Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 4 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 4 – Fork River

The fowl supper and concert held in the Orange Hall on Friday night last, by the Methodist Church was a success. There was a large turnout and the ladies are to be congratulated on the way they handled the supper. A number came from Winnipegosis. After the concert the young folks hired the hall and a good time was spent the remainder of the night, all leaving for home in the wee small hours of the morning.
There was a fair turnout to the horse breeders meeting on Saturday night last. Much business was done. The choice of the horse went to the Shire breed, the choice being closely contested by admirers of the Punch Everything passed off in a very pleasant manner, after which the meeting adjourned to be called later on by the president. Those who wish to join should call on Secretary Wilson as soon convenient and help on the horse breeding industry of this district, as only members of the association are eligible for use of the horse. Fee for membership is one dollar per annum. Anyone can become a member.
Freddie Storrar is home after spending the summer in the west. He reports a very good time.
Mrs. George Tilt left for Dauphin, having spent a month among her relatives on the Mossey.
Mr. Rogy, collector for the Sawyer-Massey Co., has been here a few days on business.
Mrs. Watson, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Fred Cooper for a few days on the Fork River.
A. Hunt, F.B. Lacey and D.F. Wilson returned from attending he Municipal convention and report not only a good time but a profitable one.
Mr. Rowe, of Harding, left with his third shipment of cattle and hogs. The cattle business has been very brisk at this point of late, there being more stock shipped than in any other previous year.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove has left for a few days visit among friends at Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Brewer, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Wm. Armstrong.
Mr. Parser, surveyor, and men have left for Winnipeg after spending a week adjusting lines east of Lake Dauphin.
Wm. Davis and T.N. Briggs returned on the Fork River local, having spent a few days in Dauphin on business.
Garnet Lacey has returned home, having spent the summer in the west. He is looking fine.
Most of the male members of this burgh are hiking for the bush to get their annual share of big game. We hope the boys will have good luck.

1913 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

Bennie Hechter returned from Winnipeg on Monday looking very jubilant.
Dugald McAulay dispatched a carload of cattle and pigs to Winnipeg on Wednesday, himself travelling by the same train.
Mr. and Mrs. Watson have departed for a well-earned holiday and the dancing folk will greatly miss them as they were the mainstay in the musical line.
Messrs. Hechter and Ford returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday, most important business having called them there. They report that the city is a bit quitter than even Winnipegosis.
“Professor” Sutton has been recuperating his health here for a few days and greatly admires the salubrity of the atmosphere to this winter sanatorium. He made no public appearance to the regret of everyone and consequently sold none of his well-known concoctions.
Archie McKerchar arranged a small dance in the Victoria Hall on Tuesday evening but your correspondent not having been invited, no details are to hand.
Mr. McGinnis of the Winnipegosis hotel (nearest the lake) is having an addition made to his livery barn which will accommodate six more teams, or is it to be a store house for the game he has gone out to shoot in company Doctor Medd and Mr. Whale.
The first consignment of fish, consisting of ten loads, arrived on Friday from up the lake, so things should new commence to be busy, although up to the present it is not apparent, there still being some individuals in the town waiting for a job.
It is observed with extreme satisfaction to most people in town that Mr. Frank Hechter is standing as councilor for Ward 4, Mossey River municipality, in the forthcoming election, in opposition to Mr. Billy Walmsley, caused by the retirement of Mr. Seiffert, whose tenure of the office has expired. It is time we had somebody with Mr. Hechter’s business acumen to look after the ward as according to all reports things have slightly got mixed up lately and the candidate being the head of a large trading concern in town, matters would no doubt straighten out at once. It is known to everyone the great interest Frank takes in the town and district generally, being the patron of every object tending to the welfare of same, his genial disposition, and is always approachable by anyone seeking aid or advice. It is up to all his adherents to get him right there on this occasion, thereby showing their appreciation of his worth.

1919 Dec 4 – Bicton Heath

It is a good thing we don’t feel the cold during these dips.
Fred. Wenger is holding an auction sale on the 12th inst. Dan Hamilton is the auctioneer.
Mr. Seal has purchased the Marantz farm in this district.
The basket social, which was held at the schoolhouse on Nov. 21st, for the purpose of raising funds to purchase an organ for the school, was a great success, $74.50 being realized. The ladies were out in force with many baskets, tastefully gotten up, which were auctioned off by Jack Haywood, who wielded the hammer with good results.
Fred Sharp is visiting friends at Fork River.
Mr. Pearson has removed to the old Snelgrove farm at Fork River.

1919 Dec 4 – Fork River

A meeting of farmers in Fork River on Monday resulted in the formation of a branch of the Grain Growers to be known as the Mossey River Grain Growers’ Association. President Marcroft, of the South Bay local, filled the chair, and gave a short but interesting address. The following officers were elected for 1920:
President – E.F. Hafenbrak
Vice – D.F. Wilson, Jr.
Sec.- treasurer – Fred J. Tilt
These officers, with M. Gealsky, J.D. Robertson, D. Briggs, Max King and A. Hunt form the board of directors. The meeting was not as large as hoped for on account of the severe weather, but a start has been made and we look for some development in the near future. The association is formed to benefit the district both socially and educationally. Every farmer, farmer’s wife and the young folks should join and help the movement. Membership fee $2 annually.

1919 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

The date for the Union Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment has been changed from the 22nd to Friday the 19th December.
Seven carloads of fish have already been shipped. Fishing is reported good from all parts of the lake.
Archie McDonell’s snowplow and 20 teams left on Tuesday morning for the north end of the lake. They will be away about ten days.
The telephone system in the village is now in full working order. About fifty residents are connected. Hello, central! What’s the news?
H. Loire has sold his butcher business to J. Angus. Former customers of Mr. Loire will be welcomed with a broad grin at the one and only meat market.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 3 – 1914

1914 Dec 3 – Shot in Hand

A Galician named Lazar was brought to the hospital on Tuesday from the mountain with a bullet in his hand. The wound is not a dangerous one.

1914 Dec 3 – Boy Died

Sam, the 9-year-old son of S.J. Buchanan, of McCreary, was brought to the hospital on Monday, having been shot in the stomach and arm by a man who was hunting rabbits. The wound was a bad one and the boy died on Monday night. The remains were taken to McCreary on Tuesday for interment.

1914 Dec 3 – Soldiers Given Send Off

The departing soldiers on Monday morning were given a great send off at the station. The citizens turned out in large numbers and the town band was also present. Bunting and flags were displayed from all sides, and the military spirit was contagious. The special train the boys were to go odd on was over an hour late and this gave everyone an opportunity for a hand shake and chance to say good-bye. As the train steamed in with its long line of coaches the band struck up a popular air, and cheer followed cheer. The scene was one that will long be remembered.
During the short stay here the soldier boys from the west mingled with the crowd and the time was spent in a jolly way singing patriotic songs, waving flags and cheering.
As the train left the station the band played and the crowd simply went wild. Women shed tears, hats were thrown into the air flags and handkerchiefs were waved and cheer followed cheer.
It was a great send off the boys got and one not soon forgotten.

1914 Dec 3 – Sifton

We are glad to learn that miss Rowe, head nurse of the Presbyterian mission, is now on the way to recovery from a long illness.
Owing to bad roads there has been very little business done in the district of late.
The town will was completed last week and there is every indication of there being an abundance of water.
A party composed of our prominent business men paid a visit to Ethelbert last week with the view of inspecting the Kennedy Mercantile Co,’s new grist mill. They report the mill is running smoothly and doing excellent work.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz celebrated on Tuesday the engagement of their daughter, Miss Ida, to Prof. Matoff, which was witnessed by their many friends and relations of the various ???.
Mr. Joe Clarke, late Sawyer-Massey salesman, paid us a visit on Monday. He reports thing quiet at present but he says business will be humming in the near future. Hoe is sure no pessimist.
The teacher and children of the Wycliffe School gave a fine entertainment in the schoolhouse on Friday evening. The one entitled “War Scenes,” consisting of four parts, namely part I, soldiers fighting; 2nd, arrival of Red Cross nurses dressing the wounded on the battlefield; 3rd, hospital scene; 4th, soldiers and Red Cross nurses tenting on the battlefield, was certainly good. The other part of the programme included solos, readings and plays, consisting of “Henry VIII” and “Britannia.” Several patriotic songs were sung during the programme. A dance concluded the evening. The whole thing proved a great success.

1914 Dec 3 – Winnipegosis

California weather.
F. Hechter arrived home on Monday’s train from Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. and Miss McArthur left this week for Winnipeg, where they will reside for the winter.
Messrs. Thompson and St. John arrived last week from Portage for their annual big game shoot. J. McInnis and Walter Grenon accompanied them on the shoot.
Capt. Coffey spent the weekend at home at Dauphin returning on Monday.
Our train service is to be changed slightly. Instead of the train arriving on Saturday as heretofore, it will arrive on Friday, starting on the 4th inst., otherwise the schedule remains the same.
The fish are beginning to come in. The first loads arrived on the 25th, for the A.T.Co. From all reports the fishing is good.
Miss Emblem and miss Burrell spent the weekend at Snake Isle.
Doc. Medd, who has been attending the assizes at Portage, returned on Monday’s train.
Wm. Walmsley has been confined to the house through sickness. Better hurry, Bill, they’ve started curling.
Mr. Foley lost his residence through fire, last week, over heated stovepipes being the cause. Mr. Foley lost everything that was in the house, as the fire had gained too much head way before being discovered.
The entertainment and bazaar in the Methodist Church last Friday afternoon and evening was a grand success. The programme, though not a lengthy one, was of a classical nature and was fully appreciated by the large crowd present.
The municipal elections promise to cause some excitement, especially in Ward 5, where it is understood, “Old Reliable,” Tom Toye and J. Namarko will be the contestants.
The rink opened for skating and curling on Monday night. It is not every town of our size that has a curling and skating rinks open this winter. It should be fully appreciated and patronized by old and young, both skaters and curlers.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 21 – 1912

1912 Nov 21 – Ethelbert

Kenneth McLean has fully recovered and has now taken a trip to Vancouver for a change, and whilst there, will look into the prospects as to Coquitlam’s progress.
The British American elevator, is now taking its share of the wheat offering, but owing to the unfavourable and late season there is not much being offered.
A case came up before the P.M. for cruelty to a calf, and was decided in favour of the defendant. During the evidence it developed that there were a great number of barking and chasing dogs and in many cases even biting at teams and pedestrians, as they passed. Owners such of such dogs, were warned, that unless the dogs were kept under, they would be liable to be destroyed upon short notice.
Postmaster Scaife was a visitor to Dauphin on Saturday.
The Pundy case was thrown out on technical grounds; had it not been so the results to all concerned might have been very serious. It is time that these petty exhibitions of spite and I’ll will should cease. The motto should be, live and let live and fair play for all, whether he be Jew or Greek, Barbarian or free, or as some might put it, everyone for himself, and the d—– take the hindmost.
Snow feel in considerable quantities on the 10th and the winter is now fairly inaugurated with us.
The danger of the arrangement of the switch, were nearly leaving bad results. A train backing up quietly, was not noticed and as the mail contractor was getting the mail from the car, he turned quickly across to reach the platform, and was within a few inches of a moving flat car before it was noticed, and he drew back. It behooves people to be careful, but all the same, the present system is full of danger, and some better provision as to lights and signals are needed, to protect the public, whilst going or coming in by train. It is now a long time, since the Ethelbert people, were promised by the company to make radical changes as to the switch and station. It seems as if nothing will be done, until someone is killed, or there is a bad fire.
J. McLean has now closed up his store business, and J. Marantz, another Jew, now carries on the business.
The Rev. Father Kraney is now stationed at Ethelbert, and conducts the services for the Greek-Roman religionists.
There are quite a number of marriages here at present, which incidentally, indicates hopeful prospects for the future.

1912 Nov 21 – FROM ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT

Mr. Marantz is right into business. He indeed deserves credit as a store manager as he is already doing a thriving business.
Miss Ethel Marantz, of Sifton, spent the week-end in Ethelbert.
Alex Katz, who is at present with Campbell & Simpson, at Dauphin, visited Ethelbert on a business trip Saturday. He reports the town looking as good as ever.
Threshing is going on at a good rate and will soon be finished.
Galicians of Ethelbert and the surrounding district had a concert on Saturday night following which was a dance.
At a recent meeting of the council the reeve and one of the councillors had a lively set-to, in which blows were exchanged.

1912 Nov 21 – Winnipegosis

J.P. Grenon, manager for the Armstrong Trading Co., who has been away the past three weeks on an extended trip to Lower Canada via the States, is expected home on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Steele, who have charge of the branch store at Mafeking, are making their semi-yearly sojourn hear at present.
Rev. H.H Scrase, anglican minister, is spending a couple of days in town visiting his parishioners.
Our senior teacher, Mr. Hulme, is suffering from a protracted cold. We are pleased to note that his interest in his pupils is extend to music; no doubt some of whom will benefit from free lessons on the organ in the school-room.
Dr. Medd is feeling the benefit of a recent vacation.
The Winnipegosis Christian League holds its weekly meetings Thursday evening at 8 o’clock in the Methodist Church, so far the interest has been well maintained and we trust that it will be beneficial.
Miss Isabelle McArthur, who has been visiting in Winnipeg for the past few weeks, is expected home early this week.
Mr. Scott, of the Standard Lumber Co., has returned from a trip to the city.
A Winnipegosis card circle is being formed by the enthusiasts which we trust will prove to be a large one.
Donald Hattie’s gasoline circular saw is in great demand at present, though the present weather is not consuming much of its product. We regret the open season is so unpropitious for the fishermen.
The Hudson’s Bay Co.’s business has been permanently closed.

1912 Nov 21 – Death of Ivor Humphreys

Ivor Humphreys, after several weeks’ illness, passed away on Sunday afternoon last at the comparatively early age of 42 years. Deceased came to the district from Brandon some eight or nine years ago and worked at Sifton for some time, afterwards removing to Dauphin. He filled the position of bookkeeper for the Steen-Copeland Co. for a considerable time and later entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Fleming Wilson, under the firm name of Humphreys & Wilson, when they purchased the gents’ furnishing business of W.C. Turner. After continuing as a member of the firm for a couple of years, during which time his health was not good, he retired and accepted a position in the Dominion Lands office. This he filled until a few weeks ago when stricken down with his final illness.
The late Mr. Humphreys was of a retiring disposition but was held in esteem by all who enjoyed his acquaintance. He was a vocalist of conservable note and for several years was leader of the Presbyterian choir. He was a prominent Knight of Pythias and was one of the hardest works in No. 31, the first Pythian lodge organized here, and to his efforts much of its success is due. He was also one of the chief movers in instating the second Pythian lodge here, Empire No. 35.
The funeral took place on Monday and was held under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, the members of both lodges attending in a body, as also the members of the uniform rank. The members of the Sons of England lodge were too in attendance. The service was held in the Presbyterian Church, which was crowded to the docs. Rev. D. Flemming conducted the service and in his remarks paid a warm tribute to the worth of the deceased.
The pallbearers were all past chancellors of Lodge No. 31 – S. Cohen, E. Mayo, J.W. Johnston, F.R. Copeland, G.A. Nicholson and J. Watson.
A widow and two small children are left to mourn the loss of a loving husband and father.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 27 – 1910

1910 Oct 27 – Arthur Milner Dead

Arthur Milner, the young man who had his back broken some five weeks ago by the falling of a scaffold, died in the hospital on Wednesday. The funeral will take place this afternoon fro the residence of Mr. F. Clark with the Dauphin Citizens Band in charge.

1910 Oct 27 – Bullet Lodged in Tissues of Cheek

By the accidental discharge of a .22 calibre rifle on Sunday, a Galician lad was the victim of the bullet. The bullet went through one cheek knocking out a tooth and lodged in the tissues of the other cheek. The boy was brought to Dauphin Monday and the bullet extracted by Dr. Ross.

1910 Oct 27 – Destructive Fire at Ethelbert

A very destructive bush fire took place last week near Ethelbert. From what can be learned it appears that a farmer near sec. 7-29-21 had just finished threshing, the straw of which had been blown into some bush that he wished to clear. The readiest way seemed to him to be to burn the straw pile and bush at the same time. After a time the wind seemed favourable, and he set it going. Two of his neighbours, seeing the fire, remonstrated with him, and expressed their fear that it was very dangerous to set it on fire; to which it is said he replied, “Oh, t will not back up. Unfortunately the wind changed to the northeast, with the result that the fire rushed over part of sec. 18 and most of sec. 17. Hence about 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon it was noticed by the farmers on 17 hat the fire was gaining rapidly upon them.. H. Fekula began at once to try to check the fire by ploughing fire guards round his stacks of hay in the meadows (which run for a good distance northwards, between the colonization road and the road allowance between 17 and 18.) Jacob Mascuik was the next too see that his stacks were in danger, and his team and plough to turn over a few furrows to save his stacks. By this time the fire had got fairly going, and Jos. Mills and L.L. Katz came up at a run to save hat they could.

But alas, they were all too late, and only partly prevented the complete destruction of their stacks of hay. Jacob Mascuik lost six stacks valued at three hundred dollars, James Mills lost five stacks valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and H. Fekula lost three stacks. In the meantime the fire had widened out until thee was a rushing, roaring belt of flames a mile wide, and it seemed for a time as if a very serious disaster was about to take place. K. McLean rushed out of town, and calling at the school he impressed the older boys, and away they to see what could be done.

After going about a mile it was seen that the fire had got too good a hold, to stop it by ordinary means, and hence Mr. McLean could do nothing to save a hay stack of from sixty to seventy tons, from total destruction, which he had, had put up for winter feed. The fire continued its course until about ten o’clock, when through the strenuous efforts of the people it was checked a short distance from the Ethelbert school, after destroying about 1000 tons of hay. Thus during the night of Thursday we were allowed to sleep in peace, after a hard fight.

Unfortunately, Kenneth McLean, after leaving the scene of the fire, went home and being dead tired, as soon as he sat down in his easy chair, he went to sleep. The window was left open, with the result that he got a severe chill, which developed into pleurisy and he has been bedfast and under the doctor’s care ever since. However we are glad to say he has taken a turn for the better and hopes to be about again in a few days.

Well, it was thought the fire had been done with, but no siree. Bush fires do not die out so quickly as that, they smoulder and linger in rotten logs or tree stumps and given a fair chance, the fire will start up again in a fresh place, and that is just what it did do. On Friday morning the wind had changed again, blowing to the south. This soon fanned into flame the dying embers and away it went south and again ruin and disaster faced the settlers’ farms and stacks in the Mink Creek district. Fortunately Mink Creek was full of water, this combined wit the efforts of the people saved the mink Creek district from even a worse fate than had befell their neighbours to the south of them. But from all account it was close call. Whilst it is true that fire is a good servant, it is also true that it is a bad master, and if only reasonable precautions had been taken, much of this great loss might have been prevented. For instance, H.P. Nicholson had some hay in the fire zone, but his men had left it well fire-guarded, thus saving his stacks. The old proverb says: “A stitch in time saves nine.”

It is time that some steps were taken to prevent such terrible loss. As it is, there is no apparatus to fight fire if it should take place, neither is there a Fire Guardian to take the lead and call out and organize a band of fire fighters if needed, and it is needed at Ethelbert.

Do not wait until the horse is stolen before you lock the stable door. Now it is the time to get ready.

1910 Oct 27 – Immigration hall to be Closed

Dr. P.J. Beauchamp immigration officer at this point, has received notice from the Department of interior that the hall here will be closed and not again reopened. The hall under Officer Beauchamp has done an important work in providing accommodation while settlers are being located and regret is heard on all sides that the building is not to be reopened. The building and lots will be put up for public sale at an early date by the department.

1910 Oct 27 – Fork River

Nat Little paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis last week.
C. Parks from Winnipeg is visiting friends here.
The Children’s Day Service at the English Church was very well attended and one of the children Miss Marjorie Scrase, sang “Fair Waved the Golden Corn,” splendidly.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooper who have been here for a few months left here last week for Brantford where they will reside in future.
Carloads of pressed hay are being sent out from this point.
On Tuesday night the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy was gladdened by the arrival of a little baby girl.
Mr. F. Storrar paid a visit to Dauphin lately.
Harry Nicholson was up here this week doing business.
A meeting of the Orangemen of this district was held last Saturday when it was decided to have a ball on Nov. 4th to help pay off the debt on the hall.
Methodist Services will be held at 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings instead of at 3 o’clock.

1910 Oct 27 – Sifton

C. Genik of Winnipeg is the guest of his daughter Mrs. C.A. Jones.
W. Thirell of the C.P.R. land department has been in Sifton the past week collecting for that department.
Messrs. Marantz & Gorfin are dissolving partnership. R. Marantz will carry on the store business alone.

1910 Oct 27 – Winnipegosis

On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will preach in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church at 7.30 p.m. The subject will be “Soul Rest.”
On Sunday last October 23rd, the Methodists inaugurated a new Sunday School. The number of children present more than exceed all the anticipation of the promoters. With a fine equipment of teachers it is confidently expected that success will crown the new institution.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 17 – 1912, 1918

1912 Oct 17 – Committed for Trial

One night last week several windows were broken in the store of Katz & Brackman at Ethelbert. I.J. Katz, who happened to be in town, swore that he saw Peter Pundy and another party that he could not recognize in the dark, break the windows with an axe. Pundy was brought before Magistrate Skaife, on the charge, and after two nights were consumed in hearing and evidence, was committed for trial. F.E. Simpson appeared for the prosecution and J.L. Bowman for the defence.

1912 Oct 17 – Ethelbert

A preliminary hearing was held before Police Magistrate R. Skaife on the evenings of the tenth and eleventh of Oct. An information, charging Peter Pundy, was laid by H. Brachman of the firm of Katz & Brachman, with breaking four panes of glass and other damages, amounting to over $20, during the night of Oct. 10th, to their store on Main Street. Considerable interest was manifested by the Ruthenian population, the court being crowded each night until midnight and feeling ran high. Mr. Simpson, of Dauphin, put the case for prosecution, and Mr. Bowman for the defence. After a prolonged and careful hearing, it was thought by the magistrate, the charge needed further investigation and Pundy was remanded for trial at Portage la Prairie. He was allowed at large, after entering into bail himself in $200, and two others for $150 each, for his appearance at Portage to stand his trial.
The Elevator is nearing completion and will need only a few more days to make it ready to receive the crop.
Norman Booth, the buyer for the Elevator Co., went west a few days ago, where he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Olive Ward, the daughter of Cross Ward, postmaster of Deepdale. Mr. Booth and his wife have returned to Ethelbert, where they will reside until the grain season is over. Cross Ward is an old resident of Ethelbert and our hearty congratulations are given to the newly wed couple, that they may live long, and prosper in their new undertaking.
Geo. Marantz has commenced business in John McLean’s store, and is doing his best to attract customers by a good display of new goods in his windows.
J. McLean expects to transfer the balance of his stock still unsold at an early date. He retains the grist mill which he hopes to run as usual this winter.
The ever present and crying need of the hour, is now, and ever will be, good roads to move the crops.
There are rumours that something will be done, in this direction, by the Council availing themselves of the government’s offer to pay two-thirds of the cost of constructing main roads through the district.

1912 Oct 17 – Fork River

J. McCaulay, Massey-Harris travelling agent, was here a few days on business with D. Kennedy.
Peter Ellis, after spending the week-end with his family, has returned to Kamsack.
Samuel Bailey took a trip to Dauphin on business last week.
Clem Kennis, who has been at Prince Albert for some months, returned home and states the harvest very late all over the West.
Robertson & Snelgrove are shipping their threshing outfit to Yorkton for the season and Pat Powers is going along. Nothing like lots of “Power.”
Miss L. Clark, of Dauphin, is visiting at the home of her parents.
Rev. H.H. Scrase paid Winnipegosis a visit lately to meet some persons from Meadow Portage on church business.
Mrs. G. Tilt, of Dauphin, is spending a few days on the farm on the Mossey.
Miss Margaret and Gertrude Kennedy are visiting with Mrs. Chas. Wilkes of Winnipegosis.
Mr. Scelly was up last week from Dauphin visiting Mr. Clemons.
Mr. Glendenning is visiting his uncle, Thos. Glendenning, on the Mossey for a few days.
Next Sunday, Oct. 20th, special children’s service at the English church at 3 o’clock, and on Sunday, Oct. 27th, the annual harvest festival service will be held and a suitable sermon for the occasion will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. All are welcome to the services.
Rev. Sam. Cruch, late of Glenella and family, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Kennedy for a few days on their way to Tullesford, Sask.

1912 Oct 17 – Sifton

Church of England services are held regularly every fortnight at Sifton (Tuesday evening) and also at other times by arrangement.

1912 Oct 17 – Winnipegosis

Harvest festival service will be held at Winnipegosis school house at 7.30 on Oct. 20th. Collection will be made for the Home Mission Fund. The sermon will be preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase, minister in charge.
J.R. Parker, of the Standard Lumber Co., has gone to Winnipeg to endeavour to secure men for work in the woods.
Jos. Birrell took his child to the hospital at Dauphin on Monday.
Active preparations are being made for the winter’s fishing. The prospects for fishing are said to be exceptionally poor.
The cattle industry in these parts is proving most profitable. Several shipments were recently made to Dauphin. Campbell Benson was the purchaser.

1918 Oct 17 – This Week’s Casualties

Pte. William Alfred Cleland, Dauphin, killed. (William Alfred Cleland, 1894, 865829)
Pte. Chas. Gray, Dauphin, killed. (???)
Pte. Francis Ingram Rogers, Asheville, wounded. (Francis Ingram Rogers, 1899, 1001239)
Pte. Harold Allan Dunlop, Dauphin, wounded. (Harold Allan Dunlop, 1897, 718788)
Pte. Campbell, Winnipegosis, wounded. (???)
Pte. Chris Benson, Dauphin, wounded. (Christian T Benson, 1887, 1000081)
Pte. Orval Wood Struthers, Dauphin, gunshot wound in right leg. (Orval Wood Struthers, 1895, 151250)
Pte. J.H. Paulson, Winnipegosis, wounded. (Johann Hannibal Paulson, 1891, 2504017)
Pte. W.S. Hamilton, Dauphin, gassed. (???)
Pte. George Edward Buchannon, Dauphin, wounded. (George Edward Buchannon, 1894, 1000633)
Pte. Ray Neely, Dauphin, wounded. (Ray Neely, 1897, 1000556)
Pte. William Meldrum, Dauphin, wounded. (William Meldrum, 1897, 1000280)
Pte. Harry Hamilton Olson, Dauphin. (???)
Pte. E.N. Humphries, Dauphin, wounded. (???)

1918 Oct 17 – Churches and Schools Closed

By order of the health officer of the town all churches, schools and public places of amusement have been closed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

1918 Oct 17 – The Man of the Hour
Gen. Spanish Flu.

1918 Oct 17 – TOWN OF DAUPHIN
SPANISH INFLUENZA
WARNING TO THE PUBLIC

This disease is very prevalent in some parts of the world today, and has reached our Town. It is therefore advisable that people generally should know something about it, its symptoms, and the measure and method of its communicability; and should be advised as to the general rules for its restraint and cure.
Spanish Influenza is generally believed to be a variety of the old type of Influenza with which we have been long familiar, with in addition possibly some increase of virulence, due to the conditions and places in which this present epidemic had its origin.
It is a “Germ” disease, and is conveyed from one suffering from it to others, by the secretions of the mouth, nose, throat and lungs. The use of towels or cups in common will readily spread it. Coughing, spitting or sneezing by anyone who has it, in the company of others, will readily spread it. Crowded and ill ventilated living rooms and sleeping places, as well as ill ventilated and insanitary places of work are conductive to its dissemination.
The following are the symptoms which generally accompany an attack:
Fever, headache, backache, inflamed throat, and often bleeding from the nose. In addition to these symptoms, in more severe cases a troublesome cough with a sense of constriction in the chest follows. From these develop the case of Broncho-Pneumonia which is the feature of the disease mainly responsible for deaths.
If cases should come to your neighbourhood, think first of Prevention. Don’t go to any house or place in which there may be persons with the above symptoms. Don’t let any person suffering from these symptoms come to your home or place of business. Don’t use common towels or drinking cups in any place. Keep away from people who have the disease, if you do you won’t get it. If on the other hand, you mingle with people who have it there is no known method of disinfection which would prevention your taking it. Therefore stay away and keep in he open air and sunlight as much as possible.
If you should be attacked by the disease, go to bed at once. Rest and Warmth are very important factors in its cure. Take warm drinks, live on fluids, and send for your Physician. Having done these things promptly, there is usually little danger. Not doing them, and taking chance, may turn a very mild illness into a very serious and sometimes a fatal one.
Attendants on all cases should wear gauze masks.

E. BOTTOMLEY,
Health Officer, Town of Dauphin.

1918 Oct 17 – Fork River

Mr. Hanson, auditor for the Armstrong Trading Co., spent a few days in town lately.
Leo Beck has purchased the threshing outfit of Charles Bugg and is making the straw fly.
There are now five outfits threshing within a radius of three miles so good progress is being made with the work.
Potatoes, yes sir. From a pound of Victory seed 50 lbs. were produced. When I comes to grain or vegetables Fork River district stands at the top.
Mrs. Moxam, from Winnipeg, is visiting at the home of Mr. Sam Reid.
So far the Spanish Flue has laid its hand lightly on us. However, we must not be behind the times or out of fashion, so that anyone from now on who gets a cold will claim to have had an encounter with His Nibbs King Flu. But, say, if we could only resort to the remedy of happy memory, hot toddy, wouldn’t the male portion of the population be suddenly afflicted.

1918 Oct 17 – Sifton

Sunday automobile travelling is just as prevalent as ever. The writer counted nine in town last Sunday. There are lots of places where yellow paint and rotten eggs could be used a plenty.
The foundations for the large Ruthenian hall has been laid and the material is on the ground.
It is about time the foreigners (and most of them are still foreigners and pride themselves on it) learned to take notice of our national statutory holidays. On Thanksgiving Day may loads of grain drove into market, the owners knowing nothing of the day, caring less, and most indignant at not being able to unload. But let an Anglo-Saxon try t hire one on a saint’s or holy day – nothing doing!
Philip Wood and Leslie Kennedy and Miss Lottie Isaacovitch and enjoying a short holiday here.
This district is not behind most of the districts in grain yields. Thirty bushels to the acre is quite common, and as high as 40 and even 50 bushels to the acre has been threshed.
W. Terin still delivers fresh fish to town, easing up the H.C.L.
An average of two car loads of live stock are shipped from here each week throughout the year, excepting possibly three months.
Several gas tractors have been sold at this point, with a promise of many more next season.
Our roads, and especially our culverts, are generally speaking, a disgrace. The wear and tear to rolling stock and automobiles, not to mention horse flesh, is beyond calculation. A culvert one foot or more above the grade was responsible for a small automobile wreck on Saturday in ward 6. The council will be asked to pay the damages.
Glorious Indian summer, with a forecast of winter within the next two months at least.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 16 – 1913, 1919

1913 Oct 16 – Boy Killed

A sad accident happened near Ashville on Friday, when Michael, the 12 year old son of Joseph Sosnowski, who lives near Valley River, was run over by the engine of Winters’ threshing outfit and instantly killed. The boy was following the engine round and jumping on and off it securing rides. At the time the accident happened the boy was standing on it when it suddenly started, throwing him under one of the big wheels which passed over his body instantly killing him.

1913 Oct 16 – Fork River

Bert Cooper left for Winnipeg and expects to spend a few months there on business. D.F. Wilson returned from a trip south on important business. Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat Centre, is on a visit to friends at Neepawa, in company with her grandson, Mr. Monnington, who after paying a visit here left for his home. Thos. Toye, councillor for ward 5 is making an inspection trip. The annual children’s service will be held in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, on Oct. 19th. Parents are requested to come and bring the little ones and help make this a hearty service. All are cordially invited. The first fall of snow fell on Friday and stopped threshing for a day or two. This week will about wind up the threshing. Fred. Cooper and W. Northam, returned from a rip to the Lake Town on business. Things are quiet there, most of the fishermen having left for the winter fishing at different points up the lake. Mr. Elliot, the new Methodist student for this mission, who is living at Winnipegosis, is visiting among his people here. T.N. Briggs, municipal road contractor, is busy making the dirt fly. We notice that municipal toothpick has managed to get across the track and the postmaster’s Plymouth Rocks are using it to pick their teeth with after it has been laying all summer on the platform. Mike says up to the present he wondered what it was got for. There are several buyers around rustling up cattle this fall. We have been informed that Harry Little has been appointed bailiff in the absence of W. Stonehouse. John Reid, of Sifton, paid us a visit on Sunday and Mr. Williams returned with him for evening service at that point.

1913 Oct 16 – Sifton

A new house not quite completed, belonging to J.G. Gillies, was burned last week. The origin of the fire is a mystery. Wasyl Felix Marantz returned on Saturday night from Dauphin, where he attended the Jewish service.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair

The following is a list of the prizes awarded all the Fork River Boys’ and Girls’ Fair:
Foals – 1st Thos. Miller, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd B. Hunt.
Beef calf – 1st Stanley Benner, 2nd Bob Williams, 3rd Ben Suchett, 4th Percy Carlson.
Dairy calf – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd W. Williams, 3rd W. Thomson, 4th Tony Bayko.
Pair of pigs – 1st James Richardson, 2nd Danny Wilson, 3rd Ernest Hafenbrak, 4th Steve Bayko, 5th Stanley Benner, 6th Densil Carlson, 7th Percy Carlson.
Lambs – 1st Ivor Humphries, 2nd Fred Solomon, 3rd Danny Wilson.

POULTRY
White Wyandottes – 1st Ben Suchett, 2nd Harriet Richardson.
Barred Rocks – 1st Densil Carlson, 2nd D. McEachern, 3rd Bob Williams, 4th W. Williams, 5th Albert Yanoski.
Buff Orpingtons – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Tony Bayko.
White Leghorns – 1st N. Suchett, 2nd Si. Benner.
Brown Leghorns – Harold McLean.
Any other variety – 1st Steve Bayko, 2nd Annie Bayko.

GRAIN
Sheaf of wheat – 1st B. Suchett, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Sheaf of oats – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Percy Carlson.

GARDENING
White potatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Lawrence White, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Rose Sawinski, 5th Minnie Lundy, 6th Amos Carlson, 7th Densil Carlson, 8th Harold McLean.
Coloured potatoes – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Pereski, 5th Minnie Karaim.
Beets – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Rosie Sawenski, 3rd Stanley Lundy, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Lawrence White.
Onions – 1st D. Nowosad, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mary Semecheson.
Cabbage – 1st Joe Nowosad, 2nd Mary Attamanchuk, 3rd Mary Toperansky, 4th Minnie Karaim, 5th Victoria Rudkavitch, 6th Rosie Sawinski.
Tomatoes – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Joe Nowosad.
Corn – 1st J. Pakylo, 2nd Sofie Bayko, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Cauliflower – Minnie Karaim.

COOKING
Bread – 1st Margaret White, 2nd Anna Pereski, 3rd Zoe Shiels, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Minnie Karain, 6th Rosie Sawienski, 7th Sofie Bayko.
Plain cake – 1st Bernice McLean, 2nd Annie Bayko, 3rd Mildred Carlson, 4th Dave Nowosad, 5th Minnie Karaim, 6th Zoe Shiels, 7th Dan McEachern.
Cookies – 1st Lulu Thomson, 2nd Birdie Stonehouse, 3rd Vila Rowe, 4th Kate Williams, 5th Mildred Carlson.
Fruit cake – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Vila Rowe.
Buns – 1st Zoe Shiels, 2nd Lulu Thomson, 3rd Lawrence White, 4th Annie Bayko, 5th Bernice McLean.

SEWING
Sewing – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Pearl Reid, 3rd Mary Briggs.
Dust cap – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Beatrice Rowe.
Towels – 1st Edith McLean, 2nd Beatrice McLean, 3rd Annie Philipchuk, 4th Edith Naraslaski.
Darning – 1st Edna Hafenbrak, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Goldie Suchett.
Middy blouse – 1st Annie Bayko, 2nd Anna Pereski.
Nightgown – 1st Viola Rowe, 2nd Edith Yaraslaski, 3rd Ellen Roblin, 4th Mildred Carlson.
Doll sheets – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Beatrice Rowe.
Apron – 1st Minnie Karaim, 2nd A. Bayko.
Corset cover – Edith McLean.
Dress – 1st Sofie Bayko, 2nd Minnie Karaim, 3rd Annie Bayko.
Handkerchiefs – 1st Vila Rowe, 2nd Beatrice Rowe, 3rd Birdie Stonehouse.
Table centre – 1st Edith Yaralashi, 2nd Annie Philipchuk, 3rd Edith McLean.

CANNING
Wild fruit – Sofie Bayko.
Peas – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Viola Rowe.
Beans – 1st Beatrice Rowe, 2nd Zoe Shiels.

Wood working:
Exhibition chicken coop – 1st W. Williams, 2nd Densil Carlson, 3rd Ben Suchett.
Essays – 1st Mildred Carlson, 2nd Mary Briggs, 3rd Edith McLean, 4th W. Williams, 5th Sofie Bayko.
Lower grades – 1st W. Thompson, 2nd Mike Barclay, 3rd Stanley Benner, 4th Nat Suchett, 5th Densil Carlson.
Writing:
Progress – 1st Mary Briggs, 2nd Viola Rowe, 3rd Irene Bailey, 4th Blanche Hunt.
Exercise book – 1st Ellen Roblin, 2nd Rosie Sawenski.
Special in writing – 1st A. Janowski, 2nd L. Zapletnic, 3rd N. Muzyka.
School work:
Basket – 1st E. Hafenbrak, 2nd Edna Hafenbrak, 3rd D. McEachern, 4th Lulu Thompson, 5th Alice Dewberry.

1919 Oct 16 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 13.
Rev. E. Roberts was a recent visitor in the district. We are glad to have a minister once more of the right type.
The 15th is the day se by the Grain Growers of Manitoba to make their political drive. Our two branches in this district have arrangements made for this date and it will be a holiday among the farmers. Everyone is prepared to do his bit.
Frank Sharp has left for Winnipeg and he is likely to require two tickets for his return trip. The life of a bachelor on the farm is not what it is cracked up to be.
Mr. Speers, a returned soldier, is the new teacher appointed for the Bicton Heath School.
A meeting will be held at Volga on the 15th for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Grain Growers association. Messrs. E. Marcroft, Thos. Toye and Emmett will be present.
James Laidlaw tells your correspondent that he has discovered a new plan to shoot wolves. Jim is nothing if not original.

1919 Oct 16 – Fork River

The Returned Soldiers’ Committee are giving a dance in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Oct. 17th, for those of our boys who have returned. It is hoped that all (or as many as can do so) the people of the district will turn out and give the boys the time of their lives – and enjoy themselves.
The baseball committee have turned in $61 to help the Returned Soldiers’ Fund, making $96 in all. This is in accordance with the promise made when raising funds to equip the ball team. The banquet to be given will be a success, sure, if everybody turns our and does his or her share. The ladies are asked to co-operate with the committee in making it something to be remembered. The date will be announced later.
M. Levin, of the White Star elevator, fell from the upper part of the building on Friday and was rather badly injured. He was taken to the Dauphin Hospital.
O. Stonehouse, who has spent the summer at Oak River, has returned home.

1919 Oct 16 – Sifton

Notwithstanding the fact that it rained off and on most of the day the Boys’ and Girls’ Club Fair, held at the Wycliffe School, was a success and the exhibits, though leaving much to be desired in some lines, were a district improvement over the previous year. Miss. St. Ruth and Chas. Murray, local agricultural representative, acted as judges. The general quality of the school exhibits was high. A good program of sports was keenly contested. Much praise is due the committee for their work, and especially to the manager, Mr. Bousfield, principal, and Mr. Winby, manager of the Bank of Commerce, who acted as secretary. It is quite evident that a very much increased exhibit in this fair will be shown next season by the surrounding schools and there is no reason why this should not be made the most important fall fair of the northern part of the province.
A progressive whist drive, box social and dance are to be held in the Wycliffe School house on Friday, the 21st inst., the proceeds of which are for the relief of the destitute of the Baltic provinces. These people, from all accounts, are in sore straits and it is up to us all in our comparative plenty to contribute liberally. It is reported that black brand is worth two rubles a lb. in that part of Europe and cats and dogs, where available are being bought at fancy prices for meat.
Principal F.L. Bousfield has been invited as a delegate to the important educational convention to be held at Winnipeg next week.
Blackleg is doing away with numbers of young cattle. Many straw piles have rotted from the rain and the present outlook for stock owners is not bright.
The odds are even now on an immediate freeze up or some hot weather climate extraordinary.
A great many cattle are being shipped out. Our one pen stock yard requires enlarging at once.
This village has made wonderful strides of late. There are four elevators, the Bank of Commerce is completing a handsome brick and stone building and F. Farion will build a large brick block in the spring. Sifton serves a large territory and with the large amount of land broken last season should with a normal crop easily market over a quarter million bushels and ship a hundred carloads of stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 14 – 1915

1915 Oct 14 – Arrested

Two young Ruthenians were arrested in the Ethelbert district this week charged with setting fire to two stacks of wheat on Michael Buyar’s farm. The case against them appears to be a strong one. Detective John Parn worked up the case and made the arrests.

1915 Oct 14 – Ethelbert

Harry Cope Nash, of Cowan, was a visitor in town Monday.
We have failed to announce for the last week or two that Mr. Wm. Barrie was appointed as justice of peace for and in the province and Mr. Geo. C. Smith as a provincial constable.
Threshing is just beginning ere and if we only get a few nice days there would be quite a portion of it done.
The average is very good, but the wheat grades somewhat low.
Brachman’s have enloaded this week a carload of flour. It looks as if they alone are going to stock flour this fall.
We had a temperance meeting here this last Sunday. There was a big crowd gathered in the town hall and Mr. Farley, from Winnipeg put up a strong speech and made an impression on the Ruthenians, which were in the majority at the meeting and it looks as if they might join the temperance forces.
Mr. White, from Grandview, is doing a big cattle business in this locality. He has shipped four cars in two weeks.
Mr. Kenneth McLean has built an addition to his house on the farm and has fixed up the house first class. Kenneth, I’ll be you expect company!
Mrs. A. Clarke, of Munson, Alta., returned home on Monday.
Ethelbert will be the chief centre of the wood business again this winter.

1915 Oct 14 – Fork River

Private A.J. Storrar, of the 45th Batt., has returned to Sewell camp after spending a few days with friends. [1 line missing].
Miss Robinson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. Dewsbury.
Mr. Sam McLean, of Dauphin, was here on a business trip lately. He had his little gun with him. Some say he was up for chickens, others think it was for larger game.
Mr. Hosey, horse dentist, spent a few days here fixing up the company farm horses.
T.N. Briggs’ outfit is threshing the company’s crop. The yield is such a surprise to Archie that it keeps him busy; in fact, he has not time to sleep as they thresh night and day.
Fred. Coop and Billy Williams are hard at the threshing also and the elevator is busy these days.
John Watson, bailiff of Dauphin, was a visitor here for a short time last week getting the lay of the land.
Capt. Alex. Russell is home from Kelwood and is spending the Thanksgiving holidays with his family.
Mr. and Mrs. Somerfield, from Ontario, are visiting at the homes of their nephews, F.F. and Vivian Hafenbrak, on the Fork River.
Prairie chickens are not near so numerous as in past years in this vicinity.

1915 Oct 14 – Sifton

Football match – 1st Sifton Patrol Boy Scouts vs. Revd. Father Sabourin’s school. Thanksgiving day was celebrated here by a football match between the above trams. The scouts made the challenge, which was kindly accepted and by the permission of Father Sabourin, the scholars marched to the Wycliffe School grounds in charge of the teacher. The Scouts played with dash and vim and although much less in stature and outweighed, steadily kept the ball in the enemy’s quarters and finally succeed in placing the leather. A large number of spectators enjoyed the dun. Score: Scouts, 1 goal; Father Sabourin’s school, nil. Scout team: Leslie Kennedy, (captain), John Gillis, Max Marantz, G. Marantz, Joe Reid, John Terchennik, Roy Kennedy, Louie Kennedy, Roddy Gillis, Mike Setchiabin, Stanley Gillis.

1915 Oct 14 – Winnipegosis

Last week was a busy week in town, every night being filled by a concert, dance or moving picture show and we all feel the better for it.
There was a most enjoyable dance in honour of our soldier boys on he occasion of their leaving for their regiment. Everybody was there and seemed to have a great time.
On Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Coffey gave a dance in the Rex Hall, which was well attended and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
The concert in aid of the Red Cross Fund was held in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 8th, inst., and the hall was crowded; the program was a good and varied one and was much appreciated. The proceeds amounted to $57.10.
The ten-cent tea at the home of Mrs. White last Wednesday netted the handsome sum of $11.75.
Don’t forget the masquerade ball in the Rex Hall on Friday, the 22nd Oct. or you will sure miss a good time. Tickets on sale from Dunc Kennedy.
Three cars of settlers’ effects arrived on Saturday from the east. This northern country is rapidly filling up. We are glad to welcome all comers.
Miss Dolly Geekie and Miss Eva Fredrickson left on Saturday’s train for Winnipeg to spend a few days with friends.
[1 line missing] few days with Miss McMartin, left on Monday’s train for Neepawa.
Mr. Wiseman, of Roblin, has opened up a jewellery store and repair shop in the Rex Hall block.
Mr. Goodman, of Winnipeg, has opened up a second hand clothing emporium in the old Hunking house across the track.
The council met as a court of revision on Wednesday the 6th inst., and adjourned to meet again on the 14th October at 9.30 a.m.
Mayor J.P. Grenon returned Friday from a business trip to Winnipeg.
Frank Hechter left on Saturday for Dauphin on business.
The Field Day at the schoolhouse on Wednesday last, the 6th Oct., was a great success but the cold weather prevented quite a number from attending. Much credit is due Principal Davis and Miss McMartin and Miss Whitemore for the good time the children had. The singing of “O Canada” deserves special mention.
All the fishermen are busy these days getting their outfits ready for leaving for the north this week.