Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 25 – 1915

1915 Mar 25 – Baby Born on Train

An event occurred on the train from Prince Albert on Saturday morning last which caused quite a commotion among the passengers. Mrs. Courtney Veal, who took passage at Hudson’s Bay Junction, for the purpose of coming to Dauphin to enter the hospital, gave birth to a male child in the vicinity of Sifton, and some fifteen miles from Dauphin. Mrs. Veal was occupying a berth in a sleeper at the time. There was only one other woman, a Mrs. McEvoy, on the train at the time, and her services were quickly requisitioned by Conductor James McQuigge, and everything possible done to make the mother and baby confortable. A rush telegram was dispatched to Dauphin for a doctor and nurse. When the train arrived Dr. Bottomley and a nurse from the hospital with the ambulance, were in waiting and the mother and child hurriedly taken to the hospital.

Forty-five minutes after Mrs. Veal entered the hospital door she have birth to another boy.
Supt. Irwin and the officials of the Canadian Northern are naturally quite proud of the part of the road played in this important event, and while they are not willing to admit they are in favour of adding a maternity department to their already unexcelled service, they say it might be a possibility in the future.

Mr. Veal, who accompanied his wife to Dauphin, speaks highly of the service rendered by Conductor McQuigge in the emergency, and as a mark of gratitude will name one of the babies after him. The two babies are to be named:
HERBERT KITCHENER VEAL.,
JAMES McQUIGGE VEAL.,

At latest accounts the mother and both babies are doing well.

1915 Mar 25 – Interesting Letters from Private J. Meek

The following extracts are taken from two interesting letters written home by Private John Meek (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578):
“No. 946, D. Coy., 32nd Batt.”
“At Sea, March 3rd, 1915,”
“Here I am and feeling fine, with our sea journey about at and end. I have not been the least bi sick all the way. It has been quite a long time on the water and not the best of sleeping quarters. We have just had steerage quarters and they not on a first class boat, so you will have an idea of what it would be like. Well, anyway we have been able to live through it all and so we should worry. A soldier has to take the like of that and smile. We expect to land tomorrow sometime, but where we do not know yet, still I think it will be England alright.”
“We have had a nice trip as far as weather is concerned. The weather and sea have not been a bit rough all the way across. We got on board on the Monday at Halifax and sailed on the Tuesday morning. There are four ships on the trip. The cruiser “Essex” has led the way al the time, of course she has not troops on board. There are three ships with about 1500 men on each, four battalions in all. On our boat is the 32nd and part of the 30th battalion from Vancouver. I do not know where the other two battalions came from. The names of the tree ships as they have travelled on the line are, the “Missanbie,” the “Vaderland” and the “Megantic.” We are on the “Vanderland.”
“Well as far as the trip is concerned there was no more excitement for the first few days. On Monday, shortly after breakfast we got word that one of the stokers had shot himself. He tried to shoot himself through the heart, but he shot a little high, so he did not do himself very much harm. The doctor operated on him and got the bullet out. We do not know what was his reason, but heard he had a row with chief engineer.”
“Yesterday and today have been sport days on board, and it has been fine. We had a boxing contest, a wrestling contest, a tug-of-war and a bunch of races. We had a sack race, a three-legged race, and two or three more.”
“Last night we had a fine concert in the first-class dining hall.”
“Everybody has been excited today, as we have been expecting to sight they south coast of Ireland.”
“Stanley (Henderson of Minitonas) has never been the least bit sick either. You ought to have seen him the morning we got into Halifax. He got out of the train and ran like a made man to see the water and the ships, with a smile all over his face.”

Feb. 4th.
“We sailed into Queenstown harbour early this morning and everything looks fine. It is a very pretty place and the grass looks quite green from here. It is regular spring weather here and it makes a fellow feel fine. There is great excitement among the boys this morning. Some of the have been up all night just to watch her sail in.”

“Shorncliffe, England,”
“March 8th, 1915”
“We have got to the end of our journey for now, anyway. We are right on the south coast of England, near Dover, in the town of Shroncliffe which is a good size. It is a lovely place. We can see the English Channel from the camp. There are about 25,000 men at this place, so it is quite a big town. We have not to live in tents either. We have houses that hold about 25 men each and which are fixed up good. It is the best barracks we have had yet.”
“We were in Queenstown two days and had a route march around the town. Say, it was lovely there! They were such nice days and quite a lot of flowers growing already. Some of the boys said it was the nicest place that they had ever seen.”
“We passed through part of London on the train but did not get off.”
“This leaves me as well as the rest of the Dauphin boys – well and happy.”

1915 Mar 25 – Fork River

Mr. W. Northam, A. Cameron and J. Richardson returned from a few days visit at Dauphin.
Mr. and Ms. F.O. Murphy, of Dauphin, arrived here with a carload of implements and furniture. They will take up their residence of F. Chase’s farm south of the town for the summer.
Our fiend Scotty took a flying visit to Winnipegosis and returned on shanks’ mare hale and hearty.
Mr. F. Hafenbrak returned from Dauphin with a fine team of draught horses. The seed grain will go in now.
Messrs. Shannon and Stonehouse returned from a pleasant vacation at Dauphin.
Several of our young people attended the 17th of Ireland ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of Winnipegosis hotel. “Mac” knows how to give the folks a good time.
Mr. Archie McDonell, manager for the A.T. Co. farms here, spent a few days arranging for the spring work.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Anglican Church, held their annual meeting on March 17. The reports show a good year’s work. The society is in a good financial condition. The officers for the coming year are Mrs. King, president; Mrs. A. Rowe, vice; Mrs. F. Hafenbrak, secretary; Wm. King, treasurer. Layment in charge, F. Steede.
The children’s annual Lenten service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, March 28th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. All are cordially invited.
W. Coultas returned on Tuesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1915 Mar 25 – Sifton

Mr. Smith Russell of Strathclair, is a visitor in town these days on business.
Mr. F. Patridge, who has been relief station agent here for the last few weeks, has left here to take up duties at Canora, Sask. We all wish him the best of luck.
William Ashmore’s livery is kept busy these days since the alteration of train service. Seemingly its true that it is an ill wind that does not do someone good.
Dr. Gilbart, of Ethelbert, spent the weekend in town.
Mr. Walter spent the weekend out east amongst the farmers and reports that if this kind of weather continues they will start operations on the land within the course of a few days.
The Kennedy Mercantile Co. has erected a large warehouse and has same stocked with a good assortment of farm implements.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt have succeeded in drilling a fine well for Fairville School.
Don’t forget the machinery, horse and stock sale at Sifton on Saturday, the 27th inst. See advertisement in Herald.

1915 Mar 25 – Winnipegosis

Capt. W.B. Sifton is in town from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele are here from Mafeking.
Sid Coffey returned on Tuesday from Dauphin. He has been on the sick list.
Contractor Neely and a staff of men arrived on Tuesday to work on the lighthouse. They were greeted with a big snowstorm.
Coun. Hechter and daughter were visitors to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Jos. Schaldermose is a Winnipeg visitor this week.
Miss Grace Saunders has arrived from Winnipeg.
The annual dance given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of the Hotel Winnipegosis, on St. Patrick’s night, was attended by a large crowd. Every one appeared to have a good time.

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