Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 23, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

Regular meeting of the above association was held on the 9th inst. about 40 comrades being in attendance. Application for membership was received from 9 returned men, all of whom were accepted.
The committee appointed to consider the question of building a home for the returned men reported that they had approved a design for a veterans’ home as presented to them by Mr. H. Payton, the architect, this sketch being placed before the comrades for approval. Instructions have been given to Mr. Payton to finish the design and it is hoped to have these drawings shortly to place before the public so that when an appeal is made for help in the construction there will be no doubt in the mind of anyone as to where the money is going. It is also felt that the plans under consideration will not only meet the needs of the veterans but will meet with the approval of the community and be a credit to the town of Dauphin and district, and will give those interested in the welfare of the returned men the opportunity of expressing their appreciation.
The members of the above mentioned committee are as follows: Comrades J.D. Neeley, H. Oliphant, F. Neeley, F. Bumstead, D. Kitney, J.W. Skinner, W.F. Terrell, W. Wright, C. Lane, H.H. Olson, E.C. Batty (chairman) and J.M. Chalmers (secretary). Any of the afore-mentioned committee will be only too pleased to go into the matter of the building and give all the information that is desired.
We are informed that the Ladies’ Auxiliary intend putting on a dance on Hallowe’en Eve (Oct 31st). Some very fine prizes have been donated, and all are asked to bear the date in mind and come and have a good time.
I have been asked to state that Comrade R.H. Elliott has lost his service button. The number of which is 163371. Anyone finding same will please return it to the G.W.V.A. rooms or to the above mentioned. These buttons cannot be replaced and also that it is a criminal offence to be in possession of one unless the certificate belonging to same is also in the possession of the bearer.
On Thursday, 14th, the Victorian Serenaders performed at the town hall under the auspices of this Association. The show was as usual good, and the music after for the dance was generally conceded to be first rate. The house was not as good as might have been hoped, but this was in a large measure due to the weather and the fact that there have been several other attractions during the month. However it was a well-paying proposition and the proceeds will be used in the furtherance of the building proposition.
On Nov. 3rd the third of the series of the concerts to be run under the auspices of this association will be placed on at the town hall. This time it is the Canadian Juveniles and it will not be necessary to say a great deal about these as they are well known to the residents here. The Gray Girls, who are travelling with this company, have already established a reputation for themselves in Winnipeg second to none; the same also applying to Charlie Wright. We would strongly recommend this entertainment to all and would ask that we be given the usual support of the public and so enable us to bring that home for the veterans a little nearer to a possibility.
Members are asked to note that the regular meeting will be on the 23rd inst., and a full attendance is requested. Now that the bulk of the farm work for the season is through, there is no reason why the members should not attend, and it is only by so doing that we can accomplish anything for the bettermen in general of the returned men.

Sir Henry Drayton to Speak

The Victory Loan Committee have their organization completed and the canvases for both town and rural will commence Monday, Oct. 27th. A public meeting will be held at Dauphin on Oct., 29th, at which Sir Henry Drayton, Minister of Finance, is expected to speak.

Fork River

Will Northam, has purchased a house and lot in town from J. MacDonald and will take up his residence with us.
E. Lockwood and family have arrived from Regina. Mr. L is the new station agent.
Bert Little and family have arrived from Chicago to take up their residence.
Ben Cameron has charge of the White Star elevator and is handling considerable grain.
A pleasant time was spent at the Orange Hall on Friday evening, when a dance and presentation was given to our returned boys. Proceedings started at nine sharp and a good crowd turned out for the occasion. Dancing occupied those present until eleven o’clock when an address was read by the se.-treasurer of the Returned Soldiers’ Committee. Presentation of watches was next on the program. Corp. Briggs, Pte. Briggs, Pte. Gasena, Pte. Reader and Drive S. Craighill each receiving a watch as a small token for the service they have rendered their country. Pte. A. King who was “over there” for four years returned while the dance was on but for some reason did not get his watch with the rest. I wonder why? The banquet for the boys is to be given on Friday evening, Oct. 31. Let us hope everyone will turn out and have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 2, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Sept. 25th. Only a small turnout was registered, this without a doubt being due to the fact that the majority were busy threshing, still, all the same, there could and should have been more and the comrades are earnestly asked to remember the meeting on October 9th. A full attendance is desired and, in fact, must be had, and all are asked to make a special effort to attend. Matters of great importance to the association will be dealt with and it is the desire of the executive that a representative meeting give its ruling on these matters.
On the 14th inst. the second entertainment arranged by the Veterans will be placed on at the town hall, viz., The Victorian Serenaders. There will be a dance after the same as the previous show an the co operation of all to secure a good house is asked. Little need be said as to the merits of the company as same is well known to the majority, but it will fully maintain the reputation established by the Castle Squares and good value for money is assured.
We would draw the attention of the reader to the special appeal from the G.W.V.A. in this edition of the paper and ask that they give the proposition their support. This will be the first time that a general appeal has been made in this district by the returned men and we are confident that we shall not ask in vain, but that the public will respond in the same spirit as the men did in the past four years.
Comrades, keep the 9th October in your “bean” and attend the meeting that night.

Presented With Meerschaum Pipe

The employees of the town met at the hall on Wendesday afternoon and presented ex-Chief Bridle with an address and valuable meerschaum pipe. Mr. Bridle and family left on the early morning train for British Columbia.

Women Killed by Tree

A sad fatality occurred last Friday during the heavy windstorm. Mrs. Wm. Lesiuk, of Venlaw, was out in the garden digging potatoes for the mid-day meal when she was struck on the head by a falling tree. A limb of the tree pierced the unfortunate woman’s skull and penetrated the brain. She leaves a family of several small children – Gilbert Plains Maple Leaf.

Fork River

The postponed Fork River fair was held on the 26th. Owing to rain the night before some of the farmers in the outlying districts did not exhibit as had been their intention. The exhibits in all classes were exceptionally good; the garden truck, I am told by those who were at both fairs, was even better than Dauphin. Taken all around Fork River did will and with the experience gained next year should be a top notcher.
The Boys’ and Girls’ Club held their fair the same day and the showing made by them was a credit to the children and their teachers.
A great deal of trouble is caused by the young people on the district in tricks played with the property of residents of the town. Unless this is stopped some of the younger generation may find themselves up before the local J.P. Boys will be boys, but the destruction of property is carrying fun too far. Placing a hayrack on the road, and piling barrels and boxes in the way of the automobiles is a pastime that may prove costly for the offenders.
Victory Loan Campaign starts Oct. 27th. This will give those who are applying for their naturalization papers a chance to show just how patriotic they are, and we are waiting to see how much they will put into victory bonds. Everybody should subscribe for some and help reconstruction.
I read with interest “Well Wisher’s” letter in last week’s Herald and think it well worthy of the thought and action of those having the welfare of the boys and girls of the district at heart.
Mrs. Jerry Frost and family have returned to Southern Manitoba, after having spent a month with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
The dance in the hall on fair night proved a success. Let us dance while we are young, as the time will come when we can’t.
Prof. Williamson and family have arrived from Southern Manitoba to take up their residence. The professor will teach music.
The Jewish New Year service was held on Thursday and Friday. Quite a number attended from Winnipegosis, Sifton and other points.
Mrs. McQuay and children were visitors at the home of Mrs. Fred. Cooper during the fair.
Mrs. Vining and G. Stuart, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mrs. Rice, who is on the sick list.

Zelana

Fork River, Sept. 23rd.
My last letter spoke of some nice weather for threshing. Perhaps I spoke too soon for there seems to have been very little nice weather since for threshing. But according to the old saying “It is an ill wind that blows nobody good,” so if people could not thresh then at least some of them can plow. A few around here have quite a bit turned over ready for next spring. If the fields could be sown now, there would surely be enough moisture to promote growth. In fact grain is sprouting in the stooks and in some of the stacks.
After threshing for Peter Drainiak on Saturday, Gaseyna’s machine was moved to their own place just before another rain. We understood that John Pokotylo’s machine held up at Mr. Chraighill’s by the bad weather. The threshing outfit owned by Messrs. Bugutsky, Miskae and Lyluk had not been out at all this season.
Last Friday Mrs. Paul Lyluk had the misfortune to run a pitchfork into her foot. Our teacher, who has taken a course in “First Aid”, dressed the wound.
Jim Phillips lost a valuable cow recently from blackleg it is supposed. A number of animals have died around here from the same cause.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 17, 1919

Fined $200 for Operating Still

Nikola Presiloski, of Valley River, appeared before the police magistrate this week on the charge of “operating a still illegally.” He pleaded guilty and was fined $200 and $7 costs. The brand of whiskey manufactured by Presiloski is said, by those who sampled it, to be the best they ever imbibed.
Constable Coleridge, laid information against Joe Woiak, for failing to register under “Alien Enemy Act.” He was fined $10 and $5 costs.

G.W.V.A. Barn Dance

A barn dance was held on July 10th under the auspices of the Great War Veterans’ association in the barn of Mr. Arthur Fisher, Burrows. Some 150 people made the trip, and as the roads were good and the weather all that could be desired, a good time was spent. The McMurray orchestra was in attendance and, as usual, this was an assurance that the music was of the highest order. After all expenses had been paid a good sum was turned over to the association which will help their work and bring nearer the fond hope of the members that at some time, and it is hoped soon, they will be able to see their way to having quarters owned by the association as a permanent home for the veterans of the district. The thanks of the association are due to Mr. Fisher, who has placed his barn at the disposal of the association on two occasions this summer, and also to the various ladies and gentlemen who assisted in the arrangements.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above Association are asked to note that the meeting will be on Thursday night at 9 o’clock in place of 8 as usual. This change is to prevent a clash with the baseball game to be played the same evening. Members are requested to put in an appearance as matters of importance will be discussed. The executive of the association is informed that an Order-in-Council has been passed extending the War Service Gratuity to men that have seen service in England, but did not proceed to France. Particulars have been requested as to the manner in which application should be made for same and comrades will be notified on receipt of same.
This association wishes to thank those ladies who kindly sent cakes for the dance recently held at Mr. Fisher’s barn, also to Mr. Fisher for the use of his place.

Peace Day Observance

Dauphin citizens will observe Peace Day by a short service in the town hall at 10 a.m. In the afternoon a basket picnic will be held in the park with a program of sports for the children.

Sentenced to Five Years

The town of Dauphin laid a charge of “vagrancy” against Wm. Boyko. He appeared for trial before P.M. Hawkins on Monday. He entered a plea of not guilty but was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment in the Industrial Training School at Portage la Prairie on Tuesday. Boyko’s previous record is bad.

Winnipegosis

Geo. Spence, who has been overseas for over two years, returned home last week.
A party of surveyors are surveying the new railway line from Toutes Aides to Winnipegosis.
Miss A. St. Godard, of the Pas, is visiting her sister before going to Winnipeg to reside.
Misses Myrtle and Edna Grenon were passengers to the city on Saturday to meet their father. They will leave for Minneapolis to send their holidays.
Mrs. St. Amour and Misses A. and H. St. Godard left on Saturday for a visit to Winnipeg.
A fire occurred in the Armstrong Trading Company’s oil sheds this week, but was put out before serious damage was done.
F.G. Shears, J.P. Grenon and A.H. Steele have left for Winnipeg in connection with the suit started by the Armstrong Trading Co. against J.P. Grenon as to the ownership of the Winnipegosis hotel.
This has been a dry season here but lots of rain has fallen this week which has put the crops in good condition.
The lake steamers have been overhauled and have made several successful trips up to the north end of the lake, establishing new fishing posts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 10 – 1913

1913 Apr 10 – Titanic Disaster Just a Year Ago

The sinking of the Steamship Titanic occurred on the Atlantic Ocean on April 15th, 1912. It will be a year next Tuesday, April 18th, since the disaster occurred, which resulted in the greatest loss of like in the history of marine travel.

1913 Apr 10 – Fork River

Bert Steele passed through from Mafeking on his way to Winnipegosis.
Dave Shinks has left for his homestead at Vonda, for the summer.
Several left here the other evening chaperoned by Captain Storrar, to take in the dance given by the ladies of Winnipegosis. They returned in the wee sma’ hours of the morning singing “the girls we left behind us.” We are not sure whether it’s the ones here or at Winnipegosis. They ought to know.
Wm. Davis and J.W. Lockhart have returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
The council has given us the auditors report in book form at last and they are to be commended for a step in the right direction. We trust that they will go farther and state what the money is paid out for. The report states Jack Smith got $20 and we don’t know whether it’s for cutting lamb’s tails or scrub or rubbing down a large pair of calves to take the selling down or what. Let’s know what the money is paid for in future, please.
Rev. S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, was here on church business between trains.
Harold Clark, of Dauphin, spent the weekend with his parents.
Pat Powers returned from his winter’s work with the Williams Lumber Co. at Lake Dauphin. Sid. Gower, engineer of that Co. is also taking a vacation and renewing acquaintances around town.
The annual vestry meeting of All Saints’ Church was held on April 3rd in the church. The chair was taken by the Rural Dean, the Rev. A.S. Wiley, M.A. The minutes of the last meetings were read out by the sec.-treasurer also the treasurer’s report, which was accepted and found satisfactory. The Rev. H.H. Scrase acted as vestry clerk and the officers elected for the coming year were Mr. W. King, minister’s warden; C. Baily, people’s warden; Wm. King, sec.-treasurer; Delegate to synod, Wm. King.
The snow is leaving us fast and there is water everywhere and yet the “philosopher” is heard to remark this is getting to be a “darned dry hole” to live in. We don’t know exactly what he means, but still this is a great country for guessing, and we are wondering if our municipal fathers are in possession of the deed of land they intend building that boundary bridge on? Or is it to be the same old chestnut like the north ditch, just ask for it or whistle for it after. We are informed there is a largely signed petition against the building of the bridge. Its time to call a halt of this bridge building and repair, for safety, what we have and give us good roads to them before we go bust entirely. We have a good country and good settlers and all we need is a little common sense and judgement by those at the head of affairs and we will be all right and leave those brainy problems alone.
A vote of thank was passed to Mr. Wm. King for his work as warden for the past 10 years. The Sunday School has been kept open all winter and there has been a very fair attendance. A vote of thanks was passed to the rural dean for coming up and acting as chairman also to Mr. and Mrs. Scrase for their work in the mission.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 27 – 1913

1913 Mar 27 – Military Men For Winnipeg

Dr. Walker, Percy Willson, and Ed. Manby, officers, and A.C. Wade, Geo. Astley, T. Coghlan and D.C. Boire, non-commissioned officers, left this morning for Winnipeg, where they will take a two weeks’ course at the military school. The men belong to the 32nd Manitoba Light Horse with headquarters at Dauphin.

1913 Mar 27 – Fork River

B. Venables shipped by express a very fine yearling Holstein bull to a farmer in Saskatchewan.
Miss Grant, of Pine View School and Miss Weatherhead left for their homes where they intend spending the Easter holidays.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the opposition bluffed Borden about that memorandum?”
“No, Pat.”
“Well, one fine morning Borden laid it on the table and the opposition took a chill and dear Wilfy took a cold after and did not go down to the house for several days. Bill Pugsley undertook to run the opposition and the government too, but the Hon. Bob sat on him. Micky Clark, of Red Deer, got fresh and the speaker threatened to name him. Jack Turriff, says, name and be damned, and there was the divel to pay, just like old Dounybroos. Next day Bill Pugsley and some more kinder smoothed it over and in the meantime Bob, having nothing to do, took a Cruise home for Easter holidays, where we hope he’ll have a good time.”
“Well, Pat, if Glen had been there to throw a little Cree into them the Naval bill would have been passed long ago. There’s nothing like education.”
Edwin King is spending Easter at his home and renewing acquaintances.
Easter service was held in All Saints’ Church in the evening last Sunday and Rev. Scrase preached a most appropriate sermon, the text being, “He is risen.” The alter was tastefully decorated with beautiful white Easter lilies supplied by Mr. A.C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis.
The farmers are rushing the grain into the elevator as it is to close next week.
Harcourt Benner, one of Dauphin’s prominent real estate agents, is renewing old acquaintances here.
We now have a veterinary surgeon which is a long felt want in this burgh and being proficient in wood work, artificial limbs can be supplied on shortest notice.
Ed Morris and family, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend with Mrs. Wm. King.
D. Kennedy received a nice bunch of barred Plymouth Rock fowl from C.F. Brewer of Ashville, and F. Hafenbrak received a fine pair of black Minorcas from an Eastern breeder.
Quite a number from here took in the St. Patrick’s ball, given by Mr. McInnes, of the Winnipegosis hotel. They report a swell time.
Miss Gertrude Cooper and Miss Clark, of Dauphin, are spending their Easter holidays with their friends.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press of the 20 inquires for his friends Joe Fahey and Bishop Langevin. They are well. Can our friend tell us if there is any profit keeping a pig after paying Cox’s fee of one hundred and forty dollars. They keeping heifers, friend, and don’t get too fresh.
Miss Pearl Wilson and Miss Woods returned from Sifton, where they have been visiting friends.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 26 – 1914

1914 Mar 26 – Fined $60

Nicola Brattiko, who accidentally shot Mike Kuzyk several weeks ago south of Winnipegosis, was fined $60 and costs a few days ago, for hunting out of season. W.H. Joyce, deputy provincial game guardian of Dauphin, was the prosecutor.

1914 Mar 26 – Fork River

Colin Inkster, of Dauphin, one of the old-timers, was a visitor here renewing acquaintances for a short time.
Sam Reid left for a week’s holiday in the south.
Coun. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, stayed over after the council meeting, the guest of Mr. Kennedy. Frank is contemplating using an aeroplane next time as the “automobilly” got stuck in the snow and he had to do a little sprinting to get here but he arrived smiling.
W. Bell returned from spending the winter with his friends at Russell. He is looking hale and hearty.
Reuben Coombers returned from a month’s visit at Selkirk and reports a pleasant time.
A. Shinks, who has been working all winter with the Williams Lumber Co. Ltd., arrived in town and has left for his homestead at Vonda, Sask.
Dr. Medd visited a family out west that was said to have the fever, which rumour upon investigation was found to be incorrect. This is too bad as the doctor had a long trip for nothing.
The Lake Dauphin fishermen’s ball proved a success, the hall being well filled. Several from Winnipegosis attended and all report a good time, although it was stormy.
Sid Coffey, of Winnipegosis, put on his moving picture show on Saturday. Judging from the crowd it had, there being hardly standing room, it was satisfactory to all when attended.
While it is a delicate subject we can’t help noticing the contrast of these turnouts in comparison with the congregations attending the two churches. Any excuse is made for not attending divine service. It is poor encouragement to young students who give their services to these [1 line missing] existence.
We notice our Mowat friend is still grinding out his imaginary P.O. troubles. He ought to take to the woods now.
James Gunness has received a 3 horse power gasoline engine for his track car. It certainly can go some when Jim and Conductor Sid get behind it.
Frank Hafenbrak has returned from Rochester, Minn., with his farther, I. Hafenbrak. We are sorry to hear he is not improving as fast as expected.
John Clements was in town for a short time Monday on business.
Nat Little is busy drawing stone for foundation for a new stable.

1914 Mar 26 – Fork River

J.T. Wiggins representative of the Steel Granary & Culvert Co., of St. Boniface, interviewed some members of the council regarding graders and road machines. Before leaving he appointed D. Kennedy, of the A.T. Co., their local agent.
Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat, returned from spending the winter months among friends in Eastern Ontario.
Nurse Tilt arrived fro Dauphin and intends spending some time on the farm.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is staying a short time with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Hafenbrak received a telegram on Friday from his father’s doctor that he was wanted at once at Rochester, Minnesota, where Mr. Hafenbrak is receiving treatment. He left at once for the south.
The Shetland pony, Hamlet, was shipped to Cypress River by express, the little fellow being a trifle too heavy for parcel post. Romeo and Juliet are left behind. Mr. Little has plenty more to pick from.
Mrs. McWilliams has left for the south to recuperate after her illness. We trust she will be benefited by her trip.
Joseph Lockhart is off on a visit and will no doubt take in the Kerfanko trial as a variety during his absence. Joe likes to be up-to-date.
C.O. Allen, Dominion Land Survey or, is back in these parts in connection with water power or the town of Dauphin.
Don’t forget the Lake Dauphin Fishermen’s Ball in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, the 27th March, or you will miss a good time.
The weather is mild again and if this continues we will soon be on the land ploughing.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is visiting at Dauphin.

1914 Mar 26 – Winnipegosis

About one hundred couples attended the St. Patrick’s Ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnis, in the Hotel Winnipegosis, and all had a very enjoyable time. The ballroom was beautifully decorated for the occasion and the guests tripped the light fantastic until the wee small hours of the morn. We haven’t space here to give a description of all the beautiful dressers worn by the ladies, so will just say they were the best dressed lot of ladies that ever graced a ball room in Winnipegosis. Mr. and Mrs. McInnis are ideal entertainers.
The fishermen’s ball was held Tuesday night, March 24th, in Victoria Hall.
It is reported another hotel will be built here this spring on the corner where the Lake View was burned.
There is talk of a bank being opened up here this spring and we hope he report is true. A bank is very much needed.
Frank Hechter has returned from Winnipeg. We understand he engaged a teacher for the third room that is to be opened up.
A party of surveyors arrived on arrived on Monday. They are leaving on Wednesday to inspect the work done by J.E. Jackson this winter.
A meeting of Conservative Association was held in Cohen’s hall on Monday might for the purpose of electing officers and appointing delegates to attend the convention at Gilbert Plains. A very large number were in attendance and the great interest taken in the meeting shows that the Conservatives are anxiously awaiting the coming election. J.P. Grenon was elected president.
Miss Phoebe Denby, who has been visiting friends in Winnipeg and Selkirk, returned last Monday. Her sister Ethel stopped in Winnipeg to attend college.
Coun. Hechter motored to Fork River on Tuesday morning to attend the council meeting
Mr. Finlayson, inspector of Dominion fish hatcheries paid our Sake Island hatchery a visit this week and reports everything in a very satisfactory condition.
Geo. Cunliffe has returned from spending a few days in Winnipeg.
Archie McDonnell has the gold fever and is going to the Pas to seek his fortune. If Archie makes good we will all get a piece of it.