Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 17 – 1910

1915 Nov 17 – Burglary at Sifton

On the night of November 8th, the office of Paul Wood, Sifton, was broken into and some $1500 in notes stolen. The lock was wrenched and broken from the door, showing how admittance was gained. As soon as the robbery was known, Provincial Constable Rooke was telegraphed for. Up to the present no clue has been found, but it is generally thought to have been done by someone familiar with the premises.

1915 Nov 17 – Fork River

Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister Mrs. Ivor Humphreys in Dauphin.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary of the English Church paid us a visit this week and gave an excellent magic lantern entertainment in the Orange Hall. The subjects given were views of Japan and Bunyan’s Pilgrims Progress etc. A large crowd turned out and all were satisfied with the evening’s enjoyment.
Mrs. M. Snelgrove paid Dauphin a visit this week.
The young people around this district are now busy skating and having a good time.

1915 Nov 17 – North Lake

John Strasdin was up before P.M. Munson last week, for shooting on Sunday. He is going around singing a song entitled “There will come a time some day.”
Inspector Walker visited the schools around here.
Although Councillor Lacey gets mixed up with missing Post Offices, we notice he did not get mixed up with missing the tamarac swamp, on sec. 17, this year for we can now get through it with ease.
W. Williams has finished threshing around here.
Thos. Glendenning shipped the finest car of wheat this year, that ever went out of Fork River. Tom says its better than “our’n” and we guess he’s rights.
Jack Robertson still knocks around although he had a nasty smash.

1915 Nov 17 – Sifton

About four inches of snow fell on Saturday night. The sleighs are making a good showing already.
Isaac Silverwood, Dauphin, who had the contract of moving the R.C. Greek Rite Chapel at Sifton has successfully complete moving it to its new foundation across the road from its former position.
Craig Bros., of Dauphin, who are building the new R.C. mission building, having the building well under way. It is quite a credit to the appearance of the village or will be when finished.
W. Hewey, of Dauphin, who was in this vicinity boring wells, returned to Dauphin last week after a couple of days at unsuccessful attempts at penetrating the earth’s crust.
A C.N.R. bridge gang outfit were here for a few days building a much needed stock yard which will be a great convenience to stock shippers.
The daily train service lately inaugurated on the Winnipeg Prince Albert line via Dauphin is being much appreciated and marks another accommodation and is a credit to the management.

1915 Nov 17 – Winnipegosis

The Council met at Winnipegosis last week when some important business was done.
Dr. Medd, who has been in this district for some time, residing at Winnipegosis, left here this week for pastures new.
Miss Millidge, Organizing Secretary of the Anglican Women’s Auxiliary, gave an entertainment, in the schoolhouse, which was attended by a large crowd. During the interval Miss Doris Hurst and Miss D. Parker sang some songs. Mrs. Bradley and several ladies of the local auxiliary had a chat with Miss Millidge.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1910

1915 Nov 3 – Before The P.M.

Robt. Machan Fined $50 and Costs Ethelbert Fire Case Dismissed – R. Spruhs fined for Sunday Hunting
On information laid by Constable Hillman, Robt. Machan, an interdict, was haled before P.M. Munson for being the worse for liquor, while Robt. was under the influence of the fiery element he made things lively, mixing up in no less than three fights. He would not divulge where he procured his jag and the magistrate gave him the full extent of the law. $50 and costs. We are glad to see the magistrate enforce the interdict law on suck strict lines, as it is the only means of protection women and children have in a licensed town.
The Ethellbert fire case tried Tuesday, created a good deal of interest. Last week there were heavy losses from fire at Ethelbert and the defendant, J. Mascuich was accused of starting the same. It seems the defendant set out a fire on his farm near Ethelbert to burn up some old potato tops and also the remains of an old straw stack. He carefully put out the potato top fire but the fire in the stack was left to smoulder and it was from this that the fire was alleged to have spread. There were numerous witnesses on the case. From the evidence taken it appears there were several other fires started in Mascuich’s neighbourhood on the same day. As the evidence did not show that the fire had been traced to Mascuich’s farm as the original cause, the case was dismissed.
Notwithstanding the result of this case, several suits will be brought before the county court for damages.
On information laid by Provincial Constable Rooke, R. Spruhs of Sifton, was tried Saturday for illegally hunting on Sunday and in close season. He pleaded guilty and was fined $10 and costs. This should be a warning to others.
Anna Kunka vs. F. Nankishowy, an assault case will be tired Friday. Both come from Pine River.

1915 Nov 3 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and his daughter Gracie paid Dauphin a visit last week.
The organising secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary, Miss Millidge, Winnipeg, will give a magic lantern entertainment in connection with All Saints Church on Nov 10th at 8 o’clock in the Orange Hall. Admission, adults 25c; children 15c.
Mr. Forbes went to Brandon last week.
Both stores seem to be doing some good business. Each train brings in quite a lot of freight.
Mr. Chase from Dauphin was up here visiting Mrs. Snelgrove, the roads around here are good for motors.
The time of service in the Methodist Church, will be 2 p.m., in future instead of 3 p.m.

1915 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the house of Mrs. Ballard. Owing to Mrs. Ballard shortly leaving the town she gave in her resignation of vice-president. A vote of thanks was passed to her for past services. A vote of the ladies present was taken to elect a president and Mrs. W. Parker was chosen.
Miss Millidge, organizing secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary will given a magic lantern entertainment in the school house on Nov. 9th at 8 o’clock.
The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church on Sunday next when the subject will be “The Thing that Matters.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 22 – 1913

1913 May 22 – Baran Executed

Portage la Prairie, May 20 – John Baran at one minute past eight o’clock this morning paid the death penalty in the yard of the Portage la Prairie jail for the murder of Constable Rooke. He walked to his death without a murmur and without even an expression of regret for his deed, and three-quarters of an hour after the drop on the scaffold he was buried in the corner of the jail yard in quick lime, no friends having made claim to his body. Baran spent a sleepless night, dozing off for a few minutes at a time, and at 7:30 this morning asked for his breakfast, which consisted of porridge, eggs, toast and coffee.
He did not eat it with a relish and was left quietly alone for his last meal. It was just 7:55 when Deputy Sheriff Muir read the death warrant to the condemned man, and preparations for the march to the scaffold was then begun.

1913 May 22 – Boy Lost

On Saturday last Mrs. Alex. Genik, who lives on the Drifting River north of Ashville, sent her seven year old son out for some wood. That was the last time he was seen. Search parties have since been organized and the country roundabout scoured, but no trace of the boy has been found. It is feared that he has been drowned.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 15 – 1913

1913 May 15 – Baran to Hang on Tuesday

A Portage la Prairie dispatch says: All hope of reprieve for John Baran under sentence of death for the murder of Constable Rooke, has been given up, and preparations will be started the latter part of the week for the carrying out of the sentence that he be hanged on Tuesday, May 20. Portage is without a sheriff and for that reason none of the new officials are to discuss the matter, but the duty will probably devolve on George Muir, the duty sheriff although he has yet received no definite instructions to prepare to carrying out the death sentence. It is known, however that the gallows will be erected in the jail yard the latter part of this week, and it is understood that a government official will arrive about Saturday to superintendent this week. Portage has never had a hanging and the official are not versed in what is really necessary.

1913 May 15 – Fork River

Mrs. W. Williams as returned from Dauphin hospital, where she has been for some time.
Mrs. J. Rice, of North Lake, is visiting Dauphin on important business.
Sandy Cameron, one of the bonanza farmers of Mowat Centre is through seeding. Got a hustle on and left the rest of us.
Mrs. C. Clark has returned from the south after spending a month there. She is greatly benefited in health by the trip.
J.D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre who had been ailing for some time, passed away May 9th at the ripe age of 80 years. The several members of his family have the sympathy of the people of this settlement in their sad bereavement. The funeral took place from the homestead on Sunday he 11th.
Rev. H.H. Scrase returned from Sifton, having held service there on Friday night.
We are informed that Fred. Tilt has rented the house on Nat Little’s farm and intends going into market gardening. We wish Fred. success in his venture.
Capt. Douglas passed through here on his way to Winnipegosis with his trotter.
Dunk Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday.
Rev. W.A. Fyles, B.A., S.S. Field secretary, will hold Communion services at All Saints’ Church at 3 o’clock and at Winnipegosis at 7:30.

1913 May 15 – Winnipegosis

The ice is still in the lake but there are now indications of warmer weather and its disappearance will be hailed with satisfaction. Once the water is clear the gasoline and sail boats will again dot the water. This is a joyful time but altogether too short in this northern climate. Boating is a splendid pastime the world over. Winnipegosis, I may say, has some capable skippers, and time is destined to become a summer resort.
Frank Hechter returned last week from a trip to Dauphin and Canora.
J.P. Grenon and daughter returned from a brief visit to Dauphin and Winnipeg on Saturday.
It is understood the Commissioner of telephones has under consideration the extension of the telephone line from Sifton to Winnipegosis. Whether the old line will be utilized o an entirely new one constructed deponeth saith not.
Miss Parker, who spent a few days visiting in Dauphin, returned home on Tuesday.
Miss Bertha Johnstone is visiting at her home here.
With the approach of June wedding bells will peal.
Mr. Clarkson returned from Dauphin on Saturday with Mrs. Clarkson, who has been in the hospital there for a couple of weeks.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 20 – 1913

1913 Mar 20 – Baran Now Praying

John Baran, condemned to be hanged for the murder of Constable Rooke, now spends his time in prayer.

1913 Mar 20 – Fork River

Geo. Esplen was a visitor with W. King on his return from Mafeking, where he spent the winter in charge of one of the fishing posts on the north end of the lake.
Mrs. Morley Snelgrove left for Dauphin to visit among friends on her way to Dryden, Ontario.
Miss Pearl Wilson is taking a short vacation among friends at Sifton.
John Bykilo returned home after a two months rest for the good of his health at Portage.
Fred Storrar, of Mowat, has resumed his duties as assistant manager of the A.T. Co. Fred’s all right, a pleasant smile for everyone.
Miss Ena Fredrickson and Miss Kennedy returned from a visit to their folks at Winnipegosis.
We are informed that Professor Ike Robinson was scalded the other day while experimenting with a boiler, which exploded throwing the contents in his face. He is doing nicely. Ike says he don’t mind having solved the tea experiment.
The C.N.Ry. bridge gang is busy renewing the bridge on the creek north of town.
The vaudeville performance which the Laurier troupe has been putting on at the National Play house on Parliament Hill, is costly for the country. Ten thousand dollars a day or sixty thousand dollars for the week is the bill which the people of the Dominion will have to foot for the little game of politics which the Opposition has been staging for the first week in the opposition to the navy bill. That’s Liberal economy and loyalty everytime.
“Say, Mike, we overheard the Admiral trying to explain the need of that boundary bridge the other day and several took a hand in the debate.”
“Well, Pat, by what I see of the affair it is a fraud to take our taxes to build a bridge to accommodate one man and it on private property. He must have caught the rest of them napping to be able to carry such a measure.”
“Now, you’ve put your foot in it, Mike, sure. The Fork River Philosopher’s idea is to bridge the whole municipality and throw the dirt on top. Gee, what next.”
Rev. Dr. Page, travelling missionary for this diocese, held Communion and Baptismal service at All Saints’, Fork River, Winnipegosis and Sifton. There were large congregations at each service. The Rev. H.H. Scrase assisted.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

Charles Johnson, of Makinak, was a visitor to Rev. Father Derome last week. He was much interested in his visit and inspected the hatchery on Snake Island, where he enjoyed himself. His father is interested in the management of a hatchery in Norway, Europe.

1913 Mar 20 – Winnipegosis

The ball in the Winnipegosis hotel on the 17th proves that the anniversary of St. Patrick is becoming very dear to the hearts of some, it being patronized by the elite, graced by those who love to trip the light fantastic, and enlivened by an appreciative crowd of onlookers. Many wore a souvenir badge supplied by willing workers of the W.A. and assistants. Fork River social element added materially to its success.
At the Christian League last Thursday Mr. Scott read a paper on “Commerce” touching on the German menace, that was worthy of a much larger crowd of understanding. He defined minutely the fundamental principles of commerce making it more interesting by apt illustrations, ably leading one’s interest up to appreciate the Empire’s present position. His reflections on England from Germany’s attitude served to illuminate her domain and in no way detracted from her greatness.
Mr. Mullens was the recipient of a handsome gift from his many friends in Winnipegosis last Wednesday evening as a token of their esteem and regret at his departure.
Mr. Hulme returns home for Easter holidays.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson are rejoicing in the possession of a young son, which was privileged to be baptized by the Rev. Dr. Page, archdeacon and general missioner of the diocese. A baptismal service was also held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walmsley on Sunday evening last.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 13 – 1913

1913 Mar 13 – Baran to Hang

Joh Baran, the man who shot Constable Rooke, was found guilty of the crime at the assizes and sentenced to be hanged on May 20th.

1913 Mar 13 – Fork River

Mr. W. King, County Master, returned form Winnipeg, where he attended as delegate the provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba.
Rev. H.H. Scrase was elected deputy grand chaplain for Dauphin country L.O.L.
John Clements spent a few days in Dauphin last week.
Everyone is busy trying to get their hauling done before the snow leaves us.
Dr. Page will hold baptismal and Communion services in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, at 2:45 o’clock next Sunday, the 16th March.
Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove returned from a visit to friends in Dauphin.
Miss Pearl Cooper left for Dauphin on a visit to friends.
D.F. Wilson has returned from the Brandon fair and reports a good time.
Mr. Vivian Hafenbrak has returned after spending a few days in Dauphin on important business.
We notice the Fork River correspondent in the Press has coupled the named of some of our esteemed citizens to his untruthful items the last two weeks. He must be hard up for news. But then he reminds us of the man who kept his spirits by pouring spirits down because he got pinched for keeping a pig within the two limits against the law. Take a tumbler, friend, and don’t be so anxious to use other people’s names.
Professor J. Robinson, who has been up the lake fishing all winter, has returned from Mafeking and is taking charge of the Fork River Quadrille club.
Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of St. Paul’s Church, Dauphin, paid, Mr. H. Scrase a visit lately.

1913 Mar 13 – Winnipegosis

Rev. Dr. Page, of Winnipeg, is expected in town on the 16th to administer Holy Communion and baptismal services will also be held Sunday next, in the school house.
P. McArthur will be back shortly to town. Mrs. McArthur will probably remain in Winnipeg some time longer owing to having recently been suffering from a painful fall while south.
Mrs. Benoit, of Dauphin, who has been the guest of Mrs. Hall Burrell the past week, has returned home. Her visit was greatly enjoyed.
We’re glad to see Miss Evelyn Burrell looking well again, only minus roses. Get strong quick, Evelyn, there’s a good time coming.
Dr. Medd is rather a ? but confirms finally the fact that there are enigmatical people even here.
Mr. Scott says he would not have come to stay in this town but for its great attractions. Dear old, Winnipegosis! If we only had a daily train service.
St. Patrick’s anniversary will be celebrated by a ball in the Winnipegosis hotel.
The play, “when Greek meets Greek” is being practiced for the concert on the 28th promises to be exceptionally good.
A meeting of the W.A. will be held at the home of Mrs. Bradley on Friday evening.
Nearly all the families are down from the north end of the lake. Possibly about 20 people have yet to return. “Dad” Danby is as brisk as ever; a fine example of 70 years young.
The snow plough has made its best trip. It can transport 10 or 50 tons of fish on a single trip, and leaves the lake somewhat picturesque. A trip on a dog sled to Snake Island is fine and a visit to the hatchery most interesting.
Anyone keeping vigils now will have the dreamy canine cries as an accompaniment. ‘Tis a pity the dogs are not treated more as man’s true friends.