Today in the Dauphin Herald – September 4, 1919

Barn Burned

Early Sunday morning last the barn on Chas. N. McDonald’s farm at Gartmere was discovered on fire. When the alarm was given the fire had made too great headway to be got under control and the structure was soon reduced to ashes. Fortunately there was no live stock in the barn at the time of the fire, but harness and other articles that were in the building were burned.

The barn was erected last summer at a cost of about $6,000 and there is $2,5000 insurance on the building and $1,000 on the contents.

The origin of the fire is a mystery.

House Burned

Norman Beyette’s dwelling at Listowel was burned early Monday last during a gale. The contents were also destroyed. Mrs. Beyette and little daughter had a narrow escape, being in bed at the time and made their escape through the flames.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 17, 1919

Fined $200 for Operating Still

Nikola Presiloski, of Valley River, appeared before the police magistrate this week on the charge of “operating a still illegally.” He pleaded guilty and was fined $200 and $7 costs. The brand of whiskey manufactured by Presiloski is said, by those who sampled it, to be the best they ever imbibed.
Constable Coleridge, laid information against Joe Woiak, for failing to register under “Alien Enemy Act.” He was fined $10 and $5 costs.

G.W.V.A. Barn Dance

A barn dance was held on July 10th under the auspices of the Great War Veterans’ association in the barn of Mr. Arthur Fisher, Burrows. Some 150 people made the trip, and as the roads were good and the weather all that could be desired, a good time was spent. The McMurray orchestra was in attendance and, as usual, this was an assurance that the music was of the highest order. After all expenses had been paid a good sum was turned over to the association which will help their work and bring nearer the fond hope of the members that at some time, and it is hoped soon, they will be able to see their way to having quarters owned by the association as a permanent home for the veterans of the district. The thanks of the association are due to Mr. Fisher, who has placed his barn at the disposal of the association on two occasions this summer, and also to the various ladies and gentlemen who assisted in the arrangements.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above Association are asked to note that the meeting will be on Thursday night at 9 o’clock in place of 8 as usual. This change is to prevent a clash with the baseball game to be played the same evening. Members are requested to put in an appearance as matters of importance will be discussed. The executive of the association is informed that an Order-in-Council has been passed extending the War Service Gratuity to men that have seen service in England, but did not proceed to France. Particulars have been requested as to the manner in which application should be made for same and comrades will be notified on receipt of same.
This association wishes to thank those ladies who kindly sent cakes for the dance recently held at Mr. Fisher’s barn, also to Mr. Fisher for the use of his place.

Peace Day Observance

Dauphin citizens will observe Peace Day by a short service in the town hall at 10 a.m. In the afternoon a basket picnic will be held in the park with a program of sports for the children.

Sentenced to Five Years

The town of Dauphin laid a charge of “vagrancy” against Wm. Boyko. He appeared for trial before P.M. Hawkins on Monday. He entered a plea of not guilty but was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment in the Industrial Training School at Portage la Prairie on Tuesday. Boyko’s previous record is bad.

Winnipegosis

Geo. Spence, who has been overseas for over two years, returned home last week.
A party of surveyors are surveying the new railway line from Toutes Aides to Winnipegosis.
Miss A. St. Godard, of the Pas, is visiting her sister before going to Winnipeg to reside.
Misses Myrtle and Edna Grenon were passengers to the city on Saturday to meet their father. They will leave for Minneapolis to send their holidays.
Mrs. St. Amour and Misses A. and H. St. Godard left on Saturday for a visit to Winnipeg.
A fire occurred in the Armstrong Trading Company’s oil sheds this week, but was put out before serious damage was done.
F.G. Shears, J.P. Grenon and A.H. Steele have left for Winnipeg in connection with the suit started by the Armstrong Trading Co. against J.P. Grenon as to the ownership of the Winnipegosis hotel.
This has been a dry season here but lots of rain has fallen this week which has put the crops in good condition.
The lake steamers have been overhauled and have made several successful trips up to the north end of the lake, establishing new fishing posts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 16, 1919

Dauphin Flour in Belgium

Our readers will remember that shortly after the first reports of the suffering among the Belgian people, due to the Hun invasion in 1914, reached Canada, the Dauphin Milling and Creamery Co. Limited, ground a carload of flour from wheat donated by farmers and others in Dauphin and adjoining municipalities. This carload was duly shipped to Belgium but no official record was ever received of its having reached its destination. The following letter received a few days ago by the company makes very interesting reading, and it is gratifying to note that at least part of the donation reached the people for whom it was intended:
“52 Rue De Mondigny,
“Charleroi, Belgium.
“Dec. 1, 1918.
“Dear Sir,—You will no doubt be greatly surprised to receive this letter from a person that you have never seen nor heard of before, and your surprise will be still greater when you hear that it is written at your request.
“One day, early in 1915, I was present at the opening of a bag of flour which, with several others, had just arrived from Canada. At the bottom of the sack was a strip of paper bearing these words, ‘Whoever gets this bag of flour write and let us know if it is good.’ I would have written at once only the Germans, with their usual kindheartedness, made things so easy for us that letter writing was out of the question. I hope never to see a German again as long as I live. ‘The best of them are bad.’
“Your flour was excellent; it has not been our luck to have such good quality since. For the last three years our bread—it really doesn’t deserve the name of bread—was composed of everything except flour, thanks to Fritz.
“You would not recognize your flour sack. It has been transferred into a beautiful sofa cushion and occupies a prominent place in our drawing-room It is the admiration of all visitors.
“Last week the Canadian troops came to Charleroi; they received a warm welcome on all sides. Everyone here speaks highly of your compatriots, many English regiments passed two or three days in this town before entering Boschland. With every good wish for Xmas and with kindest regards.
“Believe me, yours sincerely,
(Signed) Andree McDonnell.”

Mossey River Council

The first meeting of the council of 1919 took place at Fork River on Jan. 7th.
The clerk swore in the newly elected members – T.B. Venables, reeve; J. Yakavanka, councilor for Ward 1; E.A. Marcroft for Ward 3, and J. Namaka for Ward 5.
Bylaws were passed making the councilors’ fees $4 per day and appointing D.F. Wilson sec.-treasurer at a salary of $875.
The bylaws of 1918 appointing the solicitors and health officer were confirmed for 1919.

COMMITTEES
Finance – Hunt, Marcroft and Paddock.
Bridges – Coun. Reid and Hunt.
Public Works – Coun. Marcroft, Paddock and Namaka be public works committee for Wards 3, 4 and 5, and Coun. Yakavanka, Hunt and Reid be public works committee for Wards 1, 2 and 6.
Paddock-Marcroft – That the bridge committee examine the bridges that are needing repairs and make an estimate of the material that will be required for the season’s bridge work and report to the clerk who is instructed to purchase same.
Hunt-Namaka – That the assistance which has been given to the family of the late Peter Smith be discontinued.
Hunt-Marcroft – That each councilor make a diagram showing the work in his ward which he would prefer to come under the working of the Good Roads Act for the yea 1919, and forward said diagrams to the sec.-treasurer, who is instructed to make a diagram from them showing the whole municipality, which diagram is to be forwarded to the Good Roads board.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the clerk instruct the solicitors to prepare a bill legalizing the assessment roll of 1918, and that the member for the constituency be asked to bring it before the legislature at the coming session.
Marcroft-Hunt – That a grant of $50 be made to ex-Reeve Lacey for miscellaneous expenses.
Hunt-Marcroft – That the assessment roll for the year 1919 is hereby adopted for the years 1919 and 1920.
Reid-Namaka – That Reeve Venables be a delegate to the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and that the delegates receive $25 for expenses.
Council adjourned to meet at the call of the reeve.

Fork River

Mrs. James Rice, of Northlake School, has returned from a trip to Winnipeg.
Mrs. R. McEachren and daughter Helen were recent visitors to Dauphin.
A car of young fat stock was shipped out last train. Good prices were realized by the sellers.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Little have returned from a short visit south.
H. Swartwood, International Implement Co., general agent, was at Fork River last week to hook up the orders of the local agent, W. King, for the coming season. Agent Billy K. is most optimistic as to the coming season’s business and to show his faith, has placed liberal orders.
Sunday school in All Saints Church every Sunday at 2 p.m.
Mr. Jarvis is now teacher of the Mowat School.
The continued fine weather is very favorable to stock and they are in fine condition.
Grain and cordwood are coming to market in considerable quantities every day.
The following are the officers of Purple Star Lodge, L.O.L., No. 1765, for the ensuing term:
W.M., Bro. C.E. Bailey; D.M., W.J. King; chaplain, Edwin King; rec. secretary, Wm. King; fin. Secretary, A. Hunt; D. of O., F. Cooper; treasurer, Sam Bailey; lecturer, F.F. Hanfebrak; dep. lecturer, Sam Reid. Committeemen – M. Cooper, H. Hunter, W. Russell, Ed. Morris, S. King, Jos. Bickel.

Sifton

A crowded schoolroom showed the appreciation of the residents of Sifton district of the Wycliff School Xmas concert. The hit of the evening was a three-piece sketch called “Santa and the Fairies.” Joe Reid acted as Santa, Miss Tilly Farion as Queen of the Fairies, and Witch Doubletongue was impersonated by Mary Braschuk. Patriotic songs opened the program, while several part-song contributed much to the enjoyment of the evening. An effective item was a serenade by the school children, clustering in a semicircle on the platform, with a flashlight playing on them for the darkened auditorium. Mrs. J.A. Campbell contributed the piano and violin accompaniments.
A good old-time dance, at which there was a large attendance, followed the concert. The dance music was given by Mrs. Campbell and Messrs. Marcott, Potoski, Kuczma, Halinski, and others.
The proceeds of the evening, totaling $56.75, have been placed in the bank as the Wycliff School Children’s Amusement fund. Part of it is to be applied at once to the repair of the school toboggan slide, a new concert platform, and ropes for the swings.
The teachers of the school, Mr. Bousfield and Miss Trew, and the children are grateful to the friends who gave the ample and excellent refreshments; to Mr. Paul Wood for the loan of his piano and for the willing assistance given by friends before and during the evening.
The fudge and taffy were provided by the children from their own lunch as a treat to adults, enjoying the Christmas spirit. The artists responsible for the blackboard scenes of the stage were Leslie Kennedy and Tilly Farion.

Winnipegosis

Old Josey Campbell, who resides near Water Hen, had his house and content totally destroyed by fire last Friday. The house was a new frame building, and the loss is ruinous to old Josey.
The council of the Village of Winnipegosis held its regular meeting last Tuesday. The council has been shorthanded for several months but is now complete, being reinforced by the addition of two new councilors, J. Willis and Chas. Denby. The council donated $400 to the Red Cross and discussed the building of a hospital and giving the town better fire protection. These last two matters will come up again at next council meeting.
The interment of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy, Ochre River, formerly of this town, took place on Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Hook conducted the service.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1910

1915 Nov 3 – Before The P.M.

Robt. Machan Fined $50 and Costs Ethelbert Fire Case Dismissed – R. Spruhs fined for Sunday Hunting
On information laid by Constable Hillman, Robt. Machan, an interdict, was haled before P.M. Munson for being the worse for liquor, while Robt. was under the influence of the fiery element he made things lively, mixing up in no less than three fights. He would not divulge where he procured his jag and the magistrate gave him the full extent of the law. $50 and costs. We are glad to see the magistrate enforce the interdict law on suck strict lines, as it is the only means of protection women and children have in a licensed town.
The Ethellbert fire case tried Tuesday, created a good deal of interest. Last week there were heavy losses from fire at Ethelbert and the defendant, J. Mascuich was accused of starting the same. It seems the defendant set out a fire on his farm near Ethelbert to burn up some old potato tops and also the remains of an old straw stack. He carefully put out the potato top fire but the fire in the stack was left to smoulder and it was from this that the fire was alleged to have spread. There were numerous witnesses on the case. From the evidence taken it appears there were several other fires started in Mascuich’s neighbourhood on the same day. As the evidence did not show that the fire had been traced to Mascuich’s farm as the original cause, the case was dismissed.
Notwithstanding the result of this case, several suits will be brought before the county court for damages.
On information laid by Provincial Constable Rooke, R. Spruhs of Sifton, was tried Saturday for illegally hunting on Sunday and in close season. He pleaded guilty and was fined $10 and costs. This should be a warning to others.
Anna Kunka vs. F. Nankishowy, an assault case will be tired Friday. Both come from Pine River.

1915 Nov 3 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and his daughter Gracie paid Dauphin a visit last week.
The organising secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary, Miss Millidge, Winnipeg, will give a magic lantern entertainment in connection with All Saints Church on Nov 10th at 8 o’clock in the Orange Hall. Admission, adults 25c; children 15c.
Mr. Forbes went to Brandon last week.
Both stores seem to be doing some good business. Each train brings in quite a lot of freight.
Mr. Chase from Dauphin was up here visiting Mrs. Snelgrove, the roads around here are good for motors.
The time of service in the Methodist Church, will be 2 p.m., in future instead of 3 p.m.

1915 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the house of Mrs. Ballard. Owing to Mrs. Ballard shortly leaving the town she gave in her resignation of vice-president. A vote of thanks was passed to her for past services. A vote of the ladies present was taken to elect a president and Mrs. W. Parker was chosen.
Miss Millidge, organizing secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary will given a magic lantern entertainment in the school house on Nov. 9th at 8 o’clock.
The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church on Sunday next when the subject will be “The Thing that Matters.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 27 – 1910

1910 Oct 27 – Arthur Milner Dead

Arthur Milner, the young man who had his back broken some five weeks ago by the falling of a scaffold, died in the hospital on Wednesday. The funeral will take place this afternoon fro the residence of Mr. F. Clark with the Dauphin Citizens Band in charge.

1910 Oct 27 – Bullet Lodged in Tissues of Cheek

By the accidental discharge of a .22 calibre rifle on Sunday, a Galician lad was the victim of the bullet. The bullet went through one cheek knocking out a tooth and lodged in the tissues of the other cheek. The boy was brought to Dauphin Monday and the bullet extracted by Dr. Ross.

1910 Oct 27 – Destructive Fire at Ethelbert

A very destructive bush fire took place last week near Ethelbert. From what can be learned it appears that a farmer near sec. 7-29-21 had just finished threshing, the straw of which had been blown into some bush that he wished to clear. The readiest way seemed to him to be to burn the straw pile and bush at the same time. After a time the wind seemed favourable, and he set it going. Two of his neighbours, seeing the fire, remonstrated with him, and expressed their fear that it was very dangerous to set it on fire; to which it is said he replied, “Oh, t will not back up. Unfortunately the wind changed to the northeast, with the result that the fire rushed over part of sec. 18 and most of sec. 17. Hence about 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon it was noticed by the farmers on 17 hat the fire was gaining rapidly upon them.. H. Fekula began at once to try to check the fire by ploughing fire guards round his stacks of hay in the meadows (which run for a good distance northwards, between the colonization road and the road allowance between 17 and 18.) Jacob Mascuik was the next too see that his stacks were in danger, and his team and plough to turn over a few furrows to save his stacks. By this time the fire had got fairly going, and Jos. Mills and L.L. Katz came up at a run to save hat they could.

But alas, they were all too late, and only partly prevented the complete destruction of their stacks of hay. Jacob Mascuik lost six stacks valued at three hundred dollars, James Mills lost five stacks valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and H. Fekula lost three stacks. In the meantime the fire had widened out until thee was a rushing, roaring belt of flames a mile wide, and it seemed for a time as if a very serious disaster was about to take place. K. McLean rushed out of town, and calling at the school he impressed the older boys, and away they to see what could be done.

After going about a mile it was seen that the fire had got too good a hold, to stop it by ordinary means, and hence Mr. McLean could do nothing to save a hay stack of from sixty to seventy tons, from total destruction, which he had, had put up for winter feed. The fire continued its course until about ten o’clock, when through the strenuous efforts of the people it was checked a short distance from the Ethelbert school, after destroying about 1000 tons of hay. Thus during the night of Thursday we were allowed to sleep in peace, after a hard fight.

Unfortunately, Kenneth McLean, after leaving the scene of the fire, went home and being dead tired, as soon as he sat down in his easy chair, he went to sleep. The window was left open, with the result that he got a severe chill, which developed into pleurisy and he has been bedfast and under the doctor’s care ever since. However we are glad to say he has taken a turn for the better and hopes to be about again in a few days.

Well, it was thought the fire had been done with, but no siree. Bush fires do not die out so quickly as that, they smoulder and linger in rotten logs or tree stumps and given a fair chance, the fire will start up again in a fresh place, and that is just what it did do. On Friday morning the wind had changed again, blowing to the south. This soon fanned into flame the dying embers and away it went south and again ruin and disaster faced the settlers’ farms and stacks in the Mink Creek district. Fortunately Mink Creek was full of water, this combined wit the efforts of the people saved the mink Creek district from even a worse fate than had befell their neighbours to the south of them. But from all account it was close call. Whilst it is true that fire is a good servant, it is also true that it is a bad master, and if only reasonable precautions had been taken, much of this great loss might have been prevented. For instance, H.P. Nicholson had some hay in the fire zone, but his men had left it well fire-guarded, thus saving his stacks. The old proverb says: “A stitch in time saves nine.”

It is time that some steps were taken to prevent such terrible loss. As it is, there is no apparatus to fight fire if it should take place, neither is there a Fire Guardian to take the lead and call out and organize a band of fire fighters if needed, and it is needed at Ethelbert.

Do not wait until the horse is stolen before you lock the stable door. Now it is the time to get ready.

1910 Oct 27 – Immigration hall to be Closed

Dr. P.J. Beauchamp immigration officer at this point, has received notice from the Department of interior that the hall here will be closed and not again reopened. The hall under Officer Beauchamp has done an important work in providing accommodation while settlers are being located and regret is heard on all sides that the building is not to be reopened. The building and lots will be put up for public sale at an early date by the department.

1910 Oct 27 – Fork River

Nat Little paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis last week.
C. Parks from Winnipeg is visiting friends here.
The Children’s Day Service at the English Church was very well attended and one of the children Miss Marjorie Scrase, sang “Fair Waved the Golden Corn,” splendidly.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooper who have been here for a few months left here last week for Brantford where they will reside in future.
Carloads of pressed hay are being sent out from this point.
On Tuesday night the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy was gladdened by the arrival of a little baby girl.
Mr. F. Storrar paid a visit to Dauphin lately.
Harry Nicholson was up here this week doing business.
A meeting of the Orangemen of this district was held last Saturday when it was decided to have a ball on Nov. 4th to help pay off the debt on the hall.
Methodist Services will be held at 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings instead of at 3 o’clock.

1910 Oct 27 – Sifton

C. Genik of Winnipeg is the guest of his daughter Mrs. C.A. Jones.
W. Thirell of the C.P.R. land department has been in Sifton the past week collecting for that department.
Messrs. Marantz & Gorfin are dissolving partnership. R. Marantz will carry on the store business alone.

1910 Oct 27 – Winnipegosis

On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will preach in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church at 7.30 p.m. The subject will be “Soul Rest.”
On Sunday last October 23rd, the Methodists inaugurated a new Sunday School. The number of children present more than exceed all the anticipation of the promoters. With a fine equipment of teachers it is confidently expected that success will crown the new institution.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 12 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 12 – Badly Injured

Nat Douse, a young man in the employ of the Burrows Mill at Grandview, met with a bad accident last Thursday. While at work in the mill he slipped and fell against the slash saws and sustained injuries to his right shoulder, the muscle and flesh being torn very badly. After he had his wounds dressed at Grandview he was brought to the hospital here. A few days later it was found necessary to amputate his arm at the shoulder. Douse is now making as good progress as can be expected towards recovery.

1911 Oct 12 – Planing Mill Burned

The planning mill belonging to T.A. Burrows at Birch River was destroyed by fire on Monday afternoon. Besides the mill a half dozen cars of lumber were also burned. The loss is covered by insurance.

1911 Oct 12 – Fork River

The heavy rains have tied up the threshing machines and stopped the ploughing. With the present fine weather work will commence again.
Constable G. Weaver has returned from a business trip to Dauphin and reports everything quiet.
W. King, Sam Bailey and D. Wilson paid a visit to Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The fishermen are busy preparing to go up to the lake for the winter’s fishing. It is remarkable how many Conservatives one meets there since the Borden Government was elected.
Mr. Littler is attending the Rural Deanery meeting in Dauphin.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, was up inspecting the government dredge working in the Mossey River.
In the Press, Sept. 28, page 1, is composed of items of Cruise’s big Majority and the Markets is said to be correct. Take the price of barley, No. 3, 60 to 62, No. 4, 60 to 64, first time we ever knew No. 4 to bring more than 3. On another page under the heading of Charvari it is stated barely looks like thirty cents and that the Press will be doing business at the same old stand. Would advise them to take a rest and not contradict themselves so often. On another page is a large rigmarole about T.A. Burrows the gentleman who it has been claimed used his office to feather his nest and was never heard on the floor of the house only to try and protect himself regarding the timber steal. Of course he should have a senatorship. Rats! As yet they have the audacity to talk about Jimmy Harvey and Glen Campbell.
Mr. F.B. Lacey, postmaster general of Oak Brae, is attending Council meeting at Winnipegosis.

1916 Oct 12 – The Week’s Casualty List

Sergt. Frank Burt, killed on Sept. 24th. Burt enlisted at Dauphin with the first contingent two years ago. (Frank Burt, 1876, 46965)
Pte. Anderson Reed Walker, killed. (Anderson Reid Walker, 1895, 2056)
Sergt. Fred. Clark-Hughfield, wounded. (???)
Pte. Hugh Dunston, wounded on shoulder. (Hugh Leo Dunstan, 1896, 150887)
Pte. Jas. A. Justice, wounded. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
Lieut. Percy Willson, died from wounds. (Major Percy Willson, 1883)

1916 Oct 12 – Winnipegosis

Miss Edna Grenon was among the arrivals on Saturday’s train to spend Sunday and Thanksgiving Day at home.
Mrs. P. McArthur has returned from a short visit to Minneapolis.
The “Manitou” has two more trips to make taking fishermen’s supplies up. We trust the present good weather holds so that she may get in safely before freeze-up.
There has been a good deal of liquor in town of late. There is something taking in the liquor law when these boozers can have it shipped up here to them from Ontario and deal it out to other boozers more benighted than themselves. Now that men are scare it would prove a very potent method of wheeling a man over far more effective than money.
Mrs. J.E. McArthur was a passenger on Tuesday’s train going to Winnipeg.
It is reported that Jimmie Taylor, who went to the front with the 79th, has been wounded.
The Red Cross evening at Victoria Hall on Thursday night under the management of Mrs. Hall Burrell and Miss Jarvett, was a great success socially and financially. Over $10 was taken at the door.
Mr. Lacey, of Fork River, was here on Saturday in connection with the business of building the Meadow Land and Don schools.
Miss Leith McMartin spent the week-end at Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 10 – 1913

1913 Jul 10 – Greek Church Burned

The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing River, near Fork River, was struck by lightning during an electric storm sat week and was burned to the ground. There was no insurance on the building.

1913 Jul 10 – Ethelbert

K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer is visiting Winnipeg this week and taking in the exhibition.
Fine rains of late and crops looking good.
Road work is progressing throughout the municipality. We all want good roads.
Wild strawberries are coming in small quantities. The crop will be a light one this season, although the late rains have improved the berries some.
Ethelbert is preparing for a big celebration on the 18th inst. There will be races and other sports and we invite all our neighbours to come and have a good time.

1913 Jul 10 – Fork River

R. Bell is taking a vacation with his friends at Dauphin.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending her holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mr. Noble, Methodist stunt who has had charge of the circuit during the last 12 months, left to take up his summer’s work at Mafeking mission.
Miss C. Grant, teacher of Pine View School, is spending her holidays at Foxwarren.
Mr. Comber was a visitor to the Lake Town on business last week.
Miss. M. Nixon is spending her summer holidays with her sister, Mrs. A. Rowe.
Mrs. D. McLean and Mrs. A.J. Snelgrove are taking a month’s holiday’s visiting friends at Regina.
Mrs. J. Rice, of North Lake district, was in town on important business lately.
James Johnston and family, who have been spending the winter at the government hatchery on Snake Island, have returned to the farm for a time.
July 1st was warm and bright, just the day for a holiday and quite a number took advantage of it. Where were all those teams loaded with old-timers and their wives going? Why, to help Mrs. Wm. Northam to celebrate her 62nd birthday to be sure. On arriving at her beautiful place on the banks of the Fork River our hostess conducted us to a pretty grove beside the house, where tables were laid for dinner. The tables were decorated with flowers and were well loaded with turkey, chicken and other good things to temp the inner man. Dinner over, the afternoon was spent in talking over old times and other pleasant themes. Mrs. Northam was the recipient of many ??? ??? ??? ??? the good wishes of all conveyed to her. After supper all left for home having had a very pleasant time. We trust this will only be one of such pleasant gatherings.
A severe electric storm passed over this district last week. The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing Rive was destroyed by lightning and the brick chimney on the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store here was badly shaken up and it will have to be rebuilt. The water is higher than it has been for years.
James Campbell and W. Foley, of Winnipegosis, are starting to summer fallow the Snelgrove farm lately purby F.P. Grenon, of the A.T. Co.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 3 – 1913

1913 Jul 3 – Fork River

Fred Tilt had the misfortune to lose most of his household effects by fire which started in an unaccounted way.
G. O’Neill, who has been staying with friends at Mowat for some time, has returned to his home at Rainy River.
Mrs. Fred Cooper is spending a weeks’ vacation with friends at Dauphin.
Mrs. C. Clark and family left for their new home at Paswagan, Sask., with a car of household effects. We wish them prosperity in their new home.
Miss Eva Storrar and Miss Pearl Cooper are taking a trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. Gunnies and family, of Roblin arrived with a car of effects and to tend making their home at Fork River for the present.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, of Dauphin, is spending her summer vacation at home on the Fork River.
Don’t forget the Orangemen’s 11th annual basket picnic at Fork River, July 12th. Sports of all kinds. All welcome. Bring your baskets and have a day’s recreation.
Mr. Worsey arrived from St. John’s College, Winnipeg, to take up the work in the Fork River Mission. Service was held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, 20th, and Winnipegosis and will continue to be held at Sifton at 10.30 in the morning and at Fork River at 3 in the afternoon and Winnipegosis school house in the evening at 7.30, every Sunday till further notice.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 11 – 1914

1914 Jun 11 – Bad Fire at Ochre River

A disastrous fire occurred at Ochre River on Sunday morning last about 2 o’clock, when the store of the Ochre River Trading Co., together with most of the stock, was destroyed. The fire, when discovered had made considerable headway and the building being a frame one, was soon consumed. Willing hands did what they could to save the contents of the store and keep the fire from spreading.
The building was valued at $4000 and was insured for $2000.
The stock was insured for $12000 and its value placed at a sum in the neighbourhood of $15000 or $16000.
The origin of the fire is a mystery. It is probably that an investigation will be made.

1914 Jun 11 – House Burned

For the second time Mr. Gillies’ house at Sifton, was burned on Saturday night. The structure was a two-story frame building and nearly finished. Some time ago Mr. Gillies’ partly constructed dwelling was burned also. Incendiarism is suspected and the cause of the fire will be investigated.

1914 Jun 11 – Three Killed in Collision

One of the worst accidents that has happened for some time past on the C.N.R. took place just east of Cote, a small station six miles from Kamsack, on Friday night last. It was a head-on collision between No. 2 eastbound and No. 201, speed freight. There is a curve at this point in the road and the two trains were running at a good rate of speed and were right together before the engineers had time to reverse. No. 2 was in charge of Engineer J.H. Arnold and No. 201 Engineer R.T. Perkins, Jas. Clyde was firing for No. 2. and F.J. Smith for No. 201. All four were from this point. Perkins, Clyde and Smith all managed to jump and not one of them received any serious injury. Arnold stuck to his post and was so badly scalded and otherwise inured that he dead a few hours afterwards at the Kamsack Hospital.
F.J. Faiji, mail clerk, and Ross Donaldson, express messenger, were instantly killed. Both ran out of Winnipeg.
Geo. Gougeon, brakeman, of Dauphin was slightly injured.
W.H. Messier and J.A. McVicar were the conductors of the respective trains, the passage and freight. Both escaped unhurt.
None of the passengers on the train were injured, but nearly all received a bad shaking up.

1914 Jun 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Winnipegosis on May 30th.
The minutes of the previous meeting were adopted as read.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now sit as a court of revision.
The clerk reported that no protests had been filled since the court of revision had adjourned.
Hechter-Toye – That the court of revision new adjourn.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now take up the usual municipal matters.
Communications were then read from Prof. Black, the Deputy Minister of Public Works; the Land Commissioner of the Hudson’s Bay Co,; Judge Ryan; J. Irwin; the solicitors for the C.N.R.; the Municipal Solicitor; H. Rustad and a petition from certain ratepayers asking for a bridge.
Hechter-Bickle – That the plan of subdivision of block G and part of block F, village of Winnipegosis, plan being numbered 251, submitted by Munson & Allan, be approved.
Hunt-Bickle – That the secretary write the superintendent of the C.N.R. Dauphin, regarding the putting in of a culvert through the railway at pole No. 22, north of mile board No. 12.
Toye-Hunt – That W. Vincent be paid $13 for his service in securing the title to the roadway through the Champion farm.
Toye-Hechter – That plank be supplied to cover a bridge 20 feet long over Icelandic Creek, on the township line, between 29 and 30, the settlers agreeing to do the work.
Hunt-Bickle – in amendment – That Coun. Robertson and Toye deal with the matter of a bridge across Icelandic Creek and that the coasts be borne by ward 5 and 6. Amendment carried.
Messrs. Macneill and Reid, the delegates from Dauphin, were head regarding the building of a road from Winnipegosis to Dauphin.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks be tendered the delegates from Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the council now decide to come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act, a road from Fork River south to the boundary of the municipality and connecting with the proposed road to be built by the Dauphin municipality, between section 35 and 36 in township 28, range 19.
Bickle-Richardson – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter and Hunt be a committee to select the main roads and prepare the preliminary steps required t come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act.
Hechter-Richardson – That a grant of ten bags of flour be made to Seifat Michtka and that the flour by bought from whoever will supply it at the lowest price.
Hunt-Bickle – That in the matter of a petition of certain ratepayers of ward 6 regarding statute labour, the reeve by authorized to ??? in the absence of Coun. Robertson.
Robinson-Hechter – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and see the Minister of Public Works with a view to getting a grant for the biding of public roads in the municipality.
Hechter-Hunt – That the public works committee be authorized to begin work and if the weather permits complete the Fork River and Winnipegosis road; the work to be done in accordance with the profile of the Government engineer.
Richardson-Hechter – That on complaint to the clerk and the production of the necessary proof by the complainant, the clerk is hereby instructed to prosecute the owners of animals running at large contrary to the provision of the by laws.
Richardson-Hechter – That the clerk notify parties who have had interments made in the municipal cemeteries to apply at the office of the municipality for their cemetery deeds.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye-Bickle – That Coun. Hechter be authorized to rent two tents to be used by the men on road constructions.
A by-law was passed making an appropriation to the wards on a basis of six mills in the assessment.
Bickle-Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jun 11 – Fork River

Mrs. Chas. Denby, of Winnipegosis, returned home, having spent a week among friends.
Mrs. Kennedy and family have returned from Winnipegosis having spent the weekend there.
W. Williams’ planning mill is running full blast these days and “Billy” is busy shipping lumber.
W. Howiston spent a few days at Winnipegosis and while away we are informed, invested in a schooner. That’s all right “Scotty.”
Mr. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days inspecting work performed by homesteaders.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is visiting here.
Jack Robson and Harry Hunter have returned from a two months trapping and hunting trip and they report a good catch.
E. Williams, lay reader, has returned from attending the Synod at Winnipeg last week. He reports a very busy time.
The mail these days contains many copies of the speech on free wheat by our friend “Bob” Cruise, member for Dauphin. The wheat question does not cut any ice here at present. Its roads and bridges we went. We would be delighted to hear our friend “Bob” converting the Senate and his friends to vote for Borden’s good roads policy which was thrown out last session.
The seeding is over and the crop has been put in good shape, it being one of the finest seasons we have seen for years.
The captain of our fire brigade has prophesized a dry season and is seriously thinking of going into growing watermelons in case of fire. The only thing we can do is to keep smiling as the crops are looking good.
Feming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor here between trains the latter end of the week.
“Joe” Lockhart is filling a car with settlers’ effects and is off for the banana belt. Ta, ta, “Joe” we wish you good luck.
There will be a court of revision at Ethelbert on June 17th. It’s the last chance for getting on the list for the electoral division of Gilbert Plains.
W. King has returned after a two weeks’ trip north. He had a good time, tanks to his two Liberal friends who stuck to him closer than a brother, and “Billy” always appreciates a good thing.
Mrs. Curtis and Mrs. Morrisain, of Texas, U.S., are visiting their friend, Mrs. Nat Little, for a few weeks.
Miss F. Sanderson left for Winnipegosis to take charge of a large diary business started by G. Sanderson, of that burgh.
W. Hunkins and “Jimmy” Bickle passed through here recently at a 2-40 gait.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 25 – 1911

1911 May 25 – Census Enumerators Here Today

The census enumerators under Commissioner H.P. Nicholson meet here today (Thursday) to receive instructions, so as o be able to commence their work on June 1st. In most of the districts set aside for the enumerators it is thought that they can complete the work in about three weeks time.

1911 May 25 – Fire at Fork River

During the brush fires in the vicinity of Fork River last week, Wm. Williams, who operates a sawmill at that point was a heavy loser. He had his stables, engine room and a number of saw logs burned.
Mr. G.M. Littler, B.A., is a visiting Dauphin on business this week. He held service at Sifton, Sunday 21st.
Mr. McLeod of Winnipeg is busy buying a car of potatoes from the farmers and is paying 25 and 30 cents in trade and consider they are doing the farmer a favour at that price.
Mr. A Roe is able to move around again but unable to work.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has put in an excellent refrigerator. We are unable to say whether it is to keep the store or stove cool as both of them are little on the warm side sometimes.
The ratepayers of Fork River believe the time has come to remove the school into the village as over two-thirds of the scholars come from the south, those that want it should get busy and keep an eye on the bird of paradise.
Our municipal clerk is taking a day off grafting his fruit trees he does his grafting openly. We don’t know when the others do it as we never had an itemized account for three years.
Mr. Joe Lockhart’s sale on the 15th, was a success, considering the busy time. Stock brought a good price; the record price was 60 cents cash for 70 hens. Who says poultry don’t pay.
Council meeting at Fork River on Tuesday, May 30th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 12 – 1910

1910 May 12 – Burrows’ Mill Burned

Burrows’ Mill at Grandview was burned Wednesday evening. The lumber in the vicinity was saved after a hard fight. The loss is estimated at $50,000 with $25,000 insurance. Mr. Burrows will rebuild at once. The mill was to have commenced operations today on 12,000,000 feet of logs.

1910 May 12 – Died From Shock

Eunice, the three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Wells, died Saturday from pneumonia and the effects of a scalding shock. The little girl was playing on the floor of the home, when the bottom of a teapot Mrs. Wells was carrying dropped out, the contents going over the child about the face and neck, terribly scalding her. Everything possible was done to ease the little sufferer before she passed away. Rev. D. Flemming conducted funeral service on Tuesday.

1910 May 12 – Fork River

W. King and D.F. Wilson who have been to Gilbert Plains to attend the Conservative Convention returned last Monday.
Mr. Frame from Treherne came up last week and has been staying at Mr. Cameron’s for a few days.
Mrs. McLean and family from Selkirk came up last week and intend settling in this village.
A Methodist concert will be held on the 24th in the Orange Hall.
Dr. Medd, from Winnipegosis came down last week to inaugurate a Tag-day, but owning to the short notice given very few lapis turned out and the meeting was adjourned till a later date.
C. Bradley and Mr. Walmsley from Winnipegosis paid us a visit last week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 11 – 1911

1911 May 11 – Fork River

T.N. Briggs had a frame stable burned by some busy body starting a fire thinking it would do no harm.
A. Rowe had the misfortune to have a shoulder put out and a collarbone broke by a kick from a stallion. Hard lines these busy times.
The scribe whites to thank the Mowat correspondent for informing us that the council has given up the idea of advertising as there has been time enough fooled away and that they intend building bridges and roads. Bucking the Government Road Commissioner and holding the gardens and tools from him, as some of the council did, is poor policy when we want roads. It would also be well o remind the Chairman of Public Works that we have three traction threshing outfits in this municipality and it is doubtful whether the bridges built on the Winnipegosis road will carry them. The turns on two of them it would trouble the M.C. to get a wheelbarrow around them if he was coming was Winnipegosis.
The annual vestry meeting of All Saints’ Anglican Church was held last week. Mr. Littler took the chair and called on Wm. King, sec.-treasurer for his yearly report. The report showed the mission to be in good standing financially. The report was accepted and passed. Officers for 1911-12: Wm. King re-elected Minister’s Warden; C.E. Bailey, People’s Warden and Wm. King, sec.-treasurer. Mr. G. Littler is carrying on the work during Mr. Scrase’s absence by sickness. Mr. Littler gave a short address and the meeting closed with a vote of thanks to the officers and chairman.
Mr. Wm. King has been appointed registration clerk again for this part of the riding and commences at Fork River on Saturday, May 20th.

1911 May 11 – Winnipegosis

The ice is now out of the lake.
W. Cox, license inspector, was here on Saturday inspecting the Lake View hotel.
The work of rebuilding and adding to the old Albion hotel is progressing. The property has been purchased by a local company and the hotel, when completed, will be under the management of W.H. Parras, late of the Royal Alexandra, Winnipeg. The new house will be known as “The Wanigan” and will be a credit to the town.
F. Hechter has taken over the Lake View hotel and is conducting a good house.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a passenger to Portage on Saturday night. Capt. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Saturday.
It is expected with the change in the C.N.R. time table for summer that a tri-weekly daylight service will be put on. The traffic warrants it and if the service is given there will undoubtedly be a big increase in travel during the warm weather.
R. McPherson, who is living at the hatchery on Snake Island, will shortly remove with his family to Dauphin.
The new fishing regulations are as follows:

1911 May 11 – LAKE WINNIPEGOSIS AND WATERHEN LAKE

The use of gill nets for winter fishing shall be permissible from November 20 to the last day of February in each year, both days inclusive.
In Dawson bay, in the water of Lake Winnipegosis, north of the lines running east and west from the north end of Birch island, no nets having a mesh of less than 51/4 inches extension shall be permitted.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 7 – 1914

1914 May 7 – Escaped in Male Attire

Woman at station on Tuesday Night Dressed in a Man’s Suit – Who was the Woman?
When court was called on Wednesday morning there was a surprise when Chief Bridle gave out that Mrs. Murphy had left town and would not appear to answer the charge of attempting to commit suicide.
How the woman managed to get away is now what is puzzling the police as she was supposed to be in bed at home sick and the trains were being closely watched.
But there is a possible explanation of how the escape was effected. On Tuesday night a woman dressed in a man’s suit was observed on the station platform by several who were there. So sure was the conductor of the train that the supposed man was a woman that he offered to be the cigars with an acquaintance that such was the case. The disguise was very good but the woman, whoever she was, evidently forgot one essential in her make-up, which was a source of much amusement to the bystanders.

MRS. MURPHY HEARD FROM.

This (Thursdays) morning the Herald received a little from Mrs. Murphy, the postmark being Winnipeg, May 6th. In this letter she says that “she has to thank the liars of Dauphin for the trouble they have caused her.” She further remarks that after it is too late she has had her eyes opened and warms other women to beware and not believe liars as she did until it is too late to mend the damage done.

1914 May 7 – Met Instant Death

Maurice Frobisher and his brother arrived a short time ago from St. Norbert, Man., and took up homesteads at Asham Point, in the Ste. Rose district. On Saturday last the two brothers were going by ox team to Ste. Rose. Maurice was sitting in the back end of the wagon holding a rifle, when it accidently discharged, the bullet entering his arm, passing to his jaw and came out at the back of his head. Death was instantaneous.
Dr. Harrington was telephoned for and went to Ste. Rose. After learning the circumstances be decided that an inquest was not necessary.
Deceased was 40 years of age and unmarried.

1914 May 7 – Prairie Fire Does Damage

Prairie fires were running southwest of the town in the Mayflower and Spruce Bluff districts on Friday and Saturday. A dwelling on the farm of Arthur Bule, near the Mayflower School, was burned. A. Maynard lost a quantity of hay and other settlers suffered minor losses.

1914 May 7 – Ethelbert

Seeding has been going ahead actively and much of the wheat has been ???. The recent rain held things up for sure.
Very little wood is now being shipped out, still there are always a few cars moving.
Business is a little on the quiet side of late. Our burgh is becoming quite an egg expecting centre, many cases being shipped out weekly.
Wm. Morray, truancy officer, is visiting schools in our municipality. He is very busy going from one farmer to another making them send their children to school. On account of his visit the school trustees of Ethelbert S.D. have to provide more accommodation for the children that are of school age and who must attend. The people are satisfied with the action of the government in this move and will assist the officer in every way in enforcing the law.

1914 May 7 – Fork River

R. Corbett and his assistant returned to Winnipeg after taking the levels for draining a township and a half and laying out the road to Winnipegosis.
The English Church concert held in the Orange Hall, May 1st, was a very successful one. Our critic here admits it the best. A large number came from Sifton and put on a dialogue, which, to say the least was a laugh maker from start to finish. It pleased everyone. Our Winnipegosis friends were out in force and helped materially and that with the help of Fork River contingent a good evening’s entertainment was enjoyed. An excellent super was provided by the ladies. After supper several hired the hall for a dance and splendid music was supplied by Mr. Russell and sons.
Contractor Briggs is busy these days trying to make Main Street passable. Next thing we know Councilor Richardson will be putting down the balance of the sidewalk and all will be rosy.
John Clemens and family have left for McCreary, where they will reside in the future.
W. King has been appointed registration clerk for the northern portion of Gilbert Plains constituency. He starts in on the 12th of May at Winnipegosis.
Richard Harrison and E. Bickle, of South Bay, were visitors here at the council meeting during court of revision.
The dwelling house of J. McDonald caught fire last week. Captain Wilson and the fire brigade were soon on the ground. There was very little damage done.
Mr. McMillian, of Cyprus River, is a visitor at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat.
Our Mowat friend states they have put a bell and tower on the Mowat School house and yet they forgot to put a foundation under it. Of course, our friend usually does things different from others, which accounts for his being in a kicking frame of mind. He goes on to state the folks he sends to take his mail out, take all the way from one day to a week and the sometimes longer before he gets his mail back. What a shame. We trust he got the paper which contained the write up of how his pet government let the contractors mulet the people out of forty million dollars in building the Transcontinental Railway. Say, F.B. don’t get sore over our convention at Gilbert Plains. Have you forgotten the fuss you made with your friends here and up north because they wanted a share of the swag when you carried the chequebook and had to take a holiday for a few weeks in Winnipeg. You were not missed a bit. Have the common decency to keep in your own backyard, as we believe the glass in our house is of better material than yours and as in the past you can’t afford to indulge in stone throwing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 13 – 1911

1911 Apr 13 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on the 20th alt. Coun. Paddock absent.
Communications were read from Algoma Steel Bridge Co., Chairman of the Telephone Commission, stating that a telephone line would be built through Fork River to Winnipegosis this coming season; from Supt. Fisher of C.N.R.; Western Municipal News, re vital statistic register; Salvation Army and Campbell, Simpson & Macneill.
Lacey – McAuley – That the secretary write the superintendent of C.N.R., the Minster of Railway and the Railway Commission, urging the necessity of a tri-weekly service on the Winnipegosis branch.
McAuley – Hunt – That the swamp on the road allowance, lying north of secs. 35 and 36, tp. 30, range 19, be corduroyed and that A.E. Groff be appointed foreman at $2 per day and that he be empowered to employ men at $1.50 per day, or man and team at $3 per day.
The following accounts were passed by the Finance committee: J. Nawasod, assisting surveyor, $3; W. Clark, $3; St. Boniface Hospital, $3; postage, $2; team with survey party, $7; F.B. Lacey, expenses to convention, $15.75.
Nicholson – Lacey – That the tender of he Algoma Steel Bridge Co. for the building of a combination steel and wood bridge across the Fork River between sections 21 and 28, tp. 29, range 19, for the sum of $230 be accepted.
A by-law appointing the officers for 1911, was passed; the noxious weed inspectors being T.B. Venables and W. King of Fork River, and W. Marcroft and I.K. Robinson of Winnipegosis.
McAuley – Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1911 Apr 13 – Fork River

Geo. Nicholson had the misfortune to have his house and contents burnt last week. How the fire originated is a mystery. He had no insurance.
Mr. Homey, the horse dentist, is busy fixing up horses around Fork River. We have to do something with the hay as the railway seems unable to move it fast enough, and shippers are losing money on account of not being able to make prompt shipments.
A.H. Hodgson was a visitor to Fork River to spend the week-end.
A Press correspondent is shouting reciprocity because he can send to American firms and purchase barbwire and binder twine cheaper than he can get it at Fork River. We wonder if this is the individual that was giving us pointers on building a few weeks ago. We can’t all be R.C. and chairman of Boards of Public works committee. How about that municipal scheme for bringing settlers in? Rush it along, lots of room.
The people of Fork River spent an amusing evening in the Orange Hall listening to an entertainment given by Prof. Sas Koo Tam consisting of songs, recitations and vocals bits. Some of us will need remodelling before we can get into paradise. Its the first time we were aware we had Miltonia in Fork River.
W. Williams has moved his sawing outfit from Lake Dauphin here ready to saw the logs drawn by the settlers to Fork River. Billy’s a hustler in the sawdust line.
Our genial P.M., Mr. N. Little, has the greatest display of farm Implements ever seen in Fork River. If you want anything in that line give him a call. Say taw care those bandies don’t get stuck in those culvert pipes they might get damaged before they have time to experiment with them.
P. Ellis paid a flying visit to Dauphin. He believes in ascending and descending. Flying machines are all right if they run level. Call and get prices before buying. Blank forms on hand.
Wm. King has been under the weather the last two weeks. Its just a complaint he caught when the old McKenzie government was in power; times were hard then, soup kitchens were opened all over Canada. Billy says he had to consume so much free trade soup to get a little nourishment he never rightly recovered, in fact it stopped his growth. His one consolation is he’ll never have a show with the fellow who was to big to get into Paradise.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 20 – 1913

1913 Feb 20 – Escaped in Night Clothes

Hallie Burrell, who has been fishing at Mafeking, was in town this week, en route to his home at Winnipegosis. He was unfortunate in having his camp burned out through the night about a week ago, and was not able to save anything, barely escaping in his night clothes.

1913 Feb 20 – Fork River

Sandy Cameron, of Mowat, is wearing a broad simile these days. The fairies left a son and their at their fireside and there is great rejoicing over the events.
Mrs. H.H. Scrase and son paid a shot visit to Winnipegosis last week.
Mrs. Andrew Rowe has more help. It’s a new girlie. Robert Rowe is stepping around on air these days. It’s a son and heir. Good luck, Robert.
J. Playford, of Dauphin, agent for the J.L. Case Co., was a visitor at Nat Little’s on business.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and daughter returned from a visit to the Lake Town.
A number of people visited the home of M. and Mrs. F. Cooper up the Fork and they report a very pleasant time there.
S. Cameron, of Mowat, took a trip to Winnipeg on business last week.
D. Kennedy is taking a trip to Winnipegosis. We don’t know whether it’s the snow that attracts or what, but judging from the pace he was going he intends breaking the record or know the reason why.
We noticed our genial friend Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis around today all smiles as usual. The fact is they can’t keep away. Its like the mumps, catching.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 12 – 1914

1914 Feb 12 – Lake View Hotel Winnipegosis Destroyed By Fire

Early Sunday morning Winnipegosis was given a bad fire scare. With a high wind blowing it seemed that the greater part of the Main Street was doomed. A call was sent to the Dauphin Fire Brigade to be in readiness, in case the fire spread.
The fire started though the collapsing of the furnace about 9 a.m., in the basement of the Lake View Hotel, and in less than two hours the building was a complete wreck.
The fire gained such headway before a general alarm was given, that two of the female staff were compelled to jump from the second storey windows and received a severe shaking up.
The citizens of the town turned out in force and formed a bucket brigade. It is due to their strenuous efforts that the fire was confirmed to the one place. Several times adjacent property appeared to be doomed.
Hotel Winnipegosis, which is just across the street was given a bad scorching on the one side. All the window glass being broken by the heat.
The contents of Walmsley’s poolroom, Whale’s general store and Paddock’s butcher shop were cleared out.
Part of the contents of the hotel were saved, but the boarders and staff practically lost all their property.
The hotel was managed by Wm. Ford and owned by The Brewer’s Syndicate. The loss is partially covered by insurance.
The burned building was one of the first hotels in the district on the advent of the railway some fifteen years ago.

Fork River

The funeral service of the late W. Davis was conducted by Mr. Williams, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church on Tuesday, February 3rd, at the house of the deceased. The remains were interned in the Fork River Cemetery followed by a very large crowd from the surrounding vicinity.
J. Robinson, of Mowat, has shipped over 60 boxes of fish caught in Lake Dauphin.
C.E. Bailey, Fred Cooper and W. King, C.M., returned from the annual meeting of the Country Orange Lodge in Dauphin. They report a good time.
Mrs. Gunness and two children have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Paswegan, Sask.
John Richardson had the misfortune to loose a valuable mare this week when he entered the stable in the morning the beast was found dead.
Mrs. Russell and children, of Kamsack, arrived and intend making their home with Captain Russell, teacher of the Beacon Heath School.
W. Hunkings, assessor, paid Clerk Wilson a visit on municipal business.
John Angus, of Winnipeg, pays frequent visits to this burgh. It’s all right John, Kitty’s busy these days catching owls.
W. King had a number of sheep killed by dogs ??? ??? making short work of any animal looking for mutton on his ??? in the future.
Don’t forge to [1 line missing] and fancy basket social under the auspices of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church. The ladies will furnish the baskets. There will be a short programme of songs, recitations, etc. [1 line missing] to come and have a good time. Admission 20 cents. On Friday night, Feb. 20th , at 9 o’clock sharp.

Winnipegosis

Fire completely destroyed the Lake View Hotel here Sunday morning. The fire originated in the basement, and gained such headway before being discovered that some of the guests had to escape through the upper story windows, not being able to save any of their personal effects. The citizens responded very quickly as soon as the alarm was given, and through hard work managed to confine the fire to the one building. Walmsley’s poolroom had a narrow escape. It being on fire several times but the bucket brigade never gave up, and the building only received a bad scorching. Hotel Winnipegosis looked at one time as if nothing could save it. The heat was so intense that all the windows were broken on the one side, but with a cost of paint and new windows the appearance of the fire will be gone. Had it burned, a number of us would be living in tents today.
Dr. Medd is certainly getting even with the boys now for what they did to him at the beginning of the curling season. He was a little unfortunate then, not having Ben Hechter and Jack Duhurst trained to get the broom instead of the fence. But now look out for the Doc. Why McDonald and his scouts only beat him by a very small margin Monday night. The Dr. and Watson had a good game Friday night only Watson had no use for the chalk. Dennett and Walmsley played a good game the same night, Dennett winning by 3 points. Watson’s rink won from Dennett Monday night 13-9. Jack Angus was the skip.
Mrs. Paddock left on Wednesday for Brandon, where she will remain a few days vising friends.
Sid Craighill, who has been confined to his bed through sickness, we are glad to report is around once more.
J.E. Morris arrived in town from his fishing camp last Thursday. He says the fishing is light.
It is rumoured there is likely to be a telephone line extended to South Bay this spring. It would be a grand thing for the farmers in that district. There will be a good number of phones put in here this spring.
Harvey Watson left on Monday for Dauphin on a business trip.
Wm. Christinson, wife and child arrived in town Monday from their fishing camp.
Willie McNichol and Gillis Johannesson got in on Saturday. It won’t be all down, then there will be something doing.
We are certainly getting a taste of cold weather now. The thermometer at the post office on Tuesday morning registered 32 below zero. One thermometer in town registered 54 below. Wednesday morning 53 below and still going down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 8 – 1912

1912 Feb 8 – Girl’s Clothes Caught Fire
In a Moment She was Aflame
Father to Rescue Both Burn

What might have been a fatal burning accident occurred at the home of Robt. Fair, whose farm is located about 10 miles south east of Dauphin the later end of last week. His daughter Hattie, who is 22 yeas of age, was suffering from a pain in her face, and her mother advised her to soak a rag in coal oil, heat it and apply. The young woman took the oil can near to the stove and kept pouring the oil on the rag and then placing it on the stove to warm. In doing this some of the oil dripped over her clothes. The last time she applied the rag to the stove it suddenly ignited and in a twinkling her clothes were a mass of flame. She screamed and her father, who had just gone to bed, rushed to her rescue ad with the assistance of a sheet endeavoured to smother the flames. Before the fire was extinguished the fire was burned considerably about the legs, hands and face.
Mr. Fair also had his hands badly burnt. It was a miraculous escape. Had Mr. Fair not been right at hand his daughter would have been burned to death in less than two minutes as the coal oil on her clothes added greatly to the rapidity with which the flames spread over her body.

1912 Feb 8 – Fork River

Mr. Biggs has returned after a month’s stay at Bethans and has accepted the position of teacher of the Mowat School for another term, which is satisfactory to the ratepayers.
We are pleased to hear Rev. H.H. Scrase is making good progress at home.
The Leap Year ball in the Orange Hall on Friday, Jan. 26th, under the management of the ladies of Fork River, was a big success. “Wall flowers” were conspicuous by their absence. Most of the evening the ladies attended to that part of the programme and deserve great credit as the hall was well filled with people from Winnipegosis, Mowat, East Bay and all parts and every one seems to have enjoyed themselves. The break-up came at six o’clock in the morning to the strains of the “Home sweet home waltz”: and a frosty drive.
Mrs. Wm. King and son Roland, returned home after a three months’ stay at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Morris, of Mosse Island, Winnipegosis.
A. Rowe’s little girl was unfortunate enough to have her arm broke in two places while playing. Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, was sent for and the patient id progressing nicely.
Mr. Powers, provincial government auditor, spent a few days at the municipal office going over the books of the municipality. Which means getting out another financial report three inches by four. It should be larger and more comprehensive.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy and little son returned from Dauphin after a two weeks’ visit.
Fred Cooper, with Peter Ellis, paid a flying visit to Dauphin on business; also D.F. Wilson in connection with his immigration trip. Not knowing the time of the trains arrival the Fork River band was not in attendance. Still we gave them a hearty welcome.

1912 Feb 8 – Winnipegosis

If the man from Roblin, who skinned out about the middle of January would be kind enough to come back and settle for his board bill and also for the hay and oats he took from the freighters the people of Winnipegosis would be very grateful.
It would be far better for the fish companies to let the people here freight the fish than send out for freighters.
Born on Jan. 8th, 1912, to Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Morris, a son.
Some of the fishermen are complaining of the timber wolves breaking open their boxes and eating the fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 28 – 1915

1915 Jan 28 – Letter From Dauphin Man at Front

Mr. Georges Urion, a French reservist who invested considerable capital in Elm Park and other Dauphin property, writing to Coun. Geo. Johnson from 20th Company, 269 Regiment de Infantry, 70th Division, Secteur Postal 120, France, tells how he is now serving at the front in the great war in France. On January 1, when the letter was written, the French army in which he is in were then holding one half of the houses in a town in Alsace, and the Germans the other half. He is in good health and the spirit of the army is the best, he says. They are confident of success but that it will be no easy task and they expect the war to least six months yet.

1915 Jan 28 – Major Rooke Wounded

Major B. Rooke, of Second Indian Gurhkas, was wounded in a recent engagement in France. The major is a brother of the late Charles Rooke, of Dauphin.

1915 Jan 28 – Tragic Death of Miss Allan

The worst tragedy in the history of Dauphin occurred on Sunday afternoon about 5 o’clock in the Malcolm block, when Miss Florence Allan, a well-known and popular young woman of the town, was burned so badly that her death followed a few hours later.
It appears that Miss Allan and filled a small lamp was methylated spirits and in doing so had spilled some of the liquid on her flannelette gown. At the time she had only her underclothing and gown on. When she attempted to light the lamp the part of the gown on which she had spilled the spirits caught fire and in an instant the blaze spread over the unfortunate woman’s clothing. She had the door of the room locked at the time and in her excitement in looking for the key lost several valuable moments. When she got the door unlocked and rushed out in the hall she was a mass of flame. Mrs. Hooper, wife of the caretaker of the block, was the first to be on the scene, followed by Mr. Hooper. Miss Allan, in her frenzy, grabbed Mrs. Hooper, and begged of her to put out the fire. Mrs. Hooper had difficultly in freeing herself from the burning woman, as it all happened so suddenly, and in doing so had her hands burned. Mr. Hooper, as soon as he realized the situation, procured a rug and threw it about Miss Allan, and this did much to smother the flames. Mr. Hooper had one of his hands quite badly burned while covering the burning woman with the rug. Others came quickly to the rescue and Dr. Culbertson hurried from his home to the block. An examination by the Dr. at once revealed the terrible condition the young woman was in and he at once made arrangements for her removal to the hospital.

BURNED FROM HEAD TO FOOT.

Everything possible was done to alleviate the sufferings of the young woman, but as she was literally burned from head to foot there was no possible hope for her recovery, and on Monday morning she passed away.
Deceased came from Bancroft, Ont., about three years ago to take a position in her brother’s confectionery store, where she remained until a few months ago, when he sold out. She then accepted a position with the Steen-Copeand Co. which she held at the time of her death. She was a young woman of a genial disposition and was liked by all who came in contact with her whether in a business or social way.

BODY TAKEN EAST.

A service was held in the Methodist Church on Monday evening and the building was crowded with sympathizing friends. The pastor, Rev. T.G. Bethell, spoke feelingly of the awful fate that had befallen the young woman and the lesson all should learn of the terrible suddenness with which death comes at times to both young and old. He referred to the esteem and respect the deceased young woman was held and the sympathy all felt for the afflicted family.
Floral tributes, from friends and societies, covered the casket.
At the conclusion of the service the body was taken to the station and from there forwarded to Bancroft, Ont., for interment. The followed acted as pallbearers: J.T. Wright, B. Reid, W.D. Sampson, A.G. Wanless, J. Argue and B. Phillips.
Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Allan and Mr. E. Allan accompanied the remains east.

1915 Jan 28 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Winnipeg.
Mr. Desroche, of Pine Creek, was a visitor at the A.T. Co. store at Fork River and returned to Winnipegosis by the sleigh route patrolled by our trusted friend Scotty, and he’ll het there sure.
Mr. Flemming Wilson and family, of Dauphin, have taken up their residence on the Shannon homestead, Mr. W. intends farming for a time.
Miss Coomber, of Selkirk, is visiting her parents on the Fork River.
Mr. E. Thomas has returned from Verigen, Sask., and will run the elevator for a short time.
Mr. F.H. Steede, of Bradwardine, Man., will arrive on the 29th to take charge of this mission. He will hold service in All Saints’ on Sunday 31st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
A large gathering from all parts attended the pie social and dance at the home of Mr. W. King. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all. It reminded us of ye olden times.
The cold snap seems to be taking liberties with everything green or tender these days. Even the sandwich man is complaining.
Fred King is able to get around again. Try a poplar tree next time, Fred, its easier on the moccasins.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis spent the weekend at this burgh.
Mr. Fair, of Ochre River, is going his rounds and is doing a roaring trade selling slaves and liniments these cold days.
Mr. John Nowsade and family, of Aberdeen, Sask., are spending a short time with his parents in Fork River.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Harnell who have been spending a month at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt, left to visit friends at Bradwinie on their way home to Sask. John is a good sport and his many friends here wish them a pleasant trip.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton

Mr. W. Barry, of Ethelbert, paid us a visit last wee and reports business lively.
Robt. Brewer I again in our midst and is after more prom. It seems as though he thinks hogs are raised and fed up in one week as he claimed he had cleared everything in sight last week. His smile must go a long way when amongst the Galicians.
Wm. Ashmore is a very busy man these days with his team, what with hauling wood and hay. Quite a rustler is “Bill.”
There is a new company formed her which are the proud possessors of a good well, and we are all busy trying to think of a suitable name for it. They had a meeting last week to discuss the matter of taking new shareholders, as there are lots of applicants now that water is scarce. The promoters are deserving of good dividends as they took a big responsibility when they undertook to drill the well.
We are all sorry to hear that m. Green, the Church of England student, is leaving this district to take office in Winnipeg. We all wish him the best of luck.
There has been quite a number of commercial travellers here this week. It seems this must be a good business burgh for them. It certainly makes business good for some people.
The people of Sifton seem somewhat jealous of the fact that their neighbours had the pleasure of seeing an airship last week. We understand that lots of people are taking the mater very seriously and it seems that there is a hot time awaiting the airman next time he shows up.
Wm. Walters visited the surrounding country on business and reports that most of the farmers are busy solving the water problem.
A bunch of Galician farmers are busy loading a car of wheat which seem to be of a fair quality.
Mr. Wm. Taylor, of Valley River, was a visitor to town last week, and informs us that he has purchased a farm and is going to work on it next spring. We all with him luck, although we all know luck is a companion of hard work.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton Romance
PROFESSOR MATOFF

The following is from a Sifton correspondent: The celebrated Russian violinist, Michael Matoff, has been lingering in this quiet northern village of Manitoba for some months. Although used to the plaudits of great audiences in his world tours, he is now content to stay here, held an unprotesting prisoner by the silken bonds of love.
Some months ago Matoff was journeying westward on the train which passes through here. On the same train was a young Jewish girl, Miss Ida Marantz, whose home is in Sifton. She is a handsome girl and posses a fair education. She assists her father in his general store here.
On the train on that eventful day, Miss Marantz became ill. The virtuoso, Matoff, who was sitting near, noticed the girl’s distress and flew to her assistance. He procured medicine for her and comforted her in every possible way.
When the train arrived at Sifton Miss Marantz got off and Matoff’s chivalry was so great that he, too, left the train and saw her safely to her home.
The grateful parents entertained the musician, who later in the evening favoured the family with some delicious dreamy music from his famous violin.

HOW ROMANCE BEGAN

Under the spell of the witching strains Miss Marantz lost her heart to the musician and Prof. Matoff lost his to the fair listened, if her had not already lost it.
The virtuoso and he village maiden became engaged. The engagement was conducted according to Russian rites and at the observance Matoff played and enraptured all the guests.
The virtuoso has since resided at the Marantz home and whenever he plays on his loved violin knots of villagers linger outside until the last sweet note has died away.
Prof. Matoff’s violin is said to be worth $10,000.
An interesting feature of the romance is that the “eternal triangle” element is said to be not wanting. It is said that prior to the meeting with the virtuoso a village youth had aspired to the hand of the fair Ida and had not been entirely discouraged. With the coming of the distinguished musician, however, this prosaic romance was nipped before it was well budded.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd was a weekend visitor to Dauphin.
It is reported that the fishermen have received notice from the companies to pull up their nets, as the fish market had taken a slump. Six carloads were shipped from this point on Friday.
A large number enjoyed the skating and dancing party given by the young ladies of the town on Wednesday evening last. About 40 couples attended the dance. Lively music was furnished by the Russell orchestra, with Messrs. Johnson and Stevenson giving a help out. Messrs. Bickle and Burrell acted as masters of ceremonies.
Miss Stewart who has been a visitor at the home of B. Hechter, left for her home Winnipeg on Friday.
Miss Clara Bradley is visiting at the home of Mr. Mark Cardiff in Dauphin this week.
Rev. Mr. Green, of the English church, is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Born, Jan. 23rd, to Mr. and Mrs. A. Russell, a son.
It is probably the Rex Theatre will again be open to the public this week.
Mrs. John McArthur and daughter, are visiting at the home of her parents in Fork River.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. D. Kennedy has been on the sick list but is on the mend.
Mr. F. Hechter returned on Sunday form Crane River.
Mrs. W.D. King returned home on Friday after visiting her mother.
The dance in the Rex Hall, given by the young ladies of the town was sure the best of the season and everybody enjoyed a good time.
Mr. Green, the English rector, preaches his farewell sermon next Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 4 – 1912

1912 Jan 4 – Cobb Committed For Trial

Wilfred Russell Cobb, acting as station agent at Sifton, charged with misappropriating funds belonging to the C.N.R., to the extent of $853, was committed for trial on Saturday last by P.M. Munson. Cobb was taken to Portage on Sunday by P.C. Rooke. F.E. Simpson appeared for the company and J.L. Bowman represented Cobb.

1912 Jan 4 – Rowland Parke Killed

Some few weeks ago Mrs. Rowland Parke, of Sperling, Man., and late of Dauphin Plains, received a cable from Wagg Wagga, N.W.S., to the effect that Mr. Parke had been killed while going for a load of wood. Since then newspapers containing accounts of the accident have been received. It appears that his employer, Mr. McGeoch, of Egan Creek, five miles from Yerong Creek, sent Mr. Parke for a load of wood about 11 o’clock on Oct. 28th, and as he had not returned at 2 o’clock, he sent a boy to see what was the matter. The boy found Mr. Parke insensible near a fallen tree. He was at once taken to the hospital, where he remained unconscious from the time of the accident until the 31st, a period of three days.
Mr. Parke was one of the early settlers of Dauphin, coming here some twenty years ago. He leaves a widow and four mall children, the eldest being under 12 years. Mr. Parke is now a resident at Sperling, Man.

1912 Jan 4 – Fork River

Mr. Goodhand, agent for the Magnet cream separator, has been spending a few days here on business.
The house of Morley Snelgrove was destroyed by fire the other morning. Nothing was saved. The building was insured for a small amount.
Earl and Sydney Benner and Miss Laura and Amy Benner, of Saskatchewan, are visiting at E.H. Benner’s for the holidays.
Miss M. Allerton has been engaged to wield the rod of correction over the scholars of the Mossey River School for the year 1912.
Purple Star L.O.L. 1765, held their annual meeting in the Orange Hall, Fork River, on Dec. 20. The finances of the lodge are in a good condition and after the general routine of business the election of officers for the year 1912 was proceeded with: W.M., Bro. A. Hunt; D.M., Bro. C. Clark; Chaplain, Bro. Wm. King; Fin. Sec., Bro. C.E. Bailey; Treasurer, Bro. S. Bailey; D. of C., Bro., F. Cooper; Lecturer, Bro. F. Hafenbrak; D. Lect., Bro. F. King; 1st Committeeman, Bro. Edwin King; Committeeman, Bros Morris, Ellis, Hodgson and McKerchar.
E. Munro of Brandon is visiting at the home of A. Hunt for the holidays.
J. Seale, a timber inspector, was here last week issuing permits to cut timber on government lands.

1912 Jan 4 – Fork River

Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, spent the holiday with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bailey.
Miss Olive and Lizzie Clark, of Dauphin, are home for the holidays.
The annual Xmas tree, under the auspices of the Church of England S.S., was held on Dec. 22nd, in the Orange Hall. It was a fine evening and a large crowd turned out. The tree looked fine and was heavily loaded with presents. At 8:30 the chair was taken by Mr. Wm. King, churchwarden, and an excellent programme was rendered under the direction of Miss Mason and Miss Allerton and praise must be given them for their assistance. The program opened with a coral called “Good King Wincheless,” recitations and songs were given by the school children. After the program the S.S. prizes were given out by Mr. King, superintendent and Mr. Harding, lay reader. Mr. H. Benner made a good Santa Claus. Supper was served at 12 o’clock and everybody went home happy and contented.
The “Jackass” who writes for the “Jackdaw” column for the Press, had an item in the last issue of that paper referring to the likely change in the post officer here. When he states that the prospective postmaster had no vote he simply shows that he don’t know what he is talking about. It would be idle on your Correspondent’s part to waste any time replying to the little fellow as I find he is regarded as a joke pretty much by everybody.