Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 24, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

The regular meeting of the above Association was held last Thursday, July 17th, Comrade F. Scrase, president, in chair.
Application for membership was received from eleven returned men, all of which were accepted. This now brings the total membership of the Dauphin Branch to 271. It is hoped that same will reach the 500 before the end of the year. Any returned men in the town that have not become members up to the present are asked to do so at an early ate, for like all other things, many can help one, and the greater the membership then so much more will be able to be done for the returned man by the association.
The auditors’ report for the past six months was submitted, and on motion of Comrades Armstrong and Miles it was accepted.
During the past year considerable progress has been made by the local branch in the town. The present new quarters were opened in March and between three and four hundred men have slept in these rooms during that period. When it is considered that no charge is made for the use of these and the fact that it is sometimes next to impossible to secure a room in the town on shot notice, the use and benefit of the rooms to the retuned men that are here looking for land and getting information and particulars re the Soldier Settlement, can be readily seen. The rooms are also used to a very great extent by the returned men of the town in the evenings, and also by the boys who are living on the farms when they are in town during the day, and were it not for them it would be hard to find a place for them to spend the time, especially the men that are here to make entry on land and are compelled, owing to waiting for trains, etc., to stay in the town over night or in some cases two or three days.
Application was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary for the use of the large hall on Aug. 6, 7 and 8 for the purpose of serving dinner, and same was granted by the comrades.
The next meeting of the association will be July 31st, and members are requested to make note of the date.

Peace Day Celebration

In spite of the counter attractions elsewhere the citizens turned out in large numbers to celebrate Peace Day in Dauphin. At 10 a.m. about 250 people gathered for a Union Thanksgiving Service, which was conducted by Captain Kitson and Rev. Harry P. Barrett, while the address was given by Rev. J.A. Haw.
At 1.30 the children gathered at the two schools and a procession of about 40 automobiles, crowded with happy youngsters, headed by the town band, went along Main street to Fourth avenue and Second street to the park. In the park races were run for all children and in many events there were so many competitors it was necessary to have two and sometimes three beats.
The grown-ups of the town brought baskets and quite a number of family parties were to be seen enjoying picnic tea on the grass. Hot water was supplied and a booth managed by the members of the Children’s Aid Society, under the conductorship of Mrs. Vance, dispensed ice cream, sandwiches, lemonade, etc. in aid of the Home.
The whole day’s programme was arranged at two hurriedly called meetings at which Mr. George King was chairman. It would be impossible to mention all who contributed to the success of the day, but we must make note of the energy and interest of the Committee, Rev. Harry P. Barrett, Messrs. Ramsay Skinner, R.J. Malcolm, Rintoul, D. Sutherland, Wright, Barker and Ferguson.

Fork River

Harvest is expected to begin at once. There is some good crop in the district this season, and the quality, too, is expected to be high.
Wm. Coultas is building a dwelling on his farm.
S.B. Reid and family are visiting at Rathwell, Man.
Fred. Cooper and Mr. Hunt and family are on a vacation to Saskatchewan points.
The wild raspberry crop is a prolific one this season and canned raspberries will be found settlers’ tables this winter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 6 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 6 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. They report a very pleasant time.
F.B. Lacey from Mowat Centre, returned from a visit to Dauphin on business and to attend the teachers’ convention.
We are informed that Capt. Cain, of Mowat, left for Dauphin to take out a license of some sort. Time will tell whether it is for fish, flesh or fowl.
Mrs. Frost and daughter, of Rathwell, are visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reid, on the Mossey River.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey, is spending the week in Dauphin, with friends.
Archie McDonald, who has been busy with a gang ditching on the company’s farm here, has returned to Winnipegosis, the ground having frozen too hard to do any more work this season.
Miss J. Weatherhead, teacher of the Mossey River School, spent the weekend with friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Roe, of Neepawa, has left for the west with his second consignment of cattle from this point.
John Seiffert, and Steve Letwyn, of Winnipegosis, are busy among the farmers, buying cattle for the company’s at South Bay.
Wm. Coultas has invested in stock and intends stall feeding them for Xmas beef. We believe Billy is on the road to become a millionaire in the near future. Farmers take notice and follow suit.
Frank Clawson, of Dauphin, is here renewing old acquaintances.
Mrs. N. Little, and daughter, Miss Grace, took a trip south on business for a few days.
Mr. O’Callagan, of Portage la prairie, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting the Co.’s store on his semi-annual tour of inspection, and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Messrs. Sturdy, White and Shears, of Winnipegosis, are busy at the Co.’s store this week taking stock.
Mrs. Stonehouse and daughter, Miss Sylvia paid the lake town a visit this week.
Hallowe’en passed off with the usual result. Some are minus their gates, others are looking for strayed buggies. The bell of All Saints’ received its annual visit and was fixed up as usual to keep it from running away, while the other building is left in peace as usual. This is where unity comes in, we suppose; yes, with a vengeance.
Our Winnipegosis friends seem to be grieved at the way they are used by the Mossey River municipal board and would like to know if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map. Better ask somebody else, I guess. But one thing we do know at tax paying time we are not allowed to forget our residence. Not very likely Mike.

1913 Nov 6 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Coffey was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday’s train.
The ice on the lake is firm enough to permit travel between the mainland and Snake Island. If the weather becomes warm again which it threatens now, navigation will be resumed.
Frank Hechter left for Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday. Frank is up and down pretty often and helps keep the C.N.R. running.
J.P. Grenon is off to Quebec, where he will study mink farming. The mink farm at Macaza has proved a decided success and he is anxious to learn something of the methods employed in rearing this little animal which produces such a fine grade of fur. The fox branch of Mr. G’s ranch is making progress, and there is every prospect of it becoming a profitable industry. Fish and fur producing animals abound in this part of the West and if the industries flourish as we hope they will there is no reason why the people here should not become prosperous, if not wealthy. The fishing industry is a great asset and the timber resources are large and are being profitable exploited. With good land for farming and cattle raising at the back of all, no part of he West offers better inducements for settlers than this town and district.
The telephone line is now completed and it is sure to prove a great convenience. Postmaster Ketcheson is in charge of the service. The connections are small at present but they are sure to grow. Those connected up with the service are Canadian Lakes Fishing Co., The Armstrong Trading Co. and Frank Hechter. Dauphin is the Central checking office.
Cattle buyers have been in the district of late but have not secured many animals as that canna Scot, Capt. Dugald McAuley, usually covers the district like a blanket.

1919 Nov 6 – Soldiers Banqueted at Fork River

One of the largest banquets held in Northern Manitoba took place at Fork River on Friday night, the 31st ult. The banquet was gotten up by the people of the Mossey River municipality and tendered to the returned soldiers. The supper was held in the Orange Hall, and it is estimated that fully two hundred and fifty people sat down to the splendid spread prepared by the ladies of the district.
Mossey River municipality was well represented by her sturdy sons in France and Flanders, and, like all Canadians, they did their part well. Some of the boys were destined not to return and today rest under the sod across the ocean. Others survived their wounds. The occasion was one for rejoicing.
Each soldier was remembered in a tangible form and presented with either a gold watch and guard or a well-filled purse. It was a recognition of the men well worthy of any community.

TOAST LIST.
Following the supper there was a short toast list. Mr. Geo. King, of Dauphin, was toastmaster. The list included “The King.”
“The British Empire,” proposed by Geo. Spence, of Winnipegosis, and responded to by Principal Jonasson, of Winnipegosis, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts.
“The Municipality of Mossey River,” proposed by ex-Reeve F.B. Lacey, and responded to by Coun. Hunt and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
“Our Hosts and Hostesses,” was proposed by the Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin.
The address to the soldiers was read by Mr. Wm. King, and the presentations made by Sergt. Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
The men made suitable replies, in which they each returned their heartfelt thanks.
At the conclusion of the speech making the hall was cleared and the young people indulged in a dance.
There were a number of guests present from Dauphin, Winnipegosis and other points.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 19 – 1911, 1916

1911 Oct 19 – Fork River

Harvest festival was held in All Saints’ Anglican Church on Sunday. The church was tastefully decorated with flowers, grain and vegetables. The ladies and officers are to be congratulated on the fine display. The service was conducted by Mr. Littler, B.A.; Miss Nixon, organist. A large congregation took part in thanking the giver of all good things for a bountiful harvest.
Mr. Littler is leaving the mission to attend St. Johns College at Winnipeg. Mr. Harding of Algoma, will carry on the work in this mission this winter.
Our bonanza farmer, T.N. Briggs, is smiling. Wheat 37 1/2 bushels to the acre.
The C.N.R. should have an extra bonus for the grandly they handle our mail and express lately. It comes in an old box car with about two inches of coal dust all over the floor. Fancy mail bags and grapes with a nice coating of coal dust and baggage and express with syrup and dust. They might clean out the car but any old thing goes on this line.
John Newsdale is visiting his parents after spending the summer teaching in Saskatchewan.
Wm. Coultas’ team took a notion to run away the other day. The sudden stoppage in the river caused him to take a few graceful revolutions through the air. He received a good shaking up, however he is doing nicely.
Threshing is the order of the day this fine weather. There are four outfits working within two miles of town. The yield is very good.

1916 Oct 19 – Dauphin’s Population 3200

The recent census shows the population of the own to be 3200. Naturally this comes as a great disappointment. The falling off, however, can be to a large extent accounted for in the fact that over 1000 young men have been recruited from the town. The normal population must be close to the 4000 mark.

1916 Oct 19 – The Week’s Casualty List

Stuart Geekie, Winnipegosis, killed. (Stewart Geekie, 1893, 150410)
Wm. Patterson, Ochre River, killed. (???)
A. Stevenson, Minitonas, killed. (Albert Victor Stevenson, 1892, 425361)
Robin Cruise, Dauphin, killed. (Robert Wallace Cruise, 1899, 425650)
Jas. Brown, Dauphin, wounded. (James Evelyn Brown, 1896, 151554)
Pte. Younghusband, Dauphin, killed. (Francis Lloyd Younghusband, 1892, 81863)
Lance Corp. H.G. Alguire, wounded. (???)

1916 Oct 19 – Fork River

J. Schuchett and Mr. P. Zacks left for Winnipeg to arrange for taking over Mr. Zacks’ stock as he is leaving here. Zack brothers are taking three cars of potatoes to Winnipeg. They have purchased the spuds from the farmers here at 45 cents a bushel. The snow storm of Tuesday has delayed the thrashing for a few days. Farmers are busy loading grain from the platform and getting satisfactory results from their shipments. Wheat prices keep advancing. Truly the farmer is king this year.

1916 Oct 19 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J. Mossington and children have returned home from a long visit to friends in Toronto.
The tug “Isabelle” left on Sunday morning towing a barge load of supplies and W.B. Sifton’s log camp outfit. W. Johnston was also a passenger with his fishing outfit, and L. Schaldemose took his family up for the winter.
The “Manitou” returned Monday. She has one more trip to make before the close of navigation.
Mr. Wm. Sifton, of Minitonas, is visiting his daughter Mrs. A.S. Walker.
Last week some fines were imposed on account of liquor. Geo. Bickle, who is not a householder, was found guilty, and Ed. Chermok, a general merchant here, was fined for having liquor in his store. The authorities are on the watch for others who are suspected.
The Red Cross Society had a very successful meeting at Victoria Hall last Wednesday [1 line missing] the entertainment will be given by Mrs. Paddock and Mrs. White.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 14 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 14 – Political Meetings at Fork River

Glen Campbell held a meeting at Fork River on the 8th inst., which was well attended and much enthusiasm shown. There was no Government speaker and the Grits were conspicuous by their absence.
On the night of the 11th, Mr. Cruise held his meeting supported by Messer. McKinstry and McDonald, and quite unexpectedly Mr. Campbell turned up just before the meeting began. The Orange Hall was well filled as the Conservatives of Fork River were not afraid to hear both sides of the question for they did not know that Glen would be at the meeting. Had they not attended Mr. Cruise’s meeting would have been a small one.

1911 Sep 14 – Fork River

Mr. A. Harvey, an old timer who still owns property in this district, is on a visit to Mr. S. Bailey and renewing acquaintances.
T.N. Briggs’ threshing outfit arrived on Tuesday’s train and is guaranteed to thresh anything in sight from pumpkins to gerkins.
Reciprocity seems to have upset even the clerk of the weather, as we are having very poor harvest weather and a slight tinge of frost.
Mr. Glen Campbell held a meeting in the Orange Hall on the 8th, which was well attended. There were over 100 farmers and a large number of ladies present. Mr. Campbell spoke on reciprocity from a farmer’s standpoint in a plain telling way. His arguments were convincing and plainly showed the audience the reciprocity pact in its true colour and that it would be to Canada’s disadvantage. Mr. Cruise was invited bout did not put in an appearance.
Mr. Forbes of Rivers, has been in the district a few days looking over the land. He is well satisfied with Fork River and is likely to invest in a farm.
The following are a few reasons why the scribe cannot support Cruise, the non-resident candidate and why he objects to the Laurier Government. Look them over and see how few of the ministers retain public confidence. Has there ever been anything worse than Mr. Pugsley in public life in Canada. The corruption exposed in his department exceeds the McGreevy scandal during the Conservative regime. Sir Wilfred has not retired Pugsley as Sir John Thompson retired Langevin. A commission of Liberals has declared the Marine Department under Mr. Broduer, corrupt from end to end, yet he has been retained and now goes not he Supreme Court Bench. The administration of the Militia Department has been as bad as any. The printing bureau scandals have been covered up. The Oliver charges were sidetracked by the dissolution of parliament, notwithstanding pledges given by the Government upon which an adjournment was secured. Sir Wilfred Laurier made the late Mr. Prefontaine, his minister of Marine, when he knew he was corrupt. In fact he had a national reputation for corruption. But Sir Wilfred gave him one of the big spending departments. Mr. Fielding allowed the Farmers’ Bank to open its doors when he had abundance of evidence that it was a crooked organization from its very inception. Look over the ministers in the Laurier Government as it appeals for supper in 1911 and compare the administration with that of 1896 and see how are they mighty fallen. What a descent from Sir Oliver Mowat to Pugsley; from Sir Louis Davis to Broduer; from Sir Henri Joly to Oliver. Sir Wilfred does not want such a comparison to be made. He has introduced the reciprocity issue to cover up the corruption of his colleagues. The Press would try to persuade farmers to vote for the Grit candidate and put back into power Laurier and the most corrupt Government in existence. They might fool a few Jackdaws. The scribe’s advance is turn them out and try a new broom which in our experience always sweeps clean.

1916 Sep 14 – Fork River

P. Zack, of Winnipeg, has purchased the stock of J.S. Nowosad and intends carrying on the business. Mr. Nowosad has accepted a position with the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Sergant, of Kamsack, and late of Dauphin, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. W. Coultas on the Fork River.
Miss Pearl Wilson is teaching the Pine View School for the present.
On Sunday morning Mrs. Archie McMillian passed away after a period of illness. Deceased was one of the old settlers. The last three years the family resided at Kindersley, Sask. Of late Mrs. McMillian has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. C.E. Bailey.
The harvest home festival services in All Saints’ Church were well attended and the services were interesting throughout. The church was tastefully decorated for the occasion with flowers, fruit and vegetables and those who took part deserve credit. Mr. Butler preached his farewell sermon. He left for Wycliffe College on Monday to take up his studies. His departure is regretted.
Rain has delayed thrashing operations.
The duck pond opposite the post office is increasing in area. There should be good shooting when the season opens.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 11 – 1913

1913 Sep 11 – A Cucumber Freak

A cucumber entirely filling the inside of a bottle with a narrow neck is on exhibition at the Dauphin Pharmacy and is regarded as quite a curiosity. The cucumber was grown by WM. Murray, but how he got it through the narrow neck of the bottle is a problem not yet exhibited nor is Mr. M. willing to reveal this secret.

1913 Sep 11 – Fork River

I.F. Hafenbrak and Chas. Steen, of Dauphin, were visitors to the farm of Frank Hafenbrak last week between trains.
Mrs. Bert Cooper and family have taken a short vacation to Winnipegosis.
Geo. Lampard, of Dauphin, was out among the farmers and secured a car of cattle and hogs for shipment.
We are informed that some of our sportsmen are taking lessons in automobile driving. The victim went south on a flat car. There’s nothing like sport. It comes high sometimes but we must have it.
Mr. Wood, post office inspector, of Winnipeg, visited Postmaster Kennedy and found everything in good shape in the office.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with her brother, W. Coultas, on the Fork.
The annual harvest service will be held in All Saints’ English Church on Sunday, September the 31st, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. All are invited to attend this annual thanksgiving service.
Harvesting is in full swing and bumper crops are looked for by all buy may not materialize in every case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 29 – 1912

1912 Aug 29 – Ethelbert

Miss Ada Willey, has come to take up her duties as teacher at the senior school.
The British American Elevator Co. is putting in a foundation for a 50 thousand bushel elevator.
Considerable rain has fallen here of late.
K. McLean is getting better day by day, which his friends will be glad to learn.

1912 Aug 29 – Fork River

Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, accountant for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a couple of days with D. Kennedy.
Edwin King left for Minnedosa for a short time on business.
We are informed one of our farmers is putting up hay with a sky pilot. That accounts for the showery weather no doubt.
Miss Annie Briggs and Miss Mabel Tindale returned from a visit to the Lake Town last week.
Mr. Combes, of the Fork, took a short vacation to Dauphin on business.
Mrs. Chapman and her daughter, who spent the last month with her brother, Wm. Coultas, has left for her home in Winnipeg.
Sam Hunter who spent the last two months in Ontario, has returned. He states Manitoba is good enough for him.
Courtney Wilson and E. Briggs are paying Dauphin a visit on business.
N. Little has cut his fall wheat and several others cut their wild oats some time ago. Don’t sow your wild oats in future.
Give Will Davis a call and he will put you in to something good in Texas farm lands for sale on easy terms.
Same Bailey paid Winnipegosis a flying visit on business, as also Herman Godkin, real estate agent.
We are sorry to hear our alderman had a lapse of memory for a short period lately and we trust it will return shortly, as Sammy Veller says its very convenient sometimes.
Can anyone explain how it costs forty cents to ship an article to Winnipegosis by express and a week after the same article came back by express costing only thirty cents. We give it up. No offence meant.
Looking over the Winnipegosis news in the Press of August 22nd it appears as if the correspondent wants this scribe’s scalp to add to his belt. We are amused at the statement. We of F.R. are not satisfied with the medical officer’s choice of residence. Does his conscience prick him. Ba! Read the article over again friends and you will not find any mention of residence. We stated nothing but plain facts and by the way he seems to dodge the issue. They are too plain for some one’s liking. If the matter had been attended to as was promised nothing further would have been said. Bluff won’t work any more and so get down ti biz. What the people want is the manure and rubbish taken further away and it’s the health officer’s place to see it done when it’s mentioned to him whoever he is and we advise the Winnipegosis correspondent to be careful of himself as he might see snakes next time and be under the hands of the M.D. Keep to facts in future if you have anything to say, “M.O.H.” whatever it means, we do not know, it might be member of hades or some other place. We’ll let it go at that. Ta, ta for the present.
The writer of the Mowat picnic seems to have bitten off more than he could chew and the more he tries to explain the further he gets in the mire. In our opinion he always had cold feet.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1912

1912 Aug 8 – Thos. Spence Drowned

Thos. Spence, a half-breed, fell out of a boat he was crossing the Mossey River in at Winnipegosis a few days ago and was drowned. His body was recovered shortly after the accident.
Spence was formerly a resident of Dauphin and was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and several children.

1912 Aug 8 – Ethelbert

James Miles and family have gone to Stenan, Sask., to live. He is going into business there.
Kenneth McLean is seriously ill at the home of his brother, L.M. McLean. He is very sick and fears are entertained for his recovery. He expressed a wish to see his beloved niece, Cassie, who is at Arran and she came done on Sunday evening.
The new bridge entering the town is finished, and is a fair specimen of local work.
Police Magistrate R. Skaife had several cases before him on Saturday afternoon. Vonella Kuzzett, for threatening his brother-in-law, John Malyszyk, was bound over to keep the peace and he of good behaviour for twelve months. Also Vonella Kuzsyk was fined ten dollars and costs for shooting prairie chickens out of season, or in defaulting month. Nikola Kulchyski was also fined ten dollars and costs for an unprovoked assault on Audrian Skelkuoski, of Fork River, or in default one month.

1912 Aug 8 – Fork River

Professor J. Spearing, of Valley River, spent some time here renewing old acquaintances.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, inspected the work done by the dredge and we have been informed that A. Munro has been appointed dredge master for the present and his work so far is satisfactory.
Miss Joyce Sergant returned home after spending a week’s stay with Mrs. W. Coultas in Fork River.
Gorden Weaver has accepted a position of master mechanic at the Armstrong Trading Co. store.
Miss Grant arrived and will wield the rod of correction at the Pine View School for the coming term.
Miss Cameron who was been spending her holidays at her uncle’s, A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned to Neepawa.
We were pleased to see the Rev. H.H. Scrase walking around town with W. King, warden, the other day and hope that he will be able to take up his work this fall.
Mr. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are having a week’s vacation with Noah Johnston, at Mowat Centre.
H. Armstrong has branched out in the contracting and building line and is building an addition to Mr. Nowsade’s residence.
The ratepayers are of the opine that it is time that an itemized statement of accounts of all ward appropriations and general expenditures, as demanded by the status, be got out in pamphlet form.
Mr. Tubath and family are enjoying their vacation at S. Reid’s on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter are visiting with W. Coultas.
A very pleasant evening was spent in Orange Hall on Friday. Dancing was indulged till daylight.
The Misses Tindall, of Rathwell, are having a pleasant time at their uncle’s, Me. T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey.
The stores are doing a rushing business these days in raspberries and blueberries.
The postponed picnic at Lake Dauphin was held on the 30th. It was a fine day. Although there was not as large a turnout as usual a very pleasant time was spent in sports and boating.

1912 Aug 8 – Mowat Picnic

Those who chanced their luck at the Mowat picnic, which took place at Dauphin Lake on Mr. T. Briggs’ land, by his kind permission on Tuesday, July 30th were not sorry they put in an appearance. The rain, which came the previous Tuesday no doubt dampened the spirits of some, otherwise we should have had a much larger turnout; despite the fact that one or two of our Fork River worthies would have liked it to be a failure. Dame nature smiled upon us and we had a roaring good time. Nat Little’s oranges and candies were in good demand. Fortunately everyone’s ice cream freezers are not so easily broken and Mrs. C. Clark’s came in fine and handy. Even the lemons were made to “spin out,” no doubt much to the annoyance of some individuals. Hard lines, some of the folks had to leave early and therefor missed most of the sport. The Fairville boys enjoyed themselves immensely to say nothing of the ladies. We tender our hearty thanks to them for their cooperation and sympathy. They came off well in the sports, except in the football match. Keep smiling, better luck in this line next time. Our best thanks are extended to all who tried to make it a success, especially to the Lacey family, Briggs family and Sandy and Mrs. Cameron. Need I add some of the boys did not forget to look sheep’s eyes at the girls. It’s a habit handed down.