. Johnston immediately put on the emergency break but the machine struck the horse before it was stopped. On examination for casualties it was found that the animal had received a broken leg. The two veterinary, Dr. Bryant, was telephoned for to dispatch the animal.

1910 Oct 6 – Thresher Fatally Injured

Gilbert Plains, Man., Oct. 1 – Mike Genik, who was working on the threshing machine of Frank Morris, on the farm of Fred Manns, was run over by the front wheel of the engine last night, receiving internal injuries which, it is said, will prove fatal.

1910 Oct 6 – Fork River

A meeting of the Council was held here last week, when some important business was done.
Miss Hansford of Winnipegosis, paid us a visit was done.
Rev. H.H. and Scrase visited Mr. and Mrs. Lacey at Oak Brae last week.
Mowat School house was prettily decorated last Sunday on the occasion of their Harvest Festival. A nice congregation attended.
We are all wondering if the Fork River and Winnipegosis road will be ready for use this coming winter. Slow progress seemed to be made on account of scarcity of teams and men.
A spark from the engine was the cause of a load of wheat being burned up in the wagon owned by Mr. W. King was badly damaged.
Mrs. Tilt from Dauphin, came up last week.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very eloquent sermon to the congregation of All Saints Church which was greatly appreciated. His subject was “The Holy Eucharist Congress at Montreal” and replied to Father Vaughan, who said that Protestantism is a soulless religion and that Canadian public schools are Godless schools. Mr. Scrase handled the subject well.

1910 Oct 6 – To the Herald:

SIR – I notice in the press an article dated September 17th, from a Mowat correspondent, re Government Elevator, which he thinks is lost, strayed or stolen. If either of these three things have happened it, the people of this vicinity would not be surprised to hear of it dropping out of the Mowat mail bag some day as it is remarkable what that mail bag will consume – tacks, sugar and other things too numerous to mention.
I have never heard of such a thing happening an elevator but we have had an experience like that in post offices up here. Fishing River being mentioned in the Mowat article reminds me what happened a few years ago, the settlers of Fishing River petitioned the Ottawa Government for a post office. Did they get the post-office at Fishing River? Not your life! It was lost, strayed or stolen as a new post office was located shortly after, not a hundred miles from Fishing River. If our Oak Brae P.M. would put the same energy behind the mail cart as he uses on his pen, knocking at the Provincial Government, the Winnipegosis mail it carries would get here before the train leaves and not have to lay over and the people would appreciate it very much.

A Fork River Correspondent

1910 Oct 6 – North Lake

Councillor Lacey has let quite a few contracts for road work lately, which will help the Galicians to get around easier.
John Bolinski is erecting a dwelling and stable on his farm on the lake shore.
Rev. H.H. Scrase conducted harvest thanksgiving service at Mowat School house last week. His text was very appropriate. The school house was tastefully decorated by Misses Charlotte and Harriet Lacey.
If any person comes in contract with a threshing outfit looking for work, be so kind as to show them the way here in case they get lost.

1910 Oct 6 – Sifton

Fine weather continues. Threshing progressing very nicely.
Mr. Carruthers and gentlemen friend from Valley River, paid our village a visit on Tuesday evening. “Me thinks” a fair inducement.
The Rev. Sabourin is moving the R.C. Church to a property across the road from the present location.
The Rev. Archbishop of Lemburg, Galicia accompanied by Archbishop Langevin, St. Boniface, is expected at Sifton in the near future, in the interests of the Greek rite of the R.C. Church.
A number of our villagers went out to Lake Dauphin on Saturday for the day’s shooting.
The Sifton village mock council met on Wednesday of last week. After the minutes of the previous meeting were read and several very important communications were brought up and read before the council after which some heated discussions followed.
The matter of the excessive use of the Comfort Soap miniature wagons on the sidewalks of the village, was brought to the attention of the council, that the practice be immediately stopped, thus lessen the dangers to pedestrians exceeding the speed limit by law. After due discussion the motion was seconded by Alderman Dneufre, that the constable be ordered to put the by-law in force respecting this and in failure of that recommended that the family production be curtailed.
A complaint was also read from some residing in the farther wards east, of a nuisance of late in that locality. The west winds of late are heavily laden with the smell of carrion. The constable was ordered to investigate and see that all dead mosquitos, horses or horse flies, be buried at once by or at the expense of the parties responsible.
Alderman Pantoline thought that the nuisance ground was being moved too near the centre of the town anyway and wanted to know of the constable what was being done re the manure heaps which were called to his attention some time ago and demanded to know why he was not taking action. Alderman Dneufre thought the constable very dilatory in the performance of the duties of his position and said that he could produce a more competent party at less salary to take the place of the present policeman. Some charged graft repeatedly in the way of that officer’s position, others demanded investigation.
It was then moved by Alderman Dneufre and seconded by Pinkas that the matter of graft in the police commissioner’s office be investigated and reported to the council at the next meeting. Council then adjourned to again meet at the usual date.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 29 – 1910

1910 Sep 29 – Buried in Well

Kamsack, Sask., Sept. 25 – A funeral service, attended by circumstances that are unique in the history of Canada, took place Saturday on the farm of John Bowes, sixteen miles south of here. At the top of a 73 foot shaft that had been sunk for a well and at the bottom of which lay the remains of Elwer Olson, aged 35, of Yorkton. Rev. J. Morrison conducted a service for the dead. The shaft has been closed up and the body will remain for ever in the deep and improvised grave. Hansen was overcome by gas in the well and attempts to recover the body were fruitless.

1910 Sep 29 – Died from Burns

Miss Mabel Gunn of Makinak, aged 28 years, died Tuesday from burns received last week through an accident in handling coal oil. The young lady was trying to squelch a blaze on the floor with a rug, when her clothing caught on fire, and before it was put out she received terrible burns.
The unfortunate lady lingered nearly a week and everything possible was done to relive her suffering.
The funeral to the Makinak cemetery took place Wednesday.
Miss Gunn was favourably known throughout the Dauphin district, being one of Makinak’s earliest residents and having, with her sister, run a boarding house there for years. Her demise is keenly felt by the citizens of that community.

1910 Sep 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Comber left here for her home in Selkirk last week.
Mr. Frame from Treherne has been visiting friends here.
On Sunday Sept. 18th, Mrs. E. Morris gave birth to a little girl.
Quite a large congregation attended the Harvest Festival Service at Winnipegosis last Sunday night when a special sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Car loads of wheat are being shipped from this point.
Tom Toye’s youngest child died last week and was buried at Winnipegosis. The burial service was taken by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Cattle buyers are busy in this district. Quite a number of cattle have been sold lately and shipped to Winnipeg.
Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Harvest Festival Service will be held at the English Church on Sunday evening, October 9th, at 7.30.

1910 Sep 29 – Sifton

Mr. F.E. Nex of Whitemouth, is visiting his father-in-law, Mr. Ludwig Zarowoney. Fred bicycled from Winnipeg to McCreary, where he boarded the train.
Rev. Sabourin was in Winnipeg last week on business.
School Inspector Walker of Dauphin, inspected the village school on Tuesday last.
Miss A. Griffith of Fishguard, Eng., is visiting her brother-in-law, Mr. W Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Barrie have just returned home, after a couple months visit to his parents in “ye auld Scottish hielands” near Aberdeen. Bill reports a vey pleasant trip.
Theo. Stefanik of Winnipeg, addressed a large open air gathering here on Wednesday of last week in the interest of the community. Mr. Rawson of Dauphin was noticed in the gathering.
Charl Holinski is about completing the building of his new home. A fireside gathering is expected to initiate the new house when finished, so no doubt Mr. Jordan of Dauphin will be likely called upon to send up the necessary for the occasion, which is usually quite in evidence at such times.
Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Kitt and son of Valley River, visited Sifton on Sunday.
Miss Bessie Wilson of Fork River, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Paul Wood.
Mr. W. Carr went to Winnipegosis on Saturday on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 28 – 1911, 1914, 1916

1911 Sep 28 – Fork River

Miss Bertha Johnston of Dauphin, is on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan Kennedy.
Glen Campbell’s committee rooms were set fire to at the wind-up of Cruise’s meeting by some political sore head. Not much damage was done.
Mr. Y.G. Littler was a visitor to Winnipeg on business.
Our Liberal friends had to import help from Saskatchewan and outside points, with boodle and slandering stories. It was quite unnecessary as they have proven to be past masters at the game themselves. However i was of no avail as we gave a majority of 20 for Campbell in sip of their unscrupulous tricks.
James Duff, of New Lowell, Ont. is visiting at the home of Mr. Noah Johnston of Mowat. He thinks we have a good district here.
The scribe in looking over the Press notices that our old friend Jackdaw, has been to Hell on a tour of instruction. He should now know something of what is in store for him and the cabinet ministers of the late Laurier Government and govern himself accordingly as the ways of the transgressors are hard.
The Liberal-Conservatives will hold a ball in the Orange Hall on Sept. 29th. Everybody welcome irrespective of political learning.
Hurrah for R.L. Borden, a tiger for Glen Campbell, although defeated will not be forgotten in the future.
Nicola Dinsercsim is under a quarantine for scarlet fever, having lost two of his family during the last week. He has our sympathy in his time of trouble.
Threshing is going on apace this week. No doubt the change of atmosphere is due to the reciprocity funeral on the 21st.
Mossey River Council meets at Winnipegosis on Tuesday, Oct. 3rd.
There are some people who prefer to keep dogs instead of fences and consequently their neighbours cattle suffer. One farmer who has had his cattle badly cut by dogs has found an ointment made of lard and strychnine a splendid thing for cattle’s sore heels. Put in plenty of strychnine and it has a most soothing effect on the cattle.

1911 Sep 28North Lake

Owing to an outbreak of scarlet fever, North Lake School has been closed. Mr. J. Spearing the teacher, was soon on the trail and located 10 cases. Dr. Medd of Winnipegosis, health officer for this municipality, quickly responded to the call for assistance. After a strict investigation he put five houses under quarantine much to the annoyance of the inhabitants, but joy to the surrounding district. He said something about the roads here but we’d rather not put it in less the Reeve and Councillor for this district gets hold of the paper.
The Doctor’s young; but he can certainly put the fear of the old gentleman into the Galicians in a case of this kind. We’re afraid he will have to be called again for an outbreak of nervous disorder.
Threshing has started in places around here. Mostly barley has been grown this year owning to the big prices it will bring?
Mrs. Jos. Spearing is visiting in the Oak Brae district this week.

1911 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

D. McAuley made a shipment of cattle to Winnipeg on Tuesday.
Duck shooting this season has not been as good as in the past years. Sportsmen returning from the north end of the lake have fairly good bags, but not the large ones they use to be able to report.
Rev. Thorirason of Oak Point, near Brandon, held confirmation services on Sunday.
The Mossey River Council meets here on Oct. 3rd.
The fishing schooners are already leaving for the north end of the lake, to prepare for the winter season which opens on November 20th.
Something sure did happen here on the 21st. How the oracle was worked no one yet has been able to clearly state, but one thing is certain that there will be an election protect and from the revelations then, “just how it happened” will be explained and hot to the satisfaction of either the Liberals or Mr. Cruise.
Frank Hechter was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Johnson of the Dauphin Hospital staff, who has been recuperating at her home here, leaves Saturday to again take up her duties a the hospital.

1914 Sep 28 – Nine Miles of Dead in Trenches

LONDON, Sept. 23 – The Daily Mail’s correspondent reports that the German right has been turned between Peronne and St. Quentin. He says wounded have been arriving at the unnamed place. They report that there are nine miles of dead in trenches between those town towns.

1914 Sep 28 – Ethelbert

Considerable wood is being shipped out.
Messrs. Geo. Marantz and H. Brachman, were at Dauphin in the early part of the week attending the Jewish New Year services.
Threshing will be pretty well wound up in this district by the end of the week.
Efforts will be put forth by most of the farmers to have as large an area of land as possible unfair crop next year in view of the high prices promised for grain.
K.F. Slipetz was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.

1914 Sep 28 – Fork River

Mrs. D. Kennedy returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Wm. Howitson has returned and is open for business again at the A.T. Co. store. He is of the opinion that Fork River is the right place.
In the gloaming Mr. Archie McDonald left for a few days trip and will take in Winnipeg. Archie needs a rest after such a strenuous summer’s work on the farm.
Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, is taking a vacation for a week at Fork River. He says there are times that Toye’s dredges or schooners are out of the question.
Miss Grace Little has returned from a months visit with friends at Winnipeg and Brandon.
Mr. Thomas and family have arrived with a carload of furniture from Saskatchewan. He has charge of the Northern elevator and intends making this his home for some time.
F.C. Green, from England, has arrived to take charge of this mission for a time. He will hold service in All Saints’ Anglican Church, Sunday afternoon, Sept. 27th, at 2 o’clock.
In this time of war would it not look very much more loyal of Mossey River School district to have the good old flag flying say at least once a month irrespective of the reading of the School Act.

1916 Sep 28 – The Week’s Casualty List

The Dauphin boys are now in the midst of the active fighting along the Somme and the causality list grows daily.
Fred. I Pike, died from wounds.
Lorne Shand, arm shattered and eye injured.
Chas. Batty, wounded in chest and shoulder.
Fred. Grant, wounded.
Geo. Gray, gunshot wound

1916 Sep 28 – Dauphin Nurses Wanted For War Front

Miss Jackson and Miss Wilson, recent graduates of the Dauphin Hospital nursing staff, and miss Myers, have received notification that their services were accepted for overseas duty. Miss Myers will be connected with Military District No. 10 and leave Oct. 3rd. Miss Jakeman and Miss Wilson will be with the Queen Alexander Technical nursing staff and leave Oct. 7.

1916 Sep 28 – Fork River

All will regret to learn that Lieut. T.A. Worsey was killed in action on Sept. 7th. He was lay reader and in charge of Fork River mission in the summer of 1914. On his return to St. John’s College in the fall to take up his studies he enlisted in the Grenadiers as a Private and worked his way up till he got his commission of Lieutenant. He was highly esteemed by everyone for his sterling qualities.
Jas. Playford, of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a few days renewing acquaintances.
John Watson, of Dauphin, was among the recent visitors here.
S.B. Levins has sold his bunch of horses to Ben. Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
F.F. Hafenbrak was unfortunate in loosing the best team he had with pink eye. Horses are horses at this time of the year.
Wm. King has received a pair of registered Berks for breeding. Once our farmers commence to specialize in stock there will be a surer basis of the farming industry. Grain growing exclusively is too doubtful a source of income.
Steve Brazdon got his hand caught in a thrashing machine and had it badly crushed. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, dressed the wound.

1916 Sep 28 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Hall Burrell’s boat was blown ashore near Hunter’s Island during the big blow on Friday last. He took to the small boat and pulled in for help. He got her safely off the rocks without much damage and brought her into port on Monday.
The Armstrong Trading Co. here are doing a lot of business these days. Fishing is good and trade is correspondingly good. Everybody is the store is busy.
Capt. W.B. Sifton was here last week. He made a trip up the lake and on his return took a party to Salt Point for shooting.
Dr. Medd made a trip to Dauphin on Saturday afternoon in his auto, returning on Sunday.
We hear that Sunday school is to commence at 2 o’clock during the [1 line missing] are again ??? ??? Methodist Church. Sunday, the 24th was the first day of the change.
Duck Hunter says there is very little sport this season. They sigh for the palmy days when the railroad first touched the lake at this point. Then it was usual thing to bring home from fifteen to twenty five ducks, now the man who gets seven is happy.
The Red Cross Society here have announced that they will meet on the first Monday of every month for the purpose of transacting business. This is outside of committee meetings, etc.
The Home Economics Society are planning heir program for the winter. Addresses are being arranged suitable to the season for each monthly meeting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 23 – 1915

1915 Sep 23 – Recruits for Sewell

The following recruits have enlisted in the 45th Batt. from Dauphin since Aug. 15th, and are now in training at Sewell camp: Bird McKinstry, A. Schoole, Cunningham, J. Brown, F. Storrar, W.H. Johnston, J. Cahill, J. Bartrup, J. Angus, W. Young, A.L. Cocking, W. Rindholm, E. Smith, B.F. Sparks, G. Spoueer, W. Mealing, and J. Hutson.
Sergt. Weeks will be in Dauphin and district until Oct. 15th and expects to get more recruits as the battalion is listed for England at an early date.

1915 Sep 23 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Thursday evening last in honour of Mr. Barbour and Mr. Burby who are joining the colours to do their bit for their country.
Sam McLean held a bailiff sale of furniture on Saturday, which was well attended and he had no trouble getting bidders, especially on the organ.
Frank and Ben Hechter attended the Jewish services in Dauphin Friday and Saturday.
The Ladies’ baseball team had a practice game on Wednesday when the Browns beat the Blues by 16 runs. Miss Geekie had the misfortune to get hit in the eye by the ball.
D.F. Wilson, of Fork River, passed through here on Friday for South Bay with notices of election for councillor [1 line missing] the army lately.
Quite a number are up north after the ducks. Mr. McInnes took a party across the lake in his gasoline launch Thursday.
Private Walter Munro arrived from Brandon on Saturday to spend a few days leave here with his friends. He reports the boys all well.
Mr. Rutlege, of the Pas, is spending a few days in town.
W.B. Sifton arrived from the north with is gang, having completed his lumber cut.
There was a children’s hour held in the Church of England on Friday evening, which was a great success thanks to Mrs. Bradley.
Constable Clarkson is busy these days rounding up dogs without tags, parties with dogs at large without tags had better keep their eye on the pound.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 22 – 1910

1910 Sep 22 – Serious Accident

Scaffold Collapses With Three Men – Arthur Milner Has Back Broken
While engaged Wednesday afternoon in shingling the first rows of Engineer R.T. Perkin’s new residence on 3rd Ave. S.W. the scaffold from which they were working suddenly collapsed with A. Milner, Wesley and Wallace Cleaver, throwing the former two to the ground 20 feet below. Wallace Cleaver managed to catch on to a window sill and saved himself. The crash of the falling scaffolding was heard some distance and brought several neighbours to the spot at once. The unfortunate men where extricated from the fallen timbers and carried to the home of Mr. Geo. Sergant and on the arrival of Dr. Bottomley taken to hospital. On examination of the two men it was found that Cleaver had several ribs broken, while Milner was more seriously injured, his spine being broken between the shoulders, and it is feared he has slim chances of recovery.
Milner is a young Englishman and came to Dauphin from Gladstone two years ago. He has taken an active art in he town band as solo cornet player. His father resides in the north of England and is being communicated with.

1910 Sep 22 – Fork River

The funeral of Mrs. S. Lowry took place last Saturday. Quite a large number of friends came to pay their respects, the service was conducted by Rev. W. Rowan.
Mrs. W. Stonehouse who has been away in Ontario for some time returned last Saturday.
Threshing is in full swing and crops are turning out well.
Mr. A.B. Hodgson who has been here for some time left last Saturday for Winnipegosis to enter the employ of the Armstrong Trading Co.
W. Stonehouse is building a house for himself in this village.
Mrs. Northam of Weyburn came here last Wednesday and intends to stay here.
Harvest Festival will be held at Mowat on Sunday, Sept. 25 at 11 o’clock, preacher Rev. H.H. Scrase.

1910 Sep 22 – North Lake

Messrs Hunter and Glendenning have commenced threshing and report wheat turning out good.
Settlers of this district tender their sympathy to Mr. Sam Lowry in his bereavement.
Councillor Lacey is now getting ready to ditch some of the main roads leading to Fork River and Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase preached an impressive sermon at Mowat last Sunday, touching on the death of Mrs. Sam Lowry. Quite a number were present.

1910 Sep 22 – Sifton

Fine weather prevails and is greatly appreciated by every one just now, at this time of the year, as it will either 3 northern or 1 northern. Threshers are busy everywhere about.
W. Kyscyzks new outfit was considerably disabled for a couple of days. Some culprit carefully distributed old iron, taking great pains to well place it in the centre of the sheaves in many of the stooks on Paul Wood’s farm. The separator was somewhat crippled a number of times and had to undergo repairs.
H.L. Troyer, Secretary of the Toronto Bible training school, Toronto and Miss E. Spargue, who have been visiting the mission house for a couple of days left for the east on Tuesday last.
Rev. Sabourin returned last week from Montreal where he has been attending the Eucharistic Congress.
A Mr. White of Winnipeg has been viewing the district in search of land to buy. There’s plenty of land to be had if you’ve got the money. Certainly a good locality for mixed farming.
The Manitoba Government telephone gang have unloaded a couple of cars of telephone poles and other material. We can certainly appreciate such things in sight.
To Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Gillis, a bouncing boy. “Be it ever so humble there’s no place like home.”
Soapy looks as happy and pleasant as ever as he gracefully strides down the street. Who said he was married four times to one woman?

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 21 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 21 – Sifton

The elections are now over and we are all glad we can now get down to business.
The threshing has been interrupted in this district by the frequent showers of rain.
The Misses Goforth and Reid, who spent their vacation in Saskatchewan, returned to town on Friday last. The ladies in question are well known as the nurses of the Presbyterian hospital here. The nurses are very popular here and on their return were tendered a reception at the Manse, which was decorated for the occasion. During the evening the ladies were presented with an address, which contained many complimentary terms, showing the esteem in which they are held and the appreciation of their work. The address was signed by J. Kennedy, J. Reid, Wm. Barry, W.J. Ashmore and C.A. Jones. At the conclusion of a very pleasant evening spent socially, refreshments were served by the ladies.

1911 Sep 21 – Winnipegosis

Wm. Sifton is spending a few days in town renewing acquaintances (before election).
Miss Sarah Hjalmerson is spending a few days at Snake Island the guest of Mrs. N. McAuley.
Miss M. Crawford left Thursday for Winnipeg, where she will attend business college.
Mr. and Mrs. Dennit and Miss Hansford are leaving town in October for England.
Miss Lily McAuley of South Bay, is visiting with Mrs. J.W. McAuley.
Mr. Paul Paplson and bride returned last week, after spending a two weeks’ honeymoon in Winnipeg.
Sunday, Sept. 24th, a confirmation service will be held in Victoria hall, conducted by Rev. B. Thorinson.
Misses Emma and Margaret Good, man of Red Deer Point, are the guests of Mrs. T. Schaldemose.
The Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.’s tug left Monday for Shoal River with Ted Cartwright in charge.
Ken McAuley, of Kamsack, is renewing acquaintances in town.
Wm. Walmsley in again managing the Lake View Hotel. His many friends are pleased to see his genial smile again at the hotel.

1916 Sep 21 – Maxwell King Wounded

Wm. King, postmaster at Fork River, received a cablegram this week from France stating that his son, Private Maxwell King, has been wounded.

1916 Sep 21 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on Wednesday, the 30th ult., all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner, re Fishing River Bridge, and from J.L. Bowman, re Cooper ditch.
McDonell – Reid – That the Basham Bridge be put in repair at once and that Coun. Reid be authorized to use any means to accomplish it that he may find necessary.
McDonell – Reid – That J.S. Seiffert be paid $25 for repairing the McAuley Bridge and that it have a further covering of two-inch tamarac plank eight feet long in the centre and that the clerk be authorized to issue orders for the plank and one leg of six-inch spikes.
McDonell – Reid – That the municipality make a grant of $50 to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; $25 to be paid now and $25 at the end of the year.
Reid – Namaka – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt – Campbell – That the accounts [1 line missing] in work be passed, $19.50.
McDonell – Reid – That the clerk notify Lawrence municipality that the council will pay 50 percent of any improvements made on the boundary line between the municipalities and that the construction of a ditch running into Lake Dauphin, which has been under consideration by the councilors of the adjourning wards be let by public auction by Reeve Lacey and Coun. Radcliff to arrange a date for such letting.
Hunt – Campbell – That Coun. McDonell, Reid and Namaka be a committee to inspect the Fork River-Winnipegosis road with a view to its improvement and report at the next meeting of the council.
Reid – McDonell – That the six pieces of timber purchased from W. Williams by the reeve be paid for.
Reid – Hunt – That as the plank ordered for the Fork River sidewalks has not been delivered for the purpose be purchased from W. Williams.
A by-law striking the rate for 1916 was passed. Municipal rate 12 ½ mills municipal commissioner’s rate, 4 mills, and general school rate, 5 ½ mills.
Hunt – Campbell – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1916 Sep 21 – Fork River

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 15 – 1910

1910 Sep 15 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 15 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 15 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 15 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 12 – 1912

1912 Sep 12 – Arm Broken in Runaway

A spirited team belonging to Geo. Lampard ran away on Wednesday afternoon. The driver, Thos. McKay, was thrown out of the rig and had his left arm broken.

1912 Sep 12 – Infantry for Dauphin

A movement is on foot in town to organize a military regiment. A preliminary meeting was held in Harvey & Bowman’s office on Monday evening, when Dr. Walker was appointed chairman and L. Shand secretary. It is proposed to have four companies if possible. A public meeting will be held shortly at which Col. Steele will be the speaker and afterwards officers selected.

1912 Sep 12 – Ethelbert

The awful thunderstorm, and the great rain of Wednesday has left things in very bad shape here, and unless we have a spell of fine weather the prospects are none too good.
K. McLean is still improving and is able to be up and about, but he is still very weak and thin.
All the material and engine for the elevator are on the ground, but as yet no signs of the builders. They will have to get a hustle on.
There were two cases before R. Skaife on Saturday. Mrs. J. Rewniak asked that her husband, J. Rewniak, be bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months. The evidence went to show that John had been persistently ill-treating her ever since their marriage over two years ago, and that he had very recently threatened to shoot her father, an old man who is close on seventy, with the handle of a hay fork twice on the arm, making it black because he tried to protect her. He was bound over to keep the peace and be of good behaviour for twelve months or forfeit $100.
The next case was a mixed up affair. Marko Dubyk sold a pig to N. Tkatchzuk, for five dollars, the pig to be delivered as soon as possible. Marko brought the pig to town, met some friends; they went and had drinks together, and entrusted the pig to Olexa Stassuk, to take to Tkatchzuk, but instead he took it home. Then he have it to S. Basaraba, who put it in his stye, and kept it for some weeks. Ultimely Olexa asked $3 for Tkatchzuk, and he should have his pig. This Tkatchzuk refused to give, but instead he wanted the pig, and $5.50 as a sort of fine for them keeping the pig. The case was decided as follows: Basaraba was ordered to take the pig to Tkatchzuk, and without any compensation for the feed of the pig. O. Stassuk had to pay the costs of the court, as his share of the fun, and Tkatchzuk as told that it was only the magistrate who had the privilege of extracting penalties.
Later Rewniak wanted the magistrate to order his wife to go back to him, but he was advised to treat her kindly in future, and then perhaps she might go back. But Maru says no, never.
The station has got the name “Ethelbert” printed in bold letters at both ends of the building, so that all who run can read.

1912 Sep 12 – Fork River

Sydney Howlett, of E. Million, spent a few days here and took a trip to Winnipegosis on business.
Garent Lacey has returned home after a few months vacation south looking for a high spot.
“Bishop” McCartney took a trip to Winnipegosis hunting his carriage. “Bejiggered if they get it again,” says the Bishop.
Nat Little has returned from a week’s visit to the States.
Our Mowat friend seems surpassed to see a gasoline boat about the size of a coffee pot, go from Winnipegosis to Lake Dauphin and return, and pats himself on the back, as its the dredge that did the trick. Why good sized boats loaded with freight passed up and down the Mossey, fifteen and twenty years ago.
Mrs. Wm. King who has been visiting at Vancouver and California. She says the Fork looks more like home.
D. Kennedy has purchased another “gee gee” for his delivery wagon. Just see the dust fly.
Duck shooting is the order of the day. It’s hard on the feathers.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from a visit to Dauphin and Sifton.
Thomas Shannon has been treating fall wheat for the farmers for seed and several have commenced sowing it.
We are informed some one is looking for a schooner to find the levels after the storm and he is not alone. There’s schooners and schooners.
Lost or strayed, the minutes of three or four council meetings.
Teacher, “What is it Tommy.” “Dad says we will get them all right if we had an assistant. We must not expect too much after such an electric storm. It’s so depressing.”
John Clements and family of Dauphin, arrived to take off his crop in the Chase farm.
Nat Little has put on a new wagon for delivering cream at the station.
The planer has started up again, and Billy Williams is making the shavings fly.

1912 Sep 12 – Sifton

Stephen Kosy’s stable was struck by lightening last Thursday. There were in the stable, a team of horses, harness and fifty hens. Fortunately the horse broke the board and ran out but the harness and hens were burned. Stephen had his stable insured.
On the same date Hnat Skarnpa’s stable was burned, lightening being the cause.
The harvest has been checked for a few days by bad weather.
Four of our well-known citizens have formed a company and will build a big store. Our Fedor of Blue Store does not like to see any more stores in own. He would rather buy out Pinkas and have the while business to himself.
The rumour is abroad that in a short time some of the Ruthenians intend to organize a co-operative store. Building is to begin next week.
Thos. Ramsay is busy building a new postoffice and boarding house.
Paul Wood has bought three lots in block one from Nicola Haschak.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 10 – 1910

1910 Sep 10 – Gold Find Reported

The following item is taken from the Free Press of Sept. 12:
Winnipegosis – Gold has apparently been found on the shores of Lake Winnipegosis. Joseph Grenon and party have just returned from a trip up the lake, bringing with them samples of rock which indicate a rich find. Several parties have left to investigate further.

1910 Sep 10 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Friday, Sept. 2.
Councillors Hunt and Fleming absent.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk write the Manitoba Bridge Co. and ask for prices of second hand steel bridges delivered at Fork River.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the clerk advertise for tenders for completing the Cooper ditch in accordance with engineer’s profile.
Nicholson-Lacey – Re: Shannon Road – That the municipality pay all expenses connected with obtaining this road but that Thomas Shannon pay the actual price of road $200.00 in installments. $100.00 on December 15, 1910 and $100.00 on December 15, 1911 with interest at 8 percent and that the Reeve and councilor Nicholson be a committee to confer with Mr. Shannon to obtain the necessary security.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Council is prepared to transfer the road allowance on the east side of the S.E. 19-30-18 to Mr. Champion in lieu of the proposed roadway parallel with the C.N.R. and adjoining that railroad on the west side, also that the clerk be instructed to settle all legal expenses so far incurred by Mr. Champion.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the clerk make inquiring regarding the acquiring of a roadway across the corner of the S.E. 30-30-18 adjoining the roadway.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the accounts presented by weed inspector Robinson, amounting to $40, for cutting thistles, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That road commissioner Nicholson’s account for letting and inspecting work, $13, be paid.
Lacey-Toye – That Dr. Medd’s salary for services rendered the municipality, $200, be paid.
Lacey-Paddock – That the clerk advertise for sale all patented lands in arrears of taxes.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the tender of the Canadian Ingot Iron Culvert Company for twenty-two 12 inch culverts 18 feet long for the sum of $362.60 be accepted.
Lacey-Nicholson – That the Reeve and Councillors be paid their fees and mileage to date.
Lacey-Toye – That Campbell & Simpson’s account of $12.60 be passed.
A by-law authorizing a loan of $2,000 was passed.
Nicholson-Lacey – That the Council adjourn to meet at Fork River on Thursday, Sept. 29.

1910 Sep 10 – Ethelbert

Ethelbert is all right. Such is the verdict of Bob Wilson and Ike Hewitson. Some three months ago Bob and Ike, thinking that a fortune was to be made at Kindersley, Sask., pulled out of Ethelbert with a car of stock and farm utensils. After getting there they were soon convinced that they had made a big mistake, and pulling out of Kindersley re-shipped to Edmonton. After wandering about for some time looking up the country, and travelling about the one thousand miles, living in a tent the meanwhile, they again headed for the old home at Ethelbert. The trip lasted three months and they never slept in a house all that time. They arrived at Ethelbert last Thursday, having payed fully $500 to be convinced at last that Ethelbert might be bad, but a jolly sight better than many places they had seen in their search for a nice soft spot to make their fortunes in.
What we want at Ethelbert is good progressive farming, to make it one of the best and most productive district in the province. Then with an intelligent and progressive council, able and willing to make needed improvements all over the municipality, all the vacant land would soon be taken up and an era of prosperity would set in, making the district an ideal one for the poor man to make a comfortable home for himself.
“All change here!” is the cry of the conductor at the big terminals. That is what is taking place here.
Rumour has it that the Queen’s Hotel is about to change hands, also one of the stores.
M. Wollochachuck has been appointed buyer for the Crystal Farmers’ Elevator Co., N.D.
O. Myska has sold his store to Peter Kuzzyk, who expects to act as agent for the Massey-Harris Co.

1910 Sep 10 – Sifton

Threshing is again in full swing although it has been delayed somewhat by rain.
The British American elevator is open again for the coming grain season with Paul Wood in charge as buyer.
H.L. Troyie from Ontario is visiting friends in the village.
Miss E. Sprague, mission nurse at Wakan, Sask., is spending a few days at the mission house the guest of nurses Reid, Maker, and Goforth.
H.J. Gillis is home from Grandview for a visit to his family.
Milton Ross of Irma, Alta., brother of the station agent made a short visit to the village last week.
Rudolph Spruhs had the misfortune to run a nail through his foot although lamed he is able to be around.
The Rev. Sabourin is away attending the Eucharist Congress in Montreal.
W. Carr has sold his stock and we understand intends moving to Winnipeg. He has had the misfortune to loose his wife and we all extend our heartfelt sympathies in his bereavement.
A couple of our local sports drove out to the lake in their automobile on Saturday in search of the feathery game. On their return however, walking seemed too good to resist any such temptation so the auto was abandoned by the roadside in order that the more healthy exercise might be indulged in.
The whooping cough epidemic is about subsided much to the relief of the little ones.
By the goodness of all the mosquitos and toads that remain our “man behind the gun” has a new red auto. One of the more common type such as is propelled by ox power.
The railway is rapidly completing the fencing of their right of way through the community which no doubt will be a considerable relief to adjoining settlers, protecting them from loss of cattle by straying on the track as was formerly the case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 8 – 1910

1910 Sep 8 – Fork River

Mr. Hunt from Ottawa is visiting his son, Absolam, here for a short time.
F. Wilson, from Dauphin, paid us a visit this week.
W. Williams will be running the Wilson threshing outfit here.
Cutting will be all done in a few days and good yields are expected.
Lots of hay has been cut up in this district and people from a long distance are coming in to buy. Prices evidently will be high.
F. Cooper will be running a thrashing outfit this year, having bought one from W. Williams.
Nat Little nearly lost one of his horses last week. The train from Winnipegosis happened to catch one of its hind legs, which was found to be very badly cut. Mr. Little had the animal attended to at once and it will recover from the accident.

1910 Sep 8 – North Lake

Rudolph Sprubs of Sifton, visited Jacob Strasdin last week.
Wheat cutting is finished now, and we hope soon to hear the toot! Toot! of Glendenning and Hunter’s threshing machine.
John Strasdin, who has been away on his farm breaking this summer, spent a few days with his parents last week.
Nat Little, of Fork River, has been around here setting up binders. He rather likes this part of the country.
The teachers of North Lake and Janowski schools have commenced duties again.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 27 – 1914

1914 Aug 27 – Latest From Line of Battle

LONDON, Aug. 27 – Late reports to War office state that desultory fighting is occurring along French frontier.

ON EVE GREAT BATTLE

Germans are ready to strike great blow. The troops are fast advancing and one of the biggest battles of the war is in sight.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING

The Russians are advancing in German territory and clearing everything before them.

1914 Aug 27 – Volunteers Get Right-Royal Send-Off

It was truly a great night in Dauphin, the night before the volunteers went away. It was Friday night last, the boys leaving on Saturday morning. The people of the town were out in full force and their right royal patriotism was most marked. The reality of war is brought home to us when “Our Own” are called out for service and hence a subdued depth of pent up emotion which is not found on other occasions. The Band did their part well, and what could be done without the band at such a time as this.

Great Cheering

A crowd of enthusiastic men, joined by a host of boys, well supplied with Union Jacks, some Belgian and French flags, formed in procession headed by band and red-coats. Everywhere, from doors and windows, hotels and street corners, the volunteers were lustily cheered.

Meeting Held in Open

The procession reached the town hall about 9 o’clock. The ball had been packed for nearly an hour and the enthusiasm inside was no less than on the street. Patriotic music was indulged in led by Prof. Minnaert. Only a small portion of the crowd being able to hold the public meeting and send-off for the boys in the op. When all gathered in front and around the corner, as large a crowd as was ever seen in Dauphin, surrounded the group of thirty-two men, whom we have the honour of sending to the front. Again the Band did its part well and between the addresses gave without stint, sweet patriotic strains.

Farewell Speeches

The chairman, Mayor Bottomley, took his place on the front steps of the town hall and everyone, except the volunteers, stood up for over an hour’s programme of music and speeches.
The speakers were Messrs. D.S. Woods, Munson, Wiley, Flemming, Bethell, Major Walker and Captain Newcombe.
The words spoken by all were in accord with Britain’s position and in a deep serious vein set forth the new grave situation in which Canada and the Empire stand today.
The Boys were recipients of a box of cigars each, some wholesome advice, heartiest congratulations, with affectionate hopes for a safe return.
It was an evening never-to-be-forgotten in Dauphin and the warmth of the farewell, the deep subdued feeling, was only surpassed on Saturday morning, when the train actually pulled out, all hats and handkerchiefs waving, all eyes wet, and the Band paying “God be With You Till We Meet Again.”

1914 Aug 27 – Praise For Dauphin Boys

W.J. Rawson, of Brandon, who was in town on Wednesday, told a Herald representative, that the Dauphin contingent had the best appearance of any of the troops assembled at that point for transpiration to Valcartier.

DAUPHIN.
Lieut. A.E.L. Shand (Albert Edward Lawrence Shand, 1891)
Sergt. G. Fraser
Sergt. W. Code
Sergt. T.D. Massey
Corp. D. Wetmore (David Lee Wetmore, 1884, 346)
Corp. N.C. Chard (Norman Cyril Chard, 1894, 240 SGT)
Corp. C.S. Wiltshire
Pte. H.A. Bray (Harold Arthur Bray, 1891, LT)
Pte. H.H. Moore
Pte. A.J. Pudifin (Arthur James Pudifin, 1885, 322)
Pte. Garth Johnston (Garth Fraser Johnston, 1890, 718076)
Pte. Neville Munson (Neville Munson, 1892, 313)
Pte. W.S. Gilbert (William S. Gilbert, 1874, 265)
Pte. C. Curtis
Pte. H. Izon (Hubert Izon, 1885, 280)
Pte. S. Laker (Stephen Laker, 1895, 13)
Pte. J.E. Greenaway (Joseph Edward Greenaway, 1885, 269)
Pte. A.J. Johnson
Pte. D. Powell
Pte. E. Sonnenberg (Edward Sonnenberg, 1892, 335)
Pte. E. Classen
Pte. E. Herrick (Eliot Charles Herrick, 1887, 275)
Pte. E. McNab
Pte. J.E. Lewis (John Edmund Lewis, 1893, 27501)
Pte. C.S. Van Tuyll
Pte. D. McVey (Devon McVey, 1892, 302)
Pte. A.E. Pickering (Albert Edward Pickering, 1892, 320)
Pte. A. Redgate (Albert Redgate, 1889, 324)
Pte. F.A. Mathews
Pte. H. Pollard
Pte. T.A. Collins (Thomas Arthur Collins, 1887, 245)
Pte. Frank Norquay (Frank Norquay, 1891, 318)
Pte. F. Jauncey (Fredrick Jauncey, 1890, 282)

WITH 99TH BRANDON.
Pte. C. Lane
Pte. P. Mickleburg (Ernest Michleburgh, 295)
Pte. Jackson
Pte. W. Bubb (William Charles Bubb, 1884, 2140)

WINNIPEGOSIS.
Pte. E. Morris
Pte. A. Martin
Pte. A. McKerchar

SWAN RIVER.
Pte. D. Stringer (Dixon Stringer, 1890, 24178)

ROBLIN.
Corp. J.B. Shearer (John Buchanan Shearer, 1892, LT)
Pte. J. Hallam (Jonathan Hallam, 1878, 46973)
Pte. W. Day
Pte. W. Armstrong
Pte. R.J. Ritchie
Pte. F. Burt
Pte. A. Hay
Pte. E. Simpson

1914 Aug 27 – Fork River

Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak and bride have returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. Mr. H. is of the opinion the crops in the Dauphin district are ahead of anything along the route he travelled.
It is said, “War is Hell.” So is the price of binder twine, when there is a difference of 1 to 4 cents on the same quality. How the war should affect twine now that was made in 1912 we give it up and leave it to other fellows to explain. Even the motorcar dare is doubted.
The fall fishing has started, so we are told, and while wages are lower our bonnie fishermen are head singing. “Rule Britannia” and “Britons never shall be Slaves.”
Some of our ratepayers are enquiring who is running the Mossey River School affairs at present.
Jack Chipla left for Winnipeg to work on the C.P.R.
D.F. Wilson returned from a trip west on business and reports crops light out there.
A. Snelgrove and Pat Powers have left for Yorkton for the threshing season.
Mrs. Johnston, of Port Arthur, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Kennedy.
Mr. Clarkson, Winnipegosis, passed through en route for Yorkton.
The Winnipegosis contingent passed through here for the seat of war as happy as clams on their way to Dauphin.
Mr. Ramsay, of Sifton, paid the burgh a visit with a cattle buyer and is rustling a car of stock.

1914 Aug 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishing fleet has left for Spruce Island, a point about 40 miles north. There are between 15 and 20 boats engaged in the work. The catches so far are reported good.
Capt. Coffey arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a late visitor.
To be or not to be, that is the great question. At the time of this writing the funds required to complete the school are not yet in sight. It is believed they are forthcoming but until they are the citizens are in a sate of doubt. The new school is needed that is one thing sure.
Architect Bossons, of Dauphin, was here on Saturday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 13 – 1914

1914 Aug 13 – Assembling Volunteers

Major Walker, of “C” Squadron, 32nd Manitoba Horse, has received the following telegram from the Adjutant General, Ottawa.
OTTAWA, August 13.
In view of non-completion of medical examination in many places volunteering need not be closed until orders for mobilization at Valcartier are issued. Commanding officers will assemble all volunteers for overseas expeditionary force at local corps headquarters for instructional purposes from this date. Pay and substenance allowance will be allowed under authorized militia rates. Issue necessary instructions.
ADJUTANT GENERAL.

1914 Aug 13 – Latest War News

London, Aug. 13.
Great excitement prevails over report of fighting in North Sea.
German cruisers, Goeben and Brealan captured in Mediterranean. The cruisers surrendered without a shot.
Great Britain is now at war with Austria.
Bombardment of Liege forts has recommenced. Belgians are putting up strong fight.
French will force fighting with Germans. Big battle expected hourly.

1914 Aug 13 – Ready to Go to Front

The following local men have been passed by Dr. Bottomly, medical examiner, and have made application to go to the front. They are likely to be called upon at once:
Huber Izon, Garth Johnston, Neville Munson, C. Curtis, Eric Clausen, H. Pollard, F.W. Bunstead, H.H. Moore, A.J. Pudifin, E.C. Herrick, Neil A. Briss, J. Osman, H.A. Bray.

1914 Aug 13 – Fork River

Several farmers from this point took in the Dauphin fair. Another year we hope to see more go.
Mr. Fair, of Dauphin, is around peddling medicine for a medicine company. Some are of the opinion they got some bargains.
Miss Bessie Wilson was a visitor to friends at Sifton and Dauphin.
Professor Fred Storrar, of Werdon academy, is spending his holidays among friends here and is very uneasy about the war. He will no doubt tender his services as leader of a company of fullbacks and move to the front in a short order.
F.B. Lacey was a recent visitor to Winnipegosis.
The annual meeting of Mossey River School was held on Saturday night. W. King was chairman and C.E. Bailey, secretary. The annual report was passed. W. Williams and Sam Reid were appointed trustees to fill the vacancy of C.E. Bailey and J.W. Lockhart retiring.
The trustees are spending a large amount of money repairing the school which was condemned. The majority of ratepayers are of the opinion it would have been more in the interest of the community at large to build a school in the village where the majority of the scholars come from. The ratepayers who were conspicuous by their absence will have another year to chew the rag over school affairs.
A dance was held in the hall as a farewell to the Misses Briggs and Miss Gertrude Cooper, who are leaving.
John Reid and family, of Sifton, visited at the home of W. King for the weekend.
Mrs. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton, are visiting at the home of Mrs. D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 25 – 1912

1912 Jul 25 – Fork River

Mrs. Richardson who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. S. Bailey on the Mossey, has returned to her home in Ontario.
C. Cameron and daughter of Neepawa, are spending their holidays with his brother, A. Cameron, of Mowat.
Max and Edwin King have received a six horse power gasoline farm engine from the Grey Motor Co., of Detroit.
Robert Hunt, timber inspector, paid a trip to Fork River between trains on business lately.
Stanley A. King, of Togo, and Ern Munroe of Brandon, left for their respective homes after spending the holidays here with friends.
R. Cruise M.P. and Wm. Sifton, are visiting up north looking for the “missing link.”
Miss Bessie Wilson returned from Winnipeg fair after a week’s stay and enjoyed the outing very much.
William Fraser, formerly of Winnipegosis, has accepted a position here with the Armstrong Trading Co. “Bill” is a hustler.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Snelgrove have left for a trip to Brandon fair.
Stanley A. King, of Togo, and Ern Munroe of Brandon, left for their respective homes after spending the holidays here with friends.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 23 – 1914

1914 Jul 23 – Successful Ethelbert Students

The following students from Ethelbert School were successful in passing:
Entrance – Honours – Ben Brackman and Nessie McNullan
Grade IX – Maggie Hagar and William Mastiuck
Grade X – Waldmar Mastiuck

1914 Jul 23 – Fork River

The Orangemen of Fork River held their 12th annual basket picnic on July 13. The weather was fine for the occasion and there was a large turnout many coming from Winnipegosis, Mowat, Sifton and Melton. There was a parade after dinner. Speeches were made by the Rev. E. Williams and Rev. Brother Clixby, and the chairman Brother William King country master. The sports commenced with a football match between Fork River and Mowat which resulted in two goals to nothing in favour of Fork River. Foot racing and other sports were also indulged in till supper. After supper a football match was played off between Winnipegosis and Fork River teams which ended in favour of Fork River, one goal to nothing. The Winnipegosis automobile was busy all night carrying passengers. There was a good dance at night. Thanks due our Winnipegosis friends for furnishing the music, which was much appreciated.
S, Nowosad and family are away for a short time visiting at Vonda, Sask., where John, the son resides.
Edwin King has returned to Saskatchewan after a week’s visit at his home here.
Milton Cooper has returned from a trip to the Winnipeg exhibition.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, spent last week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Brewer, of Ashville, spent a few days here and took a carload of stock south. The man who is raising stock is the one who is making money these days.
Road building is the order of the day.
W. Lockhart, from Ontario, is spending a few days here on business.
Coun. Robertson, of Ward 6, has resigned as he is leaving for the north for a year. Here will be an election to select his successor.
Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Venables both lost valuable clots last week.
There was considerable discussion at the last council meeting by the ratepayers regarding stock running at large and it was decided to enforce the by-law passed. Owners of stock must take care of them during the night or get into trouble.
On Sunday parties driving along Main Street to church had to pass between young men paying baseball, which is dangerous to horse and driver. We would kindly draw the players attention to the last part of clause 3 in by-law No. 5.

1914 Jul 23 – Mr. King replies.

To Editor of the Herald.
Sir – On Friday my attention was drawn to an article in the Press reporting Dr. Shortreed’s meeting at Fork River, said to be written by F.B. Lacey, who presided at that meeting. Personally I have nothing but pity for a man who will write such an untruthful report and makes such uncharitable statements. The meeting was held out on Main Street in front of Mr. Nat Little’s store. Dr. Shortreed was given a good hearing. The doctor quoted some figures he could not prove and Mr. Grenon politely took off his hat to the doctor and asked that a Conservative be allowed to speak. The request was flatly refused. Mr. Little shouted, “Go back to Winnipegosis. What in h-ll did you come here for?” This is the language our friend used in front of his own doorstep to persons who were quietly listening to Dr. Shortreed. When later the doctor repeatedly stated that the Roblin government was kept in power by the rattle his statement was objected to. There was no one there under the influence of liquor unless our Liberal friends. To judge from their pugilistic attitude at times it would lead people to believe they were under the influence of something. Perhaps it was fright, as the 10th was close at hand. At the close of the meeting, the Conservatives offered to pay for the hall and invited Dr. Shortreed and his friends to go there and discuss the matter as long as they liked. The offer was declined. If there was any rowdyism it was not the Conservatives who indulged in it. There were several other misstatements in the article worthy of the man who wrote them. But they are not worthy noticing. We have the greatest respect for a great number of our Liberal friends in Fork River and their opinions are always treated with the consideration they merit and we are sure they do not endorse such tactics.

W. King, President of Conservative Association of Fork River.