Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15, 1919

Four Men Badly Injured

Mr. Arthur Fisher, who resides in the Burrow district, is erecting a large barn. Last Friday four men, John Neely, Frank Potter, John James and Geo. Smith were engaged erecting the rafters when a whirlwind came up suddenly collapsing the timbers. Neely, Potter and Smith were badly injured by the failing timbers. James, who was working on the top, jumped when the rafters commenced to fall, but was unable to clear himself and was struck and injured. Mr. Neely was so badly injured that his condition will not yet permit of his removal to town.

G.W.V.A.

The regular meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, May 8th, between 30 and 40 of the comrades being present. Owing to the unavoidable absence of the president, Capt. F. Scrase, Comrade G.F. Johnston, vice president, took the chair.
Applications were received from 13 returned soldiers for membership, all of which were accepted. This makes the membership of the local branch 195 and a considerable increase on this is expected in the near future.
The secretary has since this meeting been informed that a special meeting has been called by Premier Norrie to consider the memorial question for this province, on May 16th. It has, therefore, been decided to send a delegate to this meeting to represent this branch.
During the past week a donation of $112.65 was received from the citizens of the Ethelbert district, per Rev. G. Tymchuk. The thanks of the association are due to all the subscribers of the above mentioned donation.
A grant of $25 to this association has been received from the Dauphin Automobile club. This has been acknowledged and thanks are due to the members of the club for same.
On May 23rd and 24th the “Better ‘Ole” is being put on at the Star theatre. This is to be under the auspices of the G.W.V.A. Ask any returned man what he thinks of it and he will soon convince you, to say the least of it, that it will be well worth seeing, and at the same time give the association a lift.
A meeting was held on Friday, the 9th in connection with the G.W.V.A. Sports Day, to be held on 1st July, and arrangements made for appointing the various committees to make same a success. Posters are to be got out advertising same. The committee are requested to note that the next meeting will be held on Friday, may 16th, at 8 p.m. sharp. A full attendance is essential.
Members are asked to note that the Manitoba Provincial Command have issued a weekly paper devoted to the returned solider. It is known as the Manitoba Veteran, and will be issued weekly. The rate is 5c per copy or $2 per year. Sample copies have been received and if the paper continues like the sample a bright future is assured. Subscriptions are taken by the local secretary of the G.W.V.A.

Fork River

Billy Tuck has gone to Dryden, Ont., for a short trip.
W.R. Snelgrove is around again after his illness. He has moved on to the Chase farm, having exchanged his Dauphin residence for the property.
Steve Warrawrork, of Volga, has purchased the Slobodizan farm from W.R. Snelgrove.
Corp. Duncan Briggs and Private Tom Briggs and H. Craighill have arrived from overseas. They are looking hale and hearty.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cameron and children, from Neepawa, are visiting at Mr. Nat Little’s house.
Robt. Rowe intends Fording it to town for the future, having purchased a Ford car from Nat Little.
Wm. Northam is busy fencing the farm be purchased south of town.
All Saints S.S. will meet as usual at 2 o’clock, Sunday, 18th inst.
Rain is falling as I write and it is welcome. All the wheat is about in. The season for work has been very favorable.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1915

1915 Nov 3 – Before The P.M.

Robt. Machan Fined $50 and Costs Ethelbert Fire Case Dismissed – R. Spruhs fined for Sunday Hunting
On information laid by Constable Hillman, Robt. Machan, an interdict, was haled before P.M. Munson for being the worse for liquor, while Robt. was under the influence of the fiery element he made things lively, mixing up in no less than three fights. He would not divulge where he procured his jag and the magistrate gave him the full extent of the law. $50 and costs. We are glad to see the magistrate enforce the interdict law on suck strict lines, as it is the only means of protection women and children have in a licensed town.
The Ethellbert fire case tried Tuesday, created a good deal of interest. Last week there were heavy losses from fire at Ethelbert and the defendant, J. Mascuich was accused of starting the same. It seems the defendant set out a fire on his farm near Ethelbert to burn up some old potato tops and also the remains of an old straw stack. He carefully put out the potato top fire but the fire in the stack was left to smoulder and it was from this that the fire was alleged to have spread. There were numerous witnesses on the case. From the evidence taken it appears there were several other fires started in Mascuich’s neighbourhood on the same day. As the evidence did not show that the fire had been traced to Mascuich’s farm as the original cause, the case was dismissed.
Notwithstanding the result of this case, several suits will be brought before the county court for damages.
On information laid by Provincial Constable Rooke, R. Spruhs of Sifton, was tried Saturday for illegally hunting on Sunday and in close season. He pleaded guilty and was fined $10 and costs. This should be a warning to others.
Anna Kunka vs. F. Nankishowy, an assault case will be tired Friday. Both come from Pine River.

1915 Nov 3 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and his daughter Gracie paid Dauphin a visit last week.
The organising secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary, Miss Millidge, Winnipeg, will give a magic lantern entertainment in connection with All Saints Church on Nov 10th at 8 o’clock in the Orange Hall. Admission, adults 25c; children 15c.
Mr. Forbes went to Brandon last week.
Both stores seem to be doing some good business. Each train brings in quite a lot of freight.
Mr. Chase from Dauphin was up here visiting Mrs. Snelgrove, the roads around here are good for motors.
The time of service in the Methodist Church, will be 2 p.m., in future instead of 3 p.m.

1915 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the house of Mrs. Ballard. Owing to Mrs. Ballard shortly leaving the town she gave in her resignation of vice-president. A vote of thanks was passed to her for past services. A vote of the ladies present was taken to elect a president and Mrs. W. Parker was chosen.
Miss Millidge, organizing secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary will given a magic lantern entertainment in the school house on Nov. 9th at 8 o’clock.
The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church on Sunday next when the subject will be “The Thing that Matters.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 9 – 1912

1912 Sep 9 – Fork River

George Sumption, of Dauphin; is spending of short time with Mr. J. Clements on the Chase farm.
Miss Gertrude Cooper, who has been spending her holidays with her parents up the Fork, has returned to Dauphin.
Mrs. T.N. Briggs left for a two motions’ holiday with her friends at Brandon.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here lately taking in the sights.
Professor Gorden Weaver and N.H. Johnston returned from a trip to Winnipegosis on business and after the train run off the track. Misfortunes will happen to the best of regulated railways.
Frank Chase, of Dauphin, was here lately looking after his business interests.
The elevator builders have not arrived yet. We think it will be a mistake to build it on the site picked out. The building would be better if it were moved south on to the street next the cattle chute and
Mr. and Mrs. V.O. Weaver, of Vermont, are visiting their brother Gordon, of East Bay.
Wm. Geekie and son passed through here on their return trip from Strathclair to their home at Winnipegosis.
F. Lacey, of Oak Brae, has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Will Davis, who has invested heavily in real estate in Texas, strongly advocates the use of drain tiles. Will always was practical, especially on mail days when its raining.
Mrs. C. Bradley is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Several people from the Lake Town took in the dance in the Orange Hall on Thursday night past. Brother Robinson played the Fisherman’s Horn Pipe and a very pleasant time was spent.
Wm. Williams and Mr. Venables spent the week-end at Dauphin on business.
A meeting of the council will be held at Fork River on Monday, the 23rd inst.

1912 Sep 9 – Sifton

The wet season now appears to be over and all except to get on with the harvest at once.
Wm. Ashmore was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Good progress is being made with the Kennedy-Barrie store. Once these gentlemen open they are sure of doing a good business.
Frequent shipments of cattle are being made from here. There’s nothing like mixed farming to bring in the cash between seasons.
Geo. Lampard, wholesale butcher, Dauphin, and W.A. Davis were in town on Monday. These gentlemen brought a number of cattle while here.
This end of the district is open to come under the Drainage Act. It pays at any time to make improvements whether they are drains or building better roads.
Paul Wood’s family are going to reside in Dauphin during the winter so that an opportunity will be afforded the children to go to school.
Now that the Herald is giving interesting personal sketches of prominent men who have resided in the district a long time, I hope the prosperous village of Sifton will not be overlooked. We have several pioneers here who had ouch to do with its development and are will known, viz., Paul Wood, John Kennedy, Coun. Peter Ogrislo, Postmaster Thos. Ramsay, Wm. Ashmore and quite a few others that could be named.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 14 – 1913

1913 Aug 14 – Ethelbert

Captain (Mrs.) Tutte, of the Salivation Army, is visiting her mother, Mrs. A. Willey, for a few days.
Mrs. McVicar, formerly of Garland, now of Brandon, is renewing old acquaintances at Ethelbert, and is stating at the station agent’s home.
Mrs. McDonald of Fort William, youngest sister of J. McLean, is visiting old scenes hereabout.
Mrs. Rod Campbell, the oldest sister of Mrs. McPhedrian, is visiting relatives in this neighbourhood.
H. Brachman has been gazetted as J.P.
There is a fear amongst the famers that the copious rain may injure the crop prospects.
Great quantities of berries are being shipped east and west; more than 100 pails a day.
This is a great country for fruit, wheat, hay, eggs, and last but not the least in mosquitoes. They come and go in millions.

1913 Aug 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Walter Cooper, Sr., left for a two weeks’ vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Sam Bailey left for a week’s visit to his son Frank at Winnipeg.
James McDonald, assistance express agent, left for a well-earned vacation at Winnipeg.
Miss Pearl Wilson has left for Dauphin for a short visit.
Mrs. W. Williams returned from a week’s rest in the south.
J. Stewart, of North Lake, was in town lately and reports the roads out that way very bad.
Postmaster Kennedy and wife are off to Winnipeg to take in the stampede in company with the Mayor of Winnipegosis and several others from this point.
Miss Alice Godkin is spending a week with Mrs. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, with the Misses Kennedy.
Miss M. Nixon left for Winnipeg, after a month’s vacation here with friends.
St. John Butler, of Winnipegosis, has charge of the A.T. Co. store, during manager Kennedy’s absence.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, who has been visiting with her grandmother, Mrs. R. Snelgrove for some time, has returned home.
Although the council passed a by-law to the effect that all stock was to be on the owners property during sunset and sunrise and not allowed to run at large, we find cattle and ponies running at all hours of the night, and in places it is unsafe to drive along the roads dark nights for fear of tumbling over them.
The heavy rains of this week have stopped the haying and road making for a short time.
Councillor Hunt let several contracts for roads to Contractor Briggs and others. We trust there will be an open fall so this work can be done.
John Mathews, electrician for the A.T. Co., is intending to go into the pork raising business as a side issue. We wish him all kinds of success as Jack’s a pretty good fellow.
Our esteemed friends, Fred. Storrar, has charge of the cream department and is giving good satisfaction.
Much interest is being taken in the baseball match between the married and single ladies which is to come off on the 13th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 1 – 1912

1912 Aug 1 – Struck by Lightning

During the thunderstorm on Saturday last one of the large generators in the electric light plant was stuck by lightning and badly damaged. The injury put the generator out of commission for several days and considerably weakened the power of the plant. An expect was brought from Winnipeg and is engaged repairing the damage, which amounts to several hundred dollars.

1912 Aug 1 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Terry, of Dauphin, returned home after spending a few days at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. Bailey.
F. Chase, of Dauphin, and Mr. Barber, of the Northern Elevator Co., were here looking for a site for an elevator.
Mrs. Samuel Bailey started on her trip to Forest, Ontario, and intends spending about two months with relations and friends.
Frank Hafenbrak shipped a fine Berkshire sow pig to Theo Miles, of Kamsack, last week.
The heavy rain of the 23rd spoiled the picnic at the lake. Only a few water sports were indulged in. The ladies have a heavy bill of damages against the clerk of the weather for soiled hats.
Mrs. Wm. Allan, of Grandview, returned home after spending a few dates with Mrs. A. Hunt and friends.
Courtney Wilson returned from a week’s vacation at Brandon and seems to have enjoyed the trip.
Herman Godkin has returned after a two month’s stay in Saskatchewan.
Clarence Willis and family, of Dauphin, are visitors at the home of D. Kennedy.
The party who, after taking a cider bath, went over and put corkwood on the sidewalk at dark on West Main street, which caused a ball fall, should be more careful in the future. Fun is fun in the right place but we don’t want these freaks too often unless someone is looking for trouble.
A. Hunt and Wm. Northam are in Dauphin on business this week.
On Saturday Rv. J. Page, D.D., travelling missionary for the Anglican Church, visited Winnipegosis and returned and spent some time with Wm. King, Warden and H.H. Scrase. Mr. Briggs then drove the doctor to Mr. L.C. Bailey’s after which he left with service there and at Sifton. Baptismal service was held in All Saints’, Fork River, by Dr. Page Sunday evening. There was a large turnout and the full service was much appreciated.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 30 – 1914

1914 Jul 30 – Mossey River Council

Council met in the municipal office, July 18th. Coun. Richardson absent.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from W. Murray, re Children’s Aid society of Dauphin, and Davidson & McRae, re continuation of 3rd Ave., Fork River.
Hunt-Hechter – That’s grant of $25 be made to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the offer of the townsite department of the C.N.R., of the continuation of 3rd Ave. to the northwest corner of the Fork River townsite for the consideration of $1 be accepted.
Toye-Robertson – That the accounts of T. Burns, $24 and D. Stephenson $11.25, for work on the German Bridge be paid.
Bickle-Hunt – That the Public Works committee inspect the Williams Bridge and if satisfactory to report to the clerk who is then authorized to pay the contractor.
Toye-Robertson – The W. King be allowed to do his statue labour between sections 34 and 35, tp. 29, rge. 19, for the year 1914.
Hunt-Bickle – That the accounts of the reeve, $27.30; Coun. Hunt, $22.90; Coun. Toye $22.90, and Coun. Robertson $25.65 for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Coun. Robertson being about to leave the municipality for an indefinite time tendered his resignation as councillor to ward 6.
Hunt-Bickle – That Coun. Robertson resignation be accepted and that it take effect July 22nd, 1914.
Hunt-Toye – That the council tender Mr. J.D. Robertson a vote of thanks for the manner in which he has handled the affairs of the municipality while councillor for ward 6.
Robertson-Toye – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee passed.
A by-law was passed placing the standard width of the road grades at 21 feet.
Toye-Bickle – That the council now adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jul 30 – Fork River

Sam Bailey has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. Frank Chase and family returned to Dauphin after spending a week with friends on the Mossey.
Mrs. John Phycola is building a dwelling house south of the Fork River.
Nat Little is putting in a foundation for a livery stable.
Mrs. Sam Reid and family have returned from a week’s holiday in Winnipeg with friends.
One of our Mowat farmers stated it was ninety-one in the shade, which no doubt accounts for ravings of Fork River and Oak Brae Ex.-P.M.’s in the Press, which have been disgusting and not worthy of further notice on our part.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a short visit lately.
Robert Hunt, of Dauphin, Government timber inspector, was here in connection with the Williams Lumber Co.
A band of horses got into a garden the other night and the owner of the garden asked the horsemen to after his stock and was told they would get nothing as they were only squatters thereby adding insult to injury. While, the said party, at the same time, has his fence and gates and part of his buildings on the road, and has been a squatter for years; he must not kick if he gets a dose of his own medicine for unneighbourly actions.
Can the ex-p.m. of Oak Brae, show where the present p.m. of Fork River ever received anything at an election campaign, and can he tell us whose bills the money he received at an election a few years ago went to pay. If he cannot, ask the ex-p.m. of Fork River, who told us at the time where this money went. The present p.m. at Fork River can speak the Ruthenian language and his many customers come to him and ask explanations around election time regarding the political questions and I am sure he does his best to explain them to them.
When the time comes for the present p.m. at Fork River to sign the papers answering the questions asked, he will be right there, Mr. Lacey, and will be able to decide whether to sign or not.
Billy King and his friends are still looking after the Conservative interests here and do not require imported assistance from Saskatchewan and Alberta. We have opinions of our own and are able to express same.

1914 Jul 30 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. Cunliffe left Monday for the Pas, where they will take up their residence.
The Manitou started out on her first trip of the season this week. She will stop at various points to make docks prior to the opening of the fishing season.
The fishermen are making active preparation for the opening of the summer fishing season.
The Rex Theatre is now completed and was formally opened with a dance on Friday night. The theatre is one of the best in northern Manitoba. Manager Coffey is up-to-date and is installing an electric dynamic and waterworks.
The municipal officers have given 20 days’ notice that persons keeping pigs in town will have to remove them outside of the village limited it is time but why 20 days’ notice? One man was heard to remark that it was to give the little pigs a chance to grow.
Miss Hazel Coffey, of Dauphin, is visiting with friends in town.
Miss Woodard, a recent graduate nurse of the Dauphin General Hospital, spent a few days in town the guest of nurse Marcroft. She left for her home at Neepawa on Monday.
Mrs. W.D. King and Nurse Cummings, of Dauphin, where guests at the home of the former’s mother, Mrs. Theo. Johnson. They returned to Dauphin on Monday’s local.
Mrs. Hall Burrell returned the latter end of the week, from spending a few days in Dauphin, the guest of Mrs. A.V. Benoit.
The dredgemen completed the work of making a channel at Snake Island on Saturday and leave this week to commence dredging at Pine Creek.
Mrs. Cranage and two daughters, left Monday for Prince Albert, where they will spend a few days visiting with friends.
Mrs. Schaldemose, who was visiting at the home of Mrs. J.W. McAulay, Dauphin, returned to town Monday.
Frank Hechter left for the Pas on Saturday. It wouldn’t do for Frank not to be in the swim when an election is on.
J.P. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Tuesday. He reports that he and Capt. Coffey had a breakdown in the Cap.’s automobile after they had left Dauphin to make the trip by road.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 16 – 1914

1914 Jul 16 – Both Drew Gun

There was a lively time at Ashville on Monday and it looked like a shooting bee at one stage. John Burnison, a section man, has been acting strange of late and among other things was threatening to shoot residents. He drive his wife and family from the house and shot a cow belonging to Fred Kemp, the storekeeper. He services of Constable Levins, of the town force, were called into requisition and in company with John Campbell, son of Glen, he went to the house. Burnison told the men to get out and to enforce his order moved emphatically reached for his gun. As he raised the weapon Levins flashed out his revolver and Burnison wilted, dropped the gun. He was then placed under arrest and brought to Dauphin by automobile.

JOHNNY SPRINTED.

When Burnison raised the gun, Johnny Campbell, who was in the room, waited for no further display of hostility, but bolted out the door, dashed through the potato patch and over the back fence. As far as known at Ashville he holds all records for this kind of a sprint up to the present.

1914 Jul 16 – Cadets at Sewell Camp

For the first time in cadets history of this province a camp has been conducted and found to be a success, the boys coming from all parts of the province. The days were given over to drills and training in the various branches of cadet work. Reveille call for rising at 6:30, breakfast at 7:00, cleaning up lines to 8:30, when Divine service was conducted, making it impressive with the boys taking part in the singing and responsive reading; 9 to 11 inspection in drills, musketry signalling, first aid, physical training. 12:00, noon dinner; 1:00 to 2:15, rest; 2:30 to 4:00, drilling and general training work; from 4:00 to 5:00, rest, shower bath, etc.; 6:00 p.m., tea; 7 to 9 games and sports; lights out at 9.45. The above makes up the daily routine of camp life, and for the men in charge there were not many idle moments.

SPORTS CURTAILED

It was planned to have Saturday given over entirely to games and sports, but owning to the great storm that passed over the camp this programme was greatly curtailed, only eleven events being run off. Dauphin won five firsts and one second in these events. Our boys, however, kicked because they could not make it an even six firsts. This was a very creditable showing, however, hen you consider tat there were over 20 contingents of cadets in camp, most of who entered teams for the sports.

SUNDAY ROUTINE

Sunday was given over to drying clothes and blankets after the washing of Saturday’ storm, we were able, however, to have our church parade on Sunday afternoon, when the boys made a fine showing in the march past Col. S.B. Steele, Camp Commandant.

GIMLI NEXT YEAR

The camp this year has been largely in the nature of an experiment, and both officers and men profited by the experience gained, which will be conductive to better results in next year’s camp, which we are informed, on good authority, will be held at Gimli, making a more interesting camp for the boys.

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES

Presentation of prizes won by the Dauphin Cadets will take place as soon as the prizes active from Winnipeg, when both Messers. Manby and Batty will express their appreciation of the boys in camp.

PRIZES WON

The following were won by the Dauphin cadets:
Seniors – 220 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st. 440 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st.
Juniors – Standing broad jump – C. Bossons, 1st.
Horse and rider – C. Bossons and E. Struthers, 1st.
Relay Race – Struthers, Bossons, Dunstan and C, Dickerson, 2nd.

1914 Jul 16 – Notes From the Firing Line

Our boys were seldom late for the Knife and Fork Parade.
Some boys were sick, but after one visit to the hospital tent and a taste of the medicine, were able to appear again at the dining tent.
It was a surprise to the officers in charge what a lot of food the boys could consume.
Sammy Dunstan only had seven eggs, three cups of coffee and five slices of bread and butter for breakfast on Friday morning.
It took a special dish to hold the porridge for the Tierney Bros.
2nd Lieut. Lowes’ tent was the quietest one in the whole came at 6.30 a.m.
After dinner on Wednesday G. White could hardly see and had o be taken to the hospital.
Who stole the pies from the cook’s tent on Friday, July 10th?
Instructors Manby and Batty were on duty from 6 a.m. to 11.45 p.m.; everybody here sleeps with one eye open.
The Dauphin Mouth Organ Band and Quartette, consisting of Messrs. Lowes, C. Batty, Gougeon, C. Fickerson, Dunstan and Murphy, made night horrible after hours.
Sammy Dunstan, with his long blue shirt, was the star of the baseball diamond.
Our four boys, who attended the ambulance class, passed with such high honours, that they have decided to stand practice here. The charge will be moderate.
With the aid of our expect signallers, Dauphin Cadets won the sham fight on Friday night.
We wonder by whose order the mixture was put into the tea on Friday night.
Instructors Manby and Batty had their beds made every day by the cadets. We don’t think.
Gougeon and Kuryk are open to give lessons in wrestling. Charges very moderate.
Our boys were always the first in the grub tent and the last out.
Mr. Campbell, of Souris (late of Dauphin), took some interesting group photos of our boys.
The mud fight a 8.30 p.m. Saturday night was a sight never to be forgotten.
The thanks of the boys are due to Mr. Moor and Mrs. Smithers, of the Winnipeg Y.M.C.A., for the assistance rendered us in various ways.

1914 Jul 16 – Fork River

Mr. Sinstiski, who has been here the last two weeks, took great interest of the Liberal party. He is said to be a cattle buyer but no stock has been shipped up to date. All the bests are off. Nuff said.
Hurrah for Sam Hughes! This northern county knows a good man when we have him, and what we have we will hold, as Scotty says.
Edwin King, of Kinistimo, Sask., is spending his holidays at his home here.
The members of L.O.L., No. 1765, attended the Methodist Church on Sunday, the 12th. Rev. Bro. Clixby, of Winnipegosis, preached the sermon. There was a fair turn out considering the hot weather.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, is spending her holidays with her grandmother. Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove, on the Mossey.
Walter Clark, of Paswegan, Sask., has returned home after spending a few days among friends here.
Mr. Runny, of Saskatchewan, liberal representative, has returned home with an enlarge cranium, as an election souvenir in remembrance of Fork River.
The Misses Briggs, of Brandon, are visiting at their aunt’s Mrs. T.N. Briggs.
Dr. Shortreed, at his meeting here, stated that the Roblin government was supported by the rabble. As the people here did not agree with these sentiments they did their best on the 10 h to leave him at home to think over the errors of speech, trusting that in future he will have respect for the opinion of others.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son returned from a week’s visit with friends at Million.
Mr. Sam Lowery returned to Winnipeg after a week’s visit here in connection with his farm.

1914 Jul 16 – Winnipegosis

Progress is being made with the new four rooms brick school. The building promises to be adequate to our needs for the present.
Contractor Neely returned on Monday from Dauphin.
Several new residences are going up in town. Among those building are Donald Hattie, Capt. Mapes and Steven Bros.
Coun. Hechter and J.P. Grenon are taking in the exhibition at Winnipeg this week.
The steamer Manitou will commence making trips to the north end of the lake this week.
Capt. Coffey and Jos. Grenon, Sr., are building a boat with a 65 foot keel. The boat will be operated by steam power.
The elections are over and a feeling of goodwill towards all pervades us. The stress of battle is often trying and during the heat of it we are prone to lose our tempers. But this we are glad to say is only a temporary lapse. Misrepresentation should never be resorted to even in the heat of battle. In the report sent the Press of the meting at Fork River, Mr. Lacey went far out of his way to misrepresent sent Mr. Grenon and others. There was no disturbance at the meeting as Dr. Shortreed will readily admit if appealed to. The truth should be the first consideration in sending out newspaper reports.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 6 – 1911

1911 Jul 6 – Leg Amputated

T. Lee, a young farmer, who resides south of Gilbert Plains in the Glenlyon district met with a serious accident the early past of the week. He was endeavouring to stop a runaway team attached to a mower, when his left leg came in contact with the knives which badly cut it. He was brought to the hospital here on Tuesday, where upon examination it was found necessary to amputate it below the knee. The young man is doing as well as can be expected.

1911 Jul 6 – Fork River

Miss Burrell of Winnipegosis, was a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy a few days last week.
Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys at Dauphin.
Mrs. Snelgrove was a visitor to Dauphin Saturday to the home of her daughter, Mrs. F.F. Chase.
H. Chute of Dauphin, is busy with his gasoline engine and plows turning over the soil on Messrs. Chase and Lockhart’s farms.
H. Falconer, Government Weed Inspector, was here this week giving instructions to municipal inspectors Bailey and King.
The Orangemen of Fork River will hold their 10th annual bask picnic on July 11th. A program of sports is being arranged and they day’s fun will be wound up in the evening with a ball.
Coronation service was held in All Saints’ Church on the 24th ult. The members of L.O.L. No. 1765 attended in a body and the church was filled to the doors. Mr. G.M. Littler B.A., preached a very appropriate sermon which was much appreciated.
Wm. King, returned Saturday from attending the Orange Lodge convention in Winnipeg. He reports being entertained in royal manner and also getting a number of ideas which ought to stir the local brethren to greater enthusiasm.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy entertained at her home last Monday in honour of her sister, Miss Bertha Johnston, who is a nurse on the Dauphin Hospital staff. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by all present. Miss Johnston visited several days in their neighbourhood.
Mrs. N. Little and daughters, while out driving last week met with an accident caused by the team running away. The ladies were thrown from the buggy, Mrs. Little receiving a serve shaking up and a number of cuts and viruses. A nurse was called and Mrs. Little was soon made comfortable. Miss Grace and Miss Lulu escaped unhurt.
The school will remain where it is at present, is the decision given by Chairman Hunt, who held the deciding ballot at the ratepayers meeting Monday. A meeting of the ratepayers was called from the purpose of taking a vote whether the school should be moved to town or remain where it is. The vote resulted in a tie and Chairman Hunt was called on to make the decision.

1911 Jul 6 – Sifton

Miss M. O’Donnell who has been teaching school here for the past year; left on Tuesday of last week for a visit to her home in Carleton Place, Ont.
Our local baseball team went to Ethelbert and played a friendly match on Saturday. The honours were about even.
Miss Eva Zlebita of Toulon, who has been attending school here for the past term, returned to her home in Toulon on Tuesday.
Miss Marion Flemming of Winnipeg, is spending her holidays at the Presbyterian mission the guest of Nurses Gofoth and Reid.
Miss Scott of Neepawa, is a visitor at Sifton.
Mr. Emanuel Michaliuk returned to Winnipeg on Saturday, after having completed a successful term as junior school (bilingual) teach here.
The Presbyterian Sunday School held their annual picnic on Dominion day, which was indeed a success. The Ethelbert football team came down and played off a return match. The Ethelbert boys proved a little too heavy for us however, winning the game one to nothing in the last half.
During this week to Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Jones at Sifton a daughter and to Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz at Dauphin a daughter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 19 – 1913

1913 Jun 19 – Fork River

George Tilt, noxious weeds inspector, is very busy serving notices on the farmer at their homes.
Wm. Stonehouse, builder and contractor, has left for Winnipegosis to help build a mansion for J.P. Grenon.
Mrs. Ivor Humphreys has opened an up-to-date boarding house, which will fill a long felt want in this burgh. We wish her success in the undertaking.
Frank Chase and John Clemens, of the Northern Elevator Co., Dauphin, were here on business lately.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy has returned from a few days’ visit with friends at Dauphin.
Wm. Northam left for Weyburn, Sask., to spend the summer months with friends and intends combining business with pleasure.
F.B. Lacey, of Mowat Centre, has returned from a short visit to the Lake Town on business.
Pat Powers was here renewing acquaintances. He still wears that genial smile, by the Powers.
The seeding is over and everyone is looking for a bumper crop as the weather is ideal and everything is looking O.K. Butter and cream are coming so fast that it keeps that white apron in a continual whirl.
Dr. Leadbeater, veterinary surgeon, paid us a visit lately.
We are sorry to hear Charles Clark, one of our most respected old-timers, is leaving us for Saskatchewan.
R.C. Sparling, real estate agent, of Dauphin, spent a couple of days here lately on business. He left for Sifton on the Fork River special.
T.B. Venables has purchased an Evinreede motor engine for his new boat from Max. King, agent for the Scott Motor Co.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 6 – 1912

1912 Jun 6 – Elevator for Fork River

They say everything comes to those who wait. This has proved to be the correct in the case of the Fork River people. This district is one of the best in the north country and during past years has produced much grain. One of the difficulties the farmers have had to contend with in the past has been the lack of storage and shipping facilities. This, however, is about to be remedied and much of the credit for the same is due to Frank Chase, who, for some time past has interested himself in getting his company to build an elevator. This week he is in receipt of a communication from the inspector of the Northern Elevator Co., Mr. Barber, stating that the company had decided to build an up-to-date elevator at Fork River. Work of building the elevator will commence this month.

1912 Jun 6 – Fork River

Mrs. Geo. Tilt has left again for Dauphin.
Mrs. Humphreys, who has been visiting her mother, Mrs. Wilson, returned to her home on Saturday’s train.
Capt. Russell, of Sifton, is a visitor to Fork River, these days with his trotting horse.
Mr. King, registration clerk, returned Saturday from his annual trip and reports a good crop of mosquitoes and all kinds of mud. We asked him how many Grits he met and he said one.
F.A. Storrar has recovered and is back on the mail carrier route again.
S.E. Howlett was a visitor from East Bay on Saturday and Monday and reports crops well advanced in his district.
Owing to the bad weather no service was held Sunday in All Saints’ Church. The Sunday school was well-attended irrespective of the bad day.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to the Lake Town on Friday and found lots of mosquitoes coming home.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 2 – 1912

1912 May 2 – Fork River

Archie McMillan and family left here with a carload of stock and settlers’ effects as he intends taking his homestead duties at Kindersley, Sask.
Mr. Briggs of Mowat, has moved into Fork River and his friend Mr. Culverhouse lately arrived from Yorkshire, England, is staying with him for a time.
Wm. Davis, one of our bonanza farmers, returned from a few days visit to Dauphin on business.
J. Robinson took a trip to Winnipegosis on business and we are informed that since a Board of Trade has been formed in that burg. the citizens have nothing to do but sit on the sidewalk and sun themselves waiting for the golden tide to roll in. Good luck Winnipegosis.
Captain McCartney returned from a trip to Dauphin, where he was give a magic lantern lecture of the Roll Call.
There was a very good turn out at the last ball of the season in the Orange Hall. The Honourables A. Hunt, T.N. Briggs, The King and Senator Kennedy and others were present and a good time was spent. Professor Robinson and other supplied the music and kept it up till the morning.
Mr. Chard was here in connection with his business.
The scribe is inclined to think the item in he Press of the 25th by a Fork River correspondent was out of place. Surely the leaders of the Episcopal elements as he calls them should be allowed to manage their own affairs without his interring through the Press. He must be hard up for news. If the students must have a parrot to voice their opine,. they should train it up in the way it would go before sending him out on a pilgrimage in the Press.
Captain McLean, foreman of the Government dredge and his gang are busy getting the dredge in shape for the summer’s work on the Mossey River.
Jack Clemence’s gang is up putting Frank Chase’s and Alf. Snelgrove’s places into shape for this year’s crop.

1912 May 2 – ANSWER TO FORK RIVER CORRESPONDENT IN DAUPHIN PRESS.

The Fork River correspondent for the Dauphin Press of the 25th April makes the following most unwarranted remarks regarding our Church of England Parsonage. “Some of our church leaders are agitating for a parsonage in connection with the Episcopal Element here. It seem an unwarranted expense.” now the writer of this cannot possible belong to that body or his remarks would never have been uttered and if he was at all cognizant of facts in connection with what he refers to he would have worded his phrases quite differently. The Church of England congregation and management are not agitating but are going to build a parsonage and should be glad of any help financially from the press correspondent. Perhaps our friend is one of the few who objected to our building a church a few years ago, yet the church is built and fully equipped and out of debt. Also under the same management a ten team stable is almost completed and also paid for as are the lots in connection with same. We should like to say the wardens and congregation should be proud of what they have done and as they know what they are doing and can overlook any disparaging remarks of an enterprising news correspondent who passes disparaging statements re the good work going on.
The management of All Saints’ Church have found through experience it is better to build than to pay from $60 to $100 a year for rent for an unsuitable house and by so building they will have something permanent. If the correspondent in the Press has anything to say in regard to the present or past management of this church I am sure they will gladly listen to him and receive any donation as there is nothing proud about this management. If the corespondent has nothing but wind to offer her should utilize this on a football field as we already had a sufficient supply of that commodity to the detriment of this church. It is good actions they want, not wind.

Wellwisher

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 11 – 1912

1912 Apr 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the Council held in the Council chamber, Fork River, Wednesday, March 27, 1912, all member present.
The minutes, having been read were adopted as read on motion of Coun. Nicholson, seconded by Coun. Seiffert. Carried.
Nicholson-Robertson – That this Council donate ten bags of flour to Sefat Mochka and that Councillors McAuley and Seiffert be requested to see that the same is delivered. Carried.

COURT OF REVISION
McAuley – Hunt – That protests No. 10, No. 12, No. 16 and No. 17, respectively, be lowered from $880 assess to $800; and that in protest No. 15 the assessment be lowered from $800 to $720. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That all other protests remain as they are. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That W.H. Paddock’s assessment be changed from 150 acres to 100 acres. Carried.

REGULAR BUSINESS
McAuley – Nicholson – That the taxes of John Frend, N.E., 1-29-20, be reduced by $40. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the taxes on N.E. 25-29-20 be reduced rom $82.25 to $22.24, owing to taxes having been charged on abandoned homestead. Carried.
Seiffert – Hunt – That Wm. Walmslay be asked to move his house off the public streets of Winnipegosis at once. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That the Health Officer at Winnipegosis be asked to see that all back-yards and out-houses are cleaned up at an early date. Carried.
Sieffert – McAuley – That Wm. Hunking be asked to see that all cattle and horses be kept off the sidewalks in Winnipegosis; also that all parties found driving over the same be prosecuted. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That Peter Saunders be appointed pound-keeper for Winnipegosis for the year 1912, in the place of Archie Stuart, resigned. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the accounts of T.R. Nicholson ($11) and F.B. Lacey ($15.75) be passed. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That sections 3 and 4 of dog by-law No. 84 be amended as follows: That the words “sleigh dogs” be struck out and the words “all dogs in village of Winnipegosis” be interred in their place. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That J.A. Snelgrove’s account of $77.47 for tamarack piling and stringer, be paid, and that $15 be deducted from the same in payment for cable. Carried.
Hunt – Sieffert – That the council procure six comfortable chairs for the Council chamber at Fork River, and that the clerk be instructed to get the same without delay. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That Panko Solomon be instructed to furnish material and build fence at the north end of sec. 1-29-19; all posts for same to be sound tamarack, to be placed 1 rod apart, and 3 wires to be used. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the Council now adjourn to meet again at Winnipegosis at call of Reeve. Carried.
H.H. Benner,
Sec.-treasurer, pro tem.

1912 Apr 11 – Ethelbert

Mrs. A. Willey is visiting Ethelbert during Easter and is visiting Mrs. A. McPhedran.
Miss Shaw, of Gilbert Plains, stayed a day at James Miller’s on her way home to the Plains.
Mrs. A. Clark is visiting her parents and nursing her mother. Mrs. Skaife, who has been seriously ill for the last month.
Taking advantage of the fine weather Mrs. Skaife is now able to take short walks.
Both Catholic Churches are having their usual Easter services, and the attendance at both are good.
The Union Church of Ethelbert members invited Mr. Smith Jackson to preach the Easter sermons. Special Easter hymns were provided by the choir all of which went well. Mr. Smith Jack spoke in the afternoon basing his remarks upon Paul’s words to Timothy, “Lay Hold on Eternal Life,” and he gave a powerful and sympathetic exposition of his subject. There was also a quartet “The Portals of Glory” rendered by the following: Mrs. A. Phedran, soprano; Mrs. A. Clark, contralto; R. Skaife, tenor; and Kenneth McLean, basso. It is needless to say all did well and the music, which was accompanied by Miss Ella May was rendered with harmony and precision. In the evening Mr. Jackson spoke from Revelations and took for his Text “He that Overcometh,” and again gave a good and impressive discourse. The musical numbers were also well rendered and included a duet, “Go Home and Tell,” Mrs. C.F. Munro taking the soprano and Mrs. A. Clark the contralto. The voices blended together well, and it was a treat to hear such music. There was a good attendance of hearers at both services, and the general verdict was that the services had even very successful and reflected credit on all concerned. There are also Evangelistic meetings being held at John McLean’s by Evangelists Howard and Fleming May. The old story is being proclaimed to good audiences. The meetings will be continued on Tuesday and Wednesday nights this week.
Everybody is decked out in Easter holiday attire, and the village has quite a festive appearance and all seem disposed to make the season one of general rejoicing.
The snow has nearly all gone. Spring is with us in earnest and soon every one will be busy turning over the land and preparing for a bumper crop.
I almost forgot to say we have got a new police magistrate, so now the people will be able to spend their money at home. Patronize home industries is a good motto far all.

1912 Apr 11 – Fork River

Mr. Briggs, teacher of the Mowat School, is visiting Dauphin this week.
P. Ellis is leaving this week to take up a position at Miles’ store, Kamsack.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was a visitor at W. King’s last Monday.
A magic lantern show entertainment was given by Mr. McCartney at the Orange Hall last Thursday. Some very nice pictures were shown, consisting of the Passion of our Lord. Owing to the bad roads only a small attendance turned out.
The farmers are getting ready for ploughing. Quite a lot to be done in this district.
Mrs. Rice from East Bay has been visiting Mrs. Cameron’s, Mowat.
Fleming Wilson and Paul Wood paid Fork River a visit on Tuesday.
G. Shannon, F. Cooper and R. Rowe were visitors to Dauphin on business.
Mr. Walker of Dauphin, is around inspecting Mossey River, Mowat and Pine View Schools.
Edwin King returned home from a week spent in Winnipeg and states that the trains going west are crowded with new comers. Lots of room here for them.
Mrs. T. Shannon returned from visiting friends in Dauphin.
Mrs. Comber and daughter arrived here from Selkirk and are staying with Mrs. McQuay for the present.
Miss Gertie Cooper and Miss Clark came up from Dauphin and are spending the Easter holidays at the homes of their parents.
Our Mowat friend of the Press invites the scribe to see these documents which is unnecessary as we have some of his documents covering the last six years, also his savings for the Press for about eight years and when we sum them up her reminds us of a Biblical charade who betrayed his friend and master. What a pity he seems to have these spells worst coming on spring. We sincerely hope he will be recovered in time to plant his onions.
The Hon. Joseph Lockhart returned from spending some time in the south and is looking as healthy as ever.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove, who has spent some time with Mrs. F. Chase in Dauphin, returned home Tuesday.
There are lots of wild geese on the wing, to judge from the reports it is harder on the ammunition that the geese.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 25 – 1915

1915 Mar 25 – Baby Born on Train

An event occurred on the train from Prince Albert on Saturday morning last which caused quite a commotion among the passengers. Mrs. Courtney Veal, who took passage at Hudson’s Bay Junction, for the purpose of coming to Dauphin to enter the hospital, gave birth to a male child in the vicinity of Sifton, and some fifteen miles from Dauphin. Mrs. Veal was occupying a berth in a sleeper at the time. There was only one other woman, a Mrs. McEvoy, on the train at the time, and her services were quickly requisitioned by Conductor James McQuigge, and everything possible done to make the mother and baby confortable. A rush telegram was dispatched to Dauphin for a doctor and nurse. When the train arrived Dr. Bottomley and a nurse from the hospital with the ambulance, were in waiting and the mother and child hurriedly taken to the hospital.

Forty-five minutes after Mrs. Veal entered the hospital door she have birth to another boy.
Supt. Irwin and the officials of the Canadian Northern are naturally quite proud of the part of the road played in this important event, and while they are not willing to admit they are in favour of adding a maternity department to their already unexcelled service, they say it might be a possibility in the future.

Mr. Veal, who accompanied his wife to Dauphin, speaks highly of the service rendered by Conductor McQuigge in the emergency, and as a mark of gratitude will name one of the babies after him. The two babies are to be named:
HERBERT KITCHENER VEAL.,
JAMES McQUIGGE VEAL.,

At latest accounts the mother and both babies are doing well.

1915 Mar 25 – Interesting Letters from Private J. Meek

The following extracts are taken from two interesting letters written home by Private John Meek (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578):
“No. 946, D. Coy., 32nd Batt.”
“At Sea, March 3rd, 1915,”
“Here I am and feeling fine, with our sea journey about at and end. I have not been the least bi sick all the way. It has been quite a long time on the water and not the best of sleeping quarters. We have just had steerage quarters and they not on a first class boat, so you will have an idea of what it would be like. Well, anyway we have been able to live through it all and so we should worry. A soldier has to take the like of that and smile. We expect to land tomorrow sometime, but where we do not know yet, still I think it will be England alright.”
“We have had a nice trip as far as weather is concerned. The weather and sea have not been a bit rough all the way across. We got on board on the Monday at Halifax and sailed on the Tuesday morning. There are four ships on the trip. The cruiser “Essex” has led the way al the time, of course she has not troops on board. There are three ships with about 1500 men on each, four battalions in all. On our boat is the 32nd and part of the 30th battalion from Vancouver. I do not know where the other two battalions came from. The names of the tree ships as they have travelled on the line are, the “Missanbie,” the “Vaderland” and the “Megantic.” We are on the “Vanderland.”
“Well as far as the trip is concerned there was no more excitement for the first few days. On Monday, shortly after breakfast we got word that one of the stokers had shot himself. He tried to shoot himself through the heart, but he shot a little high, so he did not do himself very much harm. The doctor operated on him and got the bullet out. We do not know what was his reason, but heard he had a row with chief engineer.”
“Yesterday and today have been sport days on board, and it has been fine. We had a boxing contest, a wrestling contest, a tug-of-war and a bunch of races. We had a sack race, a three-legged race, and two or three more.”
“Last night we had a fine concert in the first-class dining hall.”
“Everybody has been excited today, as we have been expecting to sight they south coast of Ireland.”
“Stanley (Henderson of Minitonas) has never been the least bit sick either. You ought to have seen him the morning we got into Halifax. He got out of the train and ran like a made man to see the water and the ships, with a smile all over his face.”

Feb. 4th.
“We sailed into Queenstown harbour early this morning and everything looks fine. It is a very pretty place and the grass looks quite green from here. It is regular spring weather here and it makes a fellow feel fine. There is great excitement among the boys this morning. Some of the have been up all night just to watch her sail in.”

“Shorncliffe, England,”
“March 8th, 1915”
“We have got to the end of our journey for now, anyway. We are right on the south coast of England, near Dover, in the town of Shroncliffe which is a good size. It is a lovely place. We can see the English Channel from the camp. There are about 25,000 men at this place, so it is quite a big town. We have not to live in tents either. We have houses that hold about 25 men each and which are fixed up good. It is the best barracks we have had yet.”
“We were in Queenstown two days and had a route march around the town. Say, it was lovely there! They were such nice days and quite a lot of flowers growing already. Some of the boys said it was the nicest place that they had ever seen.”
“We passed through part of London on the train but did not get off.”
“This leaves me as well as the rest of the Dauphin boys – well and happy.”

1915 Mar 25 – Fork River

Mr. W. Northam, A. Cameron and J. Richardson returned from a few days visit at Dauphin.
Mr. and Ms. F.O. Murphy, of Dauphin, arrived here with a carload of implements and furniture. They will take up their residence of F. Chase’s farm south of the town for the summer.
Our fiend Scotty took a flying visit to Winnipegosis and returned on shanks’ mare hale and hearty.
Mr. F. Hafenbrak returned from Dauphin with a fine team of draught horses. The seed grain will go in now.
Messrs. Shannon and Stonehouse returned from a pleasant vacation at Dauphin.
Several of our young people attended the 17th of Ireland ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of Winnipegosis hotel. “Mac” knows how to give the folks a good time.
Mr. Archie McDonell, manager for the A.T. Co. farms here, spent a few days arranging for the spring work.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Anglican Church, held their annual meeting on March 17. The reports show a good year’s work. The society is in a good financial condition. The officers for the coming year are Mrs. King, president; Mrs. A. Rowe, vice; Mrs. F. Hafenbrak, secretary; Wm. King, treasurer. Layment in charge, F. Steede.
The children’s annual Lenten service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, March 28th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. All are cordially invited.
W. Coultas returned on Tuesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1915 Mar 25 – Sifton

Mr. Smith Russell of Strathclair, is a visitor in town these days on business.
Mr. F. Patridge, who has been relief station agent here for the last few weeks, has left here to take up duties at Canora, Sask. We all wish him the best of luck.
William Ashmore’s livery is kept busy these days since the alteration of train service. Seemingly its true that it is an ill wind that does not do someone good.
Dr. Gilbart, of Ethelbert, spent the weekend in town.
Mr. Walter spent the weekend out east amongst the farmers and reports that if this kind of weather continues they will start operations on the land within the course of a few days.
The Kennedy Mercantile Co. has erected a large warehouse and has same stocked with a good assortment of farm implements.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt have succeeded in drilling a fine well for Fairville School.
Don’t forget the machinery, horse and stock sale at Sifton on Saturday, the 27th inst. See advertisement in Herald.

1915 Mar 25 – Winnipegosis

Capt. W.B. Sifton is in town from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele are here from Mafeking.
Sid Coffey returned on Tuesday from Dauphin. He has been on the sick list.
Contractor Neely and a staff of men arrived on Tuesday to work on the lighthouse. They were greeted with a big snowstorm.
Coun. Hechter and daughter were visitors to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Jos. Schaldermose is a Winnipeg visitor this week.
Miss Grace Saunders has arrived from Winnipeg.
The annual dance given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of the Hotel Winnipegosis, on St. Patrick’s night, was attended by a large crowd. Every one appeared to have a good time.