Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 3, 1919

Case Transferred to Winnipeg

The case of the Armstrong Trading Co. vs. J.P. Grenon and J. McInnes, which was among the list of King’s Bench cases here, has been transferred to Winnipeg. This has been done for the benefit of the counsel who are all Winnipeg residents. The case starts today (Thursday).

Great War Veterans Hold Big Celebration

Fortune smiled on the Great War Veterans on Tuesday. Their first celebration was a splendid success viewed from all standpoints. The weather was ideal, and the crowds the largest that ever visited the town. Between four and five thousand people were on the Exhibition grounds in the afternoon. There was not a hitch to mark the day’s program.
The parade in the morning attracted much attention and favorable comment was heard on all sides on the many and varied representations in the line of march. There were cars decorated with flags without number, and it appeared as if every boy and girl in the town carried the colors.

Verdict for Mrs. Haley

Mrs. Jos. Haley has secured a verdict for $10,000 in the count at Saskatoon against the Canadian National Railway for the death of her husband. Joseph Haley was killed at Hawke’s spur, a mile west of Hudson’s Bay Junction in the fall of 1918 by being caught between a loading platform and a freight car. Action was instituted in the province of Saskatchewan owing to the accident having occurred there. The case came to trial at Saskatoon on June 25th, when judgment was given for $10,000. Bowman, McFadden & Caldwell represented the plaintiff.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, June 10th, Coun. Yakavanka absent. The minutes of last meeting were read and adopted.
Communication were read from the solicitor re Bowlen judgment; Fred Wenger, account against ward 2; the teacher of South Bay S.D.; W.H. Paulson re taxes; three applications for the position of road commissioner; Bank of Nova Scotia re line of credit; Dept. of Public Works re road across 3-31-18; Geo. Lvon re wood on road; the estimates of Mossey River S.D., and a largely signed petition from ratepayers in south-east corner of the municipality and Lawrence municipality praying for a road on boundary line.
Hunt-Namaka – That a grant of $250 be made to the Fork River agricultural society.
Marcroft-Paddock – That after hearing the circumstances the taxes on the se 2-31-19 be allowed to stand over till the coming December, and that the penalty on them be cancelled.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $150 be made to the Returned Soldiers’ committee for the purpose of giving a banquet to returned soldiers.
Marcroft-Reid – That the secretary obtain designs of monuments from the different marble works with a view to erecting a monument to the memory of all Mossey River soldiers who were killed in the war.
Marcroft-Namaka – That Coun. Hunt and Reid be a committee to select, stake out and authorize the use of a nuisance ground for Fork River.
Hunt-Reid – That a grant of $10 be made to the South Bay Boys and Girls’ club.
Hunt-Namaka – That a special meeting of the council be held at Fork River on Saturday, June 14th.
Reid-Namaka – That Mrs. Domeric be refunded the taxes of 1918, with the exception of the special school tax.
Reid-Namaka – That the reeve and sec.-treasurer be a committee to deal with matters regarding the council chamber at Winnipegosis.
Marcroft-Namaka – That the account of Coun. Reid ($22) for letting and inspecting work be printed.
Marcroft-Paddock – That the auditor’s report be printed.
Reid-Namaka – That the accounts of the meeting of Jan. 7th, March 5th, and those of today, as recommended by the finance committee, be passed.
Bylaws were employing the collector at $5 per day when instructed to go out by the reeve and sec.-treasurer, appointing James Bickle road commissioner, and repealing the bylaw making the councilors road commissioners. Also authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of Mossey River School District, No. 999, on a $12,000 debenture bylaw.
The council then adjourned.

Fork River

A gang of men are engaged building a new elevator. This will make the second elevator at this point.
Gus. Andrus, Jim Parker and G. Lacey have invested in tractors and are busy turning over the soil.
The heavy rain of Saturday gave the hand a good soaking and the crops are greatly befitted by it.

Mossey River School Report

The following is a list of pupils who were successful in the recent mid-summer exams:
Grade VII—Honors; Bob Williams. Pass; Ben Shuchett.
Grade VI—Nathan Shuchett, David Nowasod.
Grade V—Honors; Arthur Jamieson.
Grade IV—Mildred Carlson, Amos Carlson, Bill Williams, Sofie Beyko.
Grade III—Goldie Shuchett, Edna Hafenbrak, Earnest Hafenbrak, Donald McEachern, Tony Beyko.
Grade II—Birdie Stonehouse, Roy Dewbury, Allie Dewbury, Steve Nowasod, Jack Puchaylo.
Grade I sr—Kate Williams, Milo Carlson, Peter Zerba.
Class A—Clarice Carlson, Mary Stefishon, Tommy Hafenbrak, Cornie Chipley.
Gertrude M. Cooper, teacher.

Winnipegosis Public Schools

Grade IV to Grade V—Honors; Theary Frederickson, Benjamin Ketcheson, Lawrence Marchenaki. Pass; Gladys Cartwright, Jos. Mikit, Clara Hubble, Alexina Dumas, Charlie Adam, Mary Langlois, Harry Whale, Muriel Snelgrove, Rae Spence.
Primary to Grade II—Pass; Olive Shears, Vera Wills, Christine Schaldemose, Glen Dunby, Marie Loire, Hugh Johnson, Elizabeth Bradbury, Brynhildur Bjornsson, Grace Campbell, Bert Hubble, Chas. Spence, Harriet McLeod, Paul Lemchuk.
T. Tozer, Teacher.

Grade IV jr. to Grade IV sr.—Honors: John Marchenski, Rose McAuley. Pass: Agnes Burrell, Mary Chermak, Margaret Sanderson, M. Mapes, Albert Dumas, Sarah Klyne, Mary Richard, Donald McAuley, Violet Groff, Wm. Mapes, Olivina Langlois, Blennie St. Matt, Jessie Paddock, Jas. Richard, Hilliard Denby, Beverley Scchaldemose.
Grade III to Grade IV—Pass: Jos. Ponliot, Daisy Walmsley, Frank Wallace, Myrtle Snelgrove, Lawrence McDonell, Martha Sanderson, Wall. Pouliot, Ralph McAuley.
Following is a list, in order of merit, of successful pupils in the recent yearly examinations in Winnipegosis public schools:
Grade VII to Grade VIII—Pass: Tina Marchenski, Margaret Robinson, Ernest Needham.
Grade VI to Grade VII—Honors: Margaret Magnusson, James Brown, Kathleen Dempsey, Margaret McAuley, Charlotte Bradley. Pass: Paul Rudiak, Grace Whale, Cecil Paddock, Frank Needham.
Conditional—Alice Mapes, Harvey McAuley.
Grade V to VI—Honors: Mary Marcuenski, Evelyn Groff, Svava Frederickson, Charlotte Adam, Addie Ketcheson, Gordon Rognvaldson, Edith Hubble. Pass: Muriel Burrell, Annie Denby, Archie McLellan, Amelia Adam, Hjalmtyr Thorarinsson, Jos. Schaldemose.
Grade V Jr. to Grade V Sr—Honors: Leo Magnusson. Pass: Harvey Grenon, Verna Denby, Esther Hechter, Evolda Whale, Felix Magnusson, Gifford Campbell, George Campbell.
M. McMartin, Teacher.
Leith McMartin, Teacher.

Grade II to Grade III—Honors; Fred Magnusson, Jennie Ogryzlo, Margaret McLellan, Annie Dubinak, Stearnie Fredrickson, Stephen Zawrich, Alvina St. Godard, Sarah Alex, Mary Lyons, Myrtle Clarkson, Roderick St. Matt, Jos. Hechter, Mark Brown, Annie Zuk, Alex Klyne, Uric Lavergna. Pass; Wm. Wallock, D’Elroy Pouliot, Medos Langlois, Wm. Flamand.
Conditional: Ernest Seiffert, Bruce McAuley, Florence Paddock.
Grade I to Grade II—Honors: Viva Burrill, Lilian Bilenduke, Mary Kruchek, Donald Morris, Iva Whale, Vera Rognvaldson, Dolly Morris, Annie Marchenski, Armand Langlois, Nora Demery, Keitcha Snelgrove. Pass; Chas. Kachoe, Roderick Klyne, Dan McKay, Stephen Ogryzlo, John Semchuk, Fred St. Matt, Jos. Vermette, Helen Fiddler.
L. Levites, Teacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 23 – 1915

1915 Dec 23 – News from War Front

Lieut. Denis Cockrill, who was recently wounded, has sufficiently recovered to return to the trenches. (Ashton Dennis Cockrill, 1887, 12656)
Private Jos. Gallant who enlisted at Dauphin last winter, has been recommended for the D.S. medal. He rescued two officers after they had been wounded by the Germans near their trenches. (Joseph Gallant, 1892, 424019)

1915 Dec 23 – Sixty now Enlisted

Recruiting for the battalion with headquarters at Dauphin is going on briskly. The officers and men here now total 60, and it is expected by the 1st of the New Year will be over 100 strong.
The officers state that the men enlisted are well suited for the service and are engaged drilling every day. Physical drill exercises are held in the town hall and platoon work at the agricultural grounds. The officers in command and privates are as follows:

OFFICERS
Lieut.-Col. R.A. Gillespie, O.C. (Robert Alexander Gillespie, 1881, xxx)
Capt. and paymaster, H. Hunter (Henry Cecil Hunter, 1888, 234232)
Lieut. V.N. Severn, keeper of records (Vernon Nicholl Severn, 1890, xxx)
Lieut. J.W. Skinner (Joseph Winstanley Sinner, 1875, xxx)
Sergt. M.A. Young (Martin Albert Young, 1880, 460218)
Sergt. A.C. Wade (Arthur Ca?ebourne Wade, 1871, 693015)

PRIVATES
F. Crowe (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
H.R. Tarzwell (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
R. Merrell (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Meader (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
J.C. Henwood (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
T.M. Jones (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
H.V. Cousans (Henry Victor Cousans, 1885, 1000003)
F. Kilborn (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
W. McClernon (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.E. Hooper (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
C.W. Elliott (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
H. Gardiner (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
C. Klyne (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
W.E. Demery (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
J. Gough (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
M. Jacobson (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
E. Sandgrew (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)
A. Douglas (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
J.W. Lane (James William Lane, 1879, 1000018)
R. Pollard (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
W. Hatt (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
J. Hickie (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
A.F. Tigg (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
T.G. Kirk (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
W. Greenshields (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
J.E. Donnelly (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
S. Hesson (Samuel Hesson, 1880, 1000071)
G. Montgomery (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W.J. Crittenden (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
J.F. Calder (???)
A.E. Taylor (Albert Edward Taylor, 1893, 1000063)
J.H. Codd (John Codd, ???, 1000064)
J. Love (John Love, 1877, 1000067)
A. Love (Andrew Love, 1883, 1000072)
J. Minnis (James Minnis, 1876, 1000073)
M.W. Primrose (Malberry Whittington Primrose, 1894, 1000077)
J. McLetchie (John McLetchie, 1885, 1000070)
F. Hicks (Fredrick Hicks, 1891, 1000080)
C. Benson (Christian Benson, 1887, 1000081)
J. Humphry (???)
W.F. Terrell (William Francis Terrell, 1890, 1000141)
M.J.T. Cathcart (William Joseph Tidmarsh Cathcart, 1898, 1000147)
G. Douglas (George Douglas, 1897, 1000148)
J.G. Cathcart (John George Cathcart, 1872, 1000146)
C. Wilkey (Charles Henry Wilkey, 1895, 1000149)
G. Wilkey (George Wilkey, ???, 1000155)

NOTES
Tuesday was pay day, and the bank tellers were given a heavy bombardment for an hour.
Marsh Cathcart has enlisted as regimental bugler.

1915 Dec 23 – Had Head Cut Off

Ochre River, Dec. 21 – A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, Dec. 21, about noon when Charlie Blackman, a farmer of this district was instantly killed by the bursting of a circular wood saw. Mr. Blackman had just returned from the poll where he had been recording his vote and was cutting wood
Deceased was an old resident of the district and leaves a wife and ten children, 5 sons and 5 daughters. The eldest being a son 17 years of age. The saw that Mr. Blackman was operating was known to be cracked, but had been working for some time in that condition.
Coroner Rogers, from Dauphin visiting the scene of the accident, and after learning the facts decided an inquest was not necessary.

1915 Dec 23 – Young Ruthenian Accidentally Shot

A young Ruthenian, 24 years of age, accidently shot himself at Ethelbert on Monday evening. He was hunting rabbits at the time, and pushed the butt end of the gun in a hole, discharging it, the contents entering his abdomen, making a bad wound. Drs. Culbertson and Bottomley were sent for and went to the northern town on Tuesday morning. They dressed the wound but have little hopes for the recovery for the young man.

1915 Dec 23 – Fork River

Mrs. N. Little and daughter, Grace have returned from two weeks’ trip south.
Mrs. A. Hunt and children left on Wednesday’s train for a two months’ vacation with her friends at Ottawa.
It seems to be the order of the day of late for the Dauphin train to arrive late and take a rest at Winnipegosis for from 4 to 3 hours while they catch a load of fish for the return ship. Passengers waiting to go to Dauphin have to hang around all day. How long will the suffering public have to put up with this kind of service?
Mrs. Craig, of Weyburn, is here on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Northam.
Mr. W. Williams, our lumber magnets, has a gang out on his Lake Dauphin limits preparing for the winter’s out of lumber.
The returned hunters report big game hard to get this year. They have not had the success of other years. In a few years, if the present slaughter goes on, there will be no big game left to hunt. To preserve these fine animals a close season of two or three years should be put in force at once by the government.
F.O. Murphy paid the burg a long visit between trains last week. Fred took a cargo of eggs with him as he says “Murphys” are not too bad an old time. The only thing that it takes the train so long to go to Dauphin the eggs might hatch out on the road and he would have to get a hen coop on his arrival.
The Orangemen of Fork River will [1 missing line] ball on December 31st in the Orange Hall. Admission, gents $1, ladies free. Good music and supper provided. An invitation is extended to all.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

A grand patriotic concert, including a ladies Indian Club display song tableaux, a dramatic dialogue and the orchestra will be held in the Rex Theatre, on Tuesday, Jan. 4th, 1915, at
Eddie Chermok’s new store is all ready for business now. His stock arrived last train.
Mrs. McEachern, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
The whist drive of the Cosmopolitan Club took place on Friday evening. The prize winners were Miss Margaret Goodman and Mr. Wiseman. The bobby prize went to Miss Bertha Magunson and Mr. J. Campbell.
The Xmas tree held n the Presbyterian Church was a great success and the turn out was the nest in the annals of the town. Miss Gracie Whale was presented with a prize for the best attendance at Sunday school for the yea and John Wallace won second prize. Santa Claus did not forget any of the children.
Jas. McInnes, Walter Grenon, Joe Mossington, and Capt. Buck, returned from their hunting ground and report a good time. They brought back some good specimens of the wild steers of the Northlands.
Settlers are still flocking into the vacant lands north of here. There is room for all comers yet.
The school is closed for the festive season and we regret to say that we are losing Miss Whitemore who will attend Normal at Winnipeg after holidays. Miss Whitore will be greatly missed as she has endeared herself to her pupils and her many friends alike in this town.
Miss McMartin left on Wednesday’s train for her home at Franklin to spend the holiday season.
D.S. Hatties’ rink beat E.R. Black’s rink by 9-7. The ladies are taking an active interest in curling this season and can throw as good a rock as many of the boys.
Harry Hunter, of Fork River, spent Wednesday in town.
Mr. Goodman returned from a business trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday’s train.
Miss Augusta Crawford arrived from Dauphin on Wednesday’s train to spend Xmas at her home here.
If the mail gets any heavier Comf. will have to get a horse and rig. What price, Casey.
Mrs. Ben Hechter left on Wednesday’s train for Winnipeg on a visit.
F. Hechter left, for Waterhen on Tuesday afternoon.
We had a special train up for fish on Tuesday.
Don’t forget the Red Cross concert next week. Buy your ticket now.
The secretary treasurer of the village reports the taxes coming in very will and a great many took advantage of the discount up to the 15th Dec. The taxes are payable at par up to July 1st.
The Council of the Village meet in the Council Chambers at 2 p.m. on Monday, 3rd, of January.
Mrs. Ben Hechter and Miss Molly Hechter left on Wednesday for Winnipeg on a visit.
Ray Burley, Bert Arrowsmith, G. Johannason, A. Allan and Rev. Clixby are up from Brandon for the holidays.
On the night of the 21st inst. the Bicton Heath children were coming to Winnipegosis to the Xmas tree with Supt. Tom Toye as driver and on arriving inside the town limits a few of our children in happy spirits were singing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” which patriotic song so scared the wild quadrupeds that they bent it for the tall timbers leaving Supt. Toye and his whole school in the ditch singing “Will Ye Na Come Back Again?” However, nothing daunted by this little mishap Supt. Toye marched with his flock to the Presbyterian Church, where they enjoyed a most pleasant time.
Last week an old Frenchman at Waterhen left his nephew’s house to go to the house of a neighbour and got lost and froze to death.
Geo. Adam, of the Fishery spent Wednesday in town.
Jas. Alex and W. Walmeley returning from Waterhen Saturday and report fishing good.
Alex. Bickel arrived to town on Saturday with two loads of fish and returned from there Friday.
We are glad to report all well at Ed. Morris’ camp. The teams returned from there on Friday.
We regret to lose for a little while, and yet we are so proud to report that our worth citizen, Mr. Frank Hechter has enlisted for active service with the 107th Battalion and will be leaving us to join his regiment about the 10th of January. Frank will be badly missed but we hope to give him a royal welcome on his return. We understand he takes the rank of quarter-master sergeant. The business will be carried on by his brother, Ben Hechter until his return.

1915 Dec 23 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd and Rev. Kirkpatrick returned last week from the hunting ground. Rev. Kirkpatrick got a nice elk.
The trains are very late in arriving and leaving lately.
Mr. Robertson, surveyor, is in town after inspecting the roads at Cowan and Camperville.
The snow low left for the north at the latter end of last week.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is spending a few days in town.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 19 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 19 – Fork River

Herman Godkin, real estate agent of Dauphin, spent a few days with W. Williams.
We have been informed that Mr. Walter Clark was fortunate to get a moose. The head is said to be the finest seen in these parts with a spread of forty-four inches.
Sid. Gower, engineer, returned from Dauphin and intends working with W. Williams this winter.
We were pleased to meet Peter Robinson, an old-timer, in town. He is spending a short time with his parents on the Mossey River.
The C.N. telegraph gang is here renewing the poles, which work was needed.
The Newell moving picture show that was booked for Tuesday and Wednesday did not come off at the orange Hall for lack of accommodation. We need a good boarding house here for the travelling public.
There was not a very large turner to the masquerade ball in the Orange Hall on account of the farmers being busy threshing.
Mr. McIntosh, of Valley River, was here on business.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase will hold a Xmas service in the school house, Winnipegosis on Xmas morning at eleven o’clock, and in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, in the evening at eight o’clock.

1912 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Malley, from Brandon, arrived in town Tuesday. We trust the weather will be favourable for his trip up the lake.
The municipal elections are on now. May we hope that the wiser promises made by the candidates be fulfilled by the successful ones. We certainly need more passable roads, and here be it remarked that if our church wardens finds transportation between here and Fork River too difficult to accomplish in the future, the vision of the rectory, seen here, will have to materialize.
A Christmas morning service will be held in the school house 11 a.m. Come and help sing the carols insuring a “Merry Christmas.”
The Santa Claus fund seems to be a popular one. Perhaps it is because he is such an adept of minding his own business. He is remembering our bachelors with many plum puddings.
The Card Circle will be closed this week for the year. It is a matter of serious consideration if it should be reopened as so many lovers of the game do not enter before 9 p.m., which is near the time when wise and honest heads seek their rest; besides beige started to while pleasantly away a couple of hours, thus inviting congenial spirits, and finding ourselves entertained by a stranger proves a mental lack which should more advantagely be supplied at home, nevertheless we trust for a closing game this week that will reveal its true merit and may the winners of the prizes make good use of them. A certain Mr. Webber is to be thanked for the gentleman’s, which is a gun metal watch.
If we hurt ourselves as much by falling when climbing up hill, as we would so doing when running down hill, no one could be blamed for refusing to climb; but one of nature’s mercies is that we cannot.
The Christian League held a very successful meeting ask week.
The hunting season being closed may the stronger sex once more settle down to “the daily round.”
No moose, no heads, no tales.
Wm. Parker, of this Armstrong Trading Co. is up the lake or out to Pine Creek auditing books.
The young people of our town have a bond of sympathy with Dauphin ones in the difficulty (met here) of preparing a skating rink – see the lake.

1918 Dec 19 – Had Both Legs Crushed

Orval McInnes, a boy about 15 years of age, met with a bad accident at Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The boy was assisting to put ice in an ice house when the block that was being raised slipped from the grippers and fell on his legs, crushing them badly. He was brought to the hospital here the same afternoon.

1918 Dec 19 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Dec. 14.
Heath Officer Dr. Medd was through this district this week and has closed the school for the time being as some of the scholars are down with influenza.
D. Crerar has sold the Hudson’s Bay farm for a good figure. What about the herd law now?
Mr. Laidlaw has finished threshing. The cattle will have a chance to feed considerable land next spring.
Hechter Bros.’ gasoline tractor has arrived and they intend to turn over considerable land next spring.
W. Paddock has broke considerable land this year. Steam and gasoline engines materially aid in preparing the land for crop.
Mr. Winger has sold his flock of sheep to Mr. Venables for a good figure. There is no doubt but sheep pay well and in the future more will be kept in the district.
Mr. Waddell, from Missouri, is the new teacher engaged for the Bicton Heath School. It is up to us to “show Mr. Waddell.”
F. Sharp has completed his house and stable. The buildings are the right type for the farmers and we hope to see more of them erected.
Thos. Toye, our local weather prophet, says the winter will be a mild one. Tom, it may be said, does not make his observations from charts, but seeks his weather lore from wild animals, such as the muskrat, which he says you can depend on.

1918 Dec 19 – Fork River

Chas. Bugg, of Ochre River, was in town lately renewing acquaintances.
Pte. Arthur Shannon is home, having received his discharge.
The election is over and we are now already to shake hands and enter into the Christmas spirit, good will toward all men.

1918 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

The Dominion Government is making headway with the cutting of a canal at Meadow Portage which, when completed, will open up a waterway with Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Manitoba. The land through which the canal will run has already been cleared and boarded and in the spring about 600 men will be employed doing excavation work.
A card party, in aid of the Red Cross, is being held every Wednesday evening in the Rex theatre. A good musical program is provided and refreshments are served.
A special Xmas service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 22nd, in the Union Church. Special Xmas hymns and solos will help to make the service attractive. Subject will be “The Brotherhood of Man.” A hearty welcome is extended to all.
On the afternoon of Xmas day a Xmas tree entertainment will be held in the above church and a huge tree loaded with toys and decorations will be exhibited to delight the hearts of the children. Santa Claus has arranged to give every child a present from the tree.
A bank will shortly be established at Winnipegosis.
A recent traveller on the Dauphin and Winnipegosis express complains bitterly of having to have an extra washing day in the same week owning to the dirty condition of the train.
The Armstrong Independent Fisheries is sending ten teams up the lake this week to bring in fish. Other companies also have teams employed bringing down fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 2 – 1915

1915 Dec 2 – Enlisting Continues Active

Enlisting is now progressing actively and there are some 32 on the roll at present. Col. Gillespie is expected back from Winnipeg at the end of the week with his staff of officers.
The following is a list of those who have enlisted together with the places they hail from.
F. Crowe, Dauphin. (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
R. Tarzwill, Dauphin. (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
J.N. Meader, Dauphin. (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
R. Marrell, Dauphin. (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Henwood, Gilbert Plains. (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
Trevor Jones, Dauphin. (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
R. Courier, Dauphin. (???)
F. Kilborn, Ochre River. (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith, Dauphin. (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
H. Gardiner, Gilbert Plains. (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
J. Hooper, Dauphin. (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
W. McClernon, Dauphin. (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.W. Demery, Winnipegosis. (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel, Winnipegosis. (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
M. Jacobson, Winnipegosis. (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
C. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
J. Gough, Laurier. (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
C.W. Elliott, Gilbert Plains. (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
Wm. Hatt, Portage la Prairie. (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan, New Brunswick. (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
R. Pollard, Dauphin. (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
A. Tigg, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
J. Hickie, Gilbert Plains. (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
T. Kirk, Ochre River. (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
A. Douglas, Dauphin. (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
– Donnelly, Gilbert Plains. (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
G. Montgomery, Dauphin. (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W. Greenshields, Gilbert Plains. (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
W.J. Crittenden, Dauphin. (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
E. Sandgrew, Dauphin. (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)

1915 Dec 2 – Had Foot Amputated

John Prefonowski had his left foot run over by a train at Ashville on Wednesday. He was brought to the hospital, where the foot was amputated.

1915 Dec 2 – Mossey River Council

Mossey River Council meeting was held a Fork River, Saturday Nov. 18th, all members present.
The new member, (D.G. McAulay), for Ward III was sworn in.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner; the Red Cross Society; St. Joseph’s Orphanage; Canadian Ingot Iron Co.; J.L. Bowman re Standard Lumber Co., account; J.N. McFadden; the Solicitor, re Shannon Road Judgement; the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; the Secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities; the Patriotic Fund; J. Bickle, Jr.; C.H. Bickle; Ethelbert Municipality, re Isolation Hospital; a petition asking for the formation of a new Union School District to be called Ferley and a communication re the proposed new School District of Don.
Hunt-Reid – That the plans of subdivisions of N.W. 3-13-18 submitted by J.N. McFadden be approved.
Yakavanka-Reid – That Mrs. J. Mylanchanka of N.E. 23-29-70 be given rebate of fifty percent off her taxes.
Hunt-Reid – That the Orange Hall at Fork River be charged only the same amount of taxes as in 1914.
Hechter-Reid – That the clerk write the Department of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to give estimates of a bridge across Fishing River between sections 1 and 2, Tp. 29, Rge. 19.
[1 line missing] son be appointed arbitrator in the matter of the establishment of the proposed Union School District of Ferley.
Hunt-Reid – That work done by Fred Cooper on the road allowance between sections 22 and 23 in Tp. 29, Rge. 19 be inspected and measured and paid for by Ward I as soon as the ward has money to its credit.
Hechter-Yakavanka – That the Reeve and Councillors Hunt and Reid be delegates to the Union of Manitoba Municipalities Convention to be held at Stonewall and that they be allowed $20, for expenses.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. McAulay be appointed to take the positions on the different committee left vacant by the resignation of Mr. Bickle.
Hechter-McAulay – That the declarations of the Reeve $12.00. Coun. Hunt 24.40 and Coun. Reid 26.20 for letting and inspecting work he paid.
A by-law establishing the School District of Don in Tp. 30, Rge. 17 was passed, also a by-law amending the license by-law by putting a license fee of $1.00 per head on all horses brought into the municipality for sale.
Hechter-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert Wedding

Mr. Kenneth McLean, of the town of Ethelbert, was on Oct. 27th, united in the bonds of matrimony with Miss E. Wray, who was head nurse at the Ethelbert Mission Hospital. The ceremony was performed at the home of her parents in Toronto where the young couple were the recipients of many valuable presents. After the marriage they went on a tour through the States visiting friends in Chicago and stopping at other important points. On returning to Ethelbert they were met by their many friends and in spite of their endeavours to evade the crowd, they came in contact with the usual shower of rice. They were afterwards escorted to the Mission house for tea. On Tuesday following a large reception was given the bride and groom at the town hall, where they were presented with a beautiful writing desk and bookcase combined; also a jardiniere stand. Beside this they were presented with other costly presents. The bride and groom both responded to the address and presentation in a very touching manner. After a well rendered programme, which was heartily enjoyed by all, the guest partook of refreshments provided by the ladies.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert

All here were glad to know old Jack Oshoost received his deserts in the court at Dauphin on Tuesday. It was a cowardly set to throw a bottle, which might have killed Finegold.
Wood is coming in only in small quantities so far.
Considerable quantities of wheat have been marked at this point this fall.
The new Presbyterian hospital is nearly completed. Mr. Josh Law, of Dauphin, is doing the painting.
Mr. Ben Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday to give evidence at the Finegold-Oshoost trial.
Mr. W.H. White is ??? ??? the year. [1 line missing] a term.

1915 Dec 2 – Fork River

Mr. Sam Reid is a visitor to Winnipeg for the week on business.
Mr. Cameron left for his home at Neepawa after having spent a week with friends at the point.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Hyde, of California, left for Carnduff, Sask., having spent two weeks with Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Mr. Hyde thinks this part of the country is all right, and he is sure right in his judgment.
Mr. Fred Cooper took a few days’ vacation at Dauphin last week.
Misses Bessie and Pearl Wilson paid Winnipegosis a short visit between trains.
“Main” street is quite lively with teams coming in with wheat to the elevator from all parts of the district, some coming 30 miles out. It gives us a glimpse of what the thriving village of Fork River will be when the district settled up and all the land [1 line missing] several elevators as well as many more business places. We have the land from which prosperous homes can be established once the right kind of men are in our midst.
Mr. Glandfield, lay reader, is paying Sifton a visit on his velocipede. Don’t you know it’s good healthy weather for wheeling.
The thresherman’s ball on Friday night was quite a success. Team loads from all parts came and a very pleasant night was spent.
A large number of the boys are busy cleaning their rifles and grinding up their butcher knives to do execution to the big game when the season opens.
Mr. Peach, of Swan River, school inspector, is visiting the several schools in this district this week.
We are sure in the banana belt when peaches are out on the street not frozen this time of year.

1915 Dec 2 – Winnipegosis

The Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in town for a few days last week.
The Cosmopolitan Club held a whist drive before their weekly dance last Friday evening.
Fish are coming in new and the town is livening up.
F. Hechter left for Waterhen Saturday.
Don’t forget the skating carnival on the rink on Monday next.
The rink opened for the season on Monday last and there was a good attendance.
Mr. Jas. McInnes and party left for a hunting trip Saturday.
G.L. Irwin, of Dauphin, is spending a few days hunting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 30 – 1915

1915 Sep 30 – Threshing Held Up

Threshing operations have been suspended during the past week on account of wet weather. The returns coming in from the separators continue to be large.

1915 Sep 30 – Ethelbert

During the last four weeks I. Arnovitch has shipped eight carloads of cattle from this point.
The new Presbyterian mission hospital is nearing completion. It is going to be a commodious structure.
Threshing operations are entirely suspended owing to wet weather.
Mr. Ben Brachman, our enterprising merchant, was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.
Mr. Bert Kennedy and family have arrived from Canora and will reside here.
The wood market is commencing to be more active of late. Prices still remain at the old figure, but will advance as the weather gets colder.

1915 Sep 30 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Friday evening, which was well attended although the weather was so bad.
The Hon. Hugh Armstrong and Mrs. Armstrong are spending a few days in town.
Dr. Bottomley and Dr. Culberton, of Dauphin, were in town on Tuesday operating on Miss Pearl Paddock, who has been very ill with appendicitis. We are very glad to report. Miss Paddock a little better and trust soon to see her around again.
Mrs. Anderson left for Winnipeg on Saturday’s train accompanied by her sister, Miss Ruth Sanders.
Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Don’t forget court of revision on Oct. 9th. All complaints must reach the clerk ten days previous to that date and be duty filled by him.
Mr. Hall has accepted a position with the Standard Lumber Co., as successor to Mr. Barbour, who resigned to join the army.
H. Loiw, of Waterhen, is spending a few days in town.
Geo. Adam spent Saturday in town.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is a business visitor in town for a few days.
We hear fall fishing will soon be over and everyone will be getting in shape for outfitting for the winter. Where has our summer gone?
If looking for a good shave or hair cut don’t miss the red, white and blue post on Main Street.
There was a ten cent tea at the home of Mrs. Whale on Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 5 in and of a local family in want.
We are glad to see Jim McInnes around again after being laid up for a few days.
We are sorry to report the accident to Mrs. J.E. Parkers, who fell and broke her leg the other evening.
Geo. Lyons and D. Kennedy spent Wednesday in Fork River on municipal business and report crops already for threshing.
John Marshinsky has traded his boat for an automobile.
Ed. Chirmok is building a store next to the Methodist Church and intends starting business this fall.