Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 20 – 1913, 1919

1913 Nov 20 – Fork River

A number of farmers met at the municipal office on Saturday event, the 15th, to discuss the horse question. Q. King was appointed chairman and T.B. Venables secretary. The chairman stated the reason for calling the meeting, after which those present voted that we form an association to be known as the Fork River Horse Breeders’ Association and the flowing officers were elected: President, Thos. B. Venables; Vice, Wm. King; Sec.-Treas., D.F. Wilson. Directors: Ab. Hunt, Nat Little, A. Rowe and Geo. H. Tilt. The meeting adjourned to meet on Saturday night, Nov. 29, at 8 o’clock sharp to decide the most suitable breed to apply for a government pure bred stallion and to transact other business. Anyone can become a member of the association on the payment of one dollar membership fee. We wish the farmers every success in this worthy undertaking and it should have the hearty support of all in the district.
Dan McLean returned home for the winter months after spending the summer in charge of the government dredge at Regina.
Capt. Russell, of Cork Cliff, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Mrs. F.B. Lacey of Mowat, returned from the wedding of Mr. Cain and Mrs. O’Neil at Dauphin. We wish them all kinds of happiness.
George Basham, postmaster of Oak Brae, was in town on Saturday. He still wears that genial smile.
Harcourt Benner is visiting at the home of his uncle, D.F. Wilson, on the Mossey.
Bert Steele passed through here on his way to take up his winter quarters at Mafeking for the A.T. Co. Bert is looking the picture of health and prosperity.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, in company with the president and secretary of the Booth Fishing Co., paid the A.T. Co. store a visit last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid a visit to the home of his parents and Miss Bessie Wilson returned with him for a short visit among friends in Dauphin.
Mr. Almack, of Gilbert Plains, left for the west with two cars of cows and young stock for the ranch.
The ladies of the Union Church, of Fork River, will hold a fowl supper in the Orange Hall, on Friday, Nov. 28th. Admission, adults 35c, children 15c. Short programme, everybody welcome.

1913 Nov 20 – Sifton

The fine weather and good roads are making numbers of people visit our village and shopping and milling are the order of the day.
Mrs. J. Kiteley, of Toronto, Ont., who has been visiting her sons in Brandon, Moose Jaw and Calgary, was the guest of Miss Reid at the Presbyterian mission house for a week.
A much felt need is being met now by an enterprising shoemaker, who has opened a repair shop on Front Street. He should do well. A bank should be our next addition and would be a convenience to many.
A fatal accident occurred on Tuesday, when a nine year old son of Anton Sturcko lost his life. The child was taking a loaded gun down from the wall, where it was left, when the weapon discharged, shattering the boy’s left leg and the loss of blood was so great that when he was taken to the village about two hours later, he was in a state of partial collapse and died before he could be taken to a doctor.
The gross neglect of parents in allowing children the use of firearms is a matter of grave import, and some steps to set on foot a law imposing a heavy fine on such should be a good thing, and the means of saving other young and bright lives.
A band of boy scouts is being inaugurated and is a fine thing for the boys. Scout laws are just the kind needed here. Our best wishes for their success under the leadership of our esteemed neighbour, Mr. Paul Wood.
The quiet of the night is sometimes broken in upon the chug, chug, of our worthy section foreman’s gasoline hand car on patrol, up to the switch. Also several of our villagers have enjoyed a fast trip to Fork River or Winnipegosis.

1913 Nov 20 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Frank Hechter returned on Monday after a considerable stay in Winnipeg.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon arrived here on Wednesday, having spent a pleasant vacation studying mink farming at Quebec. Winnipegosis will soon be able to boast of its Zoological Gardens at the rate it is going on. We only want a few live bears, but no mosquitoes, as we have plenty of them to spare, in season.
Capt. Dan. McDonald accompanied by his brother, arrived from Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Paul Paulson and family returned on Monday, having recovered from his attack of typhoid fever which he contracted while staying in Winnipeg. He proceeded to his fishing camp on Thursday.
Archie Stewart, proprietor of the well known livery stable, met with an accident by falling off his wagon.
A meeting of the Curling Club took place in Walmsley’s pool room on Monday evening, when it was resolved that practice would take place an soon as the skating rink was got into working order and on receipt of first instalment of subscriptions. The club would then be open to engage all comers, bar none.
The young ladies of this place are having great times of an evening, skating on river and lake, the latter being practically frozen over. Charley Langlois having skated over from is camp on Weasel Island on Tuesday, Mr. Johnston also walking in from Snake Island the previous day.
Charley reports that the fishermen up the lake have suffered a great loss, which is probably irreparable at this time of the year.
Howard Armstrong of Fork River, appeared before Mr. Parker, magistrate, on Friday morning to answer a charge of stealing various articles, too trivial to mention, and after Miles Morris had given evidence, his worship came to the conclusion that at present there was not sufficient incriminating evidence to connect the prisoner with the charge and adjourned the case till Monday morning, the accused being allowed out on his own recognizances. During the proceedings Capt. Dan McDonald made a minute inspector of the only and only cell and evidently admired the accommodation, although he passed no comment.
Frank Hechter has a fine display of furs in his store, which would make suitable presents to the “Old Country” and prospective buyers are warned that the supply being limited, they had better hurry up so as to secure specimens at most reasonable prices.
Mr. Bennie Hechter made a trip to Winnipeg on Wednesday for the purpose of supervising his house property in that city.
A progressive whist part was held on Thursday evening at Mr. Martin’s (station agent) home and after light refreshments and an enjoyable evening, the lucky participants returned to their respective homes in the early hours of the morn.
Mrs. Coffey returned to Dauphin on Friday, having spent a few days here with the jovial Captain.
Dick Harrison went to Winnipeg on Friday for purpose of disposing of surplus funds, which is a great loss to this rising watering resort, and as it is evidently entering a new era of prosperity, can do with every little help to give it a leg up.
Mr. Sturdy, Jr., from Fort Frances, Ont., is paying a week’s visit to his father, one of our most prominent citizens.
Tom Toye, our energetic Councillor, has brought in news of a big bear having killed a Galician round his part of the country, the animal having disembowelled the man. As a gallant Welshman why does not Tom uphold the traditions of his race and kill the brute, bringing the hide back as evidence. Tom Sanderson would act as guide and track the beast to his winter lair.

1919 Nov 20 – Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. John Dobson and family, of Winnipeg, are visiting at the home of Reeve Venables.
D.F. Wilson, sec. treasurer is attending the Union of Municipalities convention at Winnipeg this week.
Milton Cooper, who has been in the Dauphin Hospital, is improving.
F.F. Haffenbrak is on a visit to Ninette, Man.
With the milder weather the attendance at Sunday school has increased. 42 were in attendance last Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 10 – 1910

1915 Nov 10 – MGR. JOST SUICIDES

The Well Known and Popular Manager of Union Bank Suicides while Temporarily Insane
The people of the town were shocked Sunday afternoon when the news spread that George N. Jost, manager of the Union Bank had committed suicide by shooting himself. During the past few days he had been complaining of not feeling well, and on Saturday night consulted a doctor, who told him that his temperature was high, and that it indicated typhoid fever and that he would arrange to have him placed in the hospital. The friend with whom he was staying left the premises for a short time, and during this period Mr. Jost procured a gun and retired to the stable, where he managed to discharge the gun by stooping over it and pulling the trigger. The charge entered the upper part of the abdomen over the left side of the stomach. When found he was still alive, but expired after a few minutes.

Coroner Harrington held an inquest Sunday afternoon and the verdict of the jury was that Jost came to his death by a gunshot wound while in a state of temporary insanity brought on by a high state of temperature in the early stages of typhoid fever.

Mr. Jost was about 28 years of age, and came to Dauphin three months ago from Kindersley, Sask., to assume the management of the Union Bank branch here. His home is in Guysboro, N.S. where his parents live. He was a popular young man and stood well with the business public. The remains were taken to Guysboro for interment.

1915 Nov 10 – Fork River

Editor King of the Dauphin Press paid us a visit last Saturday.
Professor Sutton gave an entertainment in the Hall last Saturday. Quite a number attended.
Mr. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit this week.
E. Clawson who has been away all summer returned from Rothwell last week.
W. Clark who has been away for some time returned last week.
Ten quarter sections of land were sold here last week for taxes.
Mr. Little left here last week for a two weeks holiday in the States.
Paul Wood from Sifton spent Thanksgiving Day here visiting D.F. Wilson.
Archie Stewart from Winnipegosis was here last week.
Quite a lot of damage has been done in this district by forest fires.
E. Clawson and A. Forbes paid Dauphin a visit.

1915 Nov 10 – To the Herald: –

SIR – Re Oak Brae P.M., F.B. Lacey’s reply to a correspondent of Fork River, re Fishing River p.o. and elevator at Fork River says it is a concoction of misrepresentations. Our O.B. friend does not like the truth. At a Burrows meeting at Fork River during the last Dominion election, our O.B. friend was asked by a large number of Fishing River farmers, to explain the reason the p.o. petitioned for was not given to some one of them and why one was established at O.B. instead. He replied that he was in a hurry but as soon as the train left he would explain. They waited, the train left, and our O.B. P.M. was conspicuous by his absence. No explanation. Shortly after our O.B. friend was sent to Winnipeg and we saw him no more till after the election at Fishing River.

If the P.M. appointed at Fishing River had left, there were plenty of other settlers left to take it. He states as an excuse the train did not stop at Fishing River. It does not stop at Oak Brae but he got a post office there and we never heard of a petition asking for one for Lacey P.O.

A post office was established at Fishing River Oct. 1st, 1910, and the mail is carried from Sifton, and not on the same date as the Lacey post office was established (September 25, 1905) as our Oak Brae friend would lead the public to believe in his letter, “A Misrepresentation.” Was a P.O. lost, strayed or stolen for the period of five yeas? The new P.M. has lived eight years there; he should have had it sooner. True he was a supporter of Glen Campbell at the last Dominion election, but he did not get the P.O. then, no Tories need apply. He, I believe, supported the Grits at the last Provincial election and got a P.O. in short order, which shows to get post offices keep in with the postmaster general at Oak Brae. He kicks because the people are tired of the O.B. mail coming in and going out at any old time and carried by every Tom, Dick or Harry. Our O.B. friend told us some time ago it is well to remind people of their duty as they get careless, so we are only giving our friend his own medicine.

Regarding the clique at Fork River, they are doing nicely, the place is booming in the absence of our friend. As for the champions of the Provincial Government, we have a great deal to thank them for in bridges and roads. They have always kept their promises to the people here.

Re the elevator that the O.B. P.M. is worrying about being lost, strayed or style. He is the only man we heard say that the government promised one this fall. True we need one at this point and we sent a petition for one, but the government has no say. There is an Elevator Commission appointed and I have no doubt they will build us one as soon as possible.

Our friend mentions the 9th of June often. His must have had an attack of the Hipocketzotic them. He reminds one of the little boy who stuck a pin in his toy balloon left after the wind escaped.

A Fork Riverite

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 15 – 1914

1914 Oct 15 – Gasoline Boat Burned

The gasoline boat, “Lake View,” owned by Mr. Frank Hechter, was burned at the north end of Lake Winnipegosis last week, together with supplies and fishing nets. The boat was in charge of Dan Martin. Mr. Hechter places his loss a near the $3000 mark. There was no insurance.

1914 Oct 15 – Doctors on Strike

It is said that since the declaration of war, the Swan River physicians have refused to threat German measles.

1914 Oct 15 – Fork River

Max King and Karl Erikson have left for the north end of the lake for he winter’s fishing.
Mr. W. Howitson has left for Winnipegosis and is working in the A.T. Co store. “Scotty” is always in great demand.
Mrs. Peter Ellis has returned from a trip to Ontario.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor with Mrs. D. Kennedy this week.
Miss M. Craighill and Mrs. W. Davis have returned from a short visit to Winnipegosis and report a pleasant time.
Mrs. Bert Cooper and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. W. Cooper, Sr., on the Mossey River.
Mr. D.F. Wilson has been confined to the house for a short time. It’s nothing “catching.” We trust he will recover.
Next Sunday, Oct. 10th, will be Children’s day. Special services will be held for the children. We trust there will be a good turn out to this service. All are welcome.
Mr. Mullens and friend here motored from Cypress River and are spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. A. Cameron, of Mowat Centre.
Mr. Eloftson, from Ontario, was up to W. King’s for the surveying teams and outfit which have been here all summer. He is moving them to Gimli ready for the winter’s work in that section.
Some one was enquiring of us last week if the A.T. Co. was still running the dredge at Winnipegosis.

1914 Oct 15 – Winnipegosis

Sid Coffey is going fishing and Harold Bradley will run the picture show while he is away.
Frank Hechter was a passenger Dauphin bound on Monday.
C.F. Stewart, insurance agent returned to Dauphin on Monday after a short business trip here.
Alex Bickel went to Dauphin on Monday.
Frank Hechter’s gasoline boat was burned at the north end of the lake last week. The loss is considerable as the boat was loaded with fishing apparatus and supplies for the winter. Dan Martin was in charge of the boat, and he says the origin of the fire is a mystery.
The Standard Lumber Co. is putting in a camp for the winter at Graves’ Point.
The steamer Manitou has already made several trips to the north end of the lake with supplies for the fishermen. Capt. McDonald is in charge of the boat.
It is expected that fully 150 men will be engaged in fishing this winter. The wages paid will be considerably lower than in the past two seasons.
Joe Johnston, from Fort William, is among the late arrivals. He reports times dull at the lake town. He will fish this winter.
Capt. Coffey’s new boat made her first trip to the north end of the lake last week. The boat has not been christened yet, but when the sparkling bottle of wine is broken the word “Mildred” will appear.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 30 – 1915

1915 Sep 30 – Threshing Held Up

Threshing operations have been suspended during the past week on account of wet weather. The returns coming in from the separators continue to be large.

1915 Sep 30 – Ethelbert

During the last four weeks I. Arnovitch has shipped eight carloads of cattle from this point.
The new Presbyterian mission hospital is nearing completion. It is going to be a commodious structure.
Threshing operations are entirely suspended owing to wet weather.
Mr. Ben Brachman, our enterprising merchant, was a Dauphin visitor on Monday.
Mr. Bert Kennedy and family have arrived from Canora and will reside here.
The wood market is commencing to be more active of late. Prices still remain at the old figure, but will advance as the weather gets colder.

1915 Sep 30 – Winnipegosis

There was a most enjoyable dance in the Rex Hall on Friday evening, which was well attended although the weather was so bad.
The Hon. Hugh Armstrong and Mrs. Armstrong are spending a few days in town.
Dr. Bottomley and Dr. Culberton, of Dauphin, were in town on Tuesday operating on Miss Pearl Paddock, who has been very ill with appendicitis. We are very glad to report. Miss Paddock a little better and trust soon to see her around again.
Mrs. Anderson left for Winnipeg on Saturday’s train accompanied by her sister, Miss Ruth Sanders.
Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was a visitor in town on Saturday.
Don’t forget court of revision on Oct. 9th. All complaints must reach the clerk ten days previous to that date and be duty filled by him.
Mr. Hall has accepted a position with the Standard Lumber Co., as successor to Mr. Barbour, who resigned to join the army.
H. Loiw, of Waterhen, is spending a few days in town.
Geo. Adam spent Saturday in town.
Mr. James, of Winnipeg, is a business visitor in town for a few days.
We hear fall fishing will soon be over and everyone will be getting in shape for outfitting for the winter. Where has our summer gone?
If looking for a good shave or hair cut don’t miss the red, white and blue post on Main Street.
There was a ten cent tea at the home of Mrs. Whale on Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 5 in and of a local family in want.
We are glad to see Jim McInnes around again after being laid up for a few days.
We are sorry to report the accident to Mrs. J.E. Parkers, who fell and broke her leg the other evening.
Geo. Lyons and D. Kennedy spent Wednesday in Fork River on municipal business and report crops already for threshing.
John Marshinsky has traded his boat for an automobile.
Ed. Chirmok is building a store next to the Methodist Church and intends starting business this fall.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 14 – 1913

1913 Aug 14 – Ethelbert

Captain (Mrs.) Tutte, of the Salivation Army, is visiting her mother, Mrs. A. Willey, for a few days.
Mrs. McVicar, formerly of Garland, now of Brandon, is renewing old acquaintances at Ethelbert, and is stating at the station agent’s home.
Mrs. McDonald of Fort William, youngest sister of J. McLean, is visiting old scenes hereabout.
Mrs. Rod Campbell, the oldest sister of Mrs. McPhedrian, is visiting relatives in this neighbourhood.
H. Brachman has been gazetted as J.P.
There is a fear amongst the famers that the copious rain may injure the crop prospects.
Great quantities of berries are being shipped east and west; more than 100 pails a day.
This is a great country for fruit, wheat, hay, eggs, and last but not the least in mosquitoes. They come and go in millions.

1913 Aug 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Walter Cooper, Sr., left for a two weeks’ vacation among friends at Dauphin.
Sam Bailey left for a week’s visit to his son Frank at Winnipeg.
James McDonald, assistance express agent, left for a well-earned vacation at Winnipeg.
Miss Pearl Wilson has left for Dauphin for a short visit.
Mrs. W. Williams returned from a week’s rest in the south.
J. Stewart, of North Lake, was in town lately and reports the roads out that way very bad.
Postmaster Kennedy and wife are off to Winnipeg to take in the stampede in company with the Mayor of Winnipegosis and several others from this point.
Miss Alice Godkin is spending a week with Mrs. Johnson, of Winnipegosis, with the Misses Kennedy.
Miss M. Nixon left for Winnipeg, after a month’s vacation here with friends.
St. John Butler, of Winnipegosis, has charge of the A.T. Co. store, during manager Kennedy’s absence.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, who has been visiting with her grandmother, Mrs. R. Snelgrove for some time, has returned home.
Although the council passed a by-law to the effect that all stock was to be on the owners property during sunset and sunrise and not allowed to run at large, we find cattle and ponies running at all hours of the night, and in places it is unsafe to drive along the roads dark nights for fear of tumbling over them.
The heavy rains of this week have stopped the haying and road making for a short time.
Councillor Hunt let several contracts for roads to Contractor Briggs and others. We trust there will be an open fall so this work can be done.
John Mathews, electrician for the A.T. Co., is intending to go into the pork raising business as a side issue. We wish him all kinds of success as Jack’s a pretty good fellow.
Our esteemed friends, Fred. Storrar, has charge of the cream department and is giving good satisfaction.
Much interest is being taken in the baseball match between the married and single ladies which is to come off on the 13th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 20 – 1912

1912 Jun 20 – Mossey River Council Minutes

Meeting of the Council held in the Council Chamber, Winnipegosis, Tuesday, June 4, 1912. All members present, Reeve Lacey and Councillor Nicholson arriving late.
Coun. Hunt was appointed chairman of the meeting in the absence of the reeve.
The minutes of previous meeting were adopted as read.
Sieffert – McAuley – That R.E. Broadfoot be allowed penalty off his 1911 taxes owing to his cheque to Municipality having been lost in transit. Carried.
Seiffert – Robertson – That Paul Wood be asked to pay taxes on sec. 21-31-18 up to and including the year 1910. Carried.
Seiffert – Robertson – That J.W. McAuley and Thos. Toye be appointed to investigate conditions in Cork Cliff S.D. with a view to constructing a road there; the cost of said road to remain within the bounds of Ward 5 appropriation for the year 1912. Carried.
Robertson – Nicholson – That arrears of taxes due on N.E. 10-29-18 and N.E. 14-29-18, be cancelled. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That arrears of taxes on S.E. 28-31-19 be cancelled. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk notify C. Humphreys that arrears of taxes due on N.W. 16-29-18 must be paid forthwith. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That all bridges of 20ft. or over be built, kept in repair, and generally looked after by Municipality. Carried.
Sieffert – Hunt – That the Armstrong Trading Co. be allowed the use of two wheel-scrapers, to be used in removing earth from their cellar and putting same on the streets of Winnipegosis, as directed by the Councillor; scrapers to be returned when required in good order. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the Council secure, as soon as possible, the services the of government engineer to take the levels and estimate the cost of constructing ditches throughout the Municipality, with a view to borrowing money for the same. Carried.
Hunt – Robertson – That J.W. McAuley and J.S. Seiffert be appointed a committee to look after the fencing Winnipegosis cemetery. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That Councillor for Ward 4 be allowed to accept Peter McArthur’s proposition regarding the sidewalk on block 7, all material to be chargeable to Ward 4, appropriation for the year 1913. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That each road commissioner be authorized to spend his ward appropriations in such work and by what means he considers most advisable. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That statute labour be abolished, and that the amount of money represented by the statute labour commutation in each ward at $4.50 per quarter section, be added respectively to the ward’s appropriation. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That clerk state the case regarding Gensor lands to municipal solicitors and ask that action be taken at once to enforce the payment of arrears of taxes on the same. Carried.
Hunt – Seiffert – That F.B. Lacey, G.E. Nicholson and J.D. Robertson be a committee to inspect Fishing River bridge and decide what is best to be done with same. Carried.
Toye – Robertson – That Frank Slywoski’s taxes on S.W. 18-30-17 be reduced to $17. Carried.
Wm. Paddock was appointed fence viewer for Ward 4, and George Shannon for Ward 6 for the year 1912.
Hunt – Seiffert – That all buildings and other obstructions be removed from the streets of Winnipegosis within 30 days. Carried.
Seiffer – McAuley – That arrears of taxes on the N.E. portion of the S.E. quarter of section 10-31-18 be cancelled up to the year 1910. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Council new adjoin to meet again at the call of the reeve. Carried.

1912 Jun 20 – Fork River

J. McKie of the Iowa Dairy Separator Co., Fargo, was here on business.
F.B. Venables returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Councillor J. Robinson, of Ward six is spending a few days at Dauphin.
We hear the buzz of the plairey once more. Mr. Williams having put in a new plant, is turning out some very good stuff in that line. Give him a trial oiler.
Mrs. Wm. Coultas let for a few days visit to her numerous friends in Dauphin.
The government dredge in charge of Capt. McLean is making good progress on the Mossey River.
Mr. Malley, Methodist student, will be absent a week or ten days attending conference in Winnipeg.
A. Cooper left for a trip to Lloydminster, Sask.
S. Gower left for the south to take a long earned vacation.
Panko Solomon of Mowat, returning from a trip to Dauphin on the Swan River train, undertook to get off at Sifton Junction while the train was running and had to misfortune to break his ankle and is laid off work for some time.
We asked “Billy” if anything unusual had happened. He remarked with a smile. “Don’t you know the Good Shepherds have gone to Winnipeg as we are in for a whole week of rest, which is very acceptable after the corpedo launched at Sifton, Fork River and Winnipegosis, which places were specially mentioned on Sunday regarding party politics, as it’s like football, one is one is apt to get a crack when you are not looking for it. Cut when you are not looking for it. Cut it out friend and be satisfied with the achievements of the 17th of March, as after such fusillades, singing “Peace, perfect peace, seems out of place.”
Mr. Darroch, Dominion homestead inspector, paid a visit to Fork River in the interest of homesteaders apply for their patents.
We were informed that one of the leading farmers of the south part of this district is in search of a hired man and we were asked if we could tell of one. The qualifications are he must be well up in cow, pig and horse logy; preference will be given to one who had been used to a “Jackass” as there is one on the farm and it usually starts braying about four o’clock in the morning, when not on a visit to the summer resort. The said braying means get up and milk the “keys.” Salary will be the same as given to his predecessors. Five dollars per annum; half cash and half in patent medicines and lots of fresh air exercise and the promise of a further rise in salary of five dollars per annum when the Liberals get in power again. So be good as this is the chance of your life if accepted.
Mr. Clements of Dauphin who is farming on a large scale at Fork River, is spending a few day overseeing the work on the farms.

1912 Jun 20 – Winnipegosis

Arrangements are being made for the reception of the Oddfellows excursion here from Grandview on the 28th.
Mike Whotan cut his knee while working up the lake. He was brought to town by boat by Dr. Medd and T. Whale and was taken to Dauphin Hospital on Wednesday.
Thos. Whale, Dr. Medd and F.R. McDonald were visitors to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Dugald McAuley shipped a carload of cattle to Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Archie Stewart left on Wednesday for a trip to Dauphin and Minitonas.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 26 – 1910

1910 May 26 – Sentenced to Three Years

John Demoria, the young half-breed who was arrested by Constable Hunking at Dauphin last week for housebreaking, was tried before Geo. O. Bellamy, P.M. on the charge and found guilty. He was sentenced to three years in the reformatory at Portage la Prairie, where he was taken on Saturday morning.

1910 May 26 – Fork River

A Conservative meeting was held last Wednesday in D.F. Wilson’s office.
H.P. Nicholson of Dauphin, visited here last Friday.
R. Hunt from Dauphin paid us a visit last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Cooper from Brantford, came up last Friday’s train.
Miss Finch and Miss C. Bailey paid Winnipegosis a visit last Friday.
Mayor Sparling of Dauphin was up here last week looking over some farms.
The Armstrong Trading Company of Winnipegosis will shortly open up an up-to-date store in this village.
Mrs. C. Smith and family who have been residing here for two years left this week for Calvin, North Dakota.
The Mossey River Municipality held a meeting at Winnipegosis last Saturday when some important business was done.
A very important Orangemen’s meeting was held in the Orange Hall last Wednesday when four of the members were advanced to the Royal Scarlet Chapter. Seven gentlemen from Dauphin came up and a very pleasant time came to a close in the early morning.

1910 May 26 – Winnipegosis

A very impressive memorial service for Edward VII was held on Friday, May 20th in the Presbyterian Church. Previous to the service in the church, the children of the day school under the charge of Reeve Grenon and Mr. Shannon paraded the streets en route to the church. The congregation was a large one and the service was conducted by Rev. H.H. Scrase (English Church minister). A brilliant address on the life and character of our late King was given by the Rev. W.E. Rowan (Methodist minister) and was highly appreciated. The Rev. Mr. McKay (Presbyterian minister) also took part in the service. The Dead March in Saul was impressively rendered on the organ by Miss McArthur.
The Quarterly Board of the Methodist Church was held on Friday evening under the chairmanship of the Rev. A.E. Smith of Dauphin, the chairman of the District. All the departments of the church work were reported to be in a flourishing condition, and a hearty invitation to remain as minister of the church for another year was extended to the highly esteemed minister, Rev. W.E. Rowan. Mr. Rowan’s acceptance of the invitation gave great satisfaction to the members of the Board.
On Tuesday the 24th the ladies held a picnic for the purpose of raising funds to procure a baseball outfit. A good time was enjoyed by everyone and the baseball enthusiasts will at once organize and get the game started.
C.F. Stewart, who was spending a few days in town returned to Dauphin Monday.
H.W. Grenon has built and opened up a poolroom and tobacco store.
Tag-day, the ladies were kept quite busy all day, the result of their untiring efforts being about $100.
McArthur’s boats returned from the north bringing in a raft of about 540,000 feet of lumber.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 4 – 1915

1915 Mar 4 – Playing Joke and is Head

Swan River, Feb. 26 – J. Hoey, a homesteader living near here, is dead as the result of playing the leading part in a practical joke. He was at some distance from his shack when he saw his chum come out. He thought it would be a good joke to imitate a wolf and see what happened. He crouched down low and began to howl like a wolf. The other man immediately got his rifle and shot. The bullet struck Hoey in the thigh. He was rushed to the hospital, where the leg was amputated. The shock, however, was too much and he died shortly after.

1915 Mar 4 – Thought He Had to Carry a Broom

A Galician seeing so many on the streets this week carrying brooms, asked a citizen if this was a new war regulation. He was jocularly told it was. The man then went into a store and bought a broom and proudly walked up Main Street with the “weapon” elevated over his shoulder at 45 degrees.

1915 Mar 4 – Fork River

Mr. G. O’Neil, of Mowat, is off on a visit to Rainy River.
Miss S. Lacey has returned from a few weeks’ visit with friends at Rainy River.
Mr. Munro and daughter, of Winnipeg, are spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt.
Mrs. R. McEachern spent a few days at the Lake Town lately visiting he sister, Mrs. E.J. Morris.
J. Denby and Tom Sanderson, of Winnipegosis, paid this burgh a visit on business and are looking hale and hearty after their winter up the lake fishing.
Mr. Steede, lay reader, paid a visit to Sifton in connection with church work last week.
Mr. Wm. Howitson have a dance to his many friends on Friday night in the hall. A very good time was spent.
W. King returned from attending the 43rd annual session of the Provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Manitoba at Winnipeg, on Friday. He reports the largest meeting in the history of the lodge. Arrangements were made for entertaining the Triennial Council of Ireland and the Grand Lodge of British North America next summer.
Reeve Lacey and D.F. Wilson are attending the Trustees’ Convention at Winnipeg this week.

1915 Mar 4 – Sifton

Mr. James McAuley and Mr. Eberby of the Massey-Harris Co., were visitors in town last week.
Sid Coffey was in our midst last week and gave a good show with is moving pictures, but unfortunately there was a very poor attendance. Cheer up, “Sid,” better luck next time.
Mr. Oliver Abraham has been busy hauling wheat to the elevator for the last few days. He is putting about two carloads through the elevator. We trust he will be successful in getting a top price as the wheat is of good quality.
There was half a carload of cattle shipped out of here this week. We would like to know what has become of Robt. Brewer this last week or two. Surely his smiling face would be welcomed back again.
Mr. Walters, Mr. Kitt and Mr. Onlette, of this burgh, visited the Grain Growers Association concert and dance at Fairville last Friday and report having had a good time.

1915 Mar 4 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. J.P. Grenon is in Winnipeg undergoing an operation.
J. Denby, Wm. Denby, Sr., and W. Johnson, are Winnipeg visitors this week.
Mr. Chas. Stewart, of Dauphin, was in town on business, and left on Friday’s train.
Government officials, Sweny and Taylor, were here on Friday inspecting the works.
Mrs. Jack Denby has been on the sick list for a few days, but is around again.
Mrs. Theo Johnston left on Monday for Dauphin to visit Mr. and Mrs. King.
Mr. Ed. Morris left for Dauphin on Friday’s train.
Mrs. Wm. Williams, of Fork River, is a visitor in town.
Mr. and Mrs. Himie Cohen, of Winnipeg, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. F. Hechter this week.
Jim McInnes had a run for his life on Friday evening. A call was made to the rink that there was a deuce of a rumpus at the hotel, and, of course, Jim can home on the bound to settle the dispute, but to his surprise he found about 25 o 40 lads and lassies waiting for him and Mrs. McInnes in parlour. On their entering the brunch demanded the dining room cleared out, which was done in short order. It being Mr. McInnes’ birthday a dance was enjoyed till the wee sma’ hours of the morning. Jim has not given his age away yet, imitating the ladies in this respect.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 4 – 1915

1915 Feb 4 – Remains Found

Some time last fall Paulo Jura, a one-armed young Ruthenian, disappeared at Ethelbert. An investigation was held but no trace of the young man could be found. He went out shooting with another young man named Timothy Nakonectiny, and at the time and considerable money on his person. Recently his remains were found in the Duck Mountain, but the flesh had just about all disappeared from the bones. His clothes, however, were identified. No trace of the money could be found.
Detectives are now again investigating the case.
Nakonectiny, Jura’s companion, has disappeared from the district.

1915 Feb 4 – Third Contingent Complete

The 110 men allotted to the Dauphin district to be raised for the Third Contingent has just about been enrolled, the number now reaching 106. Taken altogether the men are a fine lot and compare favourably with the first that enlisted here. The following is a summary of the nationality of the men:

Canadian 37
English 43
Scotch 20
Welsh 1
American 3
South Africa 1
Danish 1

CANADIAN.
J.D. Munson, single. (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039)
G. Prieur, single. (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219)
A.A. Day, single. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
J.E. Welch, single. (John Edward Welch, 1891-1916, 74199)
C.W. Shaw, single. (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875-1916, 424037 or A/24015)
W.C. Mitchell, single. (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202)
I. Zufelt, single. (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518)
H.W. Gardiner, single. (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894-1916, 424020)
J. Gallant, single. (Joseph Gallant, 1892-1916, 424019 or A/24019)
B.A. Whitmore, single. (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, A/24250)
H.L. Pearson, single. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)
J. Payne, single. (John Payne, 1892, 424066)
F.W. Clark, single. (Francis William Clark, 1890, 424671)
C.J. Ivens, single. (Charles John, xxx-1917, 424952)
G. Wildfong, single. (Gordon Wildfong, 1892, 424079)
S. Day, single.
J. Hicks, single. (John Hicks, 1895, 154745)
A.E. Arnold, single. (Albert Edward Arnold, 1895-1916, 424002 or A/24002)
P.E. Chard, single. (Percy Edwin Chard, 1896, 424657)
J.A. Justice, single. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
H.W. Minish, single. (Herbert Whitfield Minish, 1893, 424061)
G. Stewart, single. (Garfield Stewart, 1895-1916, 425364)
H. Bidak, single.
C.C. Stacey, single. (Clarence Crozier Stacey, 1896-1916, 425349)
J.E. Wells, single. (Joseph Edward Wells, 1889, 424076)
J.E. May, married.
J.J. Troyer, single. (Joseph James Troyer, 1887, 425428)
J.A. McLean, single.
J.S. Willis, single.
Jas. E. Cain, single. (James Edward Cain, 1894, 154744)
John Ball, single. (John Ball, 1895, 424539)
Edward Gordon, single. (Edward Gordon, 1893, 425870)
J.M. Crossland, single. (John Marshall Crossland, 1887, 154737)
Victor Lavalle, single.
John R. Levins, married. (John Richard Levins, 1880, 424033)
L.A. Campbell, single. (Lorne Alexander Campbell, 1879-1916, 460743 or A/60743)
Henry C. Batty, single. (Henry Charles Batty, xxx-1916, 424320)

ENGLISH.
A. Grove, single.
W.F. Percy, single. (William Freeman Percy, 1886, 425202)
P.E. Millard, single. (Percy Edward Millard, 18781916, 74190)
A.H.G. Whittaker, married. (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891-1916, 424077 or 424245)
A.G. Sanderson, married.
Wm. Coleman, single. (William Coleman, 1876, 424688)
R. Smith, single. (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196)
F. Clark, married. (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009)
J.S. Blundell, single. (James Stuart Blundell, 1893-1916, 74201)
A.J. Middleditch, married. (Albert John Middleditch, 1892, 425078)
J.W. Thompson, single. (John Walter Thompson, 1891, 424072)
Ivo Osman, single. (Ivo Isman, 1892, 74204)
T.L. Radway, single.
H. Marchant, single. (Harry Marchant, 1891, 424194)
G.J. Dickason, single. (George James Dickason, 1887, 424035)
P. Cowley, married. (Paul Cowley, 1886, 74186)
G. Burkett, married. (George Burkett, 1870, 154735)
J.A. Hurst, married. (J Arnold Hurst, xxx, 424339)
T.W. Swannell, single. (Frank Walton Swannell, 1893-1918, 425389)
C. Recknell, single. (Cuthbert Bradshaw Recknell, 1890, 425232)
F. Pexton, single. (Fred Pexton, 1887, 424067)
A. Wood, single. (Arthur Wood, 1897, 424375)
A.E. Weeks, single. (Arthur Edward Weeks, 1880-1917, 425472)
C.P. Webb, single. (Charles Peter Webb, 1895, 424374)
W. Weeds, single. (Walter Weeds, 1894, 424371)
A. Baldwin, single. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74184)
W.E. Ridley, single. (William Ernest Ridley, 1891, 74205)
R.E. Richards, single. (Robert Edmond Richards, xxx, 74207)
R.W. Watson, single. (Robert William Watson, 1891-1917, 424075 or 24229)
F. Pickup, single. (Frederick Pickup, 1893, 424068 or A/24068)
T. Pedley, married. (Thomas Pedley, 1878-1918, 425197)
A. Spence, married.
J. Gomme, single. (John Gomme, 1890, 424021)
C. Heather, single. (Charles Robert Heather, 1887, 424896)
B. Cheesmore, single. (Benjamin Cheesmore, 1887-1916, 424327)
W.J. Hill, single. (William James Hill, 1880, 74189)
P. Boam, single. (Percy Boam, 1883-1916, 74185)
T. Brown, single.
Herbert Townson, single. (Herbert Townson, 1896, 425426)
R.C. Crowe, single. (Roland Charles Crowe, 1897, 424012 or A/24066)
H.F.B. Percival, single.
Wm. J. Hickman, married. (William James, 1881, 424910)
F.L. Pearce, single.
Benj Dilworth, married. (Benjamin Dilworth, 1884-1916, 74187)

SCOTCH.
T.M. Ray, single. (T.M. Ray, xxx, 74206)
W.J. Wallace, single. (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200)
W. McDonald, single. (John Elliott McDonald, 1882, 424064)
Wm. Donaldson, married. (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188)
J. Nicol, married. (James Nicol, 1884, 74194)
J. Armstrong, married.
T. Latta, single. (Thomas Latta, xxx, 424031 or A/24136)
J.A. Craig, married.
A. Wilson, single. (Allan Wilson, 1895, 74198)
I. MacGlashan, single. (Isaac MacGlashan, 1885, 74193)
Wm. Miller, single. (William Miller, 1883-1916, 74191)
J. Alexander, single. (John Alexander, 1890, 425896)
R. Morrice, single. (Robert Morrice, 1892, 424343)
J.A. Whyte, single. (Joseph Alexander Whyte, 1893, 424078)
Wm. Lyon, single. (William Lyon, 1883, 424034)
R.L. Adams, single. (Robert Lawson Adams, 1896, 424001)
Wm. Munro, single. (William Munro, xxx, 74192)
Thos. Martin, single. (Thomas Martin, 1892, 424046)
N. McLeod, single.
T. Woodhouse, single. (Thomas Woodhouse, xxx, 425906)

WELSH.
E. Burnett, single. (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323)

U.S.A.
E. Engebretson, single. (Elmer Rudolph Engebretson, 1890-1918, 424015)
Wm. Madden, single. (William Madden, 1878, 424341)
C.B. Shales, single. (Chester Berdell Shales, 1896, 622436)

TRANSVAAL S. A.
H.E. Lys, married. (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.)

DENMARK.
A. Peterson, single.

1915 Feb 4 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have returned from a two weeks’ trip to Rochester, Minn.
Mr. W. Walmsley was in town last week.
Archdeacon Green spent a few days in Dauphin on church business last week.
W. King county Orange master, is away on his annual tour among the various lodges and expects to return to Dauphin in time for the annual county meeting to arrange business for the coming term.
Wm. Northam, one of the standby subscribers of the Herald at Fork River, sends in the following verse when remitting his subscription. We take it that Mr. Northam intends the lines as a warning to delinquents:
He who doth the printer pay
Will go to Heaven sure some day;
But he who meanly cheats the printer
Will go where there is never winter.

1915 Feb 4 – Winnipegosis

Five men are working on the dredge fitting her out for the summer.
A large number of the fishermen are back in town again, and things are moving a little faster than usual.
J.W. McAulay was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday to attend the trainmen’s ball.
Dancing is one of the chief pastimes in this town. Lately, hardly a week goes by without one or two dances being held. A surprise dance was given at the home of Hos. Grenon on Friday last and another dance on Tuesday night in the Rex Hall.
Will Morton, station agent, whose life was despaired of, is getting better.
Mr. and Mrs. Ravelli, left on Wednesday for Portage la Prairie, where they will enter the employ of Hugh Armstrong.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Litwyn on the 28th ult., a son.
Mrs. (Dr.) Medd returned on Monday from a visit to Winnipeg.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 28 – 1915

1915 Jan 28 – Letter From Dauphin Man at Front

Mr. Georges Urion, a French reservist who invested considerable capital in Elm Park and other Dauphin property, writing to Coun. Geo. Johnson from 20th Company, 269 Regiment de Infantry, 70th Division, Secteur Postal 120, France, tells how he is now serving at the front in the great war in France. On January 1, when the letter was written, the French army in which he is in were then holding one half of the houses in a town in Alsace, and the Germans the other half. He is in good health and the spirit of the army is the best, he says. They are confident of success but that it will be no easy task and they expect the war to least six months yet.

1915 Jan 28 – Major Rooke Wounded

Major B. Rooke, of Second Indian Gurhkas, was wounded in a recent engagement in France. The major is a brother of the late Charles Rooke, of Dauphin.

1915 Jan 28 – Tragic Death of Miss Allan

The worst tragedy in the history of Dauphin occurred on Sunday afternoon about 5 o’clock in the Malcolm block, when Miss Florence Allan, a well-known and popular young woman of the town, was burned so badly that her death followed a few hours later.
It appears that Miss Allan and filled a small lamp was methylated spirits and in doing so had spilled some of the liquid on her flannelette gown. At the time she had only her underclothing and gown on. When she attempted to light the lamp the part of the gown on which she had spilled the spirits caught fire and in an instant the blaze spread over the unfortunate woman’s clothing. She had the door of the room locked at the time and in her excitement in looking for the key lost several valuable moments. When she got the door unlocked and rushed out in the hall she was a mass of flame. Mrs. Hooper, wife of the caretaker of the block, was the first to be on the scene, followed by Mr. Hooper. Miss Allan, in her frenzy, grabbed Mrs. Hooper, and begged of her to put out the fire. Mrs. Hooper had difficultly in freeing herself from the burning woman, as it all happened so suddenly, and in doing so had her hands burned. Mr. Hooper, as soon as he realized the situation, procured a rug and threw it about Miss Allan, and this did much to smother the flames. Mr. Hooper had one of his hands quite badly burned while covering the burning woman with the rug. Others came quickly to the rescue and Dr. Culbertson hurried from his home to the block. An examination by the Dr. at once revealed the terrible condition the young woman was in and he at once made arrangements for her removal to the hospital.

BURNED FROM HEAD TO FOOT.

Everything possible was done to alleviate the sufferings of the young woman, but as she was literally burned from head to foot there was no possible hope for her recovery, and on Monday morning she passed away.
Deceased came from Bancroft, Ont., about three years ago to take a position in her brother’s confectionery store, where she remained until a few months ago, when he sold out. She then accepted a position with the Steen-Copeand Co. which she held at the time of her death. She was a young woman of a genial disposition and was liked by all who came in contact with her whether in a business or social way.

BODY TAKEN EAST.

A service was held in the Methodist Church on Monday evening and the building was crowded with sympathizing friends. The pastor, Rev. T.G. Bethell, spoke feelingly of the awful fate that had befallen the young woman and the lesson all should learn of the terrible suddenness with which death comes at times to both young and old. He referred to the esteem and respect the deceased young woman was held and the sympathy all felt for the afflicted family.
Floral tributes, from friends and societies, covered the casket.
At the conclusion of the service the body was taken to the station and from there forwarded to Bancroft, Ont., for interment. The followed acted as pallbearers: J.T. Wright, B. Reid, W.D. Sampson, A.G. Wanless, J. Argue and B. Phillips.
Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Allan and Mr. E. Allan accompanied the remains east.

1915 Jan 28 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Winnipeg.
Mr. Desroche, of Pine Creek, was a visitor at the A.T. Co. store at Fork River and returned to Winnipegosis by the sleigh route patrolled by our trusted friend Scotty, and he’ll het there sure.
Mr. Flemming Wilson and family, of Dauphin, have taken up their residence on the Shannon homestead, Mr. W. intends farming for a time.
Miss Coomber, of Selkirk, is visiting her parents on the Fork River.
Mr. E. Thomas has returned from Verigen, Sask., and will run the elevator for a short time.
Mr. F.H. Steede, of Bradwardine, Man., will arrive on the 29th to take charge of this mission. He will hold service in All Saints’ on Sunday 31st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
A large gathering from all parts attended the pie social and dance at the home of Mr. W. King. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all. It reminded us of ye olden times.
The cold snap seems to be taking liberties with everything green or tender these days. Even the sandwich man is complaining.
Fred King is able to get around again. Try a poplar tree next time, Fred, its easier on the moccasins.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis spent the weekend at this burgh.
Mr. Fair, of Ochre River, is going his rounds and is doing a roaring trade selling slaves and liniments these cold days.
Mr. John Nowsade and family, of Aberdeen, Sask., are spending a short time with his parents in Fork River.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Harnell who have been spending a month at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt, left to visit friends at Bradwinie on their way home to Sask. John is a good sport and his many friends here wish them a pleasant trip.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton

Mr. W. Barry, of Ethelbert, paid us a visit last wee and reports business lively.
Robt. Brewer I again in our midst and is after more prom. It seems as though he thinks hogs are raised and fed up in one week as he claimed he had cleared everything in sight last week. His smile must go a long way when amongst the Galicians.
Wm. Ashmore is a very busy man these days with his team, what with hauling wood and hay. Quite a rustler is “Bill.”
There is a new company formed her which are the proud possessors of a good well, and we are all busy trying to think of a suitable name for it. They had a meeting last week to discuss the matter of taking new shareholders, as there are lots of applicants now that water is scarce. The promoters are deserving of good dividends as they took a big responsibility when they undertook to drill the well.
We are all sorry to hear that m. Green, the Church of England student, is leaving this district to take office in Winnipeg. We all wish him the best of luck.
There has been quite a number of commercial travellers here this week. It seems this must be a good business burgh for them. It certainly makes business good for some people.
The people of Sifton seem somewhat jealous of the fact that their neighbours had the pleasure of seeing an airship last week. We understand that lots of people are taking the mater very seriously and it seems that there is a hot time awaiting the airman next time he shows up.
Wm. Walters visited the surrounding country on business and reports that most of the farmers are busy solving the water problem.
A bunch of Galician farmers are busy loading a car of wheat which seem to be of a fair quality.
Mr. Wm. Taylor, of Valley River, was a visitor to town last week, and informs us that he has purchased a farm and is going to work on it next spring. We all with him luck, although we all know luck is a companion of hard work.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton Romance
PROFESSOR MATOFF

The following is from a Sifton correspondent: The celebrated Russian violinist, Michael Matoff, has been lingering in this quiet northern village of Manitoba for some months. Although used to the plaudits of great audiences in his world tours, he is now content to stay here, held an unprotesting prisoner by the silken bonds of love.
Some months ago Matoff was journeying westward on the train which passes through here. On the same train was a young Jewish girl, Miss Ida Marantz, whose home is in Sifton. She is a handsome girl and posses a fair education. She assists her father in his general store here.
On the train on that eventful day, Miss Marantz became ill. The virtuoso, Matoff, who was sitting near, noticed the girl’s distress and flew to her assistance. He procured medicine for her and comforted her in every possible way.
When the train arrived at Sifton Miss Marantz got off and Matoff’s chivalry was so great that he, too, left the train and saw her safely to her home.
The grateful parents entertained the musician, who later in the evening favoured the family with some delicious dreamy music from his famous violin.

HOW ROMANCE BEGAN

Under the spell of the witching strains Miss Marantz lost her heart to the musician and Prof. Matoff lost his to the fair listened, if her had not already lost it.
The virtuoso and he village maiden became engaged. The engagement was conducted according to Russian rites and at the observance Matoff played and enraptured all the guests.
The virtuoso has since resided at the Marantz home and whenever he plays on his loved violin knots of villagers linger outside until the last sweet note has died away.
Prof. Matoff’s violin is said to be worth $10,000.
An interesting feature of the romance is that the “eternal triangle” element is said to be not wanting. It is said that prior to the meeting with the virtuoso a village youth had aspired to the hand of the fair Ida and had not been entirely discouraged. With the coming of the distinguished musician, however, this prosaic romance was nipped before it was well budded.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd was a weekend visitor to Dauphin.
It is reported that the fishermen have received notice from the companies to pull up their nets, as the fish market had taken a slump. Six carloads were shipped from this point on Friday.
A large number enjoyed the skating and dancing party given by the young ladies of the town on Wednesday evening last. About 40 couples attended the dance. Lively music was furnished by the Russell orchestra, with Messrs. Johnson and Stevenson giving a help out. Messrs. Bickle and Burrell acted as masters of ceremonies.
Miss Stewart who has been a visitor at the home of B. Hechter, left for her home Winnipeg on Friday.
Miss Clara Bradley is visiting at the home of Mr. Mark Cardiff in Dauphin this week.
Rev. Mr. Green, of the English church, is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Born, Jan. 23rd, to Mr. and Mrs. A. Russell, a son.
It is probably the Rex Theatre will again be open to the public this week.
Mrs. John McArthur and daughter, are visiting at the home of her parents in Fork River.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. D. Kennedy has been on the sick list but is on the mend.
Mr. F. Hechter returned on Sunday form Crane River.
Mrs. W.D. King returned home on Friday after visiting her mother.
The dance in the Rex Hall, given by the young ladies of the town was sure the best of the season and everybody enjoyed a good time.
Mr. Green, the English rector, preaches his farewell sermon next Sunday.