Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 24 – 1913

1913 Apr 24 – Ethelbert

Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Saunders and children left last week for Herbert, Sask., where Mr. Saunders will operate a steam plough during the summer. The family have been residents of this district since the settlement was opened and carry the best wishes of many friends to their new home.
Geo. P. Metz, another of our old-timers, has also left for Saskatchewan.

1913 Apr 24 – Fork River

Alfred Snelgrove has left for Regina to work on the government dredge at that point for the summer.
Wm. David has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Archie McMillan returned to his home at Kindersley on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong and nephew, have arrived from Dauphin and intend farming on a larger scale this summer.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, is busy taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co., store.
D. Kennedy’s little boy was taken suddenly ill with convulsions and had to get Dr. Harrington, of Dauphin to meet him at Sifton. We are pleased to hear the lad is recovering.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, was a visitor to the Lake Town recently on important business.
C. Clark is spending the weekend at Dauphin attending the railway mens’ meeting at that point.
We are sorry to hear friend George’s new bridge went down stream.
Charles White, fish inspector of Winnipegosis, is a visitor at D. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. T. Johnson is visiting with her friends in town for a few days.
If you want a horse call at Kennedy’s new emporium. He has all sorts and sizes. You pay your money and get your choice. A bargain every time.
“Say, Mike, they had quite a picnic at Monday’s council meeting. I am told the boundary bridge was laid over for the present.”
“Well, Pat, the doc gets a bonus of $600 for the coming year. That’s equal to three miles of graded road and the fun of it is in many cases we have to send to Dauphin for a doctor on account of not being able to get him when wanted.”
“Well, Mike, Winnipegosis, was represented by the Mayor and Alderman and they claim the doc will be around at all ball games. That’s something we are thankful to know. Then there’s our genial friend, the town orator; he gets the price of another 4 miles of graded road to sit on the sidewalk and sun himself while we flaunter through the mud.”
“Well, Pat, it does look as if things were shure going to the divel, but there’s a good time coming by and by.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 11 – 1912

1912 Apr 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the Council held in the Council chamber, Fork River, Wednesday, March 27, 1912, all member present.
The minutes, having been read were adopted as read on motion of Coun. Nicholson, seconded by Coun. Seiffert. Carried.
Nicholson-Robertson – That this Council donate ten bags of flour to Sefat Mochka and that Councillors McAuley and Seiffert be requested to see that the same is delivered. Carried.

COURT OF REVISION
McAuley – Hunt – That protests No. 10, No. 12, No. 16 and No. 17, respectively, be lowered from $880 assess to $800; and that in protest No. 15 the assessment be lowered from $800 to $720. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That all other protests remain as they are. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That W.H. Paddock’s assessment be changed from 150 acres to 100 acres. Carried.

REGULAR BUSINESS
McAuley – Nicholson – That the taxes of John Frend, N.E., 1-29-20, be reduced by $40. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That the taxes on N.E. 25-29-20 be reduced rom $82.25 to $22.24, owing to taxes having been charged on abandoned homestead. Carried.
Seiffert – Hunt – That Wm. Walmslay be asked to move his house off the public streets of Winnipegosis at once. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That the Health Officer at Winnipegosis be asked to see that all back-yards and out-houses are cleaned up at an early date. Carried.
Sieffert – McAuley – That Wm. Hunking be asked to see that all cattle and horses be kept off the sidewalks in Winnipegosis; also that all parties found driving over the same be prosecuted. Carried.
Sieffert – Robertson – That Peter Saunders be appointed pound-keeper for Winnipegosis for the year 1912, in the place of Archie Stuart, resigned. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the accounts of T.R. Nicholson ($11) and F.B. Lacey ($15.75) be passed. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That sections 3 and 4 of dog by-law No. 84 be amended as follows: That the words “sleigh dogs” be struck out and the words “all dogs in village of Winnipegosis” be interred in their place. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That J.A. Snelgrove’s account of $77.47 for tamarack piling and stringer, be paid, and that $15 be deducted from the same in payment for cable. Carried.
Hunt – Sieffert – That the council procure six comfortable chairs for the Council chamber at Fork River, and that the clerk be instructed to get the same without delay. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That Panko Solomon be instructed to furnish material and build fence at the north end of sec. 1-29-19; all posts for same to be sound tamarack, to be placed 1 rod apart, and 3 wires to be used. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the Council now adjourn to meet again at Winnipegosis at call of Reeve. Carried.
H.H. Benner,
Sec.-treasurer, pro tem.

1912 Apr 11 – Ethelbert

Mrs. A. Willey is visiting Ethelbert during Easter and is visiting Mrs. A. McPhedran.
Miss Shaw, of Gilbert Plains, stayed a day at James Miller’s on her way home to the Plains.
Mrs. A. Clark is visiting her parents and nursing her mother. Mrs. Skaife, who has been seriously ill for the last month.
Taking advantage of the fine weather Mrs. Skaife is now able to take short walks.
Both Catholic Churches are having their usual Easter services, and the attendance at both are good.
The Union Church of Ethelbert members invited Mr. Smith Jackson to preach the Easter sermons. Special Easter hymns were provided by the choir all of which went well. Mr. Smith Jack spoke in the afternoon basing his remarks upon Paul’s words to Timothy, “Lay Hold on Eternal Life,” and he gave a powerful and sympathetic exposition of his subject. There was also a quartet “The Portals of Glory” rendered by the following: Mrs. A. Phedran, soprano; Mrs. A. Clark, contralto; R. Skaife, tenor; and Kenneth McLean, basso. It is needless to say all did well and the music, which was accompanied by Miss Ella May was rendered with harmony and precision. In the evening Mr. Jackson spoke from Revelations and took for his Text “He that Overcometh,” and again gave a good and impressive discourse. The musical numbers were also well rendered and included a duet, “Go Home and Tell,” Mrs. C.F. Munro taking the soprano and Mrs. A. Clark the contralto. The voices blended together well, and it was a treat to hear such music. There was a good attendance of hearers at both services, and the general verdict was that the services had even very successful and reflected credit on all concerned. There are also Evangelistic meetings being held at John McLean’s by Evangelists Howard and Fleming May. The old story is being proclaimed to good audiences. The meetings will be continued on Tuesday and Wednesday nights this week.
Everybody is decked out in Easter holiday attire, and the village has quite a festive appearance and all seem disposed to make the season one of general rejoicing.
The snow has nearly all gone. Spring is with us in earnest and soon every one will be busy turning over the land and preparing for a bumper crop.
I almost forgot to say we have got a new police magistrate, so now the people will be able to spend their money at home. Patronize home industries is a good motto far all.

1912 Apr 11 – Fork River

Mr. Briggs, teacher of the Mowat School, is visiting Dauphin this week.
P. Ellis is leaving this week to take up a position at Miles’ store, Kamsack.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was a visitor at W. King’s last Monday.
A magic lantern show entertainment was given by Mr. McCartney at the Orange Hall last Thursday. Some very nice pictures were shown, consisting of the Passion of our Lord. Owing to the bad roads only a small attendance turned out.
The farmers are getting ready for ploughing. Quite a lot to be done in this district.
Mrs. Rice from East Bay has been visiting Mrs. Cameron’s, Mowat.
Fleming Wilson and Paul Wood paid Fork River a visit on Tuesday.
G. Shannon, F. Cooper and R. Rowe were visitors to Dauphin on business.
Mr. Walker of Dauphin, is around inspecting Mossey River, Mowat and Pine View Schools.
Edwin King returned home from a week spent in Winnipeg and states that the trains going west are crowded with new comers. Lots of room here for them.
Mrs. T. Shannon returned from visiting friends in Dauphin.
Mrs. Comber and daughter arrived here from Selkirk and are staying with Mrs. McQuay for the present.
Miss Gertie Cooper and Miss Clark came up from Dauphin and are spending the Easter holidays at the homes of their parents.
Our Mowat friend of the Press invites the scribe to see these documents which is unnecessary as we have some of his documents covering the last six years, also his savings for the Press for about eight years and when we sum them up her reminds us of a Biblical charade who betrayed his friend and master. What a pity he seems to have these spells worst coming on spring. We sincerely hope he will be recovered in time to plant his onions.
The Hon. Joseph Lockhart returned from spending some time in the south and is looking as healthy as ever.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove, who has spent some time with Mrs. F. Chase in Dauphin, returned home Tuesday.
There are lots of wild geese on the wing, to judge from the reports it is harder on the ammunition that the geese.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 1 – 1915

1915 Apr 1 – Boy Run Over

Robert, the 11-year-old son of Mr. Alf. Coombos, whose farm is seven miles north-east of town, was run over by a heavy wagon containing about a ton of hay on Saturday afternoon last. The wheels of the wagon passed over the boy’s body in the region of his stomach, and strange to relate, the little fellow suffered no serious internal injury and is recovering.

1915 Apr 1 – Fork River

Archie McDonell and family, of Winnipegosis, have arrived and are intending to put the summer in on the A.T.Co. farm.
Mr. F.O. Murphy held a successful sale at Sifton on Monday.
Mr. McFadden, solicitor of Dauphin, spent a short time at this point lately. He will attend to professional business on Wednesday of each week.
D.F. Wilson has returned from spending a few days at Sifton and Dauphin on business.
Captain Lyons, of Winnipegosis, collector for the Municipality, is on his rounds and paid a visit to D.F. Wilson, clerk, this week.
Harry Hunter has the contract for finishing the Lacey Bridge.
It is rumoured that there has been more deaths lately in the Weiden district and that the people are running from house to house at their own sweet will. Where’s the health officer?
Mr. Timewell has arrived here and is spending a few days in this vicinity looking for a farm to settle his family if one can be got suitable. It should not be a difficult matter as there is plenty of vacant land here waiting for settlers.
W. King is building a house on his lot east of Main Street.
Mr. Lane, government engineer, was up taking levels in the vicinity of Mr. Wilson’s farm.
Miss R. Armstrong has returned from a few days visit at her home in Dauphin and the school is running again.

1915 Apr 1 – Winnipegosis

Mud Scrow No. 2 was lowered on to the skids Saturday, and was slid on to the ice where she wills stay till the river opens.
Mrs. John McAulay, of Dauphin, is visiting in town this week.
Mr. Gunar Fredrickson and family have moved out to their old home at the point and are fitting it up for the summer.
Mrs. D. Kennedy arrived from Dauphin Friday.
Mrs. A. Johnson and her son Kari have left for North Dakota to visit friends there.
Mr. J.P. Grenon arrived home Friday from an eastern trip.
Mrs. Thos. Needham, of Dauphin, is visiting with Mrs. C. White this week.
Mr. Wm. Mapes and family are back to town from their winter camp.
Miss Grace Saunders left for Winnipeg on Friday.
The Winnipegosis Football Club held their first meeting last week when officers were elected, and it was decided to have two teams on the field this year, with Glen Burrell and Bert Arrowsmith as captains. We expect to see some fast football here this summer as the boys are already chasing the ball.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 25 – 1915

1915 Mar 25 – Baby Born on Train

An event occurred on the train from Prince Albert on Saturday morning last which caused quite a commotion among the passengers. Mrs. Courtney Veal, who took passage at Hudson’s Bay Junction, for the purpose of coming to Dauphin to enter the hospital, gave birth to a male child in the vicinity of Sifton, and some fifteen miles from Dauphin. Mrs. Veal was occupying a berth in a sleeper at the time. There was only one other woman, a Mrs. McEvoy, on the train at the time, and her services were quickly requisitioned by Conductor James McQuigge, and everything possible done to make the mother and baby confortable. A rush telegram was dispatched to Dauphin for a doctor and nurse. When the train arrived Dr. Bottomley and a nurse from the hospital with the ambulance, were in waiting and the mother and child hurriedly taken to the hospital.

Forty-five minutes after Mrs. Veal entered the hospital door she have birth to another boy.
Supt. Irwin and the officials of the Canadian Northern are naturally quite proud of the part of the road played in this important event, and while they are not willing to admit they are in favour of adding a maternity department to their already unexcelled service, they say it might be a possibility in the future.

Mr. Veal, who accompanied his wife to Dauphin, speaks highly of the service rendered by Conductor McQuigge in the emergency, and as a mark of gratitude will name one of the babies after him. The two babies are to be named:
HERBERT KITCHENER VEAL.,
JAMES McQUIGGE VEAL.,

At latest accounts the mother and both babies are doing well.

1915 Mar 25 – Interesting Letters from Private J. Meek

The following extracts are taken from two interesting letters written home by Private John Meek (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578):
“No. 946, D. Coy., 32nd Batt.”
“At Sea, March 3rd, 1915,”
“Here I am and feeling fine, with our sea journey about at and end. I have not been the least bi sick all the way. It has been quite a long time on the water and not the best of sleeping quarters. We have just had steerage quarters and they not on a first class boat, so you will have an idea of what it would be like. Well, anyway we have been able to live through it all and so we should worry. A soldier has to take the like of that and smile. We expect to land tomorrow sometime, but where we do not know yet, still I think it will be England alright.”
“We have had a nice trip as far as weather is concerned. The weather and sea have not been a bit rough all the way across. We got on board on the Monday at Halifax and sailed on the Tuesday morning. There are four ships on the trip. The cruiser “Essex” has led the way al the time, of course she has not troops on board. There are three ships with about 1500 men on each, four battalions in all. On our boat is the 32nd and part of the 30th battalion from Vancouver. I do not know where the other two battalions came from. The names of the tree ships as they have travelled on the line are, the “Missanbie,” the “Vaderland” and the “Megantic.” We are on the “Vanderland.”
“Well as far as the trip is concerned there was no more excitement for the first few days. On Monday, shortly after breakfast we got word that one of the stokers had shot himself. He tried to shoot himself through the heart, but he shot a little high, so he did not do himself very much harm. The doctor operated on him and got the bullet out. We do not know what was his reason, but heard he had a row with chief engineer.”
“Yesterday and today have been sport days on board, and it has been fine. We had a boxing contest, a wrestling contest, a tug-of-war and a bunch of races. We had a sack race, a three-legged race, and two or three more.”
“Last night we had a fine concert in the first-class dining hall.”
“Everybody has been excited today, as we have been expecting to sight they south coast of Ireland.”
“Stanley (Henderson of Minitonas) has never been the least bit sick either. You ought to have seen him the morning we got into Halifax. He got out of the train and ran like a made man to see the water and the ships, with a smile all over his face.”

Feb. 4th.
“We sailed into Queenstown harbour early this morning and everything looks fine. It is a very pretty place and the grass looks quite green from here. It is regular spring weather here and it makes a fellow feel fine. There is great excitement among the boys this morning. Some of the have been up all night just to watch her sail in.”

“Shorncliffe, England,”
“March 8th, 1915”
“We have got to the end of our journey for now, anyway. We are right on the south coast of England, near Dover, in the town of Shroncliffe which is a good size. It is a lovely place. We can see the English Channel from the camp. There are about 25,000 men at this place, so it is quite a big town. We have not to live in tents either. We have houses that hold about 25 men each and which are fixed up good. It is the best barracks we have had yet.”
“We were in Queenstown two days and had a route march around the town. Say, it was lovely there! They were such nice days and quite a lot of flowers growing already. Some of the boys said it was the nicest place that they had ever seen.”
“We passed through part of London on the train but did not get off.”
“This leaves me as well as the rest of the Dauphin boys – well and happy.”

1915 Mar 25 – Fork River

Mr. W. Northam, A. Cameron and J. Richardson returned from a few days visit at Dauphin.
Mr. and Ms. F.O. Murphy, of Dauphin, arrived here with a carload of implements and furniture. They will take up their residence of F. Chase’s farm south of the town for the summer.
Our fiend Scotty took a flying visit to Winnipegosis and returned on shanks’ mare hale and hearty.
Mr. F. Hafenbrak returned from Dauphin with a fine team of draught horses. The seed grain will go in now.
Messrs. Shannon and Stonehouse returned from a pleasant vacation at Dauphin.
Several of our young people attended the 17th of Ireland ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of Winnipegosis hotel. “Mac” knows how to give the folks a good time.
Mr. Archie McDonell, manager for the A.T. Co. farms here, spent a few days arranging for the spring work.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Anglican Church, held their annual meeting on March 17. The reports show a good year’s work. The society is in a good financial condition. The officers for the coming year are Mrs. King, president; Mrs. A. Rowe, vice; Mrs. F. Hafenbrak, secretary; Wm. King, treasurer. Layment in charge, F. Steede.
The children’s annual Lenten service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, March 28th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. All are cordially invited.
W. Coultas returned on Tuesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1915 Mar 25 – Sifton

Mr. Smith Russell of Strathclair, is a visitor in town these days on business.
Mr. F. Patridge, who has been relief station agent here for the last few weeks, has left here to take up duties at Canora, Sask. We all wish him the best of luck.
William Ashmore’s livery is kept busy these days since the alteration of train service. Seemingly its true that it is an ill wind that does not do someone good.
Dr. Gilbart, of Ethelbert, spent the weekend in town.
Mr. Walter spent the weekend out east amongst the farmers and reports that if this kind of weather continues they will start operations on the land within the course of a few days.
The Kennedy Mercantile Co. has erected a large warehouse and has same stocked with a good assortment of farm implements.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt have succeeded in drilling a fine well for Fairville School.
Don’t forget the machinery, horse and stock sale at Sifton on Saturday, the 27th inst. See advertisement in Herald.

1915 Mar 25 – Winnipegosis

Capt. W.B. Sifton is in town from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele are here from Mafeking.
Sid Coffey returned on Tuesday from Dauphin. He has been on the sick list.
Contractor Neely and a staff of men arrived on Tuesday to work on the lighthouse. They were greeted with a big snowstorm.
Coun. Hechter and daughter were visitors to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Jos. Schaldermose is a Winnipeg visitor this week.
Miss Grace Saunders has arrived from Winnipeg.
The annual dance given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of the Hotel Winnipegosis, on St. Patrick’s night, was attended by a large crowd. Every one appeared to have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 2 – 1913

1913 Jan 2 – Fred Nex Killed

Fred. Nex, formerly publisher of the Dauphin News, and who afterwards kept a store at Sifton, was killed near Whitemouth, Man., not long since. He and two other parties were riding on the C.P.R. on a gasoline motor, when it collided with a train. All three were killed. Deceased of recent years held the position of secretary-treasurer for the Municipality of Whitemouth. He leaves a widow and several small children.

1913 Jan 2 – Fork River

John Chipla and family returned from Canora, Sask., for the holidays.
Bert Williams left for Moose Jaw to see his brother, who resides there.
Miss Olive and Alice Clark are visiting friends at Laird, Sask., during the holidays.
Miss Muriel Alterton, who taught the Mossey River School the last three years, has left for Winnipeg.
Miss Grant, teacher of Pine View School, has gone home for the holidays.
A. Hunt has gone to Ottawa to spend the holidays with his parents.
There was quite a family re-union at the homestead of D.F. Wilson last week. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton; Fleming Wilson and family of Dauphin and others. It was cheering to see so many familiar faces at Christmas Tide.
Miss Bertha Johnston, of Dauphin, Mrs. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, were the guests of D. Kennedy during the holiday.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is home on a two weeks’ vacation.
Abe Shinks returned from his homestead in Sask., and intends to remain the rest of the winter at Fork River.
The Christmas tree and concert in the hall on Christmas Eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ W.A. and S.S. was a success. It being a nice evening there was a large turnout. Wm. King, warden, was chairman. A good programme of songs, recitations, and drills by the children, after which Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus arrived and distributed the gifts among the children. We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus on the able manner they filled the position. We take this opportunity of thanking all those who took part in the concert and tree. It is encouraging to see everyone turn out on Christmas Eve to give the little folks a good time.
We wish all a Happy New Year.
Rev. H.H. Scrase held service on Christmas morning at Winnipegosis, and at All Saints, Fork River, in the evening.
In the Press we notice our Mowat friend twitting Mr. Borden and his followers for opposing the Transcontinental Railway when they were in opposition. Do you remember Laurier’s election cry in 1904? A national Transcontinental Railway for thirteen million dollars. What do we now find? The National Transcontinental Railway is going to cost us, including interest and charges, payable by the people, nearly eighty million and a cash outlay of close on three hundred million by the time we are through with it. Is it any wonder it was opposed at the time considering the unbusinesslike method adopted by the Laurier government. Our M.C. objects to Borden’s scheme of giving thirty-five millions to England for Dreadnaughts to be manned by Englishmen instead of Canadians. We consider Borden’s scheme the only possible one under the circumstances and far superior to the one Laurier has being playing with for years. What did his amount to? He, Laurier, wanted a strictly Canadian fleet, part on the Atlantic coast, the other half on the Pacific coast. That’s just what he handed down to Borden when he went out of power. The Niobe in the east and the Rainbow in the west. The boats are so powerful you have to take a magnifying glass to see them on a fine day. As for manning our warships with Canadians our friend is talking through his hat. The Marine Department at Ottawa could not find recruits enough in Canada to run those two little steamboats, the Niobe and the Rainbow. They had to be tied up for want of men. Finally they had to import them. Take a rest friend, you must be tired of jumping the fence so often.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

The W.A. entertainment last Friday evening was a success and though the proceeds, were small, more was not anticipated. The orchestra selections render by the Messrs. McArthur, Mrs. A. McArthur, and Mr. Shears were most appropriate, and the representation of Mr. and Mrs. Candle was amusing, while the comedy “Box the Cox” demonstrated the fact that theatrical talent is not lacking amongst us.
If a young “Lochinvar” appears in our midst let no one say they were fully warned.
Mr. Malley, lately from college, addressed the Christian Endeavor League last week.
Harry Parker had the misfortune to sprain his ankle while coming down the lake freighting fish. Hope he will soon be about again.
J.P. Grenon’s youngest son, also sustained an injury from an accident, the nature of which has not been learned.
Mrs. Johnston, of Minitonas, is visiting her friends, the Stuarts. A little one made the festive season.
We are pleased to hear Mrs. Graff has recovered from her illness under Mrs. Johnstone’s efficient nursing.
A.C. Bardley’s late indisposition was the result of cold.
The card circle last Wednesday evening was a pleasing character. Mrs. Burrell now possesses a good time-keeper and we trust Mrs. Crannage may find her work basket useful considering her aptitude with the meddle which was effectively displayed in the doll dressed for the W.A. competition, and won by Miss Hansford. See “Whilimina”.
Mr. Seaforth made a business trip to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Browne also made a trip to meet a friend from Winnipeg.
The Presbyterian S.S. entertainment on the 27th (the most anticipated event of the season), was very successful owing to Santa Claus’ generosity, whom the children admirably presented in a Cantata. It was regretted that Mr. Malley was unable to perform the duties of chairman, but Mr. Noble very kindly filled the place.
The Anglican Christmas service was harmonious. Rev. H.H. Scrase delivered a fine sermon.
This weather might inspire a spring song, considering the gulls are circling up the lake, but undoubtedly the storm that follows such illusive calm is liable to occur any time.
We wonder what the presence of pure white partridges may prognosticate. It is easy to obtain them, and they should look very pretty mounted.
The Armstrong Trading Co. lost a valuable team in the lake last week, and a horse dropped dead the week before. Fortunately they are not likely to feel the loss.
Mr. Ruthledge, formerly of Winnipegosis, spent Christmas in town.
The Misses Bradley spent Christmas here with their parents, and Mr. and Mrs. Saunders enjoyed the company of their sons with a friend from Winnipeg. A dance was given by the latter in Victoria Hall on Thursday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, of the Lake View hotel, returned from Winnipeg on Christmas Eve, where they spent a week on business and visiting.
Mrs. Bradley spent a delightful week-end in Dauphin, and attended the Anglican S.S. entertainment, of which he “Washing Day Cantata” was a particularly enjoyable feature. The trip from their home was suggestive of wedding bells resulting in poetic effusion.
Miss Johnston returned home for the Christmas holidays.

1913 Jan 2 – A REVERIE.

Ye children of the heavenly king,
Imagine that the angels sing,
Send peace on earth for men and driven
To doubt that women have earned a heaven.

As everyone of us should hold,
The truth that’s better far tan gold’
Let dissension meet a final doom,
And perversity by refused a room.

Then trust the Savour’s power to do
All that he said, which well he knew
Would be doubted by impatient men,
Though women believe faithfully till – when!

The world shall be forced to cry, “well done”!
In Him we live, the kingdom’s won!
To exercise faith within the soul
Makes humanity’s love perfectly whole.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

James McNicholl passed quietly away on Friday afternoon last Dec. 27th, after a lingering illness, having been tended faithfully by his wife for whom he showed much affection. The funeral rites were performed by Father Derome on Monday morning. Deceased’s wife, two sons and two daughters were among the mourners.
Miss Clara Bradley is away on a visit to her aunt in Portage la Prairie. Miss Dolly having returned with her.
Miss Shannon has returned from Fork River where she spent the Christmas holidays visiting her parents.
Mr. Scott is leaving on Thursday for Mafeking on business for the Standard Lumber Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Shears are wished joy of their young daughter, born to them on the 28th inst., at the home of Mrs. Johnstone.

1913 Jan 2 – Gulls at Lake Winnipegosis

Numerous sea gulls have, of late, made their appearance at Lake Winnipegosis. It is not known that those birds have ever appeared here at so late a date in any year in the past.