Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 17 – 1914

1914 Dec 17 – Another 110 Men Wanted

Another large force for overseas service is to be raised in Canada at once. Major G.C.J. Walker received a wire this Thursday morning to this effect. The telegram read as follows:
“You are authorized to mobilize immediately one company of infantry a total 110 men for overseas service. Standard height, 5 feet 4 inches; age, 18 to 45; chest, 33 ½ inches.”

1914 Dec 17 – Injured Man Getting Better

Thos. Free, who was badly injured in a collision at Kamsack a couple of weeks ago and had to have one of his legs amputated, is making excellent progress towards recovery. It is probably he will be able to return o his home next week.

1914 Dec 17 – Jack Myers Shot in Leg

Jack Myers, a well-known resident of Gilbert Plains, was shot in the leg last week while hunting in the Riding Mountains by a young fellow named Coulter. Coulter saw the bushes move and before his companion, a man named Morran, could stop him, fired and dropped Myers.

1914 Dec 17 – Ruthenian Patriotism

An evidence of the patriotism of some of the Ruthenian settlers was given on Saturday when two of them. Panko Schnuyk and Peter Toporoski came to town to tender their mites for their country. Each gave a dollar towards the patriotic fund and also gave their promise to contribute a dollar a month each to the fund as long as the war lasted.

1914 Dec 17 – Fork River

Mr. W. Williams returned from a visit to Mrs. Williams who has been very sick for some time in the Dauphin Hospital. We are all pleased to hear that Mrs. Williams has recovered enough to be able to return home next week.
Mr. George O’Neill, of Mowat, returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and is delighted with the lake Town.
Mr. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, one of the candidates for the reeveship arrived in this burg in company with Mr. Steve Lytwyn, a representative of the Armstrong Trading Co. Mr. Lytwyn is assisting Mr. Hechter in his campaign to get control of the municipality.
Mr. Duncan Kennedy, late manager of the Armstrong Trading Company, has accepted a position with Mr. Hechter, of Winnipegosis. Mr. Kennedy has been here for the company for several years and attended strictly to business ear in year out. Although we are sorry to see Mr. Kennedy and his family leave, his friends wish him all kinds of good luck.
The box social under the auspices of All Saints’ Woman’s Auxiliary on the 11th, was fairly well attended. The boxes realized good prices in the hands of our friend, “Scotty,” who acted as auctioneer, and a nice sum was realized. It was, we believe, one of the most enjoyable times ever held in the hall. Credit us due the ladies for the nice display of boxes to tempt the boys. The social came to a close at 4.30 in the wee small hours.
There will be a public Christmas tree under the auspices of All Saints’ Sunday school on Wednesday evening, Dec. 23rd, to commence at 8.30 sharp. Everybody is invited to come and help give the kiddies a good time. Admission, adults 23 cents, children free. Proceeds to go towards maintaining the Sunday school.
Mr. Thomas, travelling Missionary of the Anglican Church, will preach in All Saints’ Church on Dec. 20th at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. Everyone invited.
Rev. Mr. Thomas will hold a meeting in All Saints’ Anglican Church on December the 19th, at 2.30 p.m. sharp. All members and those who are in sympathy


1914 Dec 17 – Sifton

The Grain Growers’ Patriotic concert held here last Friday met with great success. There was very good talent from Dauphin, also West Bay and Fairville. There was a very good attendance indeed from the outlying districts. The Sifton boys proved themselves very good in their little play, “Christmas night at the Front.”
Mr. Robt. Brewer shipped another car of stock on Monday. Quite a rustler is “Bobs.”
We all regret that Mr. William Birch, late station agent, has left town for good. We understand he is going to Invermay, Sask., and we all wish him the best of luck.
Mr. Caldwell, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town last week on business.
We understand that Mr. John Aller, of Fairville, is holding a social next Saturday in aid of the Red Cross Society. We trust it will be a success.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, are now busy canvassing orders as they expect their drilling outfit this week. They are deserving of success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 6 – 1917

1917 Dec 6 – Over $400 000 000 Raised

Over $400 000 000 has been raised in the Dominion for the Victory Loan.
Dauphin town and rural municipality guaranteed over $400 000.

1917 Dec 6 – Fork River

Harry Hunter has returned from the hospital at Dauphin.
The “Whale” which appeared in the columns of the Herald last week, re the clerk’s absence, was duly noted here.
A number of prospective settlers from outside points are here looking over the district this week.
The elevators are all full up and no cars in sight.
The deer hunters are returning with poor bags.

1917 Dec 6 – Sifton

On the 23rd a “Hard Times” dance and box social were held at the Wycliffe School house. A large crowd assembled. No linen, jewellery or fashionable clothes were allowed and two constables were kept busy rounding up offenders who were promptly fined by Justice Spearman, assisted by P. Wood was clerk. The auction sale of boxes was very successful, the highest figure realized for a single box being $21. C. Brain, who had the cheapest box knocked down to him at $2.50, was promptly fined $1 for the offence and he paid just as promptly and cheerfully. S. Kitt and other kind helpers supplied the music, the floor being in charge of Mr. H. Woods. Dancing was kept up until 3 a.m. The handsome sum of $153 was realized and sent to the Red Cross.

1917 Dec 6 – Winnipegosis

The hauling of fish will commence in real earnest next week. Everyone is preparing for big business.
Mr. Groff a new stable is about completed and already is filled with teams.
The sad death of little Christine Johnson, seven-year-old daughter of Stoney Johnson occurred this week.
The Red Cross monthly meeting was held as usual in the old school. At this meeting the auxiliary was organized into a branch of the Red Cross Society of Canada, and officers and committee elected. Mr. Ketchison was again made president, and we feel confident he will be a very efficient one.
The weekly entertainment of the Red Cross last week was a great success. A very attractive programme of music, etc., was prepared. A chorus of school children was well received and Mrs. Litwin’s singing of Ukrainian songs, translated into English, was a unique item. A handsome Christmas cake donated by Mrs. Whale netted $17. Tickets were sold for a raffle and Mr. Kristinson was the winner, but very generously put it up for action. Mr. Rod Burrell finally carried it home in triumph having paid $20 for it. The total for the evening was $87.00.
A memorial service for the late “Joe” Johnston, who gave his life in the trenches for us at home, for his country and the cause of liberty, will be held in the Presbyterian Church on Sunday, the 16th. Rev. Mr. Kirkpatrick, of Ochre River, will officiate.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 29 – 1910

1910 Sep 29 – Buried in Well

Kamsack, Sask., Sept. 25 – A funeral service, attended by circumstances that are unique in the history of Canada, took place Saturday on the farm of John Bowes, sixteen miles south of here. At the top of a 73 foot shaft that had been sunk for a well and at the bottom of which lay the remains of Elwer Olson, aged 35, of Yorkton. Rev. J. Morrison conducted a service for the dead. The shaft has been closed up and the body will remain for ever in the deep and improvised grave. Hansen was overcome by gas in the well and attempts to recover the body were fruitless.

1910 Sep 29 – Died from Burns

Miss Mabel Gunn of Makinak, aged 28 years, died Tuesday from burns received last week through an accident in handling coal oil. The young lady was trying to squelch a blaze on the floor with a rug, when her clothing caught on fire, and before it was put out she received terrible burns.
The unfortunate lady lingered nearly a week and everything possible was done to relive her suffering.
The funeral to the Makinak cemetery took place Wednesday.
Miss Gunn was favourably known throughout the Dauphin district, being one of Makinak’s earliest residents and having, with her sister, run a boarding house there for years. Her demise is keenly felt by the citizens of that community.

1910 Sep 29 – Fork River

Mrs. Comber left here for her home in Selkirk last week.
Mr. Frame from Treherne has been visiting friends here.
On Sunday Sept. 18th, Mrs. E. Morris gave birth to a little girl.
Quite a large congregation attended the Harvest Festival Service at Winnipegosis last Sunday night when a special sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Car loads of wheat are being shipped from this point.
Tom Toye’s youngest child died last week and was buried at Winnipegosis. The burial service was taken by the Rev. H.H. Scrase.
Cattle buyers are busy in this district. Quite a number of cattle have been sold lately and shipped to Winnipeg.
Fleming Wilson from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Harvest Festival Service will be held at the English Church on Sunday evening, October 9th, at 7.30.

1910 Sep 29 – Sifton

Mr. F.E. Nex of Whitemouth, is visiting his father-in-law, Mr. Ludwig Zarowoney. Fred bicycled from Winnipeg to McCreary, where he boarded the train.
Rev. Sabourin was in Winnipeg last week on business.
School Inspector Walker of Dauphin, inspected the village school on Tuesday last.
Miss A. Griffith of Fishguard, Eng., is visiting her brother-in-law, Mr. W Carr.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Barrie have just returned home, after a couple months visit to his parents in “ye auld Scottish hielands” near Aberdeen. Bill reports a vey pleasant trip.
Theo. Stefanik of Winnipeg, addressed a large open air gathering here on Wednesday of last week in the interest of the community. Mr. Rawson of Dauphin was noticed in the gathering.
Charl Holinski is about completing the building of his new home. A fireside gathering is expected to initiate the new house when finished, so no doubt Mr. Jordan of Dauphin will be likely called upon to send up the necessary for the occasion, which is usually quite in evidence at such times.
Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Kitt and son of Valley River, visited Sifton on Sunday.
Miss Bessie Wilson of Fork River, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Paul Wood.
Mr. W. Carr went to Winnipegosis on Saturday on business.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 25 – 1915

1915 Mar 25 – Baby Born on Train

An event occurred on the train from Prince Albert on Saturday morning last which caused quite a commotion among the passengers. Mrs. Courtney Veal, who took passage at Hudson’s Bay Junction, for the purpose of coming to Dauphin to enter the hospital, gave birth to a male child in the vicinity of Sifton, and some fifteen miles from Dauphin. Mrs. Veal was occupying a berth in a sleeper at the time. There was only one other woman, a Mrs. McEvoy, on the train at the time, and her services were quickly requisitioned by Conductor James McQuigge, and everything possible done to make the mother and baby confortable. A rush telegram was dispatched to Dauphin for a doctor and nurse. When the train arrived Dr. Bottomley and a nurse from the hospital with the ambulance, were in waiting and the mother and child hurriedly taken to the hospital.

Forty-five minutes after Mrs. Veal entered the hospital door she have birth to another boy.
Supt. Irwin and the officials of the Canadian Northern are naturally quite proud of the part of the road played in this important event, and while they are not willing to admit they are in favour of adding a maternity department to their already unexcelled service, they say it might be a possibility in the future.

Mr. Veal, who accompanied his wife to Dauphin, speaks highly of the service rendered by Conductor McQuigge in the emergency, and as a mark of gratitude will name one of the babies after him. The two babies are to be named:
HERBERT KITCHENER VEAL.,
JAMES McQUIGGE VEAL.,

At latest accounts the mother and both babies are doing well.

1915 Mar 25 – Interesting Letters from Private J. Meek

The following extracts are taken from two interesting letters written home by Private John Meek (John Wilson Meek, 1892, 81578):
“No. 946, D. Coy., 32nd Batt.”
“At Sea, March 3rd, 1915,”
“Here I am and feeling fine, with our sea journey about at and end. I have not been the least bi sick all the way. It has been quite a long time on the water and not the best of sleeping quarters. We have just had steerage quarters and they not on a first class boat, so you will have an idea of what it would be like. Well, anyway we have been able to live through it all and so we should worry. A soldier has to take the like of that and smile. We expect to land tomorrow sometime, but where we do not know yet, still I think it will be England alright.”
“We have had a nice trip as far as weather is concerned. The weather and sea have not been a bit rough all the way across. We got on board on the Monday at Halifax and sailed on the Tuesday morning. There are four ships on the trip. The cruiser “Essex” has led the way al the time, of course she has not troops on board. There are three ships with about 1500 men on each, four battalions in all. On our boat is the 32nd and part of the 30th battalion from Vancouver. I do not know where the other two battalions came from. The names of the tree ships as they have travelled on the line are, the “Missanbie,” the “Vaderland” and the “Megantic.” We are on the “Vanderland.”
“Well as far as the trip is concerned there was no more excitement for the first few days. On Monday, shortly after breakfast we got word that one of the stokers had shot himself. He tried to shoot himself through the heart, but he shot a little high, so he did not do himself very much harm. The doctor operated on him and got the bullet out. We do not know what was his reason, but heard he had a row with chief engineer.”
“Yesterday and today have been sport days on board, and it has been fine. We had a boxing contest, a wrestling contest, a tug-of-war and a bunch of races. We had a sack race, a three-legged race, and two or three more.”
“Last night we had a fine concert in the first-class dining hall.”
“Everybody has been excited today, as we have been expecting to sight they south coast of Ireland.”
“Stanley (Henderson of Minitonas) has never been the least bit sick either. You ought to have seen him the morning we got into Halifax. He got out of the train and ran like a made man to see the water and the ships, with a smile all over his face.”

Feb. 4th.
“We sailed into Queenstown harbour early this morning and everything looks fine. It is a very pretty place and the grass looks quite green from here. It is regular spring weather here and it makes a fellow feel fine. There is great excitement among the boys this morning. Some of the have been up all night just to watch her sail in.”

“Shorncliffe, England,”
“March 8th, 1915”
“We have got to the end of our journey for now, anyway. We are right on the south coast of England, near Dover, in the town of Shroncliffe which is a good size. It is a lovely place. We can see the English Channel from the camp. There are about 25,000 men at this place, so it is quite a big town. We have not to live in tents either. We have houses that hold about 25 men each and which are fixed up good. It is the best barracks we have had yet.”
“We were in Queenstown two days and had a route march around the town. Say, it was lovely there! They were such nice days and quite a lot of flowers growing already. Some of the boys said it was the nicest place that they had ever seen.”
“We passed through part of London on the train but did not get off.”
“This leaves me as well as the rest of the Dauphin boys – well and happy.”

1915 Mar 25 – Fork River

Mr. W. Northam, A. Cameron and J. Richardson returned from a few days visit at Dauphin.
Mr. and Ms. F.O. Murphy, of Dauphin, arrived here with a carload of implements and furniture. They will take up their residence of F. Chase’s farm south of the town for the summer.
Our fiend Scotty took a flying visit to Winnipegosis and returned on shanks’ mare hale and hearty.
Mr. F. Hafenbrak returned from Dauphin with a fine team of draught horses. The seed grain will go in now.
Messrs. Shannon and Stonehouse returned from a pleasant vacation at Dauphin.
Several of our young people attended the 17th of Ireland ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of Winnipegosis hotel. “Mac” knows how to give the folks a good time.
Mr. Archie McDonell, manager for the A.T. Co. farms here, spent a few days arranging for the spring work.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Anglican Church, held their annual meeting on March 17. The reports show a good year’s work. The society is in a good financial condition. The officers for the coming year are Mrs. King, president; Mrs. A. Rowe, vice; Mrs. F. Hafenbrak, secretary; Wm. King, treasurer. Layment in charge, F. Steede.
The children’s annual Lenten service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, March 28th, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. All are cordially invited.
W. Coultas returned on Tuesday from a trip to Dauphin.

1915 Mar 25 – Sifton

Mr. Smith Russell of Strathclair, is a visitor in town these days on business.
Mr. F. Patridge, who has been relief station agent here for the last few weeks, has left here to take up duties at Canora, Sask. We all wish him the best of luck.
William Ashmore’s livery is kept busy these days since the alteration of train service. Seemingly its true that it is an ill wind that does not do someone good.
Dr. Gilbart, of Ethelbert, spent the weekend in town.
Mr. Walter spent the weekend out east amongst the farmers and reports that if this kind of weather continues they will start operations on the land within the course of a few days.
The Kennedy Mercantile Co. has erected a large warehouse and has same stocked with a good assortment of farm implements.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt have succeeded in drilling a fine well for Fairville School.
Don’t forget the machinery, horse and stock sale at Sifton on Saturday, the 27th inst. See advertisement in Herald.

1915 Mar 25 – Winnipegosis

Capt. W.B. Sifton is in town from the north end of the lake.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele are here from Mafeking.
Sid Coffey returned on Tuesday from Dauphin. He has been on the sick list.
Contractor Neely and a staff of men arrived on Tuesday to work on the lighthouse. They were greeted with a big snowstorm.
Coun. Hechter and daughter were visitors to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Jos. Schaldermose is a Winnipeg visitor this week.
Miss Grace Saunders has arrived from Winnipeg.
The annual dance given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnes, of the Hotel Winnipegosis, on St. Patrick’s night, was attended by a large crowd. Every one appeared to have a good time.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 4 – 1915

1915 Mar 4 – Playing Joke and is Head

Swan River, Feb. 26 – J. Hoey, a homesteader living near here, is dead as the result of playing the leading part in a practical joke. He was at some distance from his shack when he saw his chum come out. He thought it would be a good joke to imitate a wolf and see what happened. He crouched down low and began to howl like a wolf. The other man immediately got his rifle and shot. The bullet struck Hoey in the thigh. He was rushed to the hospital, where the leg was amputated. The shock, however, was too much and he died shortly after.

1915 Mar 4 – Thought He Had to Carry a Broom

A Galician seeing so many on the streets this week carrying brooms, asked a citizen if this was a new war regulation. He was jocularly told it was. The man then went into a store and bought a broom and proudly walked up Main Street with the “weapon” elevated over his shoulder at 45 degrees.

1915 Mar 4 – Fork River

Mr. G. O’Neil, of Mowat, is off on a visit to Rainy River.
Miss S. Lacey has returned from a few weeks’ visit with friends at Rainy River.
Mr. Munro and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt.
Mrs. R. McEachern spent a few days at the Lake Town lately visiting he sister, Mrs. E.J. Morris.
J. Denby and Tom Sanderson, of Winnipegosis, paid this burgh a visit on business and are looking hale and hearty after their winter up the lake fishing.
Mr. Steede, lay reader, paid a visit to Sifton in connection with church work last week.
Mr. Wm. Howitson have a dance to his many friends on Friday night in the hall. A very good time was spent.
W. King returned from attending the 43rd annual session of the Provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba at Winnipeg, on Friday. He reports the largest meeting in the history of the lodge. Arrangements were made for entertaining the Triennial Council of Ireland and the Grand Lodge of British North America next summer.
Reeve Lacey and D.F. Wilson are attending the Trustees’ Convention at Winnipeg this week.

1915 Mar 4 – Sifton

Mr. James McAuley and Mr. Eberby of the Massey-Harris Co., were visitors in town last week.
Sid Coffey was in our midst last week and gave a good show with is moving pictures, but unfortunately there was a very poor attendance. Cheer up, “Sid,” better luck next time.
Mr. Oliver Abraham has been busy hauling wheat to the elevator for the last few days. He is putting about two carloads through the elevator. We trust he will be successful in getting a top price as the wheat is of good quality.
There was half a carload of cattle shipped out of here this week. We would like to know what has become of Robt. Brewer this last week or two. Surely his smiling face would be welcomed back again.
Mr. Walters, Mr. Kitt and Mr. Onlette, of this burgh, visited the Grain Growers Association concert and dance at Fairville last Friday and report having had a good time.

1915 Mar 4 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J.P. Grenon is in Winnipeg undergoing an operation.
J. Denby, Wm. Denby, Sr., and W. Johnson, are Winnipeg visitors this week.
Mr. Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was in town on business, and left on Friday’s train.
Government officials, Sweny and Taylor, were here on Friday inspecting the works.
Mrs. Jack Denby has been on the sick list for a few days, but is around again.
Mrs. Theo Johnston left on Monday for Dauphin to visit Mr. and Mrs. King.
Mr. Ed. Morris left for Dauphin on Friday’s train.
Mrs. Wm. Williams, of Fork River, is a visitor in town.
Mr. and Mrs. Himie Cohen, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. F. Hechter this week.
Jim McInnes had a run for his life on Friday evening. A call was made to the rink that there was a deuce of a rumpus at the hotel, and, of course, Jim can home on the bound to settle the dispute, but to his surprise he found about 25 o 40 lads and lassies waiting for him and Mrs. McInnes in parlour. On their entering the brunch demanded the dining room cleared out, which was done in short order. It being Mr. McInnes’ birthday a dance was enjoyed till the wee sma’ hours of the morning. Jim has not given his age away yet, imitating the ladies in this respect.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 11 – 1915

1915 Feb 11 – Death Under Suspicious Circumstance

Coroner Culbertson held an inquest on the remains of Pawlo Jura, which were found in the Duck Mountain, at Ethelbert on Wednesday. The verdict of the jury was that Jura came to his death under suspicious circumstances, and the jury request that further investigation be made. Wm. Barrie was foreman of the jury.

1915 Feb 11 – Selected to Fill Vacancies

The following twenty-five volunteers left on Friday for Winnipeg, where they will fill vacancies on the corps there caused by illness and death:
A. Wilson, R.D. Reeve, J.E. Welsh, T.M. Ray, J. Armstrong, W.C. Miltchell, R. Smith, P.E. Millard, W. Donaldson, W.E. Ridley, W.J. Hill, W. Miller, J.S. Blundell, W. McDonald, J. Nochol, W.J. Wallace, A. Baldwin, T.L. Rodway, I. Osman, B. Dilworth, R.E. Richards, P. Cowley, P. Boam, I. McGlashin, W. Munro.

1915 Feb 11 – “Winged Animals” at Ashville

R.J. Avison, the well-known farmer of Ashville district, was in town on Wednesday. He report people seeing aeroplanes and other “winged animals” in that part. From what we know of the people of that thriving district they would not be content to let other places get ahead of them in “seein’ balloons,” or anything else.

1915 Feb 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Fork River, Monday, Feb. 1st, 1915. Councillor Hechter absent.
The clerk swore in the newly elected councillor for Ward 6, li. S.B. Reid.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Confirming by laws No. 107, sec.-treas. by-law.
Bickle-Yakavanka – Confirming by-laws 21 and 196, councillors’ fees and mileage.
A by-law appointing Dr. Medd health officer, at a salary of $50.00 was passed.
Hunt-Reid – That the councillors be instructed not to expend Ward appropriations or other funds on the municipal boundary roads without consulting the council.
Reid-Yakavanka – That the councillors Hunt, Bickle and Hechter be finance committee for 1915 and the Coun. Hunt be chairman.
Hunt-Bickle – That Councillors Reid, Yakavanka and Namaka be Public Works committee and the Coun. Reid be chairman.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That Councillors Reid, Hunt and Bickle be bridge committee and that Councillor Reid be chairman.
Communications were read from the Deputy Municipal Commissioner, the Red Cross Society, S. Hughes, M.P.P., Professor Black, the solicitor, the Rural Municipality of Dauphin and Ochre River municipality.
Hunt-Reid – That the secretary write the Municipality of Ochre River and express this council’s willingness to cooperate in the matter of a convention of the Northern Municipalities and that the reeve and Councillor Hechter be a committee to take up the matter.
Bickle-Reid – That a grant of ten sacks of flour be made to Siefat Mcushka and that the clerk purchase the flour where it can be obtained at the lowest price.
Namaka-Reid – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That if material and work can be obtained at a few months time the bridge committee be authorized to finish the boundary bridge between sections 5 and 6, tp. 29 rge. 18.
Bickle-Yakavanka – That the key of the council chamber at Winnipegosis be delivered to W.H. Hunking and that he keep the place in good condition and be responsible for the same.
Bickle-Hunt – That the reeve be appointed to go to Winnipeg and interview Mr. Hughes, M.P.P., and the Minister of Public Works regarding a grant to the Municipality for 1915.
Hunt – Reid – That W.H. Hunking be authorized to purchase two padlock and two pairs of blankets for use in the Winnipegosis lock-up.
A by-law was passed cancelling certain taxes.
Hunt-Namaka – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1915 Feb 11 – Fork River

Mr. Shannon and daughter arrived from the east and are visiting at the home of Mr. Thos. Shannon, son of Mrs. Shannon.
Mr. Nat Little has returned from a trip to Brandon.
Mrs. Geo. Tilt is spending a few days on the homestead.
Mr. Wm. Russell has returned from Kamsack and is visiting at the house of his parents.
Ed. Morris and Max King have returned from their winter’s fishing up the lake and report a good season’s work.
L.E. Bailey, county secretary, and W. King, C.M., have returned from attending the L.O.L. annual meeting at Dauphin. Mr. King has filled the county master’s chair for five years and retired from that position satisfied that the order in the country is in a good healthy position.
There was a surprise party Friday night, the neighbours taking possession of the home of Mr. C.S. Bailey on the Mossey River. The visitors had a good time judging by the time they got home in the morning.
Mr. Steele, of Bradwardine, arrived here and has taken over this mission and will hold service on February 14th at Winnipegosis at 11 a.m., Fork River at 3 p.m. and Sifton at 8 p.m.
Mr. Green, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church, Fork River, leaves for Winnipeg this week. He has been pining for the Sunny South and we wish him a pleasant journey to a warm climate.
A very pleasant time was spent by the young folks the other night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Reid.
Mr. Wm. Howitson has been under the weather for the last week. We trust he will soon recover as this burgh will sure go broke without “Scott” to stir us up.
Mrs. K. McAulay and children, of Winnipegosis are visiting at the home of Mrs. P. Ellis.

1915 Feb 11 – Sifton

Jas. McAuley, the Massey-Harris collector, was in our midst last week.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt were visitors in town last week from Ethelbert, where they are drilling a well for the grist mill, and report that they are 105 feet down and no water, but we trust that by this time they have struck good supply of water.
The Catholic mission held a sacred concert on Sunday evening, which proved a great success.
The grist mill is running very steady these times.
Mr. Paul Wood received a carload of oats on Monday, which he is offering for sale, so there should not be a shortage of feed for a time now.
William Ashmore’s team took a jolly party of Siftonites out to a dance at West Bay School given by Mr. J. Adams. All report having a good time.
Business has been very quiet of late but we are looking forward to brighter times.

1915 Feb 11 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. A. Meston returned last Friday from Minnesota.
Miss Jane Paddock, returned home from the west and says, “there is no place like the old burgh.”
James Fleming, from the Pas, spent the weekend with friend at South Bay.
Mammie Bickle entertained a few of her little friends at a birthday party.
Mrs. T. Morton, of Quill Lake, Sask., is visiting her son. Will, who has been very ill. We wish him a speedy recovery.
Tom Sanderson returned from the north last week.
Frank Hechter is a visitor to Mafeking this week.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston entertained ten of the pioneer ladies of Winnipegosis at a delightful tea in honour of Mrs. F. Morton, of Quill Lake.
Curling is the order of the day. A grand bonspiel is on. “Stoop her up,” is the by-word.