Today in the Dauphin Herald – March 18, 1920

Death of Joseph P. Grenon

There passed away at Winnipegosis on the 11th inst. one of the most widely known men in northern Manitoba in the person of Joseph P. Grenon. Deceased contracted influenza and developed pneumonia. He was in his forty-second year. The Grenon family moved from Fort William, Ontario, to Winnipegosis almost a quarter of a century ago. The railroad reached Winnipegosis in 1897, and from that date the development of the village and the district commenced. At that period Lake Winnipegosis teamed with fish and with the facilities afforded of transportation by rail and the fishing industry soon developed. One of the first outside companies to become interested was the Armstrong Trading Company, which represented at that time the Booth interests of Chicago. Young “Josey” Grenon was appointed manager of the company and was not long in displaying business qualities of much more than the ordinary standard. The company carried on a general store in connection with the fish and for years the Armstrong Trading Company was a household word in the north. As can be readily understood a man of Mr. Grenon’s ability was note allowed to confine his efforts entirely to private business interests. When the municipality of Mossey River was organized some years ago he had the honour of being its first reeve, and a few years later when the village of Winnipegosis was incorporated he was chosen to fill the mayor’s chair.
In politics he was a Conservative and wielded considerable influence at election times. When Winnipegosis became part of the provincial constituency of Gilbert Plains he was one of those placed in nomination at the Conservative convention.
In an aggressive, though short short career, it could not but be expected that he had met with, in some cases, strenuous opposition, and, at times, relations became somewhat strained, but it would be hard to find one who had more friends and whose passing caused more real sorrow.
He is survived by a widow, two daughters and two sons.
The funeral took place on Saturday and was largely attended. About fifty went from Dauphin and others were in attendance from Portage la Prairie and Winnipeg.
The service was conducted by the Rev. Father Brachet, of Pine Creek, in the Roman Catholic Church.
Many beautiful wreaths covered the casket.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – August 28, 1919

G.W.V.A. Notes

(Contributed by J.M. Chalmers, secretary.)
Members of the above association are asked to note that the regular meeting called for 28th inst. Has been cancelled. This is owing to the fact that threshing operations make it pretty nearly impossible for the majority of the comrades to attend. In fact, at this time of the year it is hard for any to attend. The next meeting will be held on the 11th of September and all the members are asked to make an effort to be present as business of importance will be placed before the comrades.
The rooms are proving their use these days. During the month of July some 250 comrades slept in them and this number will be exceeded during the present month. We have within the past two weeks had a large number of comrades from the east looking for work in the harvest fields and on threshing gangs and the fact that these men are able to put up in these rooms until they have been placed has been a boon to mauy, and the manner in which they have expressed their appreciation speaks well for Dauphin.
We are informed that Comrade G.F. King has been notified that he is to be presented with the Military Medal, earned whilst he was in France by the Prince of Wales during his visit to Winnipeg. This will mean another parade for George, but he will doubtless endure same in consideration of the fact that by doing so he is giving a boost to the Vets of Dauphin, to say nothing of the town in general.

Verdict in Favor of Mr. Grenon

In the suit of the Armstrong Trading Co. Ltd., against T.P. Grenon for possession of the property known as the Commercial hotel, Winnipegosis, has resulted in favor of defendant. Mr. Grenon’s counter-claim for rent was allowed. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented Mr. Grenon and a Winnipeg firm the A.T. Co.

Winnipegosis

The ladies of the Woman’s institute entertained the children of the town at a picnic at the beach on Wednesday Aug. 20th. Races and games were the order of the day, for which prizes were given and a beautiful lunch and parcel of candy to each child. After having a good time they were taken home in cars by the Misses Grenon, Dr. Medd and Mr. Bradley.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 17, 1919

Fined $200 for Operating Still

Nikola Presiloski, of Valley River, appeared before the police magistrate this week on the charge of “operating a still illegally.” He pleaded guilty and was fined $200 and $7 costs. The brand of whiskey manufactured by Presiloski is said, by those who sampled it, to be the best they ever imbibed.
Constable Coleridge, laid information against Joe Woiak, for failing to register under “Alien Enemy Act.” He was fined $10 and $5 costs.

G.W.V.A. Barn Dance

A barn dance was held on July 10th under the auspices of the Great War Veterans’ association in the barn of Mr. Arthur Fisher, Burrows. Some 150 people made the trip, and as the roads were good and the weather all that could be desired, a good time was spent. The McMurray orchestra was in attendance and, as usual, this was an assurance that the music was of the highest order. After all expenses had been paid a good sum was turned over to the association which will help their work and bring nearer the fond hope of the members that at some time, and it is hoped soon, they will be able to see their way to having quarters owned by the association as a permanent home for the veterans of the district. The thanks of the association are due to Mr. Fisher, who has placed his barn at the disposal of the association on two occasions this summer, and also to the various ladies and gentlemen who assisted in the arrangements.

G.W.V.A. Notes

Members of the above Association are asked to note that the meeting will be on Thursday night at 9 o’clock in place of 8 as usual. This change is to prevent a clash with the baseball game to be played the same evening. Members are requested to put in an appearance as matters of importance will be discussed. The executive of the association is informed that an Order-in-Council has been passed extending the War Service Gratuity to men that have seen service in England, but did not proceed to France. Particulars have been requested as to the manner in which application should be made for same and comrades will be notified on receipt of same.
This association wishes to thank those ladies who kindly sent cakes for the dance recently held at Mr. Fisher’s barn, also to Mr. Fisher for the use of his place.

Peace Day Observance

Dauphin citizens will observe Peace Day by a short service in the town hall at 10 a.m. In the afternoon a basket picnic will be held in the park with a program of sports for the children.

Sentenced to Five Years

The town of Dauphin laid a charge of “vagrancy” against Wm. Boyko. He appeared for trial before P.M. Hawkins on Monday. He entered a plea of not guilty but was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment in the Industrial Training School at Portage la Prairie on Tuesday. Boyko’s previous record is bad.

Winnipegosis

Geo. Spence, who has been overseas for over two years, returned home last week.
A party of surveyors are surveying the new railway line from Toutes Aides to Winnipegosis.
Miss A. St. Godard, of the Pas, is visiting her sister before going to Winnipeg to reside.
Misses Myrtle and Edna Grenon were passengers to the city on Saturday to meet their father. They will leave for Minneapolis to send their holidays.
Mrs. St. Amour and Misses A. and H. St. Godard left on Saturday for a visit to Winnipeg.
A fire occurred in the Armstrong Trading Company’s oil sheds this week, but was put out before serious damage was done.
F.G. Shears, J.P. Grenon and A.H. Steele have left for Winnipeg in connection with the suit started by the Armstrong Trading Co. against J.P. Grenon as to the ownership of the Winnipegosis hotel.
This has been a dry season here but lots of rain has fallen this week which has put the crops in good condition.
The lake steamers have been overhauled and have made several successful trips up to the north end of the lake, establishing new fishing posts.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 26, 1919

The Great Strike Over

The greatest strike in the history of the country is virtually over. The sympathetic strike has been declared off and hundreds of the strikers have returned to work and others are returning as fast as places can be found for them.
The staff of the Dauphin Telephone Exchange all returned to work on Wednesday, and the local trains are scheduled to run again. Most of the men, if not all, are expected to be back at their places in the shops by the end of the week.

Winnipegosis

The Great War Veterans’ Association held a successful picnic at the baseball grounds here on June 20th. The program of sports was attractive and drew a large crowd of visitors. There were foot races for men, women and children. Fast and slow horse races were also held. There was other variety with the hop.-step and jump race, the running jump and the tug of war. Fork River won the football game and Winnipegosis won the baseball game. Each team got a prize of $25, and both games were spirited and hotly contested.
Mrs. E.A. Morrison, after spending a few months holiday with her daughter, Mrs. E. Cartwright, has departed for her home in Kerrobert, Sask.
Hugh Armstrong was a business visitor in town last week.
Mrs. Geo. Spence has left for Winnipeg to meet her husband who is returning from overseas after over two years military service.
Miss M. Olsen, who has been nursing C. Burrell, left on Tuesday for her home in Winnipeg.
R. Montgomery, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is in town for a few days on business.
The season is very dry here and rain is badly needed.
The strike in Winnipeg is making conditions awkward and the town is having trouble in getting mail and freight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 27 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 27 – Given Two Months

Peter Pandro, a Galician from the Fork River district, appeared before P.M. Munson on Friday, charged with stealing a gold watch from W. Lawson, with whom he had been working. Pandro acknowledged the theft and was sentenced to two months in jail at Portage la Prairie.

1913 Nov 27 – Had Nose Broken

A spread rail near Kamsack threw two cars of a freight train off the track on Wednesday and delayed traffic for several hours. Brakeman John McRae, of this town, had his nose broken in the accident.

1913 Nov 27 – Fork River

Miss Alice Clark, of Dauphin, is spending a shot time here among her friends.
John Mathews left for Winnipegosis, having taken a position with Frank Hector, storekeeper.
N. Slobojan, Mowat Centre, is a visitor to Dauphin on business.
Messrs. Forst and Howitson and others took in the dance at Winnipegosis on Thursday night and report a whale of a time, never to be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordan Weaver, of Winnipegosis are spending the weekend at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Fred. King and S. Bailey returned from a trip north and report the fishing town exceptionally quiet.
“Say, Mike, run over to the store and get us a dozen fresh eggs while we unload.” Arriving at the store he shouted back: “Pat, there’s only eleven eggs and Biddy’s on the nest. Hold the train a minute.” Then biddy flies off and Mike arrives with the dozen eggs all O.K., and off we go for Dauphin. Next.
Fred. Cooper has arrived home from a few days vacation at Dauphin.
Wm. Stonehouse, carpenter and contractor, has returned home after spending the summer with the A.T. Co., at Winnipegosis and South Bay.
The members of the S.S. and Women’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held a meeting on Wednesday and arranged for a Xmas tree and programme to be held in Dec. 23rd.
Mr. Elliot, Methodist student of Winnipegosis, is spending the weekend visiting members of his congregation.
Alfred Snelgrove has returned home from Yorkton, where he has been the last two months with his threshing outfit.
Dunc. Briggs and MAX King have left for the north to draw fish for the Armstrong Trading Co.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Howard Armstrong, of Fork River, who was under remand on a charge of stealing, was brought up before the magistrate, Mr. Parker, on Monday, the case being dismissed for want of evidence, a verdict that was popular with all.
Miss Spence proceeded to Dauphin hospital on Monday, having to be conveyed to the station on an ambulance.
The government school inspector, conducted by Coun. Tom Toye, made a visit to all the schools in the district during the past week.
Mr. De Rouchess, of Pine Creek, has suffered a great loss through having some thousands of skins confiscated by the Inspector visiting his store.
A dance was given by the bachelors in conjunction with the spinsters (who supplied the refreshments) of this town on Monday night. Everybody enjoyed themselves immensely, the “turkey trot” and “bunny hug” being in great demand, the dancing lasting up to the wee sma’ hours of the morning. The music was supplied by Mr. Watson, being ably assisted by his wife. Noticeably among the guests present were Constable Hunkings, Messrs. Cunliffe, Paddock, Morton and Watson and their respective wives with Misses Stevenson, Goodman and many others. Numerous “boys” from Fork River took the opportunity of enjoying themselves on this occasion.
I. Foster, reeve of Landsdowne, near Galdstone, visited us on Wednesday for the purpose of buying a couple of car loads of cattle, but found that the surrounding country had been gleaned by previous operators who already left.
Mr. Graffe has taken over the Lake View hotel livery stable and no doubt this caterer for equine wants will make a success of it, as “Billy” Ford, proprietor of the hotel, has gone to considerable expense in renovating the barn and being a genial “Mine host” with a charming personality, both man and beast will be well provided for.
“Billy” Walmesley, pool room proprietor, intends standing as councillor for ward 4 in the coming election, and as he is greatly respected, it is hoped that everybody will give the support due to him, as he is an old timer, always to the front in all kinds of sport and making it his business to push forward the interests of the town on every occasion. “Billy” should do well in the council chamber as he has a most varied and vigorous style of speech.
Captain Reid, of Shoal River, is visiting the town after a considerable absence.

1913 Nov 27 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Nov. 21.
Frank Hechter was the delegate to the District Grain Growers convention at Dauphin. Frank is now a horny handed son of toil.
The snowstorm on Monday has put a stop to the stock grazing in the open.
The ratepayers from this section will attend the next meeting of the council, on Dec. 5th, in a body. This will mean a road to the school.
Mr. Wenger is contemplating holding an auction sale at an early date.

1913 Nov 27 – Ethelbert

Mr. A. McPhedran and wife have returned from Fort William, where they were visiting relatives.
Mr. Leary has been to Winnipeg interviewing the Returned Soldiers Pension Board.
Miss McLennan was a visitor to the hospital here this week.
The Victory Loan in Ethelbert sure was a success. The allotment was $25 000, but over $45 000 was subscribed. The canvassers did good work.

1913 Nov 27 – Winnipegosis

Monday, Dec. 22nd, at the Rex Hall, is the date fixed for the Union Sunday School Christmas tree and entertainment. The scholars are engaged upon the preparation of a comedy entitled “Santa Claus and the Magic Carpet,” and a good miscellaneous program.
Mr. F.G. Shears returned on Saturday from a trip to Dauphin.
The winter fishing season opened on the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

1919 Nov 20 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. John Dobson and family, of Winnipeg, are visiting at the home of Reeve Venables.
D.F. Wilson, sec. treasurer is attending the Union of Municipalities convention at Winnipeg this week.
Milton Cooper, who has been in the Dauphin Hospital, is improving.
F.F. Haffenbrak is on a visit to Ninette, Man.
With the milder weather the attendance at Sunday school has increased. 42 were in attendance last Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 6 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 6 – Fork River

Mrs. D.F. Wilson and daughter, Miss Pearl, returned from a month’s visit to Ontario. They report a very pleasant time.
F.B. Lacey from Mowat Centre, returned from a visit to Dauphin on business and to attend the teachers’ convention.
We are informed that Capt. Cain, of Mowat, left for Dauphin to take out a license of some sort. Time will tell whether it is for fish, flesh or fowl.
Mrs. Frost and daughter, of Rathwell, are visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reid, on the Mossey River.
Mrs. C.E. Bailey, is spending the week in Dauphin, with friends.
Archie McDonald, who has been busy with a gang ditching on the company’s farm here, has returned to Winnipegosis, the ground having frozen too hard to do any more work this season.
Miss J. Weatherhead, teacher of the Mossey River School, spent the weekend with friends at Dauphin.
Mr. Roe, of Neepawa, has left for the west with his second consignment of cattle from this point.
John Seiffert, and Steve Letwyn, of Winnipegosis, are busy among the farmers, buying cattle for the company’s at South Bay.
Wm. Coultas has invested in stock and intends stall feeding them for Xmas beef. We believe Billy is on the road to become a millionaire in the near future. Farmers take notice and follow suit.
Frank Clawson, of Dauphin, is here renewing old acquaintances.
Mrs. N. Little, and daughter, Miss Grace, took a trip south on business for a few days.
Mr. O’Callagan, of Portage la prairie, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., is visiting the Co.’s store on his semi-annual tour of inspection, and is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Messrs. Sturdy, White and Shears, of Winnipegosis, are busy at the Co.’s store this week taking stock.
Mrs. Stonehouse and daughter, Miss Sylvia paid the lake town a visit this week.
Hallowe’en passed off with the usual result. Some are minus their gates, others are looking for strayed buggies. The bell of All Saints’ received its annual visit and was fixed up as usual to keep it from running away, while the other building is left in peace as usual. This is where unity comes in, we suppose; yes, with a vengeance.
Our Winnipegosis friends seem to be grieved at the way they are used by the Mossey River municipal board and would like to know if anybody knows that Mossey River is on the map. Better ask somebody else, I guess. But one thing we do know at tax paying time we are not allowed to forget our residence. Not very likely Mike.

1913 Nov 6 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Coffey was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday’s train.
The ice on the lake is firm enough to permit travel between the mainland and Snake Island. If the weather becomes warm again which it threatens now, navigation will be resumed.
Frank Hechter left for Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday. Frank is up and down pretty often and helps keep the C.N.R. running.
J.P. Grenon is off to Quebec, where he will study mink farming. The mink farm at Macaza has proved a decided success and he is anxious to learn something of the methods employed in rearing this little animal which produces such a fine grade of fur. The fox branch of Mr. G’s ranch is making progress, and there is every prospect of it becoming a profitable industry. Fish and fur producing animals abound in this part of the West and if the industries flourish as we hope they will there is no reason why the people here should not become prosperous, if not wealthy. The fishing industry is a great asset and the timber resources are large and are being profitable exploited. With good land for farming and cattle raising at the back of all, no part of he West offers better inducements for settlers than this town and district.
The telephone line is now completed and it is sure to prove a great convenience. Postmaster Ketcheson is in charge of the service. The connections are small at present but they are sure to grow. Those connected up with the service are Canadian Lakes Fishing Co., The Armstrong Trading Co. and Frank Hechter. Dauphin is the Central checking office.
Cattle buyers have been in the district of late but have not secured many animals as that canna Scot, Capt. Dugald McAuley, usually covers the district like a blanket.

1919 Nov 6 – Soldiers Banqueted at Fork River

One of the largest banquets held in Northern Manitoba took place at Fork River on Friday night, the 31st ult. The banquet was gotten up by the people of the Mossey River municipality and tendered to the returned soldiers. The supper was held in the Orange Hall, and it is estimated that fully two hundred and fifty people sat down to the splendid spread prepared by the ladies of the district.
Mossey River municipality was well represented by her sturdy sons in France and Flanders, and, like all Canadians, they did their part well. Some of the boys were destined not to return and today rest under the sod across the ocean. Others survived their wounds. The occasion was one for rejoicing.
Each soldier was remembered in a tangible form and presented with either a gold watch and guard or a well-filled purse. It was a recognition of the men well worthy of any community.

TOAST LIST.
Following the supper there was a short toast list. Mr. Geo. King, of Dauphin, was toastmaster. The list included “The King.”
“The British Empire,” proposed by Geo. Spence, of Winnipegosis, and responded to by Principal Jonasson, of Winnipegosis, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts.
“The Municipality of Mossey River,” proposed by ex-Reeve F.B. Lacey, and responded to by Coun. Hunt and Mrs. D.F. Wilson.
“Our Hosts and Hostesses,” was proposed by the Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin.
The address to the soldiers was read by Mr. Wm. King, and the presentations made by Sergt. Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis.
The men made suitable replies, in which they each returned their heartfelt thanks.
At the conclusion of the speech making the hall was cleared and the young people indulged in a dance.
There were a number of guests present from Dauphin, Winnipegosis and other points.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 21 – 1913

1913 Aug 21 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Patrick McLeod, a half-breed, aged 16 years, was drowned at Winnipegosis on Sunday afternoon. He and some other boys were playing about the steamer Manitou, when he fell overboard and was drowned.

1913 Aug 21 – Fork River

Mrs. Jas. Weatherhead, of Dauphin, is spending the week with her daughter at C.E. Bailey’s on the Mossey.
Mr. Noble, Methodist student at Mafeking, is here renewing acquaintances for a few days.
The Methodist picnic was held on the 13th. It was an ideal picnic day and a good crowd turned out considering the busy season. There were sports of all kinds and the booth did a roaring trade. The baseball game between the married and single ladies was won by the single ladies.
Professor Sas Poo was kept busy telling fortunes during his stay here. There is some thing he ken and there’s other things he don’ ken, as the Scotchman would say.
Professor Weaver has severed his connection with the A.T. Co. and is making for his farm at Million. Whether there’s millions in it for Gordon remains to be seen.
Gerald Stuart has left for Winnipeg, where he intends taking up school teaching.
Dunk. Kennedy and wife and S. Bailey returned from the Stampede at Winnipeg and report a lively time.
Mrs. Tallbath and family of Winnipeg, and visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sam Reid, on the Mossey River.
The Power Co. of Dauphin have their survey party busy taking levels on the Mossey River one mile north of town.
The farmers are busy cutting their fall wheat and barley now and by the end of this week cutting will be general. Thee are some fields of real good fall wheat in this district and prospects are away ahead of what was expected considering the wet season.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 14 – 1913

1913 Aug 14 – Ethelbert

Captain (Mrs.) Tutte, of the Salivation Army, is visiting her mother, Mrs. A. Willey, for a few days.
Mrs. McVicar, formerly of Garland, now of Brandon, is renewing old acquaintances at Ethelbert, and is stating at the station agent’s home.
Mrs. McDonald of Fort William, youngest sister of J. McLean, is visiting old scenes hereabout.
Mrs. Rod Campbell, the oldest sister of Mrs. McPhedrian, is visiting relatives in this neighbourhood.
H. Brachman has been gazetted as J.P.
There is a fear amongst the famers that the copious rain may injure the crop prospects.
Great quantities of berries are being shipped east and west; more than 100 pails a day.
This is a great country for fruit, wheat, hay, eggs, and last but not the least in mosquitoes. They come and go in millions.

1913 Aug 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Walter Cooper, Sr., left for a two weeks’ vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Sam Bailey left for a week’s visit to his son Frank at Winnipeg.
James McDonald, assistance express agent, left for a well-earned vacation at Winnipeg.
Miss Pearl Wilson has left for Dauphin for a short visit.
Mrs. W. Williams returned from a week’s rest in the south.
J. Stewart, of North Lake, was in town lately and reports the roads out that way very bad.
Postmaster Kennedy and wife are off to Winnipeg to take in the stampede in company with the Mayor of Winnipegosis and several others from this point.
Miss Alice Godkin is spending a week with Mrs. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, with the Misses Kennedy.
Miss M. Nixon left for Winnipeg, after a month’s vacation here with friends.
St. John Butler, of Winnipegosis, has charge of the A.T. Co. store, during manager Kennedy’s absence.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, who has been visiting with her grandmother, Mrs. R. Snelgrove for some time, has returned home.
Although the council passed a by-law to the effect that all stock was to be on the owners property during sunset and sunrise and not allowed to run at large, we find cattle and ponies running at all hours of the night, and in places it is unsafe to drive along the roads dark nights for fear of tumbling over them.
The heavy rains of this week have stopped the haying and road making for a short time.
Councillor Hunt let several contracts for roads to Contractor Briggs and others. We trust there will be an open fall so this work can be done.
John Mathews, electrician for the A.T. Co., is intending to go into the pork raising business as a side issue. We wish him all kinds of success as Jack’s a pretty good fellow.
Our esteemed friends, Fred. Storrar, has charge of the cream department and is giving good satisfaction.
Much interest is being taken in the baseball match between the married and single ladies which is to come off on the 13th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 7 – 1913

1913 Aug 7 – First Rat Seen at Dauphin

One swallow does not make a summer but the indications always are that when one makes its appearance others will not be long in following. The first rat, so far as our information goes, was seen at the railway station a few days ago by O. Law, of the express office. The rodent was a large one and run under the platform when a rock was thrown at it.

1913 Aug 7 – Fork River

Mr. Dryden returned from a short stay in Dauphin and is going into the hay business.
Mrs. Murray, of Selkirk, has been spending a week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Miss Weatherhead has returned from her holidays and the Mossey River School stated on Monday.
The herd law came into force August 1st for one day only and another was substituted in its place of no earthly use as we see. There endeth another municipal shuffle.
Mr. Jones agent for the London Assurance Co. has been around inspecting their business in this part. He thinks this part of the country all right.
Master Laurie Rowe invited a number of his young friends to his home at the farm one day last week. All present report having a jolly time.
A number of young folks spent a very pleasant evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt in honour of Miss Nixon, who is leaving to resume school duties after the holidays.
H. Armstrong returned from Dauphin where he was working and intends to go into farming again.
D. Kennedy was a visitor at the Lake Town Sunday.
Mr. O’Callaghan, chief auditor, and Mr. Shears, accountant, were at the A.T. Co’s store on Wednesday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 10 – 1913

1913 Jul 10 – Greek Church Burned

The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing River, near Fork River, was struck by lightning during an electric storm sat week and was burned to the ground. There was no insurance on the building.

1913 Jul 10 – Ethelbert

K.F. Slipetz, sec.-treasurer is visiting Winnipeg this week and taking in the exhibition.
Fine rains of late and crops looking good.
Road work is progressing throughout the municipality. We all want good roads.
Wild strawberries are coming in small quantities. The crop will be a light one this season, although the late rains have improved the berries some.
Ethelbert is preparing for a big celebration on the 18th inst. There will be races and other sports and we invite all our neighbours to come and have a good time.

1913 Jul 10 – Fork River

R. Bell is taking a vacation with his friends at Dauphin.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending her holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mr. Noble, Methodist stunt who has had charge of the circuit during the last 12 months, left to take up his summer’s work at Mafeking mission.
Miss C. Grant, teacher of Pine View School, is spending her holidays at Foxwarren.
Mr. Comber was a visitor to the Lake Town on business last week.
Miss. M. Nixon is spending her summer holidays with her sister, Mrs. A. Rowe.
Mrs. D. McLean and Mrs. A.J. Snelgrove are taking a month’s holiday’s visiting friends at Regina.
Mrs. J. Rice, of North Lake district, was in town on important business lately.
James Johnston and family, who have been spending the winter at the government hatchery on Snake Island, have returned to the farm for a time.
July 1st was warm and bright, just the day for a holiday and quite a number took advantage of it. Where were all those teams loaded with old-timers and their wives going? Why, to help Mrs. Wm. Northam to celebrate her 62nd birthday to be sure. On arriving at her beautiful place on the banks of the Fork River our hostess conducted us to a pretty grove beside the house, where tables were laid for dinner. The tables were decorated with flowers and were well loaded with turkey, chicken and other good things to temp the inner man. Dinner over, the afternoon was spent in talking over old times and other pleasant themes. Mrs. Northam was the recipient of many ??? ??? ??? ??? the good wishes of all conveyed to her. After supper all left for home having had a very pleasant time. We trust this will only be one of such pleasant gatherings.
A severe electric storm passed over this district last week. The Greek Catholic Church at Fishing Rive was destroyed by lightning and the brick chimney on the Armstrong Trading Co.’s store here was badly shaken up and it will have to be rebuilt. The water is higher than it has been for years.
James Campbell and W. Foley, of Winnipegosis, are starting to summer fallow the Snelgrove farm lately purby F.P. Grenon, of the A.T. Co.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 12 – 1913

1913 Jun 12 – Ethelbert

The last week or so of fine hot weather has made a great transformation; the trees and flowers are decked out in all their loveliness and Ethelbert now looks good for picnickers.
Two autos came from Gilbert Plains and had an ideal run.
I.J. Katz had his farm house raided whilst he was at Pelly by a dozen school boys whose ages ranged from 8 to 14. The magistrate had them and their parents before him, and made them pay for the damage and loss, and advised the parents to look after the boys better, and to use small willows as a corrective.
The post office has got a new coat of paint all round, steel grey and dark trimmings, and looks very well in its new dress.
The ??? train will visit Ethelbert on Monday, the 23rd, and it is proposed to hold a general picnic that day in its honour. A good attendance is expected.
A tennis club has been formed and a nice court marked out, and play for the summer has commenced.

1913 Jun 12 – Fork River

A concert was held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the Methodist Church, which was a success, there being a large attendance.
Is not remarkable that if a horse or cow belonging to a farmer strays into the village they are about devoured by dogs. On the other hand if a farmer has a few bags of grain shipped in for seed, and if, it is left on the platform for a few hours the town horses are allowed to rip and tear them at will while the owners of these pests looks on and congratulate themselves that it is lawful for them to do so and pay no damages.
Mr. Skelpen and wife are visitors at the home of T.N. Briggs.
Jack Mathews has accepted a position with the Armstrong Trading Co. He comes direct from London, England.
Miss Sparling, of Dauphin, returned home after a few days’ visit with Mrs. C. Bailey on the Mossey.
Miss Weatherhead is spending the week-end at her home in Dauphin.
Mrs. Peter Ellis returned home from a short visit to her folks in Dryden, Ont.
Mrs. W. King, president of the W.A. and delegate to the W.A. convention, Winnipeg, returned home on Saturday.
H. Benner, of Dauphin, is busy renewing old acquaintances for a few days.
Wm. Northam was a visitor to the Lake Town.
Wm. King, registration clerk, returned from the north and reports mosquitoes in full force up that way.
D. Kennedy returned from attending the Masonic rally in Dauphin and reports a good time.
Messrs. Robinson and Briggs, contractors, are rushing things in the building line.
John Seiffert, manager of the A.T. Co. farms, was here inspecting the Snelgrove farm and to see about seeding it.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 8 – 1913

1913 May 8 – Fork River

Seeding is the order of the day. The land is getting in good order and everyone is as busy as bees and expects to put in a large crop if the fine weather continues.
John Clemens, of Dauphin, was up inspecting his farm and intends putting in a crop.
“Say, Mike, did yees notice the state of the crossing in front of the express office? It looks like Paddy’s pants, “more holy than righteous.” Some one will get hurt there yet.”
“Well, Pat, I am told it is caused by the heavy mail passing over it to the municipal office. Shure they are mistaken as I notice all the crossings in Winnipegosis are about busted up, too. They have only been down one year.”
“Well, Mike, its either those heavy draft horses of Josies that’s playing the divel with them crossings or their not built right. We’ll have to see the reeve about it. Fancy building crossings on Main Street with two inch spruce plank.”
We notice in last week’s issue a paragraph about early hatching of eggs in Manitoba given as the 11th April and we would like to inform our readers that Dunc Kennedy had chicks out on the 1st of March and are now well grown. What about Fork River for poultry raising. There were raised by the hen.
Mrs. A. Cameron and Mrs. G. Shannon of Mowat Centre were visitors to the Lake Town this week.
R.C. Sparling, real estate agent of Dauphin, paid us a short visit on business.
Mrs. Wm. King returned from a two weeks’ visit to her daughter, Mrs. E. Morris, at Winnipegosis.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, returned from Dauphin and states Mrs. William is improving in health.
Miss Ena Fredrickson has been transferred to the Armstrong Trading Co. store at Winnipegosis. She will be missed her and her numerous friends wish her a pleasant time in her new position.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has received word from the Synod that he and his family are to be transferred to Kinisota on Lake Manitoba as soon as arrangements are completed.
We are pleased to see Sam Baily around town again after being confined to the house for some time.
Wm. King, having been appointed registration clerk for this district, is busy posting up the bills and starts registration at Winnipegosis, on May 27th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 24 – 1913

1913 Apr 24 – Ethelbert

Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Saunders and children left last week for Herbert, Sask., where Mr. Saunders will operate a steam plough during the summer. The family have been residents of this district since the settlement was opened and carry the best wishes of many friends to their new home.
Geo. P. Metz, another of our old-timers, has also left for Saskatchewan.

1913 Apr 24 – Fork River

Alfred Snelgrove has left for Regina to work on the government dredge at that point for the summer.
Wm. David has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Archie McMillan returned to his home at Kindersley on Saturday.
Howard Armstrong and nephew, have arrived from Dauphin and intend farming on a larger scale this summer.
Wm. Parker, of Winnipegosis, is busy taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co., store.
D. Kennedy’s little boy was taken suddenly ill with convulsions and had to get Dr. Harrington, of Dauphin to meet him at Sifton. We are pleased to hear the lad is recovering.
W. Williams, lumber merchant, was a visitor to the Lake Town recently on important business.
C. Clark is spending the weekend at Dauphin attending the railway mens’ meeting at that point.
We are sorry to hear friend George’s new bridge went down stream.
Charles White, fish inspector of Winnipegosis, is a visitor at D. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. T. Johnson is visiting with her friends in town for a few days.
If you want a horse call at Kennedy’s new emporium. He has all sorts and sizes. You pay your money and get your choice. A bargain every time.
“Say, Mike, they had quite a picnic at Monday’s council meeting. I am told the boundary bridge was laid over for the present.”
“Well, Pat, the doc gets a bonus of $600 for the coming year. That’s equal to three miles of graded road and the fun of it is in many cases we have to send to Dauphin for a doctor on account of not being able to get him when wanted.”
“Well, Mike, Winnipegosis, was represented by the Mayor and Alderman and they claim the doc will be around at all ball games. That’s something we are thankful to know. Then there’s our genial friend, the town orator; he gets the price of another 4 miles of graded road to sit on the sidewalk and sun himself while we flaunter through the mud.”
“Well, Pat, it does look as if things were shure going to the divel, but there’s a good time coming by and by.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 3 – 1913

1913 Apr 3 – Nellie McClung Recitals

Mrs. Nellie L. McClung, the popular Manitoba novelist, favoured Dauphin with her first visit this week. She came under the auspices of the Presbyterian Ladies’ Aid, and gave two recitals in the town hall on Monday and Tuesday evenings, respectively. Mrs. McClung gave all her numbers from her own books, “Sowing Seeds in Danny,” The Second Chance,” “The Black Creek Stopping House.” The selections contained variety of wholesome humour and pathos. The splendid character of the author is reflected in her works. Each reading had many lessons to teach. One might go as far as to say some of them were sugar coated sermons. The entertainer was assisted by some of our best local talent including Miss Harvely, the ladies’ quartette, Misses Johnston, Gunne, Coutts, and Cadman; the male quartette, Messrs. Park, Argue, Johnston and Stelck; Mrs. Jewsbury, Miss Astley and Mr. Main. On Tuesday evening the McMurray orchestra was in attendance.

1913 Apr 3 – Ethelbert

Mr. Finch, of Minitonas, took the services at the Methodist Church on Easter Sunday, to full congregation. He gave two very instructive sermons, and was very much appreciated.
We had a novel and spirited debate at the church on Friday night, when six debaters dealt with the subject of “Should women be allowed to vote?” Mr. McPhedran, Mrs. Munro and H. Brackman took the affirmative and Mr. Brown, teacher, Cyril Skaife and N. Booth took the negative.
Two men were arrested on Friday night for a savage attack upon one of the councillors named Mandryk. A preliminary trial was held and upon taking the evidence a fresh summon was taken out and the case will be dealt with Thursday, the 3rd inst.
The council intend putting two cells into the lock up of a substantial and safe character like those at Dauphin. We need a good man as constable.

1913 Apr 3 – Fork River

C. Bradley and family, were visitors from the Lake tow at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. McQuigge and family, of Dauphin, returned home from visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper on the Fork.
Miss Alice Godkin and Katie Williams have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
A car load of young stock were shipped from here by a farmer for his ranch at Lloydminster, Sask.
The elevator has closed down for the season and John Clemens and family left for Dauphin, where they will reside.
Dave Shinks, general manager for the Williams Lumber Co., east of Lake Dauphin, is renewing acquaintances around town this week.
Mrs. Scrase and Mrs. Kennedy and family spent the weekend at Winnipegosis with friends.
Harcourt Benner returned to his duties at Dauphin and his many friends are pleased to hear his vacation here has been beneficial to him. Come again Harcourt.
Mrs. R. McEacheron and son, Donny, returned from a two months visit to friends in Nova Scotia.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held their annual meeting in the church on Wednesday, March 26th. Quite a number were present. The secretary’s and treasurer’s report were received, showing a good year’s work with a cash balance on hand. The officers elected for the coming year are president, Mrs. W. King; vice. Mrs. Lacey, Mowat; secretary, Mrs. H. Scrase; treasurer, Wm. King.
F.B. Lacey, of Oak Brae, who has been under the weather for some time, is getting around again.
Mr. Gordon and family, of Mowat, have left for North Dakota for a change of climate.
Dunk Kennedy paid the lake town a visit on Sunday.
“Say, Mike, some one’s wife got sick, I am told, and they phoned for a doctor and by the time he arrived the baby had grown bald headed and was crying with the toothache.”
“Well, Pat, that shows we are not paying $600 a year for speed. If we are it got miscarried that time.”
“Now, Mike, don’t put your foot into it again. You know that unless you can yell like “Hell-o” they don’t catch on. It’s the fellow at the other end. Wow.”
“Say, Mike, did yees catch on to the way the members of parliament from the different provinces voted on the proposal of the government to build three Dreadnoughts, to be added to the British fleet, pending the formation of Canada’s permanent naval policy? It’s instructive.”
Our readers should note whence came the opposition. The vote against the government’s proposal as the division recorded in Hansard, was made up thus:

Against
Quebec (with 65 members) 44
Prince Edward Island (with 4 members) 2
Nova Scotia (with 18 members) 9
New Brunswick (with 13 members) 5
Saskatchewan (with 10 members) 6
Alberta (with 7 members) 6
Manitoba (with 10 members) 2
British Columbia (with 7 members) 0
Ontario (with 66 members) 11
Total opposition 85

It is not significant that 75 out of 85 members from the province of the United Empire Loyalist (Ontario) supported the measure, while 44 out of 65 from Quebec opposed it? Besides the 44 members from Quebec, at least 9 members from other provinces who voted against the proposal represented French ridings, making a total of 53, so that at the very outside figure only 32 coming from English speaking ridings, out of a total 221 members, tried to force the government to the country. If time were taken to go further into details it could be shown that one-half of these 32 members represented ridings in which there was a considerable sprinkling of French-Canadian and foreigners. So there is every reason for the assertion that the British people of Canada are well content with Borden’s naval.

1913 Apr 3 – Winnipegosis

The Armstrong Trading Co. has purchased and received a car load of horses from Winnipeg which they have deposited on their farm. A chance is open for any one wishing to purchase a good team. The company is preparing to build an addition to their store, also a house on the farm.
Mr. McArthur and daughters are again residents of their home here. We hope Mr. McArthur will soon join hem, fully recovered.
Mr. Scrase and Master Archer visited in town last week, and were the guests of Mrs. Bradley.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and children, of Fork River, are visiting her mother for the week past. Mr. Kennedy joined her on Sunday to avail themselves of a trip to Snake Island with Inspector and Mrs. White.
Mrs. Langlois and sons have gone on a trip to Le Pas to visit friends there.
The Anglican Church entertainment had to be postponed owing to the interest taken in the moving pictures exhibited here the past week and contined this one, which will make it difficult to satisfactorily produce the playette, “When Greek meets Greek” on the 4th as intended. An interesting competition is being held to raise extra church funds. The cigarette quilt won by Mr. Bradley at a raffle recently being the reward.
Messrs. Coffey, Whale, Ketcheson, White and others are attending a meeting of the masonic order this week in Dauphin.
The spring, though tardy, is likely to prove a delightful one at the Lake.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 1 – 1915

1915 Apr 1 – Boy Run Over

Robert, the 11-year-old son of Mr. Alf. Coombos, whose farm is seven miles north-east of town, was run over by a heavy wagon containing about a ton of hay on Saturday afternoon last. The wheels of the wagon passed over the boy’s body in the region of his stomach, and strange to relate, the little fellow suffered no serious internal injury and is recovering.

1915 Apr 1 – Fork River

Archie McDonell and family, of Winnipegosis, have arrived and are intending to put the summer in on the A.T.Co. farm.
Mr. F.O. Murphy held a successful sale at Sifton on Monday.
Mr. McFadden, solicitor of Dauphin, spent a short time at this point lately. He will attend to professional business on Wednesday of each week.
D.F. Wilson has returned from spending a few days at Sifton and Dauphin on business.
Captain Lyons, of Winnipegosis, collector for the Municipality, is on his rounds and paid a visit to D.F. Wilson, clerk, this week.
Harry Hunter has the contract for finishing the Lacey Bridge.
It is rumoured that there has been more deaths lately in the Weiden district and that the people are running from house to house at their own sweet will. Where’s the health officer?
Mr. Timewell has arrived here and is spending a few days in this vicinity looking for a farm to settle his family if one can be got suitable. It should not be a difficult matter as there is plenty of vacant land here waiting for settlers.
W. King is building a house on his lot east of Main Street.
Mr. Lane, government engineer, was up taking levels in the vicinity of Mr. Wilson’s farm.
Miss R. Armstrong has returned from a few days visit at her home in Dauphin and the school is running again.

1915 Apr 1 – Winnipegosis

Mud Scrow No. 2 was lowered on to the skids Saturday, and was slid on to the ice where she wills stay till the river opens.
Mrs. John McAulay, of Dauphin, is visiting in town this week.
Mr. Gunar Fredrickson and family have moved out to their old home at the point and are fitting it up for the summer.
Mrs. D. Kennedy arrived from Dauphin Friday.
Mrs. A. Johnson and her son Kari have left for North Dakota to visit friends there.
Mr. J.P. Grenon arrived home Friday from an eastern trip.
Mrs. Thos. Needham, of Dauphin, is visiting with Mrs. C. White this week.
Mr. Wm. Mapes and family are back to town from their winter camp.
Miss Grace Saunders left for Winnipeg on Friday.
The Winnipegosis Football Club held their first meeting last week when officers were elected, and it was decided to have two teams on the field this year, with Glen Burrell and Bert Arrowsmith as captains. We expect to see some fast football here this summer as the boys are already chasing the ball.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 25 – 1915

1915 Mar 25 – Baby Born on Train

An event occurred on the train from Prince Albert on Saturday morning last which caused quite a commotion among the passengers. Mrs. Courtney Veal, who took passage at Hudson’s Bay Junction, for the purpose of coming to Dauphin to enter the hospital, gave birth to a male child in the vicinity of Sifton, and some fifteen miles from Dauphin. Mrs. Veal was occupying a berth in a sleeper at the time. There was only one other woman, a Mrs. McEvoy, on the train at the time, and her services were quickly requisitioned by Conductor James McQuigge, and everything possible done to make the mother and baby confortable. A rush telegram was dispatched to Dauphin for a doctor and nurse. When the train arrived Dr. Bottomley and a nurse from the hospital with the ambulance, were in waiting and the mother and child hurriedly taken to the hospital.

Forty-five minutes after Mrs. Veal entered the hospital door she have birth to another boy.
Supt. Irwin and the officials of the Canadian Northern are naturally quite proud of the part of the road played in this important event, and while they are not willing to admit they are in favour of adding a maternity department to their already unexcelled service, they say it might be a possibility in the future.

Mr. Veal, who accompanied his wife to Dauphin, speaks highly of the service rendered by Conductor McQuigge in the emergency, and as a mark of gratitude will name one of the babies after him. The two babies are to be named:
HERBERT KITCHENER VEAL.,
JAMES McQUIGGE VEAL.,

At latest accounts the mother and both babies are doing well.

1915 Mar 25 – Interesting Letters from Private J. Meek

The following extracts are taken from two interesting letters written home by Private John Meek (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578):
“No. 946, D. Coy., 32nd Batt.”
“At Sea, March 3rd, 1915,”
“Here I am and feeling fine, with our sea journey about at and end. I have not been the least bi sick all the way. It has been quite a long time on the water and not the best of sleeping quarters. We have just had steerage quarters and they not on a first class boat, so you will have an idea of what it would be like. Well, anyway we have been able to live through it all and so we should worry. A soldier has to take the like of that and smile. We expect to land tomorrow sometime, but where we do not know yet, still I think it will be England alright.”
“We have had a nice trip as far as weather is concerned. The weather and sea have not been a bit rough all the way across. We got on board on the Monday at Halifax and sailed on the Tuesday morning. There are four ships on the trip. The cruiser “Essex” has led the way al the time, of course she has not troops on board. There are three ships with about 1500 men on each, four battalions in all. On our boat is the 32nd and part of the 30th battalion from Vancouver. I do not know where the other two battalions came from. The names of the tree ships as they have travelled on the line are, the “Missanbie,” the “Vaderland” and the “Megantic.” We are on the “Vanderland.”
“Well as far as the trip is concerned there was no more excitement for the first few days. On Monday, shortly after breakfast we got word that one of the stokers had shot himself. He tried to shoot himself through the heart, but he shot a little high, so he did not do himself very much harm. The doctor operated on him and got the bullet out. We do not know what was his reason, but heard he had a row with chief engineer.”
“Yesterday and today have been sport days on board, and it has been fine. We had a boxing contest, a wrestling contest, a tug-of-war and a bunch of races. We had a sack race, a three-legged race, and two or three more.”
“Last night we had a fine concert in the first-class dining hall.”
“Everybody has been excited today, as we have been expecting to sight they south coast of Ireland.”
“Stanley (Henderson of Minitonas) has never been the least bit sick either. You ought to have seen him the morning we got into Halifax. He got out of the train and ran like a made man to see the water and the ships, with a smile all over his face.”

Feb. 4th.
“We sailed into Queenstown harbour early this morning and everything looks fine. It is a very pretty place and the grass looks quite green from here. It is regular spring weather here and it makes a fellow feel fine. There is great excitement among the boys this morning. Some of the have been up all night just to watch her sail in.”

“Shorncliffe, England,”
“March 8th, 1915”
“We have got to the end of our journey for now, anyway. We are right on the south coast of England, near Dover, in the town of Shroncliffe which is a good size. It is a lovely place. We can see the English Channel from the camp. There are about 25,000 men at this place, so it is quite a big town. We have not to live in tents either. We have houses that hold about 25 men each and which are fixed up good. It is the best barracks we have had yet.”
“We were in Queenstown two days and had a route march around the town. Say, it was lovely there! They were such nice days and quite a lot of flowers growing already. Some of the boys said it was the nicest place that they had ever seen.”
“We passed through part of London on the train but did not get off.”
“This leaves me as well as the rest of the Dauphin boys – well and happy.”

1915 Mar 25 – Fork River

Mr. W. Northam, A. Cameron and J. Richardson returned from a few days visit at Dauphin.
Mr. and Ms. F.O. Murphy, of Dauphin, arrived here with a carload of implements and furniture. They will take up their residence of F. Chase’s farm south of the town for the summer.
Our fiend Scotty took a flying visit to Winnipegosis and returned on shanks’ mare hale and hearty.
Mr. F. Hafenbrak returned from Dauphin with a fine team of draught horses. The seed grain will go in now.
Messrs. Shannon and Stonehouse returned from a pleasant vacation at Dauphin.
Several of our young people attended the 17th of Ireland ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of Winnipegosis hotel. “Mac” knows how to give the folks a good time.
Mr. Archie McDonell, manager for the A.T. Co. farms here, spent a few days arranging for the spring work.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Anglican Church, held their annual meeting on March 17. The reports show a good year’s work. The society is in a good financial condition. The officers for the coming year are Mrs. King, president; Mrs. A. Rowe, vice; Mrs. F. Hafenbrak, secretary; Wm. King, treasurer. Layment in charge, F. Steede.
The children’s annual Lenten service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, March 28th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. All are cordially invited.
W. Coultas returned on Tuesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1915 Mar 25 – Sifton

Mr. Smith Russell of Strathclair, is a visitor in town these days on business.
Mr. F. Patridge, who has been relief station agent here for the last few weeks, has left here to take up duties at Canora, Sask. We all wish him the best of luck.
William Ashmore’s livery is kept busy these days since the alteration of train service. Seemingly its true that it is an ill wind that does not do someone good.
Dr. Gilbart, of Ethelbert, spent the weekend in town.
Mr. Walter spent the weekend out east amongst the farmers and reports that if this kind of weather continues they will start operations on the land within the course of a few days.
The Kennedy Mercantile Co. has erected a large warehouse and has same stocked with a good assortment of farm implements.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt have succeeded in drilling a fine well for Fairville School.
Don’t forget the machinery, horse and stock sale at Sifton on Saturday, the 27th inst. See advertisement in Herald.

1915 Mar 25 – Winnipegosis

Capt. W.B. Sifton is in town from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele are here from Mafeking.
Sid Coffey returned on Tuesday from Dauphin. He has been on the sick list.
Contractor Neely and a staff of men arrived on Tuesday to work on the lighthouse. They were greeted with a big snowstorm.
Coun. Hechter and daughter were visitors to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Jos. Schaldermose is a Winnipeg visitor this week.
Miss Grace Saunders has arrived from Winnipeg.
The annual dance given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of the Hotel Winnipegosis, on St. Patrick’s night, was attended by a large crowd. Every one appeared to have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 20 – 1913

1913 Mar 20 – Baran Now Praying

John Baran, condemned to be hanged for the murder of Constable Rooke, now spends his time in prayer.

1913 Mar 20 – Fork River

Geo. Esplen was a visitor with W. King on his return from Mafeking, where he spent the winter in charge of one of the fishing posts on the north end of the lake.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove left for Dauphin to visit among friends on her way to Dryden, Ontario.
Miss Pearl Wilson is taking a short vacation among friends at Sifton.
John Bykilo returned home after a two months rest for the good of his health at Portage.
Fred Storrar, of Mowat, has resumed his duties as assistant manager of the A.T. Co. Fred’s all right, a pleasant smile for everyone.
Miss Ena Fredrickson and Miss Kennedy returned from a visit to their folks at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that Professor Ike Robinson was scalded the other day while experimenting with a boiler, which exploded throwing the contents in his face. He is doing nicely. Ike says he don’t mind having solved the tea experiment.
The C.N.Ry. bridge gang is busy renewing the bridge on the creek north of town.
The vaudeville performance which the Laurier troupe has been putting on at the National Play house on Parliament Hill, is costly for the country. Ten thousand dollars a day or sixty thousand dollars for the week is the bill which the people of the Dominion will have to foot for the little game of politics which the Opposition has been staging for the first week in the opposition to the navy bill. That’s Liberal economy and loyalty everytime.
“Say, Mike, we overheard the Admiral trying to explain the need of that boundary bridge the other day and several took a hand in the debate.”
“Well, Pat, by what I see of the affair it is a fraud to take our taxes to build a bridge to accommodate one man and it on private property. He must have caught the rest of them napping to be able to carry such a measure.”
“Now, you’ve put your foot in it, Mike, sure. The Fork River Philosopher’s idea is to bridge the whole municipality and throw the dirt on top. Gee, what next.”
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese, held Communion and Baptismal service at All Saints’, Fork River, Winnipegosis and Sifton. There were large congregations at each service. The Rev. H.H. Scrase assisted.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

Charles Johnson, of Makinak, was a visitor to Rev. Father Derome last week. He was much interested in his visit and inspected the hatchery on Snake Island, where he enjoyed himself. His father is interested in the management of a hatchery in Norway, Europe.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

The ball in the Winnipegosis hotel on the 17th proves that the anniversary of St. Patrick is becoming very dear to the hearts of some, it being patronized by the elite, graced by those who love to trip the light fantastic, and enlivened by an appreciative crowd of onlookers. Many wore a souvenir badge supplied by willing workers of the W.A. and assistants. Fork River social element added materially to its success.
At the Christian League last Thursday Mr. Scott read a paper on “Commerce” touching on the German menace, that was worthy of a much larger crowd of understanding. He defined minutely the fundamental principles of commerce making it more interesting by apt illustrations, ably leading one’s interest up to appreciate the Empire’s present position. His reflections on England from Germany’s attitude served to illuminate her domain and in no way detracted from her greatness.
Mr. Mullens was the recipient of a handsome gift from his many friends in Winnipegosis last Wednesday evening as a token of their esteem and regret at his departure.
Mr. Hulme returns home for Easter holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson are rejoicing in the possession of a young son, which was privileged to be baptized by the Rev. Dr. Page, archdeacon and general missioner of the diocese. A baptismal service was also held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walmsley on Sunday evening last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 18 – 1915

1915 Mar 18 – Fork River

The Armstrong Trading Co. has closed their store here. Manager Seiffert has left to take charge of the company’s farm at South Bay. We have been informed that the store and buildings are for sale. There is a good opening for the right man.
Our friend “Scotty” is still in our midst and is in no hurry to leave for Winnipegosis. “Scotty” has made a lot of friends during his stay here and we wish him prosperity.
A large quantity of tamarac plank has been received by the municipality.
The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bailey are pleased to see them around again after their spell of sickness.
Two of our worthy citizens went on a hunting expedition in the east township and came back without their game. Better luck next time.
Mr. W. Williams is a busy man these days trying to do two months work in one now the snow has disappeared. That’s always the way, Billy. The trouble is our winters are so sort.
Our friend, Professor Storrar, of Weiden, was in town last Monday, renewing acquaintances. He has become a frequent visitor of late.

1915 Mar 18 – Winnipegosis

The ladies of South Bay gave a ball and concert in aid of the Patriotic fund. They made $17.50. About forty of the Winnipegosis people attended.
Miss Lillian McAulay, of South Bay, is visiting in Dauphin with Mrs. J.W. McAulay.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is visiting in Dauphin with her sister, Mrs. Wm. D. King.
Mr. Barber was a Snake Island visitor on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. McInnes are giving their third annual ball in the hotel on St. Patrick’s night, March 17th.
Sidney Coffey is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Harold Bradley returned from the city on Tuesday after spending a two weeks holiday.
Mr. and Mrs. John McArthur are Dauphin visitors this week.
Mr. Stonehouse, of Fork River, accompanied Harold Shannon to Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 6 – 1913

1913 Mar 6 – 100 Years Old

An old resident of Ethelbert, named Hogg, died this week. He was believed to be 100 years old.

1913 Mar 6 – Baran Pleads Not Guilty

The assizes opened on Tuesday at Portage la Prairie. The Baran case is the most important one on the docket. Contrary to expectations Baran has put in a plea of “not guilty.” The witnesses from here are Mary Peleck, the woman who was in the house at the time the shot was fired, E.A. Munson, S.A. McLean, J. Tomoski, A. Rzesnoski and Dr. Harrington.

1913 Mar 6 – Fork River

A. Hunt returned from Ottawa having spent two months visiting with his parents and friends. While in Ottawa he located our friend, “Bob” Cruise in his seat in the house. Ab. will know where his seat is when he goes to Ottawa again.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ramsay, of Sifton, were visitors at the home of Dunc Kennedy this week.
Duncan Briggs returned from Mafeking having spent the winter fishing up north with Theo. Johnston.
Messrs. Johnston, Nowside and King were visitors to the Lake town on business recently.
Sid Howlet, of Million, paid us a visit last week and is returning with a road of supplies to his homestead.
Miss Pearl Wilson has returned from Dauphin after a month’s visit among friends at that point.
Sandy Munro is spending the weekend with his family at Mowat.
The Fork River Quadrille club got a little mixed up on Friday night. Part went to one house and part to another. They all claim to have had a good time. It’s no trouble to have a good time at Fork River.
John Nowsede, after spending two months with his parents, left for Aberdeen, Sask., to take up his duties as teacher for another term.
Miss Gilanders, who has been some time with her sister, Mrs. J. Lockhart, left on a vacation among friends in the south.
George Butler, assistant to Frank Hechter, of Winnipegosis, was a visitor at Wm. King’s recently.
Fred and Max King have purchased from the Ontario W.E. & Pump Co., Winnipeg, a 18 horse power gasoline engine of the Stickney manufacture, also a J.T. case separator and are taking them to Fishing River among the Ruthenian farmers to finish their threshing before spring opens.
S. Strasdin, of North Lake, paid us a visit overnight on his way to Winnipegosis and says everything is quiet in his district.
J.P. Grenon, manager of the A.T. Co., Winnipegosis, has purchased the west half of 36-29-19 from Morley Snelgrove.
Mr. Rowe, section foreman of Laurier, is visiting with C. Clark for a few days.
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese will hold baptismal service and holy communion in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon, March 16th, at 2:45. Lenten service every Thursday night at 8 o’clock during the season.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 27 – 1913

1913 Feb 27 – Fork River

Wm. Paddock spent several days here among the farmers buying and dressing beef and pork for his meat emporium at Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase has returned from Sifton, where he held divine service. He states that he has good congregations at that point.
The Fork River correspondent in the Press states one of our citizens changed his office from the Armstrong T. Co., which is not so, as he is quite at home at the A.T. Co. Don’t get annoyed friend because he didn’t move right over your way. Come in and warm yourself, we don’t mind it if you don’t want to talk.
Mrs. T. Johnson, who has been spending two weeks with friends, returned home to Winnipegosis last week.
“Say, Mike, did you hear the latest? A customer from the country went into one of our department stores and “Buttons” stepped up and asked him if he would take the elevator. He accepted; “elevate it. I’ll take it without any water” and it was elevated. “Buttons” is there anything else we can do for you. We have some fresh case goods and we take in minors and flats, where we can.”
Several of the councillors took the train to attend the municipal meeting at Winnipegosis. “Admiral Turnover” accompanied them and they returned on a special.
Fred. and Max King took a business trip to Winnipegosis this week.
Wm. Davis and Sid Craighill are home from the fish haul. Too much snow to fish now.
We wish to say to the Mowat correspondent that his scurrilous remarks are not true. We wish to remind him before he was a member of the council he was the one that set the ball rolling by his weekly tirade against the council because he could not get what he wanted. Any remarks we have made are mild compared to opinions we hear from other ratepayers regarding the blunders and unbusinesslike transactions that have been done and we are sorry to say we have to admit what they say is true in most cases. As you have told us before you don’t wish to hurt people’s feelings, but just do it to remind us, so its up to you to take it in the same spirit. You say, “hands off.” Don’t get alarmed M.C. as we are never anxious to touch pitch as it sticks. Kind regards M.C. and we trust you will be all right after the change of the moon.
F.B. Lacey went south on the train and intends combining pleasure with business while absent. A pleasant time, Fred.
The Lenten services are held in All Saints’ Church Tuesday nights at 8 o’clock. Everyone welcome. Service at 3 o’clock Sunday, March 2nd.
The weekly dance party came off at the home of Mr. and Mrs. S. Reid over the Mossey River and a pleasant time was spent and that tired feeling chased away for the time being.
“Say, Mike, a stranger wanted to know what those pipes were for on the river bank and what they were worth to the people as a money maker.” “Can’t say Pat, what they are worth but the “Admiral” ordered them we believe to do duck shooting with.”
Miss M. Shannon, of Winnipegosis, paid a visit to her parents on the Mossey on Friday.

1913 Feb 27 – Winnipegosis

The fishermen are arriving down the lake each day. At present Mr. and Mrs. Christianson, Mr. and Mrs. Arrowsmith, Mr. and Mrs. Holly Burrell, Mr. and Mrs. Schaldermouse and family, Leo Hjalmarson, and Jack Angus have arrived.
H. Burrell has opened a pool room at the north end of the town.
R. McLean, an old timer freighter, is back in town on business.
Mrs. J. McAuley, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Whale since the 22nd.
Mr. Lloyd Younghusband, of Dauphin, is a guest of Mrs. Bradley.
Miss Irma Bradley, of Bowsman, is making a few weeks visit with Miss. C. Bradley.
Some of the young folk are greatly enjoying snowshoe tramps.
J. McArthur recently spent a few weeks in Winnipeg and saw his parents off on a southern trip from which we hope they will return greatly befitted.
Mr. Mullens, station agent, is leaving us for a more lucrative position in Minitonas. His departure is to be regretted.
Mrs. Grenon, Sr. is enjoying the visit of her brother from Montreal.
Last week the Christian League’s monthly social meeting was held in the Methodist Church, where a large number gathered to hear a debate on Woman’s Suffrage. It is to be hoped the parties wishing to espouse the movement (which might better be ignored as one of our prominent young men thinks) are not greatly in earnest. Mr. Grenon, Mr. Hechter and Mrs. Dempsey acted as judges, giving honors to the negative side.
Being the Lenten season it is regretted that an arrangement has not been made for weekly services here; we know Rev. Mr. Scrase does his best.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 6 – 1913

1913 Feb 6 – Baran Fired Fatal Shot

Monday was the most fateful in the life of John Baran. It opened with the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke in morning and in the afternoon the coroner’s jury found Baran guilty of the shooting.
Coroner Harrington held an inquest in the afternoon, when the following composed the jury: Geo. King, foreman; H.F. Caldwell, John Cole, A.B. Buie, Nelson Taylor, Stewart Baird, Thos. Shaw, F.J. McDonald, R.G. Ferguson, Thos. Jordan, Frank Beely, and Arch. Esplen. Witnesses examined were Dr. Culbertson, as to immediate cause of death; John Tomaski, the man who drove the sleigh that carried Constable Rooke to Baran’s house where he was shot, and Marie Pelech, the woman who lived with Baran.
The jury, in order to receive the woman’s evidence, proceeded to the hospital and for an hour listened to a well connected and intelligent reciting of the incidents which led up to the shooting.
The woman testified that Baran fired two shots from a rifle through the door when Rooke attempted to force an entrance; that she knew that one of the bullets took effect for she examined the spot where Rooke fell exhausted in the snow, when the man who accompanied him left to secure assistance. She stated that she found a pool of blood. She also testified that Baran forced her to state that she fired two shot through the door. The whole affair was brought home to Baran in a most vivid manner.

THE JURY’S VERDICT

The following is the verdict of the jury:
“We, the jury empanelled to hear the evidence as to the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke, find that the said Charles Rooke on Sunday, Jan. 26, 1913, received a bullet in the breast from a rifle in the hands of John Baran and that the said Charles Rooke died on Monday, Feb. 3, 1913, from the effects of this shot.”
The death of Constable Rooke has cast a gloom over the community as he was a good citizen, as well a good officer, unassuming and kind to all.
Marie Pelech, who lived with Baran, is still in the hospital, but is doing as well as can be expected. If she recovers she will have to have her right arm amputated at the shoulder. Her brother, Michael, arrived from Winnipeg Monday morning and was overcome with grief to find his sister in such a pitiable condition. He says he has been looking for her for three years.
Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Munson on Monday on the charge of murder. He was remanded until Friday for trial.
Rooke was born at Redhill, Surrey, England. May 5, 1876, being the son of Inspector-General Rooke, of the Indian army, who was honorary physician to Queen Victoria, and was educated at Willington College. He came to Western Canada in 1895, and served five years with the Northwest Mounted Police. In 1905 the Manitoba government gave him the job of organizing the Manitoba mounted police, a body whose efforts were mainly directed to the suppression of lawlessness along the international boundary line. He made his name a terror to horse thieves, yeggmen and smugglers and soon made the frontier as safe as any other part of the province. Latterly, his headquarters have been here, where he had jurisdiction over much of the north country. In 1909 he married Elizabeth Surrey, who, with one son, survives him.
A brother, E.G. Rooke, news editor of the Nelson News, and former publisher of the Port Hope., Ont. Times, is here to attend the funeral as are also Mr. Geo. Surry, Victoria, B.C., Mrs. Rooke’s brother, and Miss Ellen Surrey, of Galt., Ont., sister of Mrs. Rooke.

1913 Feb 6 – Funeral Today

The funeral of the late Constable Charles Rooke is taking place this afternoon from the family residence 8th Ave., N.E. Vermillion Lodge No, 68, A.F. & A.M., of which deceased was a member having charge of the services. Rev. A.S. Wiley will conduct the service. Interment will be made at Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fraser Given Two Months

Wm. Fraser, who attempted suicide last week by cutting his throat, appeared before P.M. Munson on the 30th ult., and was sentenced to two months in jail. He was taken to Portage by Constable McLean.

1913 Feb 6 – Died From Bullet Wound

Fred Bichardson, a Barnardo boy who was working for Arthur Lee, a farmer at Togo, shot himself in the head Friday with a 22 rifle. He was brought to the hospital here on Saturday, but died shortly after his arrival. The remains were interred in Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fork River

Henry Benner, of Lloydminster, is visiting his parents up the Fork River. He is wanting a car of young cattle to take back with him. No objections to females being among them.
Howard Armstrong has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Dony, left for Bayhead, Nova Scotia, for a two months visit among relations and friends.
D. Kennedy’s high flyer got kicked the other day and is out of business for a short time, consequently Dunk had to fall back on the old reliables for a trip to Winnipegosis.
All the threshing outfits got cold feet early this fall except for Fred Cooper and he is on his last job. Fred’s a stayer and there should be no kick from the farmers as there’s no money in it for either this year as far as threshing goes.
We were out the other day looking for a stray heifer and didn’t find her, but came across someone looking for a pig. They did not mention whether it was a live pig, or dead pig or a blind pig and judging from their track a few hours after they must have run across a pig of some kind. Moral, don’t try to carry more pig than you can handle unless you cover up your tracks.
There is considerable kicking being done among the owners of gasoline engines re the poor gasoline sent up here from Dauphin. It not only wastes our time but puts the engines out of order.
We notice in the Press a long rigmarole about compulsory education also an ad for a teacher for Mowat School. We hear there has been several application received. It seems a pity this school should be closed since the summer holidays, it being in the centre of a settlement where there is a large number of children. The parents seem to be anything but delighted to have the kids miss all the nice weather we have had. We bet dollars to doughnuts that the head push has no children to send or we would have heard of it every week for the last five months.
Can anyone tell us what benefit the majority of the ratepayers receive for their taxes in the Municipality. Of course there are some who go on a pilgrimage to all the meetings looking for snaps and they get them, by gum. The clerk has had a rise of fifty. Oh well, I believe he published the minutes of one council meeting since last June. The municipal auditor was around so look out for the statement three inches by four. We received a copy of the Auditor’s report in book form of 47 pages from Ochre River Municipality. Its good reading and looks like business. A few dollars expended like this would be more appreciated by the ratepayers than paying two road commissioners in ward five, as there has been done the last three years to spend two or three hundred dollars.
The new Oak Brae postoffice as officially opened today. It is situated at Janowski schoolhouse and should prove a great boon to the people of that locality as it has been a deeply felt want. Geo. Basham is postmaster and we feel sure he will fill the bill to all satisfactorily. We hear Billy is sore, but we can’t help these things, so Billy, please remember the little saying “No use crying over spilt milk.” Such is life in the Wolly West.
The annual clearance sale started today 1st Feb. at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store and they are sure slaughtering the prices. This has been a poor year for the farmer so now is your chance to buy right.
Wanted, a boarding house right away for the travelling public.

1913 Feb 6 – Sifton

A ball was held in the Kennedy hall in aid of the English church; about forty couples were present, and a very enjoyable time was spent.
Elaborate arrangements were made for a wedding here on the 31st ult. A large number of guests had assembled and everything was in readiness for the ceremony when it was found that the would-be bride was missing. Consternation reigned for a time and great disappointment was felt, especially by the intended groom.