Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 13, 1919

Flogging Advocated

The problem of dealing with the small boy who smokes is troubling many of the teachers, the members of the school board and even the members of the town council, which body, at its last meeting appointed Coun. Houston and Katz to cooperate with the trustees as to the best means of remedying this undesirable sate of affairs.

Flogging Advocated
A correspondent writes: “We hear a great deal about the small boy who goes to school smoking and having tobacco on his person and the regrets expressed that the trouble can’t be remedied. If these boys attended school in England they would soon be disciplined, and in no namby-pamby style either. They would simply be flogged, and if one application was not sufficient the second strapping would effect the cure. But, after all is the small boy to blame when he sees the bigger boys parading the streets smoking both pipe and cigarette? Perhaps now that we have a committee to investigate they will bring in a report which will offer suggestions concerning the big boy as well as the small boy as to the bad effects of tobacco on the developing youth.”

Memorial Committee Busy

Chairman W. Rintoul, of the memorial committee, states that progress is being made. No definite plans have been considered as yet. A suggestion that an up to date skating and curing rink be built as a “memorial” is meeting with much favor in some quarters. Some favor a “community building,” others a monument, and so forth.

Opening G.W.V. Club Rooms

The new club rooms of the Great War Veterans will be opened on Tuesday evening next, the 18th inst. There will be a short musical program at which Mayor Bowman will preside. Later there will be dancing and cards. Refreshments will be served. The McMurray orchestra will furnish the music. The public are invited to attend.

“Still” Operators Fined

For some time past there has been an increasing supply of what is known as “domestic’ manufactured liquor. The manufacture was exclusively in the hands of the foreign element. Almost any tin vessel from a teapot to a ten gallon can was improvised as a “still.” And despite the crudeness of the particles used to manufacture the “liquor” a fairly good brand is said, by those who sampled it, to have ben produced in some cases. But the promoters’ dreams of accumulating wealth in an easy manner, were destined to failure. Collector Ball was soon wise to the operation of the “stills” and with the assistance of the local police, rounded up three parties who were either operating or connected with the enterprises.
The parties were Mike Torharczuk, Fred Moranczuk and M. Silverman. Informations were laid under the Inland Revenue act, and they appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday and were found guilty. Torharczuk and Moranczuk were each $200 and costs, and Silverman $250 and costs.

War Bride to Arrive

The first war bride that is to come to Dauphin is expected to arrive about the first of next week. During the month of December Sergt. Harold Crowe was married to a young lady in London. The young couple sailed on the Grampian, which was due to arrive at Halifax on Wednesday.

Fork River

Pte. Eales and his war bride have arrived from overseas. They are visiting at the home of H. Pearson.
The manager of the Northern Lumber Co. was a recent visitor to our town. The company may open a lumber yard here.
Mr. Osborne, municipal auditor, is auditing the books of the municipality. When he is through we shall expect the council to have the report printed. This is the only way the ratepayers have of knowing how their money is being spent and the law directs that the report be published.
Mr. Martin, homestead inspector, was here last week in connection with the applications of returned soldiers for land.
The stork visited the home of H. Little last week and left a wee girlie.
Wm. King is visiting Dauphin and Winnipeg this week.
Jack Richardson has purchased a registered Holstein bull, having sold his old sire to Thos. Toye, of Bicton Heath.
The committee which is looking after the interests of the returned soldiers has been organized and is now composed as follows: Owen Pruder, S.L. Gower, A. Hunt, J. Shuchett, J.D. Robertson, Thos. Briggs, F. Cooper, and W. King, sec.-treasurer.

Ethelbert

At a well attended meeting of the Ukrainian farmers held at Ethelbert on March 1st, the following resolution were unanimously passed. Over $100 was collected at the gathering which will be devoted to assisting the returned men.

RESOLUTION NO. 1
1. Having experienced the hardship of the newcomer, we therefore wish to help the returned men to settle with their families on the land. We are ready to volunteer at any time to graciously help any returned soldier settling in our district on the land by offering at least one day’s work on his farm in plowing or doing any required improvements, and will also arrange to have his family and luggage brought from the station to his respective land.
2. We also wish to assure such newcomers that friendly and neighborly assistance will always be at their disposal and that such returned men shall not suffer an want or hardship of a beginner. Carried.

RESOLUTION NO. 2
That we, as one of the Dominion Communities of Canada, do express our belief and faith in the principle of the League of Nations which has recently come into being at the Peace Conference at Paris.
That while believing in the self interim nation of nationalities, we cordially support the idea of human brotherhood and the new international order expressed in its terms.
That we look to the League as the ultimate solvent of the barriers which have hitherto divided mankind and plunged them in recurring strife.
That we also believe the protection of customs tariff the most potent and evil of all the barriers against the unity of mankind must be broken down to insure the permanence of political peace and the continued effectiveness of the League.
That we hold the Farmers’ platform as adopted by the Grain Growers’ conventions recently held in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, to be a welcome step in the direction of that universal free trade which must be chief buttress of a stable international order.
And also that we cordially support the other reforms contained in the same platform.

RESOLUTION NO. 3
That we wish that a committee be appointed whose duty it will be to help the returned men coming into our midst. Carried.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 21 – 1916

1916 Dec 21 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. J.D. James, Grandview, killed. (James Daniel Stanley James, 1892, 151767)

1916 Dec 21 – Frank Meader Wounded

Mrs. Meader received a telegram on Wednesday notifying her that her son, Pte. Frank Thomas Morris Meader was wounded on Dec. 7th, at Camlers, France. The wounds consist of a gunshot in the back and left thigh. (Frank Thomas Morris Meader, 1896, 425693)

1916 Dec 21 – Another Returned Soldier

The list of returned soldiers continues to grow. There are now five of these men in town. On Wednesday Pte. John Ball, who was recently wounded in France, reached home. He is suffering from paralysis on one side and it will be sometime before he is able to be about.
Pte. Bird McKinstry is expected to arrive this week.

1916 Dec 21 – Fork River

What are the Fork River farmers doing in the mater of the proposed Mossey Agricultural society? The Ruthenians and South Bay people seem to be setting them as example.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 31 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 31 – Hotel Sold

The Lake View hotel, owned by Frank Hechter, at Winnipegosis, has been sold to H.M. Hicks, of Winnipeg. The hew proprietor will take possession at once. Mr. Foster, the manager for Mr. Hechter, is leaving for other parts.

1912 Oct 31 – Hallowe’en Ball

What holds more charms and spells for the young than the Scotch superstitions and customs regarding Hallowe’en? Burns in his poem, “Hallowe’en” describes to us filly the traditions of his country. Those interesting customs are more or less exploded now, and Hallowe’en with its mystic rites is fast dying out. So it was with much curiosity and interest that those who love to trip the light fantastic looked forward to the Hallowe’en ball given by the G.I.A. to the B. of L.E. on Tuesday evening of this week. Nor were any of the seventy-five couples present disappointed. Unique decorations appropriate to the occasion were carried out, with pumpkins, black cats, bats and other Hallowe’en favours. A brilliant headlight on the stage with one of the pumpkin lanterns on top, and two on either side supplied the light for the popular twilight waltz. At the entrance of the hall the word welcome was formed with flag pennants. The black cats ands bats showed up effectively on the sidewalls. The call for supper came after the strains of the soft dreamy melody of the twilight waltz had died away. It was served in the fire hall and reflected much credit on the efforts of the ladies to provide an appetizing repast.
Mrs. J.W. Johnston was master of ceremonies, and acquitted himself as always, in a most creditable manner. The music, which was supplied by the McMurray Orchestra was all that could be desired. The selections for the extras provided by Mrs. W.H. Sutherland were much appreciated by all.
The committee in charge of the ball were as follows:
Management – Mesdames D.A. Roberge, A. Thomson, F.L. Ball, J. McKeever, Mrs. R.M. Smith.
Reception – Mesdames W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, F.L. Ball, A. Thomson.
Decorations – Mesdames J. McKeever, W.H. Sutherland, D.A. Roberge, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.
Floor – Brothers W.H. Sutherland, J. McKeever, A. Thomson, R.M. Smith, F.L. Ball.

1912 Oct 31 – Tag Day at Winnipegosis

A Tag Day was held at Winnipegosis and the Dauphin Hospital Ladies’ Aid is indebted to the ladies of that place for the proceeds amounting to fifteen dollars.

1912 Oct 31 – Fork River

Mrs. Isaac Armstrong has returned from visiting her daughter at Gilbert Plains.
Mrs. S. Bailey was a visitor to Dauphin on a land deal so we are informed.
Thomas Shannon returned from a short trip to friends at Canora.
Miss Peal Wilson left for Dauphin with her brother, Fleming Wilson.
Mrs. S. Reid and children returned from Rathwell after spending a week with her friends.
The ladies of the Leap Year committee have invited the gentlemen to a farewell ball in the Orange Hall on Friday night, November 1st. The ladies will supply refreshments, the boys are simply to look pleasant.
Mr. Swartwood, superintendent of the International Harvester Co., was taking stock at D. Kennedy this week.
The Northern Elevator Co. have about finished their up-to-date elevator at this point and it is quite an improvement to the looks of the town.
Mrs. B. Tate of Dauphin, visited Mr. and Mrs. Tom Bailey on the Mossey this week.
All Saints’ Church was very tastefully decorated for the Harvest Festival held on Sunday last. Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very appropriate sermon and a large congregation attended from Sifton, Mowat and the surrounding country.
Miss Gertrude Cooper is spending the week with her parents on the Fork River.

1912 Oct 31 – Sifton

Mr. Russell, principal of Wycliffe School, is building a house for himself. The present house in which he resided was bought by John Kennedy.
There’s a great dissatisfaction amongst the ratepayers of Sifton S.D. The taxes of said school are at the rate of 36 mills on the dollar and the trustees are expected to give an explanation why they have found it necessary to put the estimate so high. In comparison with the taxes of other school districts this is certainly a very high rate.
The Roman Catholic Polish Church has a new priest who is to take charge of said church. The present pastor, the Rev. Plocmski, is leaving the church.
The new Mercantile Co.”s store is expected to open its business in two weeks’ time.
Mr. Reid, section foreman, says that the road bed of the C.N.R. over his section was never in better condition.
Mr. Souborin, late Greek and Roman Catholic priest here but now of Montreal, is visiting with friends here.
An old country Greek Catholic priest is to be located at Ethelbert permanently. Last Sunday he was a visitor to Sifton.
Miss P. Malkowicz has been appointed principal of Sifton School by the school board for the next twelve months.
J. Holland, teacher of Mink River School has brought his wife from Rossburn. John has been batching it for nearly two months.

1918 Oct 31 – The Week’s Causalities

Pte. Karl McFarlane, Dauphin, wounded. (???)
Pte. A. McQueen, Grandview, wounded. (Arthur McQueen, 1894, 2418348)
Pte. G.P. Norman, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Gisli Peterson Norman, 1895, 294050)
Pte. Andrew Baldwin, Dauphin, wounded. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74183)
L. Corp. K.R. Young, Ochre River, missing. (???)
Pte. J.O. Plante, McCreary, wounded. (Joseph Ovide, Plante, 1897, 2381123)

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1915

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis Council

Meeting of the Council of the Village of Winnipegosis held in the Council chambers at 7 p.m. on the 6th inst. Mayor J.P. Grenon in the chair and Councillors Walmsley, Levons, Morris and Hjalmarson present.
Walmsley – Morris – That the minutes of previous meetings be adopted as read. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That Dunc Kennedy be appointed sec-treasurer at a salary of $30 per month from Sept. 1st till end of the fiscal year. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That Walter Clarkson be appointed constable for the Village of Winnipegosis at a salary of $40 per month. Carried.
Lyons – Morris – That the Mayor and Councillors walmsley and Lyons be a committee to secure a yard and feed for pound for Village of Winnipegosis. Carried.
Lyons – Hjalmarson – That the Mayor, Coun. Walmsley and the Sec.-Tresurer meet the committee appointed by the municipality to go over the matter of the appointment between the village and the municipality. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council may for the transportation of Mr. [2 lines missing] such time as the Council are in a position to buy it our it is sold. Carried.
Morris – Walmsley – That the Council adjourn to meet at the call of the Mayor. Carried.

1915 Sep 9 – Winnipegosis

Miss Evelyn Barrell and Mr. Sidney Coffey were married in Winnipeg on the 30th August, and arrived in town on Saturday’s train. Their many friends wish them a long and happy wedded life.
G.O. Bellsmy, an old-timer, spent Sunday in town.
Geo. C. Nigh spent the week-end wit his wife and reports the crops in good shape at Grandview. He left on Monday’s train for Grandview.
Dr. Buttomley, accompanied by Tom Needham, arrived from Dauphin by auto Saturday, and left for Meadow Portage with Ern. Bickel to inspect the smallpox epidemic over there.
J.A. Ball, customs officer, spent Saturday in town.
T.F. Ganther arrived on Saturday’s train and is helping J.C. Adams with the completion of his residence.
Sergeant Jack Angus came up from Brandon on Saturday’s train and is looking well and reports the boys from here all well and happy and getting along splendidly. He left Joe Johnston in charge of his squad.
Jas. McInnes has purchased a gasoline launch and made a trip to Waterhen on Saturday with a survey party.
Hull Burrell took Mr. Loire and party to their ranch on Saturday, returning Saturday night.
The S.S. “Maniton” arrived from the north Sunday with a load of fish and report fishing quiet.
Donald Hattie returned from Snake Island and report fishing quiet.
W.H. Hunking left on Wednesday from Johnston, North Dakota, where he intends making his home. His family preceded him some time ago.
Harry and Walter Grenon returned on Saturday from an extended trip to Quebec and Eastern points and report a splendid vacation and a real good time.
Miss St. Vrain and Geo. Adams were married at the home of the latter’s parents last week and are receiving the congratulations of their many friends.
Mrs. Jne. Cain left on Wednesday’s train for her home in Rainy River, Ont.
The Mossey River Council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on the 31st August. The reeve and all councillors present.
E.R. Black and Scotty Howatson had an exciting trip going to Grave’s Point in a gasoline boat. They were lost and were eleven days making their destination. Why they made the point they had only a few matches left.
Sam McLean made a flying visit to town on Friday by automobile. We don’t see much of Sam nowadays.
Mrs. W. Morton and children returned on Wednesday from a two months’ visit to her parents at Wadena, Sask.
Capt. Russell received a nice bull terrier from Kelwood recently. Experts Dunc Kennedy and Billie Walmsley will tell you all about it. These two can sure spot a good dog with half an eye open.
Mr. and Mrs. Woiff and family motored up from Ochre River on Sunday to visit Mrs. Kennedy.
Joe Alex left for Winnipeg on business on Saturday.
Wm. Flett, Hudson’s Bay agent, returned from the far north and has been spending a week in town. He left for Winnipeg Saturday.
C.L. White left for Waterhen River Friday, taking a canoe in tow on account of the low water in the rivers.
The new principal for our school arrived in town Wednesday last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 18 – 1912

1912 Jul 18 – Wm. Hall Killed

William Hall, foreman of the bridge and building gang of the Canadian Northern railway, was killed 15 miles west of Melfort, on Friday by being thrown from his motor car and run over. Just how the accident occurred is not definitely known. There was a pike pole on the motor at the time and it is supposed to have slipped catching in the belt, stopping the car suddenly and throwing him over in front on the track. The wheels of the car then passed over his head and shoulders. He was at once picked up and found to be in an insensible condition. This was about 3:30 in the afternoon. Later he was conveyed to the Melfort hospital and a doctor procured, but the injuries received were of such a serious nature that he succumbed at six o’clock.
The news of the accident cast a shadow of gloom over the town, as deceased was one of the early residents and an old employee of the railroad. He leaves a wife and seven children to mourn his untimely taking off, and they have sympathy of all in their hour of sorrow.
The funeral took place on Sunday under the direction of the Oddfellows, of which society the late Mr. Hall was a member. The service at the Methodist church was conducted by the Rev. A. Chisholm and E.A. Webb, chaplain of the I.O.O.F. lodge. The following were the pallbearers: Geo. Leach, J. Law, R. Lilly, S. Code, J.A. Ball, and R. Smith.

1912 Jul 18 – Fork River

Sam Hunter left for Sever Bridge, Ont., where he intends spending a few days at his old home.
The collector for the International Harvester Co., paid a visit to D. Kennedy, agent, in connection with business.
Harry Little is taking in the fair at Winnipeg.
Mrs. Willis Miller and family, of Mowat Centre, left for Dauphin for a few days’ visit.
S. Briggs and Mr. Culverhouse returned from Dauphin after a few dies vacation there.
D.F. Wilson left for Winnipeg late on Friday.
Purple Star L.O.L., 1765 returned from Dauphin after taking in the celebration there on the 12th, which was one of the largest and most orderly gatherings in the history of Dauphin and everyone was satisfied with the way they were used while there. Great credit is due to the boys of Coronation L.O.L. and the citizens of Dauphin, who worked hard to make it a successful day. The yellow boys are all right.
Miss Gertie Cooper and friend are spending their holidays with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper.
Peter Ellis, who has been at Kamsack for the last two months, has returned for a few days.
John Stark of Kamsack, one of our old-timers, is spending a few days here renewing acquaintances.
E. Munroe, of Brandon, is spending a few days with his sister, Mrs. A. Hunt.
Mr. Noble, of Winnipegosis, held service in the Methodist Church on Sunday.
S.S. was held in All Saints as usual and no service. That comes of taking too long a view of Fairview.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to Sifton a few days ago.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 27 – 1913

1913 Mar 27 – Military Men For Winnipeg

Dr. Walker, Percy Willson, and Ed. Manby, officers, and A.C. Wade, Geo. Astley, T. Coghlan and D.C. Boire, non-commissioned officers, left this morning for Winnipeg, where they will take a two weeks’ course at the military school. The men belong to the 32nd Manitoba Light Horse with headquarters at Dauphin.

1913 Mar 27 – Fork River

B. Venables shipped by express a very fine yearling Holstein bull to a farmer in Saskatchewan.
Miss Grant, of Pine View School and Miss Weatherhead left for their homes where they intend spending the Easter holidays.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the opposition bluffed Borden about that memorandum?”
“No, Pat.”
“Well, one fine morning Borden laid it on the table and the opposition took a chill and dear Wilfy took a cold after and did not go down to the house for several days. Bill Pugsley undertook to run the opposition and the government too, but the Hon. Bob sat on him. Micky Clark, of Red Deer, got fresh and the speaker threatened to name him. Jack Turriff, says, name and be damned, and there was the divel to pay, just like old Dounybroos. Next day Bill Pugsley and some more kinder smoothed it over and in the meantime Bob, having nothing to do, took a Cruise home for Easter holidays, where we hope he’ll have a good time.”
“Well, Pat, if Glen had been there to throw a little Cree into them the Naval bill would have been passed long ago. There’s nothing like education.”
Edwin King is spending Easter at his home and renewing acquaintances.
Easter service was held in All Saints’ Church in the evening last Sunday and Rev. Scrase preached a most appropriate sermon, the text being, “He is risen.” The alter was tastefully decorated with beautiful white Easter lilies supplied by Mr. A.C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis.
The farmers are rushing the grain into the elevator as it is to close next week.
Harcourt Benner, one of Dauphin’s prominent real estate agents, is renewing old acquaintances here.
We now have a veterinary surgeon which is a long felt want in this burgh and being proficient in wood work, artificial limbs can be supplied on shortest notice.
Ed Morris and family, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend with Mrs. Wm. King.
D. Kennedy received a nice bunch of barred Plymouth Rock fowl from C.F. Brewer of Ashville, and F. Hafenbrak received a fine pair of black Minorcas from an Eastern breeder.
Quite a number from here took in the St. Patrick’s ball, given by Mr. McInnes, of the Winnipegosis hotel. They report a swell time.
Miss Gertrude Cooper and Miss Clark, of Dauphin, are spending their Easter holidays with their friends.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press of the 20 inquires for his friends Joe Fahey and Bishop Langevin. They are well. Can our friend tell us if there is any profit keeping a pig after paying Cox’s fee of one hundred and forty dollars. They keeping heifers, friend, and don’t get too fresh.
Miss Pearl Wilson and Miss Woods returned from Sifton, where they have been visiting friends.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 25 – 1915

1915 Mar 25 – Baby Born on Train

An event occurred on the train from Prince Albert on Saturday morning last which caused quite a commotion among the passengers. Mrs. Courtney Veal, who took passage at Hudson’s Bay Junction, for the purpose of coming to Dauphin to enter the hospital, gave birth to a male child in the vicinity of Sifton, and some fifteen miles from Dauphin. Mrs. Veal was occupying a berth in a sleeper at the time. There was only one other woman, a Mrs. McEvoy, on the train at the time, and her services were quickly requisitioned by Conductor James McQuigge, and everything possible done to make the mother and baby confortable. A rush telegram was dispatched to Dauphin for a doctor and nurse. When the train arrived Dr. Bottomley and a nurse from the hospital with the ambulance, were in waiting and the mother and child hurriedly taken to the hospital.

Forty-five minutes after Mrs. Veal entered the hospital door she have birth to another boy.
Supt. Irwin and the officials of the Canadian Northern are naturally quite proud of the part of the road played in this important event, and while they are not willing to admit they are in favour of adding a maternity department to their already unexcelled service, they say it might be a possibility in the future.

Mr. Veal, who accompanied his wife to Dauphin, speaks highly of the service rendered by Conductor McQuigge in the emergency, and as a mark of gratitude will name one of the babies after him. The two babies are to be named:
HERBERT KITCHENER VEAL.,
JAMES McQUIGGE VEAL.,

At latest accounts the mother and both babies are doing well.

1915 Mar 25 – Interesting Letters from Private J. Meek

The following extracts are taken from two interesting letters written home by Private John Meek (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578):
“No. 946, D. Coy., 32nd Batt.”
“At Sea, March 3rd, 1915,”
“Here I am and feeling fine, with our sea journey about at and end. I have not been the least bi sick all the way. It has been quite a long time on the water and not the best of sleeping quarters. We have just had steerage quarters and they not on a first class boat, so you will have an idea of what it would be like. Well, anyway we have been able to live through it all and so we should worry. A soldier has to take the like of that and smile. We expect to land tomorrow sometime, but where we do not know yet, still I think it will be England alright.”
“We have had a nice trip as far as weather is concerned. The weather and sea have not been a bit rough all the way across. We got on board on the Monday at Halifax and sailed on the Tuesday morning. There are four ships on the trip. The cruiser “Essex” has led the way al the time, of course she has not troops on board. There are three ships with about 1500 men on each, four battalions in all. On our boat is the 32nd and part of the 30th battalion from Vancouver. I do not know where the other two battalions came from. The names of the tree ships as they have travelled on the line are, the “Missanbie,” the “Vaderland” and the “Megantic.” We are on the “Vanderland.”
“Well as far as the trip is concerned there was no more excitement for the first few days. On Monday, shortly after breakfast we got word that one of the stokers had shot himself. He tried to shoot himself through the heart, but he shot a little high, so he did not do himself very much harm. The doctor operated on him and got the bullet out. We do not know what was his reason, but heard he had a row with chief engineer.”
“Yesterday and today have been sport days on board, and it has been fine. We had a boxing contest, a wrestling contest, a tug-of-war and a bunch of races. We had a sack race, a three-legged race, and two or three more.”
“Last night we had a fine concert in the first-class dining hall.”
“Everybody has been excited today, as we have been expecting to sight they south coast of Ireland.”
“Stanley (Henderson of Minitonas) has never been the least bit sick either. You ought to have seen him the morning we got into Halifax. He got out of the train and ran like a made man to see the water and the ships, with a smile all over his face.”

Feb. 4th.
“We sailed into Queenstown harbour early this morning and everything looks fine. It is a very pretty place and the grass looks quite green from here. It is regular spring weather here and it makes a fellow feel fine. There is great excitement among the boys this morning. Some of the have been up all night just to watch her sail in.”

“Shorncliffe, England,”
“March 8th, 1915”
“We have got to the end of our journey for now, anyway. We are right on the south coast of England, near Dover, in the town of Shroncliffe which is a good size. It is a lovely place. We can see the English Channel from the camp. There are about 25,000 men at this place, so it is quite a big town. We have not to live in tents either. We have houses that hold about 25 men each and which are fixed up good. It is the best barracks we have had yet.”
“We were in Queenstown two days and had a route march around the town. Say, it was lovely there! They were such nice days and quite a lot of flowers growing already. Some of the boys said it was the nicest place that they had ever seen.”
“We passed through part of London on the train but did not get off.”
“This leaves me as well as the rest of the Dauphin boys – well and happy.”

1915 Mar 25 – Fork River

Mr. W. Northam, A. Cameron and J. Richardson returned from a few days visit at Dauphin.
Mr. and Ms. F.O. Murphy, of Dauphin, arrived here with a carload of implements and furniture. They will take up their residence of F. Chase’s farm south of the town for the summer.
Our fiend Scotty took a flying visit to Winnipegosis and returned on shanks’ mare hale and hearty.
Mr. F. Hafenbrak returned from Dauphin with a fine team of draught horses. The seed grain will go in now.
Messrs. Shannon and Stonehouse returned from a pleasant vacation at Dauphin.
Several of our young people attended the 17th of Ireland ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of Winnipegosis hotel. “Mac” knows how to give the folks a good time.
Mr. Archie McDonell, manager for the A.T. Co. farms here, spent a few days arranging for the spring work.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Anglican Church, held their annual meeting on March 17. The reports show a good year’s work. The society is in a good financial condition. The officers for the coming year are Mrs. King, president; Mrs. A. Rowe, vice; Mrs. F. Hafenbrak, secretary; Wm. King, treasurer. Layment in charge, F. Steede.
The children’s annual Lenten service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, March 28th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. All are cordially invited.
W. Coultas returned on Tuesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1915 Mar 25 – Sifton

Mr. Smith Russell of Strathclair, is a visitor in town these days on business.
Mr. F. Patridge, who has been relief station agent here for the last few weeks, has left here to take up duties at Canora, Sask. We all wish him the best of luck.
William Ashmore’s livery is kept busy these days since the alteration of train service. Seemingly its true that it is an ill wind that does not do someone good.
Dr. Gilbart, of Ethelbert, spent the weekend in town.
Mr. Walter spent the weekend out east amongst the farmers and reports that if this kind of weather continues they will start operations on the land within the course of a few days.
The Kennedy Mercantile Co. has erected a large warehouse and has same stocked with a good assortment of farm implements.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt have succeeded in drilling a fine well for Fairville School.
Don’t forget the machinery, horse and stock sale at Sifton on Saturday, the 27th inst. See advertisement in Herald.

1915 Mar 25 – Winnipegosis

Capt. W.B. Sifton is in town from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele are here from Mafeking.
Sid Coffey returned on Tuesday from Dauphin. He has been on the sick list.
Contractor Neely and a staff of men arrived on Tuesday to work on the lighthouse. They were greeted with a big snowstorm.
Coun. Hechter and daughter were visitors to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Jos. Schaldermose is a Winnipeg visitor this week.
Miss Grace Saunders has arrived from Winnipeg.
The annual dance given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of the Hotel Winnipegosis, on St. Patrick’s night, was attended by a large crowd. Every one appeared to have a good time.