Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 21 – 1911, 1916

1911 Sep 21 – Sifton

The elections are now over and we are all glad we can now get down to business.
The threshing has been interrupted in this district by the frequent showers of rain.
The Misses Goforth and Reid, who spent their vacation in Saskatchewan, returned to town on Friday last. The ladies in question are well known as the nurses of the Presbyterian hospital here. The nurses are very popular here and on their return were tendered a reception at the Manse, which was decorated for the occasion. During the evening the ladies were presented with an address, which contained many complimentary terms, showing the esteem in which they are held and the appreciation of their work. The address was signed by J. Kennedy, J. Reid, Wm. Barry, W.J. Ashmore and C.A. Jones. At the conclusion of a very pleasant evening spent socially, refreshments were served by the ladies.

1911 Sep 21 – Winnipegosis

Wm. Sifton is spending a few days in town renewing acquaintances (before election).
Miss Sarah Hjalmerson is spending a few days at Snake Island the guest of Mrs. N. McAuley.
Miss M. Crawford left Thursday for Winnipeg, where she will attend business college.
Mr. and Mrs. Dennit and Miss Hansford are leaving town in October for England.
Miss Lily McAuley of South Bay, is visiting with Mrs. J.W. McAuley.
Mr. Paul Paplson and bride returned last week, after spending a two weeks’ honeymoon in Winnipeg.
Sunday, Sept. 24th, a confirmation service will be held in Victoria hall, conducted by Rev. B. Thorinson.
Misses Emma and Margaret Good, man of Red Deer Point, are the guests of Mrs. T. Schaldemose.
The Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.’s tug left Monday for Shoal River with Ted Cartwright in charge.
Ken McAuley, of Kamsack, is renewing acquaintances in town.
Wm. Walmsley in again managing the Lake View Hotel. His many friends are pleased to see his genial smile again at the hotel.

1916 Sep 21 – Maxwell King Wounded

Wm. King, postmaster at Fork River, received a cablegram this week from France stating that his son, Private Maxwell King, has been wounded.

1916 Sep 21 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on Wednesday, the 30th ult., all the members being present.
The minutes of the last meeting were adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner, re Fishing River Bridge, and from J.L. Bowman, re Cooper ditch.
McDonell – Reid – That the Basham Bridge be put in repair at once and that Coun. Reid be authorized to use any means to accomplish it that he may find necessary.
McDonell – Reid – That J.S. Seiffert be paid $25 for repairing the McAuley Bridge and that it have a further covering of two-inch tamarac plank eight feet long in the centre and that the clerk be authorized to issue orders for the plank and one leg of six-inch spikes.
McDonell – Reid – That the municipality make a grant of $50 to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; $25 to be paid now and $25 at the end of the year.
Reid – Namaka – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt – Campbell – That the accounts [1 line missing] in work be passed, $19.50.
McDonell – Reid – That the clerk notify Lawrence municipality that the council will pay 50 percent of any improvements made on the boundary line between the municipalities and that the construction of a ditch running into Lake Dauphin, which has been under consideration by the councilors of the adjourning wards be let by public auction by Reeve Lacey and Coun. Radcliff to arrange a date for such letting.
Hunt – Campbell – That Coun. McDonell, Reid and Namaka be a committee to inspect the Fork River-Winnipegosis road with a view to its improvement and report at the next meeting of the council.
Reid – McDonell – That the six pieces of timber purchased from W. Williams by the reeve be paid for.
Reid – Hunt – That as the plank ordered for the Fork River sidewalks has not been delivered for the purpose be purchased from W. Williams.
A by-law striking the rate for 1916 was passed. Municipal rate 12 ½ mills municipal commissioner’s rate, 4 mills, and general school rate, 5 ½ mills.
Hunt – Campbell – That the council adjourn to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

1916 Sep 21 – Fork River

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 28 – 1915

1915 Jan 28 – Letter From Dauphin Man at Front

Mr. Georges Urion, a French reservist who invested considerable capital in Elm Park and other Dauphin property, writing to Coun. Geo. Johnson from 20th Company, 269 Regiment de Infantry, 70th Division, Secteur Postal 120, France, tells how he is now serving at the front in the great war in France. On January 1, when the letter was written, the French army in which he is in were then holding one half of the houses in a town in Alsace, and the Germans the other half. He is in good health and the spirit of the army is the best, he says. They are confident of success but that it will be no easy task and they expect the war to least six months yet.

1915 Jan 28 – Major Rooke Wounded

Major B. Rooke, of Second Indian Gurhkas, was wounded in a recent engagement in France. The major is a brother of the late Charles Rooke, of Dauphin.

1915 Jan 28 – Tragic Death of Miss Allan

The worst tragedy in the history of Dauphin occurred on Sunday afternoon about 5 o’clock in the Malcolm block, when Miss Florence Allan, a well-known and popular young woman of the town, was burned so badly that her death followed a few hours later.
It appears that Miss Allan and filled a small lamp was methylated spirits and in doing so had spilled some of the liquid on her flannelette gown. At the time she had only her underclothing and gown on. When she attempted to light the lamp the part of the gown on which she had spilled the spirits caught fire and in an instant the blaze spread over the unfortunate woman’s clothing. She had the door of the room locked at the time and in her excitement in looking for the key lost several valuable moments. When she got the door unlocked and rushed out in the hall she was a mass of flame. Mrs. Hooper, wife of the caretaker of the block, was the first to be on the scene, followed by Mr. Hooper. Miss Allan, in her frenzy, grabbed Mrs. Hooper, and begged of her to put out the fire. Mrs. Hooper had difficultly in freeing herself from the burning woman, as it all happened so suddenly, and in doing so had her hands burned. Mr. Hooper, as soon as he realized the situation, procured a rug and threw it about Miss Allan, and this did much to smother the flames. Mr. Hooper had one of his hands quite badly burned while covering the burning woman with the rug. Others came quickly to the rescue and Dr. Culbertson hurried from his home to the block. An examination by the Dr. at once revealed the terrible condition the young woman was in and he at once made arrangements for her removal to the hospital.

BURNED FROM HEAD TO FOOT.

Everything possible was done to alleviate the sufferings of the young woman, but as she was literally burned from head to foot there was no possible hope for her recovery, and on Monday morning she passed away.
Deceased came from Bancroft, Ont., about three years ago to take a position in her brother’s confectionery store, where she remained until a few months ago, when he sold out. She then accepted a position with the Steen-Copeand Co. which she held at the time of her death. She was a young woman of a genial disposition and was liked by all who came in contact with her whether in a business or social way.

BODY TAKEN EAST.

A service was held in the Methodist Church on Monday evening and the building was crowded with sympathizing friends. The pastor, Rev. T.G. Bethell, spoke feelingly of the awful fate that had befallen the young woman and the lesson all should learn of the terrible suddenness with which death comes at times to both young and old. He referred to the esteem and respect the deceased young woman was held and the sympathy all felt for the afflicted family.
Floral tributes, from friends and societies, covered the casket.
At the conclusion of the service the body was taken to the station and from there forwarded to Bancroft, Ont., for interment. The followed acted as pallbearers: J.T. Wright, B. Reid, W.D. Sampson, A.G. Wanless, J. Argue and B. Phillips.
Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Allan and Mr. E. Allan accompanied the remains east.

1915 Jan 28 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Winnipeg.
Mr. Desroche, of Pine Creek, was a visitor at the A.T. Co. store at Fork River and returned to Winnipegosis by the sleigh route patrolled by our trusted friend Scotty, and he’ll het there sure.
Mr. Flemming Wilson and family, of Dauphin, have taken up their residence on the Shannon homestead, Mr. W. intends farming for a time.
Miss Coomber, of Selkirk, is visiting her parents on the Fork River.
Mr. E. Thomas has returned from Verigen, Sask., and will run the elevator for a short time.
Mr. F.H. Steede, of Bradwardine, Man., will arrive on the 29th to take charge of this mission. He will hold service in All Saints’ on Sunday 31st at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.
A large gathering from all parts attended the pie social and dance at the home of Mr. W. King. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all. It reminded us of ye olden times.
The cold snap seems to be taking liberties with everything green or tender these days. Even the sandwich man is complaining.
Fred King is able to get around again. Try a poplar tree next time, Fred, its easier on the moccasins.
Miss Clara Bradley, of Winnipegosis spent the weekend at this burgh.
Mr. Fair, of Ochre River, is going his rounds and is doing a roaring trade selling slaves and liniments these cold days.
Mr. John Nowsade and family, of Aberdeen, Sask., are spending a short time with his parents in Fork River.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Harnell who have been spending a month at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hunt, left to visit friends at Bradwinie on their way home to Sask. John is a good sport and his many friends here wish them a pleasant trip.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton

Mr. W. Barry, of Ethelbert, paid us a visit last wee and reports business lively.
Robt. Brewer I again in our midst and is after more prom. It seems as though he thinks hogs are raised and fed up in one week as he claimed he had cleared everything in sight last week. His smile must go a long way when amongst the Galicians.
Wm. Ashmore is a very busy man these days with his team, what with hauling wood and hay. Quite a rustler is “Bill.”
There is a new company formed her which are the proud possessors of a good well, and we are all busy trying to think of a suitable name for it. They had a meeting last week to discuss the matter of taking new shareholders, as there are lots of applicants now that water is scarce. The promoters are deserving of good dividends as they took a big responsibility when they undertook to drill the well.
We are all sorry to hear that m. Green, the Church of England student, is leaving this district to take office in Winnipeg. We all wish him the best of luck.
There has been quite a number of commercial travellers here this week. It seems this must be a good business burgh for them. It certainly makes business good for some people.
The people of Sifton seem somewhat jealous of the fact that their neighbours had the pleasure of seeing an airship last week. We understand that lots of people are taking the mater very seriously and it seems that there is a hot time awaiting the airman next time he shows up.
Wm. Walters visited the surrounding country on business and reports that most of the farmers are busy solving the water problem.
A bunch of Galician farmers are busy loading a car of wheat which seem to be of a fair quality.
Mr. Wm. Taylor, of Valley River, was a visitor to town last week, and informs us that he has purchased a farm and is going to work on it next spring. We all with him luck, although we all know luck is a companion of hard work.

1915 Jan 28 – Sifton Romance
PROFESSOR MATOFF

The following is from a Sifton correspondent: The celebrated Russian violinist, Michael Matoff, has been lingering in this quiet northern village of Manitoba for some months. Although used to the plaudits of great audiences in his world tours, he is now content to stay here, held an unprotesting prisoner by the silken bonds of love.
Some months ago Matoff was journeying westward on the train which passes through here. On the same train was a young Jewish girl, Miss Ida Marantz, whose home is in Sifton. She is a handsome girl and posses a fair education. She assists her father in his general store here.
On the train on that eventful day, Miss Marantz became ill. The virtuoso, Matoff, who was sitting near, noticed the girl’s distress and flew to her assistance. He procured medicine for her and comforted her in every possible way.
When the train arrived at Sifton Miss Marantz got off and Matoff’s chivalry was so great that he, too, left the train and saw her safely to her home.
The grateful parents entertained the musician, who later in the evening favoured the family with some delicious dreamy music from his famous violin.

HOW ROMANCE BEGAN

Under the spell of the witching strains Miss Marantz lost her heart to the musician and Prof. Matoff lost his to the fair listened, if her had not already lost it.
The virtuoso and he village maiden became engaged. The engagement was conducted according to Russian rites and at the observance Matoff played and enraptured all the guests.
The virtuoso has since resided at the Marantz home and whenever he plays on his loved violin knots of villagers linger outside until the last sweet note has died away.
Prof. Matoff’s violin is said to be worth $10,000.
An interesting feature of the romance is that the “eternal triangle” element is said to be not wanting. It is said that prior to the meeting with the virtuoso a village youth had aspired to the hand of the fair Ida and had not been entirely discouraged. With the coming of the distinguished musician, however, this prosaic romance was nipped before it was well budded.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Dr. Medd was a weekend visitor to Dauphin.
It is reported that the fishermen have received notice from the companies to pull up their nets, as the fish market had taken a slump. Six carloads were shipped from this point on Friday.
A large number enjoyed the skating and dancing party given by the young ladies of the town on Wednesday evening last. About 40 couples attended the dance. Lively music was furnished by the Russell orchestra, with Messrs. Johnson and Stevenson giving a help out. Messrs. Bickle and Burrell acted as masters of ceremonies.
Miss Stewart who has been a visitor at the home of B. Hechter, left for her home Winnipeg on Friday.
Miss Clara Bradley is visiting at the home of Mr. Mark Cardiff in Dauphin this week.
Rev. Mr. Green, of the English church, is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Born, Jan. 23rd, to Mr. and Mrs. A. Russell, a son.
It is probably the Rex Theatre will again be open to the public this week.
Mrs. John McArthur and daughter, are visiting at the home of her parents in Fork River.

1915 Jan 28 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. D. Kennedy has been on the sick list but is on the mend.
Mr. F. Hechter returned on Sunday form Crane River.
Mrs. W.D. King returned home on Friday after visiting her mother.
The dance in the Rex Hall, given by the young ladies of the town was sure the best of the season and everybody enjoyed a good time.
Mr. Green, the English rector, preaches his farewell sermon next Sunday.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 7 – 1915

1915 Jan 7 – Engineer Jas. McLeod Scalded

Jas. McLeod, the well-known engineer, badly scalded his right arm a few days ago by tipping over a kettle of boiling water. He is now confined to his bed.

1915 Jan 7 – Card of Thanks

I wish to thank the people of Ethelbert and vicinity for their kindness and help in extinguishing the fire at my house recently.
K.F. SLIPETZ

1915 Jan 7 – Purchased 16 Horses

Mr. Boyd and Dr. McGillivary, V.S., of the Army Remount, spent Wednesday in town buying horses. They succeeded in purchasing 16. Many of those having animals for sale considered the prices offered too low. Among those selling were A.V. Thomas, H. Harkness, Ed. Wellman and J.L. Rose.

1915 Jan 7 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on Friday, Dec. 18th, Coun. Richardson absent. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted as read.
Communications were read from J.A. Seiffert, the Dept. of Public Works, Winnipeg; D.N. Benner, N. Yaraway, the Western Municipal News, certain ratepayers of Ward 5 – re diphtheria cases, Belgian relief, the solicitor and the Department of the Interior.
A petition was also read praying for a bridge to be built across Fork River between ranges 19 and 20.
Hechter – Lacey – That the matter of a bridge across Fork River be left for the council of 1915 to deal with.
Hunt – Hechter – That the municipality donate $200 to the Patriotic fund.
Hunt – Toye – That owing to the financial stringency the clerk be instructed to allow a discount on taxes up to Dec. 31st.
Hechter – Lacey – That any lands that may have been sold for taxes by mistake be redeemed.
Toye – Hechter – That the work on the road built through the Gruber swamp be charged to the public works account.
Bickle – Lacey – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work be passed: A. Hunt, $13.20, Thos. Toye, $19.70, W. King, $24.15, J.H. Richardson, $29.60 and F. Hechter, $30.50.
Bickle – Hunt – That the resignation of F.B. Lacey as councillor for Ward 6 be accepted.
Toye – Lacey – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committed be passed.
Five by-laws were passed, viz: providing for the enforcement of by-laws repealing certain license by-laws, hotel license, billiard and pool room licenses and auctioneer and transient traders licenses.
Bickle – Toye – That the council adjourn.

1915 Jan 7 – Fork River

The Venerable Archdeacon Greth spent Christmas and New Year’s with his friends at Winnipegosis. Mr. Williams, of St. John’s, took charge of All Saints’ during the holidays.
The Rev. Mr. Malley spent his New Years’ holidays with Mr. James Parker on the Mossey River.
Mr. Cavers, of Rock Lake, is a visitor with Mr. W.J. Williams.
Mr. Harold Bradley, of Winnipegosis held a moving picture show in the Orange Hall last week.
The Anglican S.S. Christmas tree was held in the Orange Hall on Dec. 23rd. There was a crowded house and it was a grand success. All those who took part in the singing and recitations did very well. Great credit is due to Miss Bradley, Mr. Green and others for the programme provided. Later the Sunday school prizes were given to the children by Mr. F. Williams. Supt. W. King presented the teachers with suitable prayer books, while Mr. K was the recipient of a fine box of stationary from the children. The Russell orchestra provided some good music. During the evening Santa Claus and his wife arrived from Pine Creek and a happy time was spent stripping and distributing presents to the 80 kiddies in attendance. Mr. Hunt and Mrs. Green made a famous couple for the occasion. The hall was tastefully decorated with flags, bunting and mottos. W. King, warden, acted as chairman. After supper the hall was cleared and turned over to the young people to trip the light fantastic.
The New Year’s ball under the auspices of the Orangemen, was a success in every way. Fine night, a good attendance, splendid music and the ladies provided a good supper.
Mr. E. Williams, of St. John’s College, who was the guest of W. King, warden, during the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, has returned to Winnipeg. His numerous friends wish him a Happy New Year.
Your correspondent wishes the Herald and staff “A Happy and Prosperous New Year.”

1915 Jan 7 – Sifton

Business here has been better this last week as everybody has been buying for New Years. The Galicians are now busy preparing for their Christmas which comes on the 7th inst.
Mr. and Mrs. W. George, of Verigin, Sask., spent Christmas here amongst their many friends.
“Bill” Barry, of Ethelbert, spent Christmas and New Year’s with his old friends here.
Mr. Hiram Reid, together with his brother and sister, Ivan and Violet, have been spending Christmas and New Year’s with their relations and friends, returning Monday. Hiram, we understand, is busy studying law in Winnipeg and we all trust his ambitions will prove successful.
There have been several card parties around this burgh of late and it seems that Bill and Jack are still the champions.
The grist mill has been running steady this last week.
Mr. Fred. Kitt made a business trip to Dauphin on Monday.
Some of the women folks here are now scared to hang out their washing as there is a few cattle around here that make a speciality of eating anything in the dry goods line. Up till now when clothes were missed off the line the women would say there were thieves around, but a different tune is now.
It is said that several horses will be taken from here to Dauphin to be inspected by government men for war purposes.
The children around here seemed very disappointed at their not being a Christmas tree at the Presbyterian Church. This is the first year it has been omitted. We will try and amend it next year. Cheer up, children.
Peter Farion, eldest son of Fred Farion, general merchant of this burgh, has returned home after being away for some time. We understand that he travelled all through the Southern States, but he say “there is no place like Sifton.”

1915 Jan 7 – Winnipegosis

Large quantities of fish are being brought down from the north. The fishing is reported very good.
Mr. Murray, truancy-officer, was in our midst last week. He came here to look after a Galician family which were in destitute circumstances. The family were located several miles from town and the condition Mr. Murray found them in is past description. He brought the children to town and the ladies here went to work in earnest to assist in putting the little ones in presentable shape, such as giving them a bath and finding clothes for them. They also raised $23 for the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin. Mr. Murray speaks highly of the assistance the ladies gave him. The children were taken to the Children’s Home in Winnipeg on New Year’s day. The father, who is believed to be insane, was committed to jail for two months, during which time it is proposed to have him examined as to his sanity
Capt. Coffey returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Coun. Roy Johnstone, his wife and family, spent a couple of weeks in town visiting with relatives. They returned to Minitonas New Year’s day.
Walter Johnson, a former ‘Gosis boy but who for the past five years has been a resident of Fort William, is again in our midst to spend the winter months. Walter says the burgh looks as familiar as ever.
The skating rink is very well patronized.
Mrs. D. Walker, of Dauphin, and Miss M. Johnston, of Brandon, were visitors here last week. They were royally entertained by their friends.
Fred McDonald has been in unusually good humour of late. Lady visitors nearly always put our young eligible bachelors in a flutter.