Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 28 – 1915

1915 Jan 28 – Letter From Dauphin Man at Front

Mr. Georges Urion, a French reservist who invested considerable capital in Elm Park and other Dauphin property, writing to Coun. Geo. Johnson from 20th Company, 269 Regiment de Infantry, 70th Division, Secteur Postal 120, France, tells how he is now serving at the front in the great war in France. On January 1, when the letter was written, the French army in which he is in were then holding one half of the houses in a town in Alsace, and the Germans the other half. He is in good health and the spirit of the army is the best, he says. They are confident of success but that it will be no easy task and they expect the war to least six months yet.

1915 Jan 28 – Major Rooke Wounded

Major B. Rooke, of Second Indian Gurhkas, was wounded in a recent engagement in France. The major is a brother of the late Charles Rooke, of Dauphin.

1915 Jan 28 – Tragic Death of Miss Allan

The worst tragedy in the history of Dauphin occurred on Sunday afternoon about 5 o’clock in the Malcolm block, when Miss Florence Allan, a well-known and popular young woman of the town, was burned so badly that her death followed a few hours later.
It appears that Miss Allan and filled a small lamp was methylated spirits and in doing so had spilled some of the liquid on her flannelette gown. At the time she had only her underclothing and gown on. When she attempted to light the lamp the part of the gown on which she had spilled the spirits caught fire and in an instant the blaze spread over the unfortunate woman’s clothing. She had the door of the room locked at the time and in her excitement in looking for the key lost several valuable moments. When she got the door unlocked and rushed out in the hall she was a mass of flame. Mrs. Hooper, wife of the caretaker of the block, was the first to be on the scene, followed by Mr. Hooper. Miss Allan, in her frenzy, grabbed Mrs. Hooper, and begged of her to put out the fire. Mrs. Hooper had difficultly in freeing herself from the burning woman, as it all happened so suddenly, and in doing so had her hands burned. Mr. Hooper, as soon as he realized the situation, procured a rug and threw it about Miss Allan, and this did much to smother the flames. Mr. Hooper had one of his hands quite badly burned while covering the burning woman with the rug. Others came quickly to the rescue and Dr. Culbertson hurried from his home to the block. An examination by the Dr. at once revealed the terrible condition the young woman was in and he at once made arrangements for her removal to the hospital.

BURNED FROM HEAD TO FOOT.

Everything possible was done to alleviate the sufferings of the young woman, but as she was literally burned from head to foot there was no possible hope for her recovery, and on Monday morning she passed away.
Deceased came from Bancroft, Ont., about three years ago to take a position in her brother’s confectionery store, where she remained until a few months ago, when he sold out. She then accepted a position with the Steen-Copeand Co. which she held at the time of her death. She was a young woman of a genial disposition and was liked by all who came in contact with her whether in a business or social way.

BODY TAKEN EAST.

A service was held in the Methodist Church on Monday evening and the building was crowded with sympathizing friends. The pastor, Rev. T.G. Bethell, spoke feelingly of the awful fate that had befallen the young woman and the lesson all should learn of the terrible suddenness with which death comes at times to both young and old. He referred to the esteem and respect the deceased young woman was held and the sympathy all felt for the afflicted family.
Floral tributes, from friends and societies, covered the casket.
At the conclusion of the service the body was taken to the station and from there forwarded to Bancroft, Ont., for interment. The followed acted as pallbearers: J.T. Wright, B. Reid, W.D. Sampson, A.G. Wanless, J. Argue and B. Phillips.
Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Allan and Mr. E. Allan accompanied the remains east.

1915 Jan 28 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Winnipeg.
Mr. Desroche, of Pine Creek, was a visitor at the A.T. Co. store at Fork River and returned to Winnipegosis by the sleigh route patrolled by our trusted friend Scotty, and he’ll het there sure.
Mr. Flemming Wilson and family, of Dauphin, have taken up their residence on the Shannon homestead, Mr. W. intends farming for a time.
Miss Coomber, of Selkirk, is visiting her parents on the Fork River.
Mr. E. Thomas has returned from Verigen, Sask., and will run the elevator for a short time.
Mr. F.H. Steede, of Bradwardine, Man., will arrive on the 29th to take charge of this mission. He will hold service in All Saints’ on Sunday 31st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
A large gathering from all parts attended the pie social and dance at the home of Mr. W. King. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all. It reminded us of ye olden times.
The cold snap seems to be taking liberties with everything green or tender these days. Even the sandwich man is complaining.
Fred King is able to get around again. Try a poplar tree next time, Fred, its easier on the moccasins.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis spent the weekend at this burgh.
Mr. Fair, of Ochre River, is going his rounds and is doing a roaring trade selling slaves and liniments these cold days.
Mr. John Nowsade and family, of Aberdeen, Sask., are spending a short time with his parents in Fork River.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Harnell who have been spending a month at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt, left to visit friends at Bradwinie on their way home to Sask. John is a good sport and his many friends here wish them a pleasant trip.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton

Mr. W. Barry, of Ethelbert, paid us a visit last wee and reports business lively.
Robt. Brewer I again in our midst and is after more prom. It seems as though he thinks hogs are raised and fed up in one week as he claimed he had cleared everything in sight last week. His smile must go a long way when amongst the Galicians.
Wm. Ashmore is a very busy man these days with his team, what with hauling wood and hay. Quite a rustler is “Bill.”
There is a new company formed her which are the proud possessors of a good well, and we are all busy trying to think of a suitable name for it. They had a meeting last week to discuss the matter of taking new shareholders, as there are lots of applicants now that water is scarce. The promoters are deserving of good dividends as they took a big responsibility when they undertook to drill the well.
We are all sorry to hear that m. Green, the Church of England student, is leaving this district to take office in Winnipeg. We all wish him the best of luck.
There has been quite a number of commercial travellers here this week. It seems this must be a good business burgh for them. It certainly makes business good for some people.
The people of Sifton seem somewhat jealous of the fact that their neighbours had the pleasure of seeing an airship last week. We understand that lots of people are taking the mater very seriously and it seems that there is a hot time awaiting the airman next time he shows up.
Wm. Walters visited the surrounding country on business and reports that most of the farmers are busy solving the water problem.
A bunch of Galician farmers are busy loading a car of wheat which seem to be of a fair quality.
Mr. Wm. Taylor, of Valley River, was a visitor to town last week, and informs us that he has purchased a farm and is going to work on it next spring. We all with him luck, although we all know luck is a companion of hard work.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton Romance
PROFESSOR MATOFF

The following is from a Sifton correspondent: The celebrated Russian violinist, Michael Matoff, has been lingering in this quiet northern village of Manitoba for some months. Although used to the plaudits of great audiences in his world tours, he is now content to stay here, held an unprotesting prisoner by the silken bonds of love.
Some months ago Matoff was journeying westward on the train which passes through here. On the same train was a young Jewish girl, Miss Ida Marantz, whose home is in Sifton. She is a handsome girl and posses a fair education. She assists her father in his general store here.
On the train on that eventful day, Miss Marantz became ill. The virtuoso, Matoff, who was sitting near, noticed the girl’s distress and flew to her assistance. He procured medicine for her and comforted her in every possible way.
When the train arrived at Sifton Miss Marantz got off and Matoff’s chivalry was so great that he, too, left the train and saw her safely to her home.
The grateful parents entertained the musician, who later in the evening favoured the family with some delicious dreamy music from his famous violin.

HOW ROMANCE BEGAN

Under the spell of the witching strains Miss Marantz lost her heart to the musician and Prof. Matoff lost his to the fair listened, if her had not already lost it.
The virtuoso and he village maiden became engaged. The engagement was conducted according to Russian rites and at the observance Matoff played and enraptured all the guests.
The virtuoso has since resided at the Marantz home and whenever he plays on his loved violin knots of villagers linger outside until the last sweet note has died away.
Prof. Matoff’s violin is said to be worth $10,000.
An interesting feature of the romance is that the “eternal triangle” element is said to be not wanting. It is said that prior to the meeting with the virtuoso a village youth had aspired to the hand of the fair Ida and had not been entirely discouraged. With the coming of the distinguished musician, however, this prosaic romance was nipped before it was well budded.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd was a weekend visitor to Dauphin.
It is reported that the fishermen have received notice from the companies to pull up their nets, as the fish market had taken a slump. Six carloads were shipped from this point on Friday.
A large number enjoyed the skating and dancing party given by the young ladies of the town on Wednesday evening last. About 40 couples attended the dance. Lively music was furnished by the Russell orchestra, with Messrs. Johnson and Stevenson giving a help out. Messrs. Bickle and Burrell acted as masters of ceremonies.
Miss Stewart who has been a visitor at the home of B. Hechter, left for her home Winnipeg on Friday.
Miss Clara Bradley is visiting at the home of Mr. Mark Cardiff in Dauphin this week.
Rev. Mr. Green, of the English church, is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Born, Jan. 23rd, to Mr. and Mrs. A. Russell, a son.
It is probably the Rex Theatre will again be open to the public this week.
Mrs. John McArthur and daughter, are visiting at the home of her parents in Fork River.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. D. Kennedy has been on the sick list but is on the mend.
Mr. F. Hechter returned on Sunday form Crane River.
Mrs. W.D. King returned home on Friday after visiting her mother.
The dance in the Rex Hall, given by the young ladies of the town was sure the best of the season and everybody enjoyed a good time.
Mr. Green, the English rector, preaches his farewell sermon next Sunday.

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