Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 28 – 1915

1915 Jan 28 – Letter From Dauphin Man at Front

Mr. Georges Urion, a French reservist who invested considerable capital in Elm Park and other Dauphin property, writing to Coun. Geo. Johnson from 20th Company, 269 Regiment de Infantry, 70th Division, Secteur Postal 120, France, tells how he is now serving at the front in the great war in France. On January 1, when the letter was written, the French army in which he is in were then holding one half of the houses in a town in Alsace, and the Germans the other half. He is in good health and the spirit of the army is the best, he says. They are confident of success but that it will be no easy task and they expect the war to least six months yet.

1915 Jan 28 – Major Rooke Wounded

Major B. Rooke, of Second Indian Gurhkas, was wounded in a recent engagement in France. The major is a brother of the late Charles Rooke, of Dauphin.

1915 Jan 28 – Tragic Death of Miss Allan

The worst tragedy in the history of Dauphin occurred on Sunday afternoon about 5 o’clock in the Malcolm block, when Miss Florence Allan, a well-known and popular young woman of the town, was burned so badly that her death followed a few hours later.
It appears that Miss Allan and filled a small lamp was methylated spirits and in doing so had spilled some of the liquid on her flannelette gown. At the time she had only her underclothing and gown on. When she attempted to light the lamp the part of the gown on which she had spilled the spirits caught fire and in an instant the blaze spread over the unfortunate woman’s clothing. She had the door of the room locked at the time and in her excitement in looking for the key lost several valuable moments. When she got the door unlocked and rushed out in the hall she was a mass of flame. Mrs. Hooper, wife of the caretaker of the block, was the first to be on the scene, followed by Mr. Hooper. Miss Allan, in her frenzy, grabbed Mrs. Hooper, and begged of her to put out the fire. Mrs. Hooper had difficultly in freeing herself from the burning woman, as it all happened so suddenly, and in doing so had her hands burned. Mr. Hooper, as soon as he realized the situation, procured a rug and threw it about Miss Allan, and this did much to smother the flames. Mr. Hooper had one of his hands quite badly burned while covering the burning woman with the rug. Others came quickly to the rescue and Dr. Culbertson hurried from his home to the block. An examination by the Dr. at once revealed the terrible condition the young woman was in and he at once made arrangements for her removal to the hospital.

BURNED FROM HEAD TO FOOT.

Everything possible was done to alleviate the sufferings of the young woman, but as she was literally burned from head to foot there was no possible hope for her recovery, and on Monday morning she passed away.
Deceased came from Bancroft, Ont., about three years ago to take a position in her brother’s confectionery store, where she remained until a few months ago, when he sold out. She then accepted a position with the Steen-Copeand Co. which she held at the time of her death. She was a young woman of a genial disposition and was liked by all who came in contact with her whether in a business or social way.

BODY TAKEN EAST.

A service was held in the Methodist Church on Monday evening and the building was crowded with sympathizing friends. The pastor, Rev. T.G. Bethell, spoke feelingly of the awful fate that had befallen the young woman and the lesson all should learn of the terrible suddenness with which death comes at times to both young and old. He referred to the esteem and respect the deceased young woman was held and the sympathy all felt for the afflicted family.
Floral tributes, from friends and societies, covered the casket.
At the conclusion of the service the body was taken to the station and from there forwarded to Bancroft, Ont., for interment. The followed acted as pallbearers: J.T. Wright, B. Reid, W.D. Sampson, A.G. Wanless, J. Argue and B. Phillips.
Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Allan and Mr. E. Allan accompanied the remains east.

1915 Jan 28 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Winnipeg.
Mr. Desroche, of Pine Creek, was a visitor at the A.T. Co. store at Fork River and returned to Winnipegosis by the sleigh route patrolled by our trusted friend Scotty, and he’ll het there sure.
Mr. Flemming Wilson and family, of Dauphin, have taken up their residence on the Shannon homestead, Mr. W. intends farming for a time.
Miss Coomber, of Selkirk, is visiting her parents on the Fork River.
Mr. E. Thomas has returned from Verigen, Sask., and will run the elevator for a short time.
Mr. F.H. Steede, of Bradwardine, Man., will arrive on the 29th to take charge of this mission. He will hold service in All Saints’ on Sunday 31st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
A large gathering from all parts attended the pie social and dance at the home of Mr. W. King. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all. It reminded us of ye olden times.
The cold snap seems to be taking liberties with everything green or tender these days. Even the sandwich man is complaining.
Fred King is able to get around again. Try a poplar tree next time, Fred, its easier on the moccasins.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis spent the weekend at this burgh.
Mr. Fair, of Ochre River, is going his rounds and is doing a roaring trade selling slaves and liniments these cold days.
Mr. John Nowsade and family, of Aberdeen, Sask., are spending a short time with his parents in Fork River.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Harnell who have been spending a month at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt, left to visit friends at Bradwinie on their way home to Sask. John is a good sport and his many friends here wish them a pleasant trip.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton

Mr. W. Barry, of Ethelbert, paid us a visit last wee and reports business lively.
Robt. Brewer I again in our midst and is after more prom. It seems as though he thinks hogs are raised and fed up in one week as he claimed he had cleared everything in sight last week. His smile must go a long way when amongst the Galicians.
Wm. Ashmore is a very busy man these days with his team, what with hauling wood and hay. Quite a rustler is “Bill.”
There is a new company formed her which are the proud possessors of a good well, and we are all busy trying to think of a suitable name for it. They had a meeting last week to discuss the matter of taking new shareholders, as there are lots of applicants now that water is scarce. The promoters are deserving of good dividends as they took a big responsibility when they undertook to drill the well.
We are all sorry to hear that m. Green, the Church of England student, is leaving this district to take office in Winnipeg. We all wish him the best of luck.
There has been quite a number of commercial travellers here this week. It seems this must be a good business burgh for them. It certainly makes business good for some people.
The people of Sifton seem somewhat jealous of the fact that their neighbours had the pleasure of seeing an airship last week. We understand that lots of people are taking the mater very seriously and it seems that there is a hot time awaiting the airman next time he shows up.
Wm. Walters visited the surrounding country on business and reports that most of the farmers are busy solving the water problem.
A bunch of Galician farmers are busy loading a car of wheat which seem to be of a fair quality.
Mr. Wm. Taylor, of Valley River, was a visitor to town last week, and informs us that he has purchased a farm and is going to work on it next spring. We all with him luck, although we all know luck is a companion of hard work.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton Romance
PROFESSOR MATOFF

The following is from a Sifton correspondent: The celebrated Russian violinist, Michael Matoff, has been lingering in this quiet northern village of Manitoba for some months. Although used to the plaudits of great audiences in his world tours, he is now content to stay here, held an unprotesting prisoner by the silken bonds of love.
Some months ago Matoff was journeying westward on the train which passes through here. On the same train was a young Jewish girl, Miss Ida Marantz, whose home is in Sifton. She is a handsome girl and posses a fair education. She assists her father in his general store here.
On the train on that eventful day, Miss Marantz became ill. The virtuoso, Matoff, who was sitting near, noticed the girl’s distress and flew to her assistance. He procured medicine for her and comforted her in every possible way.
When the train arrived at Sifton Miss Marantz got off and Matoff’s chivalry was so great that he, too, left the train and saw her safely to her home.
The grateful parents entertained the musician, who later in the evening favoured the family with some delicious dreamy music from his famous violin.

HOW ROMANCE BEGAN

Under the spell of the witching strains Miss Marantz lost her heart to the musician and Prof. Matoff lost his to the fair listened, if her had not already lost it.
The virtuoso and he village maiden became engaged. The engagement was conducted according to Russian rites and at the observance Matoff played and enraptured all the guests.
The virtuoso has since resided at the Marantz home and whenever he plays on his loved violin knots of villagers linger outside until the last sweet note has died away.
Prof. Matoff’s violin is said to be worth $10,000.
An interesting feature of the romance is that the “eternal triangle” element is said to be not wanting. It is said that prior to the meeting with the virtuoso a village youth had aspired to the hand of the fair Ida and had not been entirely discouraged. With the coming of the distinguished musician, however, this prosaic romance was nipped before it was well budded.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd was a weekend visitor to Dauphin.
It is reported that the fishermen have received notice from the companies to pull up their nets, as the fish market had taken a slump. Six carloads were shipped from this point on Friday.
A large number enjoyed the skating and dancing party given by the young ladies of the town on Wednesday evening last. About 40 couples attended the dance. Lively music was furnished by the Russell orchestra, with Messrs. Johnson and Stevenson giving a help out. Messrs. Bickle and Burrell acted as masters of ceremonies.
Miss Stewart who has been a visitor at the home of B. Hechter, left for her home Winnipeg on Friday.
Miss Clara Bradley is visiting at the home of Mr. Mark Cardiff in Dauphin this week.
Rev. Mr. Green, of the English church, is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Born, Jan. 23rd, to Mr. and Mrs. A. Russell, a son.
It is probably the Rex Theatre will again be open to the public this week.
Mrs. John McArthur and daughter, are visiting at the home of her parents in Fork River.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. D. Kennedy has been on the sick list but is on the mend.
Mr. F. Hechter returned on Sunday form Crane River.
Mrs. W.D. King returned home on Friday after visiting her mother.
The dance in the Rex Hall, given by the young ladies of the town was sure the best of the season and everybody enjoyed a good time.
Mr. Green, the English rector, preaches his farewell sermon next Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 21 – 1915

1915 Jan 21 – 90 New Enlisted

There are 90 out of the 110 men required now enlisted. They are a fine lot of men taken as a whole. Sergeant instructors are Highfield and Fletcher. The men are now well advanced in drill.

1915 Jan 21 – Going to the Front

Nurse Margaret Cummings has been offered and accepted a position on nursing staff of the medical department of the army. She leaves for Ottawa to-night (Thursday). This is the second graduate nurse of the Dauphin General Hospital called, the other being Miss Hudson, who is now in England.
Dr. Jas. C. King, of Humboldt, has been appointed to the medical corps with the rank of first lieutenant. His commission dates from January 1st.
Captain Newcombe will go to Winnipeg on Feb. 1st to attend the military school of instruction.

1915 Jan 21 – Got Contract for Lighthouse

Mr. Frank Neely has been notified by the Dept. of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa, that he is the successful tenderer for the proposed lighthouse at Winnipegosis. Mr. Neely is now making arrangements for the material. A.J. Hunt has the contract for the painting.

1915 Jan 21 – Letter From Lewis Barnard

Mr. Thos. Barnard received a letter from his son Lewis, who is with the first contingent at Salisbury Plain this week. He states, in the letter, that he visited the Dauphin men at their camp recently and found them in bad quarters and quite a number sick. The sickness, he says, was nearly altogether confined to the older men. They were still occupying tents and the mud around the tents was fully a foot deep.
Mr. Barnard enlisted at Prince Albert and went to the front with the Saskatoon section.
Lewis has the distinction of being the second best shot in the regiment for rapid firing.

1915 Jan 21 – Mrs. Arnold Wins Case

Shortly after the death of Mr. Jas. Arnold, engineer, in the collision on the C.N.R. near Kamsack last summer. Mrs. Arnold applied through her solicitor, Mr. Bowman, for compensation. This was refused by the railway company and a suit was entered under “The Workman’s Compensation Act” of Saskatchewan, claiming a considerable amount of damages. When the case was ready to come to trial the officials of the company had evidently changed their minds for a cheque for the full amount claimed was forwarded to Mr. Bowman.

1915 Jan 21 – No Trace of Deserter Yet

Private John Alexander deserted on Saturday from the Dauphin contingent, and although the wires have been busy no trace of him has yet been ascertained. All that is known is the Alexander took the train south.

1915 Jan 21 – Fork River

Mr. Thos. Secord, of Dauphin, homestead inspector, spent a short time here lately.
Mr. W. Williams and gang of men left for his timber limits east of Lake Dauphin, where they will run his sawing outfit for the winter.
A large party of neighbours met at the home of Mr. A. Hunt on Wednesday evening the 13th, when a very pleasant evening was spent in dancing and social recreation.
Messrs. Walmsley, Hunking and Toye, of Winnipegosis, were visitors to this burgh on municipal matters lately.
The A.T. Co. have been very busy shipping cordwood lately.

1915 Jan 21 – Sifton

Mr. Robt. Brewer was in our midst last week and purchased a number of hogs. He states that business is still good with him and still has a pleasant smile for everyone.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, left here last week and are now busy drilling wells around Ethelbert. Their outfit is a good one.
Since sleighing has commenced there is quite a lot of hardwood coming into town and our friend Fred Farion, seems to be the “Cordwood King.”
Joe Shand, of Dauphin, was a visitor here last week on his way from Ethelbert, where he had been on business.
The grist mill here has been running very steady this last week owing to the roads being good for sleighing and the people are now able to bring their grain to town.
We are all looking forward to business being a little brighter now that all the holidays are over.

1915 Jan 21 – Winnipegosis

A concert was held here on Friday evening in aid of the Red Cross society. Everybody turned out for the good cause, and a pleasant evening was spent. The sum of $30.00 has been forwarded direct to the society at Toronto, making in all a total of $70.00 sent from Winnipegosis, in addition to three shipments of bandages, pillows, etc.
It is understood the incorporation of the town will not take place until the return of the fishermen from the north. A considerable portion of our population is away at present.
Capt. Wm. Sifton, who is in charge of the Standard Lumber Co.’s camp at the north end of the lake, is visiting at Dauphin. The captain says the output of logs this winter will be limited.
We are all patiently waiting for the return of the fishermen. When they are away the town is like the play of “Hamlet” with “Hamlet” left out. And, you know, the nimble dollar of the fishermen is like the fish, it has the faculty of slipping from one to the other.
Like everything else, curling is expected to boom when the boys return from the north end of the lake. Up to the present it has been on the slow side.

Winnipegosis

1915 Jan 21 – Winnipegosis

Chas. White returned on Saturday night from his rounds as fish inspector, and reports the fishing good.
To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Christianson, a daughter, on Jan. 13th.
Jack Matthews is on the sick list, but is reported improving.
Mr. F. Neely, of Dauphin, has been awarded the contract for the new lighthouse.
The young ladies of the town are giving a dance and skating party on Wednesday evening, the 20th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 9 – 1913

1913 Jan 9 – Engineer Wm. Bowman Killed

Engineer Wm. Bowman, who was running for Engineer Wm. Graham on No. 4 train was killed in the Winnipeg yard on Saturday afternoon last. The train reached Winnipeg safely from Dauphin and Mr. Bowman was running to the roundhouse light when another engine ran into the tender, smashing it and driving the tender into the cab with such force that the boiler was injured in such a way that the steam escaped and scalded Bowman so badly that he expired on the spot.
Jack Cobb, the fireman, escaped through the cab window without suffering any injury.
Engineer Bowman was well-known in Dauphin and sympathy is felt for the family in their great sorrow.

1913 Jan 9 – Frozen to Death

Tuesday was Christmas according to the Galician custom and there was the usual festivities on that day and the following two days. John Kuruk, a Galician about 45 years of age, imbibed freely on Tuesday and Wednesday and on the later day he lay down at the C.N.R. tool house near the bridge and (Thursday) morning was found there frozen to death.
Deceased came from Austria about three years ago and has been working on the railway as a section man. He leaves a wife and two grown-up sons.

1913 Jan 9 – Suffered Bad Cut

Mrs. E.H. Walker was carrying a crock in her hands on Tuesday at the farm three miles south of the town when she slipped and fell. The crock broke and one of the pieces cut a bad gash on her left wrist. An artery was severed and she bled freely for quite a time. A phone message hurriedly brought Dr. Culbertson to the scene when the wound was dressed and Mrs. Walker brought to the hospital. It is expected she will be out in the course of a day or two.

1913 Jan 9 – Fork River

Mr. French, of Grandview, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens.
W. Williams has taken his outfit out to his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Frank Bailey left for Winnipeg after spending his New Year’s holidays with his parents on the Mossey.
Miss M. Nixon left for Findlay, having accepted the position of teacher in that district.
Miss Bessie and Miss Pearl Wilson left on a visit to friends at Sifton.
Professor S. Biggs returned to Dauphin after spending Xmas week among friends.
M. Sturdy, assistant manager of the A.T.Co. store, left on a short vacation. We wish him a good time.
Edwin King, who if with the C.N.R., was a visitor at the home of his parents lately.
Mrs. Willis Miller, of Mowat, who has been under the doctor’s care at Winnipegosis, has returned home.
The C.N.R. surveyor paid a visit and took the measurement of the elevator here.
Mr. Howatson, from Winnipegosis, is relieving Mr. Sturdy at the Armstrong Trading Co. for a few days while Mr. Sturdy is on holiday.
The annual meeting of Purple Star, 1775 was held on Tuesday, Dec 31st. The auditors’ report was most satisfactory, showing a balance in hand, after meeting all expenses for 1912.
The following officers were elected for 1913.
W.M. – Bro F.F. Hafenbrak
D.M. – Bro. W.J. King
Chaplain – Bro. H.H. Scarse, re-elected
Recording Secretary – Bro. W. King, re-elected
Financial Secretary – Bro. C.E. Bailey, re-elected
Treasurer – Bro. C. Bailey, re-elected
D. of C. – Bro. F. Cooper, re-elected
Lecturer – Bro. A Hunt
Dept. Lecturer – S.B. Reid
1st Committeemen – Edwin King, re-elected; C. Clark
Committeemen – J. Frost, Joe Bickle, J.E. Morriss, S.B. Munro, J.C. Bickle
Installation of officers at next regular meeting.

1913 Jan 9 – Winnipegosis

The Standard Lumber Co.’s mill is closed for the season.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has started their snow-plow with ten teams on its first trip up the lake to haul down fish.
Alex McArthur’s steam engine invention is also on a trip for the same purpose.
J.P. Grenon made a trip to Winnipeg on Saturday on business.
There was no Anglican Church service last Sunday owing to the recent storms impeding velocipede transition.
The Christian League held their social evening at the home of Mrs. J.J. Burrell last week. A very enjoyable time is reported.
Mr. Noble has returned to Dauphin to continue his studies after spending a week here visiting his adherents.
Mr. Malley returned on Saturday to Winnipeg.
The school was opened on Friday by Miss Hayes on account of Mr. Hulme not returning till Saturday.
Inspector Charles White has been away to Waterhen.
Miss Bradley has returned to Winnipeg to pursue her studies at St. Mary’s Academy.
Mrs. Bradley last Saturday received a letter from a Greek lady of Athens giving an account of the war raging in the Balkans. The letter was dated Dec 12th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 2 – 1913

1913 Jan 2 – Fred Nex Killed

Fred. Nex, formerly publisher of the Dauphin News, and who afterwards kept a store at Sifton, was killed near Whitemouth, Man., not long since. He and two other parties were riding on the C.P.R. on a gasoline motor, when it collided with a train. All three were killed. Deceased of recent years held the position of secretary-treasurer for the Municipality of Whitemouth. He leaves a widow and several small children.

1913 Jan 2 – Fork River

John Chipla and family returned from Canora, Sask., for the holidays.
Bert Williams left for Moose Jaw to see his brother, who resides there.
Miss Olive and Alice Clark are visiting friends at Laird, Sask., during the holidays.
Miss Muriel Alterton, who taught the Mossey River School the last three years, has left for Winnipeg.
Miss Grant, teacher of Pine View School, has gone home for the holidays.
A. Hunt has gone to Ottawa to spend the holidays with his parents.
There was quite a family re-union at the homestead of D.F. Wilson last week. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton; Fleming Wilson and family of Dauphin and others. It was cheering to see so many familiar faces at Christmas Tide.
Miss Bertha Johnston, of Dauphin, Mrs. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, were the guests of D. Kennedy during the holiday.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is home on a two weeks’ vacation.
Abe Shinks returned from his homestead in Sask., and intends to remain the rest of the winter at Fork River.
The Christmas tree and concert in the hall on Christmas Eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ W.A. and S.S. was a success. It being a nice evening there was a large turnout. Wm. King, warden, was chairman. A good programme of songs, recitations, and drills by the children, after which Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus arrived and distributed the gifts among the children. We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus on the able manner they filled the position. We take this opportunity of thanking all those who took part in the concert and tree. It is encouraging to see everyone turn out on Christmas Eve to give the little folks a good time.
We wish all a Happy New Year.
Rev. H.H. Scrase held service on Christmas morning at Winnipegosis, and at All Saints, Fork River, in the evening.
In the Press we notice our Mowat friend twitting Mr. Borden and his followers for opposing the Transcontinental Railway when they were in opposition. Do you remember Laurier’s election cry in 1904? A national Transcontinental Railway for thirteen million dollars. What do we now find? The National Transcontinental Railway is going to cost us, including interest and charges, payable by the people, nearly eighty million and a cash outlay of close on three hundred million by the time we are through with it. Is it any wonder it was opposed at the time considering the unbusinesslike method adopted by the Laurier government. Our M.C. objects to Borden’s scheme of giving thirty-five millions to England for Dreadnaughts to be manned by Englishmen instead of Canadians. We consider Borden’s scheme the only possible one under the circumstances and far superior to the one Laurier has being playing with for years. What did his amount to? He, Laurier, wanted a strictly Canadian fleet, part on the Atlantic coast, the other half on the Pacific coast. That’s just what he handed down to Borden when he went out of power. The Niobe in the east and the Rainbow in the west. The boats are so powerful you have to take a magnifying glass to see them on a fine day. As for manning our warships with Canadians our friend is talking through his hat. The Marine Department at Ottawa could not find recruits enough in Canada to run those two little steamboats, the Niobe and the Rainbow. They had to be tied up for want of men. Finally they had to import them. Take a rest friend, you must be tired of jumping the fence so often.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

The W.A. entertainment last Friday evening was a success and though the proceeds, were small, more was not anticipated. The orchestra selections render by the Messrs. McArthur, Mrs. A. McArthur, and Mr. Shears were most appropriate, and the representation of Mr. and Mrs. Candle was amusing, while the comedy “Box the Cox” demonstrated the fact that theatrical talent is not lacking amongst us.
If a young “Lochinvar” appears in our midst let no one say they were fully warned.
Mr. Malley, lately from college, addressed the Christian Endeavor League last week.
Harry Parker had the misfortune to sprain his ankle while coming down the lake freighting fish. Hope he will soon be about again.
J.P. Grenon’s youngest son, also sustained an injury from an accident, the nature of which has not been learned.
Mrs. Johnston, of Minitonas, is visiting her friends, the Stuarts. A little one made the festive season.
We are pleased to hear Mrs. Graff has recovered from her illness under Mrs. Johnstone’s efficient nursing.
A.C. Bardley’s late indisposition was the result of cold.
The card circle last Wednesday evening was a pleasing character. Mrs. Burrell now possesses a good time-keeper and we trust Mrs. Crannage may find her work basket useful considering her aptitude with the meddle which was effectively displayed in the doll dressed for the W.A. competition, and won by Miss Hansford. See “Whilimina”.
Mr. Seaforth made a business trip to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Browne also made a trip to meet a friend from Winnipeg.
The Presbyterian S.S. entertainment on the 27th (the most anticipated event of the season), was very successful owing to Santa Claus’ generosity, whom the children admirably presented in a Cantata. It was regretted that Mr. Malley was unable to perform the duties of chairman, but Mr. Noble very kindly filled the place.
The Anglican Christmas service was harmonious. Rev. H.H. Scrase delivered a fine sermon.
This weather might inspire a spring song, considering the gulls are circling up the lake, but undoubtedly the storm that follows such illusive calm is liable to occur any time.
We wonder what the presence of pure white partridges may prognosticate. It is easy to obtain them, and they should look very pretty mounted.
The Armstrong Trading Co. lost a valuable team in the lake last week, and a horse dropped dead the week before. Fortunately they are not likely to feel the loss.
Mr. Ruthledge, formerly of Winnipegosis, spent Christmas in town.
The Misses Bradley spent Christmas here with their parents, and Mr. and Mrs. Saunders enjoyed the company of their sons with a friend from Winnipeg. A dance was given by the latter in Victoria Hall on Thursday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, of the Lake View hotel, returned from Winnipeg on Christmas Eve, where they spent a week on business and visiting.
Mrs. Bradley spent a delightful week-end in Dauphin, and attended the Anglican S.S. entertainment, of which he “Washing Day Cantata” was a particularly enjoyable feature. The trip from their home was suggestive of wedding bells resulting in poetic effusion.
Miss Johnston returned home for the Christmas holidays.

1913 Jan 2 – A REVERIE.

Ye children of the heavenly king,
Imagine that the angels sing,
Send peace on earth for men and driven
To doubt that women have earned a heaven.

As everyone of us should hold,
The truth that’s better far tan gold’
Let dissension meet a final doom,
And perversity by refused a room.

Then trust the Savour’s power to do
All that he said, which well he knew
Would be doubted by impatient men,
Though women believe faithfully till – when!

The world shall be forced to cry, “well done”!
In Him we live, the kingdom’s won!
To exercise faith within the soul
Makes humanity’s love perfectly whole.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

James McNicholl passed quietly away on Friday afternoon last Dec. 27th, after a lingering illness, having been tended faithfully by his wife for whom he showed much affection. The funeral rites were performed by Father Derome on Monday morning. Deceased’s wife, two sons and two daughters were among the mourners.
Miss Clara Bradley is away on a visit to her aunt in Portage la Prairie. Miss Dolly having returned with her.
Miss Shannon has returned from Fork River where she spent the Christmas holidays visiting her parents.
Mr. Scott is leaving on Thursday for Mafeking on business for the Standard Lumber Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Shears are wished joy of their young daughter, born to them on the 28th inst., at the home of Mrs. Johnstone.

1913 Jan 2 – Gulls at Lake Winnipegosis

Numerous sea gulls have, of late, made their appearance at Lake Winnipegosis. It is not known that those birds have ever appeared here at so late a date in any year in the past.