Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 24, 1919

Boys Plead Guilty to Robbery

On Sunday night, April 6th, the Clothes Shop, Mr. Benedickson’s store, was entered and a quantity of goods stolen. The matter was placed in Chief Bridle’s hands and he at once got busy with the result that two boys, about 17 years of age, were arrested at Wadena, Sask. The boys’ names are Fred Beach and Norman Clubb, and hail from Winnipeg. They were brought from Wadena on Tuesday and appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday, and pleaded guilty to the charge. They were remanded till Friday for sentence. The boys are known to the city police and their previous history is to be investigated. The most of the stolen goods were recovered.

G.W.V.A. Notes

A meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, April 17th, some 40 members being in attendance.
The question of a memorial for the fallen comrades was discussed by the comrades, and it was suggested that the memorial should take the shape of a home for the returned men, and that a committee be formed to confer with the memorial committee organized by the town.
It was moved by Comrade Armstrong, seconded by Comrade H. Harvey, “that this branch of the G.W.V.A. endorse the Imperial Veterans’ resolution, and request that the government take up the matter of insurance by the state for returned men who, owing to injuries received whilst in action, are at the present time unable to get insurance, or who have to pay excessive rates for such.
Moved by Comrade H. Harvey, seconded by Comrade Oliphant, that this branch endorse the resolution of the G.W.V.A. Winnipeg, and protest against the sect known as ‘Hutterites’ from being allowed to settle in this country.
A delegation was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary, and arrangements made as to taking care of soldiers’ widows, who come to this town in connection with land, etc. It was decided that the auxiliary should provide rooms, as it was not considered that the G.W.V.A. rooms were suitable accommodation for ladies, and that they would be more comfortable in a separate house.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on April 7th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting wee read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Children’s Hospital, Winnipeg; the solicitor, re passing of social legislation; R. Flett, re reduction of taxes; The Red Triangle Fund, R. Cruise, M.P., re Hudson’s Bay Railway; copies of letters from the weed commission, C.B. Martin, re seed grain, and Sawinski Bros., re car of plank.
Hunt-Reid – That in consideration of the large amount of money that has been expended in the buildings of the Hudson’s Bay railroad, and, further, very large amounts in construction of harbor accommodation on the bay, and, whereas, a comparatively small amount will be required to finish the railway and thus render the large expenditure useful; this council is therefore, of the opinion and most empathically recommends that the Hudson’s Bay railroad be completed as soon as possible, thus giving to Western Canada the benefits to be derived from it and for which it has waited so long. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Thomas White.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the council of the rural municipality of Mossey River hereby makes formal application to the Good Roads Board of the Province of Manitoba that the following roads within the municipality be brought under the provisions of “The Good Roads Act, 1914,” and amendments thereto;
Road from south boundary of the municipality, making connection with the Dauphin good road system; due north to the village of Fork River, and from that point north and easterly to the village of Winnipegosis.
Road from the village of Fork River due west to the western boundary of the municipality road from corner on Fork River-Winnipegosis road to west side of range 19, along township line between tps. 29 and 30. Also from corner on same road westerly two miles between tps. 30 and 31.
Road from n.w. corner 12-29-19, easterly six miles, thence south to Lake Dauphin and then following lake shore to south boundary of the municipality.
Road from Winnipegosis north-westerly through tp. 31, rge. 18, and continuing into tp. 31, rge. 19.
Road from Winnipegosis south-easterly through tp. 3, rge. 18, and continuing easterly across tp. rge. 17.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. Paddock and Marcroft be a committee to inspect road northwest of Winnipegosis, and report what can be done in the matter of making it passable at net meeting.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the municipal bank account be moved from the Bank of Ottawa, Dauphin, to the Winnipegosis branch of the same bank.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask its council of it is prepared to pass a bylaw similar to those passed for the last two years covering work on the boundary road between the two municipalities.
By laws authorizing a line of credit of $15,000, amending the collector’s bylaw by reducing the salary to $125 pre month, and a bylaw authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of the Mossey River School district to issue expenditures for the borrowing of $12,000 to purchase grounds and build and equip a school. The vote to be taken June 14th.
The council adjourned to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8 p.m., in the Union Church. It being Good Friday the musical part of the programme consisted of Easter hymns. Mrs. J.E. McArthur gave an excellent paper on “Ventilation and Well-Lighted Rooms,” and Mr. Hook spoke in his usual pleasing manner on the subject, “Associates for the Young,” bringing foremost in his speech the necessity of child training. Ten cent tea was served, proceeds in aid of the library fund, when the meeting was brought to a close by singing he National anthem.
The Home Economics Society library is open every Saturday from 3 o 5 p.m., in Mrs. Honchin’s ice cream parlor.
Mr. D.G. McAulay and family have moved from the farm into town and taken up residence in the house formerly owned by J. Alexander.
The executive of the Order of the Needle wish to thank all those who helped to make the bazaar on the evening of Monday, the 21st, so successful. Mr. J.R. Burrell and her assistants, Mrs. K. McAuley and Mrs. Thomas, are especially to be lauded for the efficient way in which they handled the tea room, which was very popular. Mr. Hamilton very kindly gave his time in arranging the booths, which were very prettily decorated by Mrs. Steele, Mrs. St. Amour, Mrs. J.E. McArthur and Mrs. J.A. Campbell. A number of ladies and gentlemen assisted on the programme of music for dancing after the booth closed. Mr. Ketchison acted as floor manager and as usual made things go. The receipts for the evening were $119.10. Paid out for working material $3.75, for decorations $1.40, cartage 75 cents, rent of hall $6; total $11.90. To be divided between Red Cross and Belgian Fund, $107.20.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 17 – 1914

1914 Dec 17 – Another 110 Men Wanted

Another large force for overseas service is to be raised in Canada at once. Major G.C.J. Walker received a wire this Thursday morning to this effect. The telegram read as follows:
“You are authorized to mobilize immediately one company of infantry a total 110 men for overseas service. Standard height, 5 feet 4 inches; age, 18 to 45; chest, 33 ½ inches.”

1914 Dec 17 – Injured Man Getting Better

Thos. Free, who was badly injured in a collision at Kamsack a couple of weeks ago and had to have one of his legs amputated, is making excellent progress towards recovery. It is probably he will be able to return o his home next week.

1914 Dec 17 – Jack Myers Shot in Leg

Jack Myers, a well-known resident of Gilbert Plains, was shot in the leg last week while hunting in the Riding Mountains by a young fellow named Coulter. Coulter saw the bushes move and before his companion, a man named Morran, could stop him, fired and dropped Myers.

1914 Dec 17 – Ruthenian Patriotism

An evidence of the patriotism of some of the Ruthenian settlers was given on Saturday when two of them. Panko Schnuyk and Peter Toporoski came to town to tender their mites for their country. Each gave a dollar towards the patriotic fund and also gave their promise to contribute a dollar a month each to the fund as long as the war lasted.

1914 Dec 17 – Fork River

Mr. W. Williams returned from a visit to Mrs. Williams who has been very sick for some time in the Dauphin Hospital. We are all pleased to hear that Mrs. Williams has recovered enough to be able to return home next week.
Mr. George O’Neill, of Mowat, returned from a visit to Winnipegosis and is delighted with the lake Town.
Mr. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, one of the candidates for the reeveship arrived in this burg in company with Mr. Steve Lytwyn, a representative of the Armstrong Trading Co. Mr. Lytwyn is assisting Mr. Hechter in his campaign to get control of the municipality.
Mr. Duncan Kennedy, late manager of the Armstrong Trading Company, has accepted a position with Mr. Hechter, of Winnipegosis. Mr. Kennedy has been here for the company for several years and attended strictly to business ear in year out. Although we are sorry to see Mr. Kennedy and his family leave, his friends wish him all kinds of good luck.
The box social under the auspices of All Saints’ Woman’s Auxiliary on the 11th, was fairly well attended. The boxes realized good prices in the hands of our friend, “Scotty,” who acted as auctioneer, and a nice sum was realized. It was, we believe, one of the most enjoyable times ever held in the hall. Credit us due the ladies for the nice display of boxes to tempt the boys. The social came to a close at 4.30 in the wee small hours.
There will be a public Christmas tree under the auspices of All Saints’ Sunday school on Wednesday evening, Dec. 23rd, to commence at 8.30 sharp. Everybody is invited to come and help give the kiddies a good time. Admission, adults 23 cents, children free. Proceeds to go towards maintaining the Sunday school.
Mr. Thomas, travelling Missionary of the Anglican Church, will preach in All Saints’ Church on Dec. 20th at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. Everyone invited.
Rev. Mr. Thomas will hold a meeting in All Saints’ Anglican Church on December the 19th, at 2.30 p.m. sharp. All members and those who are in sympathy


1914 Dec 17 – Sifton

The Grain Growers’ Patriotic concert held here last Friday met with great success. There was very good talent from Dauphin, also West Bay and Fairville. There was a very good attendance indeed from the outlying districts. The Sifton boys proved themselves very good in their little play, “Christmas night at the Front.”
Mr. Robt. Brewer shipped another car of stock on Monday. Quite a rustler is “Bobs.”
We all regret that Mr. William Birch, late station agent, has left town for good. We understand he is going to Invermay, Sask., and we all wish him the best of luck.
Mr. Caldwell, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town last week on business.
We understand that Mr. John Aller, of Fairville, is holding a social next Saturday in aid of the Red Cross Society. We trust it will be a success.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt, the well drillers, are now busy canvassing orders as they expect their drilling outfit this week. They are deserving of success.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 5 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 5 – Fork River

Miss M.B. Nixon left for Winnipeg, for a weeks visit among friends.
Miss Muriel Alterton, of Mossey River, and Miss Grant, of Pine View Schools attended the convention at Dauphin.
Mrs. Geo. Shannon and Mrs. Kennedy returned from a visit to Winnipegosis.
Wm. King expressed to E. Walker, of Dauphin, a trio of Mammoth Bronze turkeys for breeding purposes.
Fred Cooper, W. Williams and T. Shannon’s threshing outfits are busy these days.
D.F. Wilson, F.B. Lacey and J. Seiffert, members of the council, returned from a week’s trip to the Municipal Convention at Winnipeg.
Miss Lizze Clark returned to Dauphin after spending a few days at her home.
Mr. Monington, of Neepawa, is staying with J. Robinson for the hunting season.
Duncan Kennedy has received two shipments of pure bred Plymouth Rocks from Portage la Prairie last week and is now in the market with pure bred roosters.
Joe Lockhart was elected trustee for Mossey River School for the coming term in place of Wm. King, who retires this term.
Looking over the Herald we notice the annual statement of receipts and expenditures for ten months of the municipality of Mossey River. Just the same old two by four statement. Why not publish in book form in detail like Dauphin. Our council seems to be behind the times in this respect. Year after year we are asking for this to see where our money is expended and this year we cannot see where any of it has been expended on the roads.

1912 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

The annual school meeting was held in the school house on Monday, a large number of ratepayers being present. Messrs. Grenon, Whale and Thomas were elected as trustees for the coming year and Mr. Shear continues as sec.-treasurer. Mr. Hulme’s engagement is for the year. The master of a new school to be erected was discussed. The lots have already been secured, as we hope it will not be long till they are build on.
Rev. H.H. Scrase remained in town from Sunday’s service till Tuesday.
Harry Grenon is preparing to open a business in the late Hudson’s Bay post.
The Misses Paddock had a party last night to entertain Miss Hazel Coffey who has been visiting the Misses Whale while Mr. and Mrs. Whale made a trip to Dauphin.
We are pleased to see certain patients are able to be out again.
The young people’s enjoyment on the lake will be curtailed since the snow has come.
A few of the men from the fishing camps took advantage of the recent glistening ice to make a trip back to town, an enviable one “on their steely feet so bright.”
Mrs. Bradley has enjoyed a most delightful visit from her sister, Mrs. Armstrong. Miss Charlotte accompanies her aunt back to Portage.
Mr. and Mrs. Hippesley, of South Bay, have returned from a trip to Dauphin. Regret is felt at the probability of their moving West to B.C.
A visit to Mrs. Johnston’s home would assure anyone of the benefit on illness to be gained by sojourning there.
Miss Hayes reports an interesting convention held in Dauphin.
Hunters are arriving in town in pursuit of the fleet footed game of the woods.

1918 Dec 5 – Blew Out His Brains

Telesphore Gagnon, who resided with his two sons at Valpoy, 15 miles northeast of Ste. Rose, committed suicide last week by blowing out his brains with a shotgun. Gagnon lost his wife a year ago, and also suffered lose to his property by fire. These matters preyed on him until his mind became unbalanced and led him to commit the rash act. He was 60 years of age.

1918 Dec 5 – Had Arm Amputated

Thos. Switzer, who resides in the Sandringham district, had the misfortune to accidentally discharge his rife, the bullet entering his left arm. He was brought to the hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the arm below the elbow.

1918 Dec 5 – Major Barker Critically Ill

A cablegram from France to Mr. G. Barker at the end of the week states that the condition of his son William is critical.

1918 Dec 5 – Military Funeral

Pte. Wilbur Olsob, of the 226th Batt., who died of influenza, was accorded a military funeral, he arrangements being in the hands of the G.W.V.A. The funeral cortege assembled at 2.30 p.m. at Farrell’s undertaking parlours on Friday afternoon, where a service was conducted by Rev. J.A. Haw, who also officiated at the graveside. About 50 members of the association, under command of Capt. Scrase, attended. Lieut. Clark and Sergt. Chambers were in charge of he firing party.

1918 Dec 5 – Rural Nominations

MOSSEY RIVER
Reeve – T.B. Venables, F.B. Lacey, J.D. Robertson
Ward 1 – J. Yakavanka
Ward 3 – E.A. Marcroft
Ward 5 – J. Namaka

1918 Dec 5 – Victoria Cross for Barker

Major Wm. G. Barker has been awarded the highest honour possible for distinguished service at the front, the Victoria Cross.
Other Dauphin boys who have been decorated, include:
Military Cross – Lawrence Shand
Military Medals – Stuart R. Widmeyer (deceased), G.A. Jackson, Geo. F. King, N. Chard, A. Douglas and J. Fletcher

1918 Dec 5 – Fork River

Mrs. M. Angus has returned to Winnipeg after spending two weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Craighill.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Brewer are patients in the hospital at Dauphin.
W. King, I.H.C. agent, has just finished a warehouse in which to store implements.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Northam have taken up their residence in the parsonage for the winter.
H. Swartwood, of Dauphin, was a recent visitor in our midst.
Sid Frost has left for Rathwell. Before leaving Wm. King, on behalf of Sid’s many friends here, presented him with a valuable violin and case in recognition of his services in a musical way.
Wm. Williams was a Dauphin visitor on Tuesday.
F.B. Lacey, T.B. Venables and J.D. Robertson are the nominees for the reeveship.
The Fork River, Mossey River and Pine View Schools are still closed.
Several of the hunters have returned. Which one shot the steer?

Pte. N. MacCauley, of Winnipegosis, was among the returned soldiers from overseas this week.

1918 Dec 5 – Winnipegosis

A special peace thanksgiving service was held in the Union Church on Dec. 1st. The church was well decorated with flags of the Allies, and was packed to overflowing. The hymns were of a joyful, patriotic and military character, and were heartily sung. The Rev. A.E. Hook conducted the service and took on his subject, “Trusting in God.” He gave a vivid description of the terrible struggle which had lasted over four years, and spoke of the murmurings which had sometimes arising during the war. People had doubted if there was a God and if there was he was not a righteous God. The termination of the war, however, had vindicated God as a righteous God. He said that we had many things to be thankful for because of the war. He mentioned principally that drink and practically been abolished and that nations had been awakened into prayer in a manner they had never done before.
The ban, which had closed down all public gatherings during he epidemic of influenza, was lifted last week and there are no cases in town, though there are a few in the rural districts.
The first load of fish from the lake arrived in town on Tuesday. The fishing has been delayed somewhat on account of the mild weather, but the prospects of a large catch are good.
D. Roy Grenon skated into town today from Waterhen, a distance of over 25 miles.
Winnipegosis reports over two crowns to its credit in the Victory Loan Drive.
Two carloads of wheat were shipped out of town this week.
The fishermen have started to put up ice for summer use.
The collectors report that subscriptions to the Mercantile Sailors’ Fund are coming in well.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 26 – 1914

1914 Nov 26 – Ethelbert Children Do Well

To the Editor of the Herald:
Please allow me some room in your paper to state how well the boys and girls in my room have done towards helping to relieve the suffering of the Belgium children. A little over a week ago I mentioned the subject to them and they immediately decided to try and do something. The result is that they have collected in the neighbourhood of $25. This, I think, is a credit to them and I am writing this to show how the boys and girls are willing to help if they are given the chance and how they will make good.
W.H. WHITE.
Principal Ethelbert School.

1914 Nov 26 – Soldiers Return Thanks

To the Editor of the Herald:
Sir – On behalf of the boys allow me, through the medium of your paper to thank all those very kind townspeople who have in such substantial and many ways subscribed to their welfare.
During the time of our enforced visit to Berlin or Constantinople we hope the town will prosper and so afford us some chance of again taking up a more peaceable occupation on our return.
Orders will be taken for scalps and other trophies.
ARTHUR C. GOODALL.
Reg. Serg. Maj., 32nd M.H.

1914 Nov 26 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Oct. 29th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Good Roads Association, the health officer, G.A. Warringon, C.E., the secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities and St. Joseph’s Orphanage.
Hechter-Lacey – That the clerk write Mr. McGilvray and ask him to come to this municipality and lecture on the Good Roads Act.
Lacey-Hunt – That in all cases where a contractor calls for inspection of work that is found incomplete, according to the terms of the contract, the contractor shall be charged with the cost of the inspection fees and mileage.
Lacy-Richardson – That the health officer’s livery account in connection with the diphtheria cases be certified to by Dr. Medd and paid, the said expense to be charged in the tax accounts of the parties involved.
Hechter-Lacey – That each councillor be authorized to collect voluntary subscriptions for the patriotic fund. All money so collected to be sent in to the treasurer of the municipality.
Toye-Bickle – That the clerk be instructed to credit Ward 1 with 23 pieces of tamarac pilling and charge the same to the public works account, the piles having been expended n the Bailey Bridge.
Hunt-Richardson – That all road commissioners’ certificates issued after this date be payable only to the parties to whom they are issued.
Lacey-Richardson – That any representatives of the council attending the convention of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities be allowed $15.00 for expenses.
Bickle-Toye – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter be representatives to the Convention.
Hunt-Richardson – That Coun. Lacey take the place of J.D. Robertson, resigned, on the public works committee.
Lacey-Richardson – That the council suggest to the Minister of Public Works that in future all grants to the municipality be paid through the office of the municipality and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to our member, Mr. Hughes.
Toye-Lacey – That the clerk write the Minister of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to inspect the bridges recently completed over German Creek.
Hunt-Hechter – That the municipal collectors be bonded to the extent of $500 each.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hechter-Richardson – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work, T. Toye $25.30, C.H. Bickle $39.10 and A. Hunt $28.70, be passed.
Toye-Lacey – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Nov 26 – Fork River

Reeve W. King and D.F. Wilson are attending the convention of the Union Municipalities at St. Boniface this week. Coun. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, is also attending the convention.
The company’s auditor, assisted by Messrs. John Sieffert and Jas. Campbell, is taking stock at the Armstrong Trading Co. store here this week.
A pie social was held at the home of Mrs. W. King for the W.A. of All Saints’ Church on the 18th inst. All report a pleasant time and the disposal of much pie.
Mr. Thomas, our grain buyer, is kept busy pretty much all the time. The quantity of what being marketed here this season is surprising considering the adverse conditions prevailing during part of the year.
Wood has started to come in since the snow arrived. It is expected that there will be considerable quantities brought in for shipment here this winter.
All old acquaintances hereabouts learned with regret of the misfortune which befell Thos. Glendenning last week in the burning of his barn last week. He had doors, windows and other material with which to erect a new house stored in the buildings when the fire occurred and all was burned. He also had about $1500 worth of grain burned. No insurance was carried on the building or the contents. With the true spirit of the pioneer he is starting to rebuild.
Many have taken out big game hunting licences and it looks as if the fleet-footed deer will have a warm time this season.
There is some talk of a contest for the reeveship. It seems only fair that the present reeve should have another term.
Mrs. Wm. Williams has just undergone a serious operation in the Dauphin Hospital.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 11 – 1917

1917 Oct 11 – Week’s Casualties

Pte. Thos. Roy, Ste. Amelie, wounded. (???)
Pte. R.C. Irven, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Russell Clarmont Irven, 1896, 696917)
Pte. L.H. Lacey, Fork River, prisoner of war. (Lorne Henry Lacey, 1897, 1001230)
Pte. L. Tortignon, Ste. Rose, prisoner of war. (???)
Lieut. W.W. Code, Dauphin, has been wounded by shrapnel in left arm and thigh, and was admitted to a hospital in France on the 3rd inst. (William Wellis Code, 1892, 246)

1917 Oct 11 – Fork River

G.A. Warrington, surveyor from the public works dept., Winnipeg, has been here laying out roads for the municipality.
Mr. Wipplewind is here from Montana looking over the land with a view to locating.
The harvest home festival in All Saints’ Church was well attended. Rural Dean Price, of Swan River, was the preacher for the afternoon service. Mr. and Mrs. R. Forster sang a duet during the offertory which was much appreciated. The church was tastefully decorated with flowers and grain.
Ernest Munro, of Brandon, is visiting his sister, Mrs. A. Hunt.
D.F. Wilson, secretary-treasurer, has been appointed on the local exception board under the Military Act.
We regret to learn that Pte. L.H. Lacey is reported to be a prisoner in Germany.
Mr. and Mrs. John Allan, of Grandview, spent the week-end with Mrs. T. Dewsberry.
Much interest is taken in the liquor cases which come up for trial next Tuesday in Winnipegosis.
Renew your subscription to the Herald promptly.

1917 Oct 11 – Winnipegosis

The Winnipegosis Home Economics Society held is regular monthly meeting on Friday evening, Sept. 21st. The special feature of the evening’s programme was an excellent talk on “Fall Sewing in the Home,” by Mrs. E. Bickle. She also have a very practical demonstration of a neat and cosy outfit for a small school girl. Two pleasing contributions to the programme were a solo my Miss Jarrett and a dainty 10 cent tea served by Mrs. Thomas in aid of the H.E.S. library fund.
On Tuesday, Oct. 2nd, the society held an auction rummage sale in aid of the Red Cross. The people of the town contributed liberally towards the collection of goods and a large crowd of both men and women attended the sale. Miss McMartin acted in the capacity of auctioneer. Bidding was high and spirited, particularly among the ladies. Two of the most gratefully received donations were a beautiful band painted satin pillow given by Mrs. George Spence, and a 7-weeks’ old pig given by Mr. Harold Bradley, and selling for $10.15. Net proceeds of the sale amounted to a considerable sum.
The excitement of late was the liquor cases. Four of the “boys” had to come across with the coin. The balance of the cases come up next Tuesday for hearing. Inspector Gurton, of Dauphin, is prosecuting. Mayor Whale is hearing the cases.
Pte. H.C. Irven, of this town, is reported among the wounded.
Dr. Rogers, of Dauphin, was among the outsiders in town this week.
What about the “informer?”

Today in the Dapuhin Herald – Sep 3 – 1914

1914 Sep 3 – Thousands are Being Killed

LONDON, SEPT. 3RD – While little or no official news has been allowed to pass the censors, it is known for the past three days that tremendous fighting has taken place between the Allies and the Germans. One authority places the number killed at 100 000, seventy percent being Germans.

1914 Sep 3 – Germans will be Licked

If the Germans can’t reach Paris by the end of the week they will not be able to reach it all. Emperor William is urging her generals to take the city at all costs. The English and French troops are being reinforced and there is no fear at headquarters that they will not be able to repulse the invaders and later drive them out of the country.

1914 Sep 3 – Ethelbert

Houses are scarce in our village. There is a good opening here for some enterprising contractor to build a half dozen dwellings.
There is a large supply of wood on hand. Pretty nearly everything else is affected by the war but it is not likely wood will soar. We are thankful for this small favour.
W.H. White, principal of our school returned on Monday from Dauphin. Mr. W. has not moved his family from Dauphin yet being unable tog et a house.
Threshing has commenced. The quality of the grain is good but the yields are on the light sight.

1914 Sep 3 – Fork River

Mrs. Minocan and Mrs. Carter returned to Montana, U.S. having spent the summer with Mrs. Nat. Little.
Wm. Howitson, assistant clerk at the A.T. Co. store, received an urgent call to headquarters at Winnipegosis to take charge of the manager’s gold fish emporium. “Scotty’s” all right and will will miss him around here.
E. Thomas, of Veregin, Sask., has arrived here to take charge of the elevator. He reports many elevators have been closed down in Saskatchewan. D. Kennedy will handle the finances.
Mrs. Rice, of North Lake, was in town on Saturday.
We overheard Mrs. Manglewortzel top giving His Majesty hail Columbia because she had not got her Eaton catalog the other day as the T.E. Co. had informed her that several copies had been sent to members of her illustrious family and she wanted them. Strange to say, two hours after two bags of the catalogs were seen on the platform addressed to the express agent. We trust her ladyship received her Sunday reading ere this. Some people are busy looking for imaginary trouble.
Miss M. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, has accepted the position of teacher to the Mossey River School for a time.
The few showery days have put back the harvesting but have put out the fires in most places. We should have a fire guardian here.
W. King, reeve, was a visitor to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Sep 3 – Winnipegosis

There has been a bad outbreak of diphtheria among the Galicians in this district and already several deaths have occurred. It appears that these people will not obey the instructions of the health officer in regard to quarantine and as a result the disease has spread. The services of Constable Hunking have been required and he will endeavour to reinforce the law. A supply of antitoxin has been secured from Dauphin.
Negotiations have been completed for funds and work has been resumed on the school. What a power the mighty dollar has.
The fishing is very good and the fishermen seem to be fairly satisfied, which counts for something. When you find a satisfied fishermen then the end of the universe is in sight.
The war is likely to do several things for this district. One is that the farmers will bend their efforts to raise more cattle and hogs and another is that a larger area of land will be got ready for crop next year.
J.S. Seiffert has been appointed police magistrate for the district. The office is an important one and if properly filled requires judicial talent. We sure have had a variety of P.M.’s – good, bad and indifferent.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 6 – 1913

1913 Feb 6 – Baran Fired Fatal Shot

Monday was the most fateful in the life of John Baran. It opened with the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke in morning and in the afternoon the coroner’s jury found Baran guilty of the shooting.
Coroner Harrington held an inquest in the afternoon, when the following composed the jury: Geo. King, foreman; H.F. Caldwell, John Cole, A.B. Buie, Nelson Taylor, Stewart Baird, Thos. Shaw, F.J. McDonald, R.G. Ferguson, Thos. Jordan, Frank Beely, and Arch. Esplen. Witnesses examined were Dr. Culbertson, as to immediate cause of death; John Tomaski, the man who drove the sleigh that carried Constable Rooke to Baran’s house where he was shot, and Marie Pelech, the woman who lived with Baran.
The jury, in order to receive the woman’s evidence, proceeded to the hospital and for an hour listened to a well connected and intelligent reciting of the incidents which led up to the shooting.
The woman testified that Baran fired two shots from a rifle through the door when Rooke attempted to force an entrance; that she knew that one of the bullets took effect for she examined the spot where Rooke fell exhausted in the snow, when the man who accompanied him left to secure assistance. She stated that she found a pool of blood. She also testified that Baran forced her to state that she fired two shot through the door. The whole affair was brought home to Baran in a most vivid manner.

THE JURY’S VERDICT

The following is the verdict of the jury:
“We, the jury empanelled to hear the evidence as to the death of Provincial Constable Charles Rooke, find that the said Charles Rooke on Sunday, Jan. 26, 1913, received a bullet in the breast from a rifle in the hands of John Baran and that the said Charles Rooke died on Monday, Feb. 3, 1913, from the effects of this shot.”
The death of Constable Rooke has cast a gloom over the community as he was a good citizen, as well a good officer, unassuming and kind to all.
Marie Pelech, who lived with Baran, is still in the hospital, but is doing as well as can be expected. If she recovers she will have to have her right arm amputated at the shoulder. Her brother, Michael, arrived from Winnipeg Monday morning and was overcome with grief to find his sister in such a pitiable condition. He says he has been looking for her for three years.
Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Munson on Monday on the charge of murder. He was remanded until Friday for trial.
Rooke was born at Redhill, Surrey, England. May 5, 1876, being the son of Inspector-General Rooke, of the Indian army, who was honorary physician to Queen Victoria, and was educated at Willington College. He came to Western Canada in 1895, and served five years with the Northwest Mounted Police. In 1905 the Manitoba government gave him the job of organizing the Manitoba mounted police, a body whose efforts were mainly directed to the suppression of lawlessness along the international boundary line. He made his name a terror to horse thieves, yeggmen and smugglers and soon made the frontier as safe as any other part of the province. Latterly, his headquarters have been here, where he had jurisdiction over much of the north country. In 1909 he married Elizabeth Surrey, who, with one son, survives him.
A brother, E.G. Rooke, news editor of the Nelson News, and former publisher of the Port Hope., Ont. Times, is here to attend the funeral as are also Mr. Geo. Surry, Victoria, B.C., Mrs. Rooke’s brother, and Miss Ellen Surrey, of Galt., Ont., sister of Mrs. Rooke.

1913 Feb 6 – Funeral Today

The funeral of the late Constable Charles Rooke is taking place this afternoon from the family residence 8th Ave., N.E. Vermillion Lodge No, 68, A.F. & A.M., of which deceased was a member having charge of the services. Rev. A.S. Wiley will conduct the service. Interment will be made at Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fraser Given Two Months

Wm. Fraser, who attempted suicide last week by cutting his throat, appeared before P.M. Munson on the 30th ult., and was sentenced to two months in jail. He was taken to Portage by Constable McLean.

1913 Feb 6 – Died From Bullet Wound

Fred Bichardson, a Barnardo boy who was working for Arthur Lee, a farmer at Togo, shot himself in the head Friday with a 22 rifle. He was brought to the hospital here on Saturday, but died shortly after his arrival. The remains were interred in Riverside Cemetery.

1913 Feb 6 – Fork River

Henry Benner, of Lloydminster, is visiting his parents up the Fork River. He is wanting a car of young cattle to take back with him. No objections to females being among them.
Howard Armstrong has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son Dony, left for Bayhead, Nova Scotia, for a two months visit among relations and friends.
D. Kennedy’s high flyer got kicked the other day and is out of business for a short time, consequently Dunk had to fall back on the old reliables for a trip to Winnipegosis.
All the threshing outfits got cold feet early this fall except for Fred Cooper and he is on his last job. Fred’s a stayer and there should be no kick from the farmers as there’s no money in it for either this year as far as threshing goes.
We were out the other day looking for a stray heifer and didn’t find her, but came across someone looking for a pig. They did not mention whether it was a live pig, or dead pig or a blind pig and judging from their track a few hours after they must have run across a pig of some kind. Moral, don’t try to carry more pig than you can handle unless you cover up your tracks.
There is considerable kicking being done among the owners of gasoline engines re the poor gasoline sent up here from Dauphin. It not only wastes our time but puts the engines out of order.
We notice in the Press a long rigmarole about compulsory education also an ad for a teacher for Mowat School. We hear there has been several application received. It seems a pity this school should be closed since the summer holidays, it being in the centre of a settlement where there is a large number of children. The parents seem to be anything but delighted to have the kids miss all the nice weather we have had. We bet dollars to doughnuts that the head push has no children to send or we would have heard of it every week for the last five months.
Can anyone tell us what benefit the majority of the ratepayers receive for their taxes in the Municipality. Of course there are some who go on a pilgrimage to all the meetings looking for snaps and they get them, by gum. The clerk has had a rise of fifty. Oh well, I believe he published the minutes of one council meeting since last June. The municipal auditor was around so look out for the statement three inches by four. We received a copy of the Auditor’s report in book form of 47 pages from Ochre River Municipality. Its good reading and looks like business. A few dollars expended like this would be more appreciated by the ratepayers than paying two road commissioners in ward five, as there has been done the last three years to spend two or three hundred dollars.
The new Oak Brae postoffice as officially opened today. It is situated at Janowski schoolhouse and should prove a great boon to the people of that locality as it has been a deeply felt want. Geo. Basham is postmaster and we feel sure he will fill the bill to all satisfactorily. We hear Billy is sore, but we can’t help these things, so Billy, please remember the little saying “No use crying over spilt milk.” Such is life in the Wolly West.
The annual clearance sale started today 1st Feb. at the Armstrong Trading Company’s store and they are sure slaughtering the prices. This has been a poor year for the farmer so now is your chance to buy right.
Wanted, a boarding house right away for the travelling public.

1913 Feb 6 – Sifton

A ball was held in the Kennedy hall in aid of the English church; about forty couples were present, and a very enjoyable time was spent.
Elaborate arrangements were made for a wedding here on the 31st ult. A large number of guests had assembled and everything was in readiness for the ceremony when it was found that the would-be bride was missing. Consternation reigned for a time and great disappointment was felt, especially by the intended groom.