Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 19 – 1912, 1918

1912 Dec 19 – Fork River

Herman Godkin, real estate agent of Dauphin, spent a few days with W. Williams.
We have been informed that Mr. Walter Clark was fortunate to get a moose. The head is said to be the finest seen in these parts with a spread of forty-four inches.
Sid. Gower, engineer, returned from Dauphin and intends working with W. Williams this winter.
We were pleased to meet Peter Robinson, an old-timer, in town. He is spending a short time with his parents on the Mossey River.
The C.N. telegraph gang is here renewing the poles, which work was needed.
The Newell moving picture show that was booked for Tuesday and Wednesday did not come off at the orange Hall for lack of accommodation. We need a good boarding house here for the travelling public.
There was not a very large turner to the masquerade ball in the Orange Hall on account of the farmers being busy threshing.
Mr. McIntosh, of Valley River, was here on business.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase will hold a Xmas service in the school house, Winnipegosis on Xmas morning at eleven o’clock, and in All Saints’ Church, Fork River, in the evening at eight o’clock.

1912 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Malley, from Brandon, arrived in town Tuesday. We trust the weather will be favourable for his trip up the lake.
The municipal elections are on now. May we hope that the wiser promises made by the candidates be fulfilled by the successful ones. We certainly need more passable roads, and here be it remarked that if our church wardens finds transportation between here and Fork River too difficult to accomplish in the future, the vision of the rectory, seen here, will have to materialize.
A Christmas morning service will be held in the school house 11 a.m. Come and help sing the carols insuring a “Merry Christmas.”
The Santa Claus fund seems to be a popular one. Perhaps it is because he is such an adept of minding his own business. He is remembering our bachelors with many plum puddings.
The Card Circle will be closed this week for the year. It is a matter of serious consideration if it should be reopened as so many lovers of the game do not enter before 9 p.m., which is near the time when wise and honest heads seek their rest; besides beige started to while pleasantly away a couple of hours, thus inviting congenial spirits, and finding ourselves entertained by a stranger proves a mental lack which should more advantagely be supplied at home, nevertheless we trust for a closing game this week that will reveal its true merit and may the winners of the prizes make good use of them. A certain Mr. Webber is to be thanked for the gentleman’s, which is a gun metal watch.
If we hurt ourselves as much by falling when climbing up hill, as we would so doing when running down hill, no one could be blamed for refusing to climb; but one of nature’s mercies is that we cannot.
The Christian League held a very successful meeting ask week.
The hunting season being closed may the stronger sex once more settle down to “the daily round.”
No moose, no heads, no tales.
Wm. Parker, of this Armstrong Trading Co. is up the lake or out to Pine Creek auditing books.
The young people of our town have a bond of sympathy with Dauphin ones in the difficulty (met here) of preparing a skating rink – see the lake.

1918 Dec 19 – Had Both Legs Crushed

Orval McInnes, a boy about 15 years of age, met with a bad accident at Winnipegosis on Tuesday. The boy was assisting to put ice in an ice house when the block that was being raised slipped from the grippers and fell on his legs, crushing them badly. He was brought to the hospital here the same afternoon.

1918 Dec 19 – Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Dec. 14.
Heath Officer Dr. Medd was through this district this week and has closed the school for the time being as some of the scholars are down with influenza.
D. Crerar has sold the Hudson’s Bay farm for a good figure. What about the herd law now?
Mr. Laidlaw has finished threshing. The cattle will have a chance to feed considerable land next spring.
Hechter Bros.’ gasoline tractor has arrived and they intend to turn over considerable land next spring.
W. Paddock has broke considerable land this year. Steam and gasoline engines materially aid in preparing the land for crop.
Mr. Winger has sold his flock of sheep to Mr. Venables for a good figure. There is no doubt but sheep pay well and in the future more will be kept in the district.
Mr. Waddell, from Missouri, is the new teacher engaged for the Bicton Heath School. It is up to us to “show Mr. Waddell.”
F. Sharp has completed his house and stable. The buildings are the right type for the farmers and we hope to see more of them erected.
Thos. Toye, our local weather prophet, says the winter will be a mild one. Tom, it may be said, does not make his observations from charts, but seeks his weather lore from wild animals, such as the muskrat, which he says you can depend on.

1918 Dec 19 – Fork River

Chas. Bugg, of Ochre River, was in town lately renewing acquaintances.
Pte. Arthur Shannon is home, having received his discharge.
The election is over and we are now already to shake hands and enter into the Christmas spirit, good will toward all men.

1918 Dec 19 – Winnipegosis

The Dominion Government is making headway with the cutting of a canal at Meadow Portage which, when completed, will open up a waterway with Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Manitoba. The land through which the canal will run has already been cleared and boarded and in the spring about 600 men will be employed doing excavation work.
A card party, in aid of the Red Cross, is being held every Wednesday evening in the Rex theatre. A good musical program is provided and refreshments are served.
A special Xmas service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 22nd, in the Union Church. Special Xmas hymns and solos will help to make the service attractive. Subject will be “The Brotherhood of Man.” A hearty welcome is extended to all.
On the afternoon of Xmas day a Xmas tree entertainment will be held in the above church and a huge tree loaded with toys and decorations will be exhibited to delight the hearts of the children. Santa Claus has arranged to give every child a present from the tree.
A bank will shortly be established at Winnipegosis.
A recent traveller on the Dauphin and Winnipegosis express complains bitterly of having to have an extra washing day in the same week owning to the dirty condition of the train.
The Armstrong Independent Fisheries is sending ten teams up the lake this week to bring in fish. Other companies also have teams employed bringing down fish.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 8 – 1910

1915 Dec 8 – Shot for a Deer

What might have proved a fatal accident to a hunter occurred in the Riding Mountain south of Gilbert Plains on Friday last. William, the 18-year-old son of Jas. D. Sutherland was hunting in the mountain and was attired in white. He was coming through the scrub when the white of his legs was noticed by another hunter, by the name of Dimmick from Roblin, who at a distance of 2200 yards fired at him for a deer and hit him in the right leg, the ball breaking it. Sutherland immediately ell and yelled loudly which prevented Dimmick from again firing as he had the rifle to his shoulder a second time when he heard the yells. As the two men were a long distance away from any habitation, Dimmick had to carry the wounded man three miles to a farmer’s house when medical aid was procured and young Sutherland brought to the Dauphin Hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1915 Dec 8 – Fork River

Miss Lane, from Dauphin is spending a few days up here before proceeding to her home in Winnipeg.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of Mowat School was taken seriously ill last week and returned to Dauphin to be under the doctor’s hands. We all hope she will soon be herself again.
F. Storrar paid a visit Dauphin lately.
A Christmas tree and entertainment will be held in the Orange Hall under the auspices of the English Church, on Friday evening, December 23rd, at eight o’clock. A good time is expected for the children. Admission all children free, but a charge for admission will be made to adults.
Mr. Letwin has been appointed as assistant to Mr. D. Kennedy in the Armstrong Store here.

1915 Dec 8 – Sifton

Bert Kennedy, of Canora, Sask., who was a patient in the Dauphin Hospital with typhoid, was a visitor to his brother John Kennedy for a few days before returning to his house at Canora.
Miss Scott, Neepawa, was a visitor at the Presbyterian mission house for a couple of days. Miss Scott is always welcomed at the mission house.
Rev. Johnston, of Gilbert Plains, held services here on Wednesday evening last. The sermon was well put and much appreciated.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held service on Thursday evening. Quite a large crowd congregated.
The moose shooting season is on again. Rudolph Spruhs is one of the number to leave for the haunts of the antlered monarch.
The Manitoba Government Telephones have a construction gang camped in the village doing construction work east of town.
On Tuesday Messrs. Buckwold & Levin shipped out three cars of cattle to Winnipeg.
The elevator of the British America Elevator Co. had to close down on Saturday for lack of cars to ship out. This is said to be the first experience of this kind since the elevator was erected. The opportune arrival of empty cars has now, however relieved the situation.
Rev. J.A. Sabourin is having a furnace and hot water heating system installed by M. Cardiff, of Dauphin, in his new building which is being rapidly completed. A new R.C. Church is expected to be erected next summer.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Melynik a few days ago a pair of twin girls. All three doing well.
With the late fall of snow the farmers are quickly taking advantage of the good sleighing and hustling their grain to market.

1915 Dec 8 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church, Winnipegosis, on Sunday next. Subject: The Call to Advance.
Teamsters here have been busy freighting fish from the various fishing grounds up the lake. They are impartment men and must needs be well catered for. Recognizing this fact the Misses Geekie and Black have opened a new restaurant at which good, solid, substantial meals are served at all hours. This is just what was needed in our busy little town. The fact that hot meals can be obtained at all hours, would see to be a guarantee of success. We wish them luck.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 7 – 1911, 1916

1911 Dec 7 – Municipal Nominations

Reeve
Nominations for rural Municipalities throughout the province took place on Tuesday. In these municipalities two weeks elapse before election day.

MOSSEY RIVER.
Reeve – F.B. Lacey, acclamation.

COUNCILLORS.
Ward 2 – A. Hunt, acclamation.
Ward 4- J.S. Seiffert, acclamation.
Ward 6 – No nomination.

1911 Dec 7 – Fork River

An ice gang left here for the put up ice for the Armstrong Trading Co., Winnipegosis, composed of Messrs. Munro, Johnston, Gower and others.
We have been informed that Lake Winnipegosis is to be opened for summer fishing again. It will be a great blunder if it is. As it is winter fishing is of great benefit to the resident fisherman and farmer, where as summer fishing is for the benefit of the 102 American companies and means clearing out the lake in about two seasons.
George Tilt left last week for Dauphin on a business trip.
Rev. Mr. Cruikshank held a service in the Methodist Church on Tuesday evening assisted by Mr. Malley, of Winnipegosis. A business meeting was held after service.
Mrs. C. Bradley, of Winnipegosis, is spending a few days with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Breiver, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Armstrong.
Our trains here have not been on time more than twice for the last month. We were informed by a traveller from Winnipeg that instead of the train leaving Dauphin on time they had to wait while they manufactured a conductor and when he was manufactured they had to wait while he got some breakfast and then it did not matter when they started. Farmers wait hours for their mail and freight. Of course we sympathized with the traveller as we are used to waiting in Dauphin while they manufacture an engine to take a train out, but this is our first experience in making conductors. What’s next?
The office of the municipality will be closed from the 12th to 14th of the month. The Sec.-treasurer will be at the council chamber, Winnipegosis, during this period.

1911 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sec-treasurer of the municipality will be here at the council chamber Winnipegosis, from the 12th to the 14th of this month.

1916 Dec 7 – The Week’s Casualties

Pte. J.L. Godkin, Minitonas, died of wounds. (John Laurence Godkin, 1897, 2382826 ??? (not found on virtual memorial))
Pte. J.T. Taylor, Winnipegosis, wounds. (???)

1916 Dec 7 – Death of Pte. Harold Curtis

Private Harold Curtis succumbed to his wounds last week. By his death Mrs. Curtis has sacrificed her tow and only sons on the alter of her country. The loss is inestimable, but the Empire must be saved, and many more such sacrifices will have to be made by mothers, fathers and some before the war is brought to a successful completion. Our deep sympathy goes out to the grief-stricken mother.

1916 Dec 7 – Fork River

Mrs. Wm. Northam has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin.
Metro Boyko has purchased he old ???.
W. Stonehouse, of Oak River, is in town.
Miss Leone Stonehouse has returned to Dauphin, after having spent the week-end with her mother.
F.F. and V. Hafenbrak, Fred and A. King and Jack Richardson, have returned from the deer chase with a bull moose each.
David Briggs has returned to Rathwell after a week’s visit to T.N. Briggs.
Thos. Barnard contractor of Dauphin, is busy plastering Will Northam’s new residence.
Mr. Kasmir has purchased a car of fat cattle for S.B. Levins, of Winnipeg.
The ladies of the Home Economics Society have sent a number of Xmas boxes to gladden the hearts of our soldier laddies at the front.
Hon. Hugh Armstrong, of Portage la Prairie, and J.P. Grenon, of Winnipegosis, paid a short visit to W. King, P.M., when passing through Fork River to Dauphin.
The municipal nominations took place on Tuesday, Reeve Lacey is opposed by F.B. Venables. Mr. Venables is also running against G.E. Nicholson in Ward 1. Archie McDonnell was elected by acclamation in Ward 3, as also was John Namaka for Ward 5.

1916 Dec 7 – Sifton

We much regret the illness of our popular station agent, Mr. Oulette, who was removed to the Dauphin Hospital by special on Sunday morning. Mrs. Oulette returned, however, Monday with more reassuring news of her husband’s speedy recovery.
News from Lance-Corp. Walters this week informs us that he is fast recovering from his wounds, but the shock of the shell, which buried him, has in a great measure robbed him of hearing in his right ear.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore entertained this evening (4th) at their residence a large number of old friends on the occasion of the 15th anniversary of their marriage. Mrs. Ashmore decorated her table with the top tier of her wedding cake, which she hopes to have an evidence for her 25th. After Mr. Paul Wood had made the presentation of a cut glass service in ??? evening was spent in music and song, Mrs. Campbell presiding at the piano with her usual brilliancy.
Look out for Wycliffe School concert and dance Wednesday, 20th.

1916 Dec 7 – Winnipegosis

The Sunday school Christmas tree and concert will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 20th. This annual event has, in the past always been held in the Presbyterian Church but on the present occasion will be given in the Rex Hall. This change will given room for more stage effect and also better accommodation for the parents and friends, who have always filled the church to its utmost capacity. The programme will be a good one including a representation by the children of the famous Christmas story of Charles Dickens, entitled “The Christmas Carol.” The message of the carol is of universal interest Under the touch of the spirit of Christmas the selfish man is rid of his selfishness, plum pudding and roast beef are found to be indigestible without kindness, charity mercy, and forbearance. The story will be given in the form of a three-act play and several tableaux.
We ask everybody to reserve his evening and appreciate the efforts of the children by giving them a full house. This year the Christmas presents ??? Sunday school without the aid of gifts from the parents and friends. This is partly to save time and also to avoid the inequality in the gifts received by the children.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 1 – 1910

1910 Dec 1 – Fork River

D.F. Wilson, clerk of the Municipality has been to Winnipeg this week to attend a conference of the different municipalities.
C. Parks opened up a grocery store in this village this week.
W. King returned from visiting several districts in Swan River Valley and seemed pleased with the trip and all that he saw.
The several school trustees are called to transact business in this district on December 5th at 10 o’clock sharp. All persons with children should make an effort to attend.
The nomination papers are out for the election of Reeve and Councillors for this district to be held at Winnipegosis, Dec. 6th.
W. Cooper’s hounds killed a wolf this week.
Charley Clarke paid Dauphin a visit last week.
J. Spearing, teacher of North Lake School, seemed to be getting on very well. He bought a farm just lately and erected a house on it. He speaks highly of the land in this district, but what is most needed is more settlers.
Mr. Barber from Winnipeg was up here this week on business.
D. Briggs killed three bears near here this week.

1910 Dec 1 – Winnipegosis

The Rev. James Malley held services as usual in the church at Winnipegosis and Fork River. His subject was “The Power of the Men of Vision.”
The weather here is mild, but skaters are not debarred the pleasure so much enjoyed by them. Dog trains are now arriving from time to time from up the lake, and it is expected that the ice will soon be strong enough for freighting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 3 – 1915

1915 Nov 3 – Before The P.M.

Robt. Machan Fined $50 and Costs Ethelbert Fire Case Dismissed – R. Spruhs fined for Sunday Hunting
On information laid by Constable Hillman, Robt. Machan, an interdict, was haled before P.M. Munson for being the worse for liquor, while Robt. was under the influence of the fiery element he made things lively, mixing up in no less than three fights. He would not divulge where he procured his jag and the magistrate gave him the full extent of the law. $50 and costs. We are glad to see the magistrate enforce the interdict law on suck strict lines, as it is the only means of protection women and children have in a licensed town.
The Ethellbert fire case tried Tuesday, created a good deal of interest. Last week there were heavy losses from fire at Ethelbert and the defendant, J. Mascuich was accused of starting the same. It seems the defendant set out a fire on his farm near Ethelbert to burn up some old potato tops and also the remains of an old straw stack. He carefully put out the potato top fire but the fire in the stack was left to smoulder and it was from this that the fire was alleged to have spread. There were numerous witnesses on the case. From the evidence taken it appears there were several other fires started in Mascuich’s neighbourhood on the same day. As the evidence did not show that the fire had been traced to Mascuich’s farm as the original cause, the case was dismissed.
Notwithstanding the result of this case, several suits will be brought before the county court for damages.
On information laid by Provincial Constable Rooke, R. Spruhs of Sifton, was tried Saturday for illegally hunting on Sunday and in close season. He pleaded guilty and was fined $10 and costs. This should be a warning to others.
Anna Kunka vs. F. Nankishowy, an assault case will be tired Friday. Both come from Pine River.

1915 Nov 3 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and his daughter Gracie paid Dauphin a visit last week.
The organising secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary, Miss Millidge, Winnipeg, will give a magic lantern entertainment in connection with All Saints Church on Nov 10th at 8 o’clock in the Orange Hall. Admission, adults 25c; children 15c.
Mr. Forbes went to Brandon last week.
Both stores seem to be doing some good business. Each train brings in quite a lot of freight.
Mr. Chase from Dauphin was up here visiting Mrs. Snelgrove, the roads around here are good for motors.
The time of service in the Methodist Church, will be 2 p.m., in future instead of 3 p.m.

1915 Nov 3 – Winnipegosis

A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the house of Mrs. Ballard. Owing to Mrs. Ballard shortly leaving the town she gave in her resignation of vice-president. A vote of thanks was passed to her for past services. A vote of the ladies present was taken to elect a president and Mrs. W. Parker was chosen.
Miss Millidge, organizing secretary of the Women’s Auxiliary will given a magic lantern entertainment in the school house on Nov. 9th at 8 o’clock.
The Rev. James Malley will occupy the pulpit in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church on Sunday next when the subject will be “The Thing that Matters.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 27 – 1910

1910 Oct 27 – Arthur Milner Dead

Arthur Milner, the young man who had his back broken some five weeks ago by the falling of a scaffold, died in the hospital on Wednesday. The funeral will take place this afternoon fro the residence of Mr. F. Clark with the Dauphin Citizens Band in charge.

1910 Oct 27 – Bullet Lodged in Tissues of Cheek

By the accidental discharge of a .22 calibre rifle on Sunday, a Galician lad was the victim of the bullet. The bullet went through one cheek knocking out a tooth and lodged in the tissues of the other cheek. The boy was brought to Dauphin Monday and the bullet extracted by Dr. Ross.

1910 Oct 27 – Destructive Fire at Ethelbert

A very destructive bush fire took place last week near Ethelbert. From what can be learned it appears that a farmer near sec. 7-29-21 had just finished threshing, the straw of which had been blown into some bush that he wished to clear. The readiest way seemed to him to be to burn the straw pile and bush at the same time. After a time the wind seemed favourable, and he set it going. Two of his neighbours, seeing the fire, remonstrated with him, and expressed their fear that it was very dangerous to set it on fire; to which it is said he replied, “Oh, t will not back up. Unfortunately the wind changed to the northeast, with the result that the fire rushed over part of sec. 18 and most of sec. 17. Hence about 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon it was noticed by the farmers on 17 hat the fire was gaining rapidly upon them.. H. Fekula began at once to try to check the fire by ploughing fire guards round his stacks of hay in the meadows (which run for a good distance northwards, between the colonization road and the road allowance between 17 and 18.) Jacob Mascuik was the next too see that his stacks were in danger, and his team and plough to turn over a few furrows to save his stacks. By this time the fire had got fairly going, and Jos. Mills and L.L. Katz came up at a run to save hat they could.

But alas, they were all too late, and only partly prevented the complete destruction of their stacks of hay. Jacob Mascuik lost six stacks valued at three hundred dollars, James Mills lost five stacks valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and H. Fekula lost three stacks. In the meantime the fire had widened out until thee was a rushing, roaring belt of flames a mile wide, and it seemed for a time as if a very serious disaster was about to take place. K. McLean rushed out of town, and calling at the school he impressed the older boys, and away they to see what could be done.

After going about a mile it was seen that the fire had got too good a hold, to stop it by ordinary means, and hence Mr. McLean could do nothing to save a hay stack of from sixty to seventy tons, from total destruction, which he had, had put up for winter feed. The fire continued its course until about ten o’clock, when through the strenuous efforts of the people it was checked a short distance from the Ethelbert school, after destroying about 1000 tons of hay. Thus during the night of Thursday we were allowed to sleep in peace, after a hard fight.

Unfortunately, Kenneth McLean, after leaving the scene of the fire, went home and being dead tired, as soon as he sat down in his easy chair, he went to sleep. The window was left open, with the result that he got a severe chill, which developed into pleurisy and he has been bedfast and under the doctor’s care ever since. However we are glad to say he has taken a turn for the better and hopes to be about again in a few days.

Well, it was thought the fire had been done with, but no siree. Bush fires do not die out so quickly as that, they smoulder and linger in rotten logs or tree stumps and given a fair chance, the fire will start up again in a fresh place, and that is just what it did do. On Friday morning the wind had changed again, blowing to the south. This soon fanned into flame the dying embers and away it went south and again ruin and disaster faced the settlers’ farms and stacks in the Mink Creek district. Fortunately Mink Creek was full of water, this combined wit the efforts of the people saved the mink Creek district from even a worse fate than had befell their neighbours to the south of them. But from all account it was close call. Whilst it is true that fire is a good servant, it is also true that it is a bad master, and if only reasonable precautions had been taken, much of this great loss might have been prevented. For instance, H.P. Nicholson had some hay in the fire zone, but his men had left it well fire-guarded, thus saving his stacks. The old proverb says: “A stitch in time saves nine.”

It is time that some steps were taken to prevent such terrible loss. As it is, there is no apparatus to fight fire if it should take place, neither is there a Fire Guardian to take the lead and call out and organize a band of fire fighters if needed, and it is needed at Ethelbert.

Do not wait until the horse is stolen before you lock the stable door. Now it is the time to get ready.

1910 Oct 27 – Immigration hall to be Closed

Dr. P.J. Beauchamp immigration officer at this point, has received notice from the Department of interior that the hall here will be closed and not again reopened. The hall under Officer Beauchamp has done an important work in providing accommodation while settlers are being located and regret is heard on all sides that the building is not to be reopened. The building and lots will be put up for public sale at an early date by the department.

1910 Oct 27 – Fork River

Nat Little paid a flying visit to Winnipegosis last week.
C. Parks from Winnipeg is visiting friends here.
The Children’s Day Service at the English Church was very well attended and one of the children Miss Marjorie Scrase, sang “Fair Waved the Golden Corn,” splendidly.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cooper who have been here for a few months left here last week for Brantford where they will reside in future.
Carloads of pressed hay are being sent out from this point.
On Tuesday night the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. Kennedy was gladdened by the arrival of a little baby girl.
Mr. F. Storrar paid a visit to Dauphin lately.
Harry Nicholson was up here this week doing business.
A meeting of the Orangemen of this district was held last Saturday when it was decided to have a ball on Nov. 4th to help pay off the debt on the hall.
Methodist Services will be held at 11 o’clock on Sunday mornings instead of at 3 o’clock.

1910 Oct 27 – Sifton

C. Genik of Winnipeg is the guest of his daughter Mrs. C.A. Jones.
W. Thirell of the C.P.R. land department has been in Sifton the past week collecting for that department.
Messrs. Marantz & Gorfin are dissolving partnership. R. Marantz will carry on the store business alone.

1910 Oct 27 – Winnipegosis

On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will preach in the Winnipegosis Methodist Church at 7.30 p.m. The subject will be “Soul Rest.”
On Sunday last October 23rd, the Methodists inaugurated a new Sunday School. The number of children present more than exceed all the anticipation of the promoters. With a fine equipment of teachers it is confidently expected that success will crown the new institution.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 20 – 1910

1910 Oct 20 – Chapter of Accidents

Wm. Cruise has Ribs Broken
Wm. Ashmore Leg Broken
Gun Accident
Wm. Ashmore of Sifton, met with a serious accident Saturday. While felling a beef, the animal made an unexpected plunge and fell on one of Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking two bones below the knee. He was brought to the hospital, where he is doing as well as can be expected.

1910 Oct 20 – Had Ribs Broken

Robt. Cruise, who recently invested in a power gang plough and why is busy ploughing his farm south of the town, has among the crew operating the plough his son William, aged 17 years. On Saturday night, William attempted to jump from the engine to the plough and was thrown under the wheel and the weight of the plough passing over him, breaking four ribs and slightly injuring him internally. We are glad to report that the young man is now on a fair way recovery.

1910 Oct 20 – Arm Amputated

John Kolodichook of Pine River, was accidentally shot Sunday morning in the left forearm, which resulted in amputation of same just below the elbow. Mr. K was out shooting and had climbed a tree to see if there were any ducks on a nearby pond. Before climbing he laid his gun against the trunk of the tree. When part of the way up the tree he slipped and fell, discharging the gun with the above result. The unfortunate man had no attention for three hours after the accident, and bled from eleven o’clock in the morning until the arrival of Dr. Lineham that evening at seven. He was brought to Dauphin on a special Sunday evening, and taken to the hospital.

1910 Oct 20 – Fork River

Mrs. Lipsky and Mr. Shaffer, from St. Louis, are staying at Mrs. Clawson’s in this village.
Mr. Dallas having disposed of his farm intends to have a sale on November 2nd. Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
A large congregation attended the English Church last Sunday night for Harvest Festival, when a very appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. The church was very prettily decorated by Mrs. Rowe, Mrs. Scrase, Miss Collins, Miss Gracie Little and Mr. King, Churchwarden.
Mr. Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P for Portage la Prairie and Provincial Secretary, paid us a visit last week and was accompanied by Mr. J. Grenon and Mr. D.F. Wilson looking over land in this district.
Mrs. C. Bailey gave birth to a son last week.
Mrs. Crouch and children who have been visiting Mrs. Kennedy, left for Winnipeg last week.
Mrs. Morris, who has been staying here for some time left for Winnipegosis last week.
Mrs. Johnson, from Winnipegosis, is staying with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.

1910 Oct 20 – Sifton

Rev. Dr. Carmichael of Winnipeg and Dr. McLaren, of Toronto, stopped off at Sifton on Saturday on their way east.
Mark Cardiff, Dauphin, paid us a business visit last week.
Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P., passed through here a week ago on his way home from Winnipegosis.
J.G. Harvey, M.P.P., Robt. Hunt, and A.J. Rawson, Dauphin, were among the visitors to Sifton on Sunday.
Messrs. Kennedy & Barrie started up their flour mill on Monday for another season’s operations.
Wm. Ashmore met with a rather serious accident on Saturday last while felling a beef. The animal made an unexpected plunge forward, falling on Mr. Ashmore’s legs, breaking both bones below the knee in one leg. He was taken to the Dauphin General Hospital for treatment.
Everybody took advantage of the prevailing fine weather and drove in to the Ruthenian Church Services held by His Reverence Archbishop Sczeptycki, of the Greek Orthodox Church, on behalf of the adherents of that rite. The gathering was the largest in Sifton for years.
Mrs. Wm. Ashmore and John Kennedy were visitors to Dauphin on Sunday.
H.H. Scrase, Fork River, held services at the mission on Sunday, also Rev. Father Perhach at he Greek Orthodox Church.
Rev. Archbishop Scztepski and staff, left Monday evening for Prince Albert.

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In your issue of Oct. 6th, I noticed something about a missing post-office at Fishing River and a P.M. Re the missing P.O. That said P.O. was called Sobeiski and a man named Demko Kasczuk was duly appointed but owing to his moving to Sifton he would not accept that appointment therefore the post office was never opened so I fail to see where it was missing. Re the elevator. We heard a great deal about it in June but since then it has been hors de combat. Re the mail bag. I was always under the impression that the P.M. at the distributing office had the locking up of all mail bags leaving his office so as to prevent such things as tacks etc., getting mixed up with the mail and if that is so the mail carrier would be ignorant of what the mail bag contained.

A Subscriber

1910 Oct 20 – To the Herald:

SIR – In reply to, and for the information of, “A Fork River Correspondent” whose concoction of misrepresentations appeared in your issue of Oct. 6th, I beg to be allowed to state the following facts regarding the establishing of a post office at Fishing River. That on Sept. 25th, 1905, the post office that the farmers of Fishing River petitioned for on N.W. ¼ 33-28-19 west P. mer. was established under the name of “Sobieski,” and that Demko Kasczuk who was mentioned in the petition as a fit and proper person, was appointed as Postmaster. That the necessary papers, etc., for opening the office were taken to Kasczuk’s place of business at Fishing River, and it was found that Kasczuk had departed for Sifton and had barred the doors and windows, and that he did not intend to return to Fishing River to do business because the R.R. Company would not stop their trains at that point. That as there was no other person asking to take the office over, the matter was allowed to drop for a time; so it will appear that it was the postmaster that was lost, and not the post office as stated. I would also state that a postmaster has been found since in the person of one of Mr. Glen Campbell’s workers at last Dominion election, and that the Fishing River P.O. is in operation. Also on the same date (Sept. 25th, 1905) “Lacey” P.O. was established (since named Oak Brae) 5½ miles east of “Sobieski” and Fred Lacey was appointed Postmaster and still survive, much to the annoyance, it seems, of the Fork Riverite whose letter appeared on Oct. 6th. As to tacks and sugar being put into Oak Brae mail at Fork River, I may say that I am not responsible for what is put into the mail bag at Fork River. I would advise him to complain to Fork River postmaster or to the postmaster general at Ottawa, and state what damage has been done and I am confident he will get satisfaction, also if this correspondent will find out and inform me as to time of making up mail for Winnipegosis at Fork River I will try and get in on time and thus please him has he is the only one who seems to worry about the matter, we have yet to receive the first complaint on this score from any one who has mailed a letter from this office to Winnipegosis. If “A Fork River Correspondent” will call at Oak Brae I will produce documentary evidence to support the statement re establishment of post office which I am certain will convince this reckless individual.

Not many years ago we had in the British House of Commons a set of politicians known as “Little Englanders.” They were opposed to the progress and expansion of the empire and it seems to me that one or two of that party must have got their quietus in the old land and turned up at Fork River, for whenever anything is said or done having for its object the improvement and development of this part of Manitoba, this “Little Fork Riverite” and his kindred spirits oppose it, and set to work to frustrate any movement for the betterment of this country. We remember when a siding was asked for by the farmers of Fishing River district the “Little Fork Riverite clique saw ruination for Fork River in it, and suggested that something ought to be done to prevent that siding being constructed. The farmers of Fishing River and Fork River were encouraged to sign a petition just previous to the election last June, asking the Government to erect an elevator and were told again and again that an elevator would be erected this fall at Fork River is the Roblin Government was returned to power, have we got one? Not on your life and I charge that the action of the “Fork Riverite” clique has discouraged any of the Elevator companies from erecting an elevator at Fork River. I do not bow the knee to the Roblin Government but I signed the petitions for the erection of a Government Elevator and advised others to do the same and intended if it was built, to patronize it because it would be built with the people’s money and it is good policy the patronize any institution that our money is invested in and endeavour to get the best we can out of the investment, there are thousands of bushels of grain in our district this season and we have no local market, I repeat that the Government Elevator is lost to Fork River district and the famers have been fooled once again and I ask the disappointed farmers to become “knockers” along with me and we will get the elevator along with a lot of other good things such as post offices etc., etc.

Fred Lacey,
Post Master, Oak Brae.

1910 Oct 20 – Winnipegosis

On Monday last the “Manitou” left the landing stage at Winnipegosis, heavily laden with fishermen and their equipment. Part of this equipment, and one would think a very important part, consisted of the wives and children of some of the fishermen. Although so many have left the town, the toll of departure is not yet complete but it is expected that this week all the people occupied during the winter in fishing, will have left the town. We wish them luck.
On Sunday next the Rev. James Malley will conduct the service in the Fork River Methodist Church at 11 o’clock in the morning instead of 3 p.m.
On Sunday next the Methodist pulpit at Winnipegosis will be occupied by the Rev. Jas. Malley. The subject will be “Buried alive by Devils.”

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 27 – 1911

1911 Jul 27 – Fork River

Sam Bailey and Mr. and Mrs. N. Johnston were visitors to the Winnipeg exhibition last week.
A social evening was spent at Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Bailey’s in honour of Miss Finch, a former school teacher of this district, who is visiting here. An interesting programme of songs and recitations was given by Mrs. Duncan Kennedy, Miss Finch, Miss Hill and Mr. Malley. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all present.
What’s the matter with the Press. We look over it week after week for news and all it contains in some “caw” from a demented “Jackass”, otherwise known as a “Jackdaw”. Column after column of abuse about Glen Campbell and J.G. Harvey, the members who the people have chosen to represent them. It is disgusting.
D.F. Wilson, our local Galloway breeder, was a visitor to the Winnipeg fair. He was there for the purpose of getting a Galloway bull brought from Ontario, and shown at the fair.
N. Little and daughter, Grace, have returned from the Winnipeg exhibition and report a pleasant time. Chief among the other attractions they saw was the flying machine.
Mr. Cameron and niece of Neepawa, were visiting at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat, last week.
Messrs. Corbet and McKee are busy putting a bridge over the Fork River at Mr. Coultas, which, when completed will fill a long felt want.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 11 – 1912

1912 Jul 11 – Sent Down for Six Months

Wm. Wright, better known as “Nigger Bill”, appeared before P.M. Munson on Wednesday, charged with disturbing the peace and using threating language towards Mrs. F. Crowder. He was found guilty and fined $50 and sentenced to six months imprisonment, and in default of payment of fine “Bill” is to serve another six months. According to evidence the defendant was shown to have attempted to stab Mr. Chowder. This is not the first time Wright has been up before the magistrate and he appears to be an undesirable citizen.

1912 Jul 11 – Fork River

Mr. Noble, Methodist student who has taken charge of this mission in Mr. Malley’s place, who has moved to Brandon, is spending a few days at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. Clark.
A. Cameron, of Mowat Centre, returned home after a weeks visit to Neepawa and Cypress.
Miss Oliver Clark has returned home from Dauphin.
The Orangemen of Fork River, who intend celebrating in Dauphin on the 12th, held their 10th annual picnic here on the 5th. There was a fair turnout considering it was raining. About 100 were in the grounds. At five o’clock it cleared up and the Fork River Coons and the Winnipegosis Bunters lined up for a game of football, which was a hard fought match from beginning to finish and some good playing was done. Fork River made 1 goal the first half and Winnipegosis 1 the second half. As it commenced to rain later the game was declared a draw. One prominent Orangeman remarked if the Orange goat was ever put out of business he would get the M.D. as he would fill the bill to perfection. It being too wet for further sports a dance was held in the hall and a pleasant time was spent till 3:30 next morning.
Professor H. Armstrong is busy building a sidewalk from the Municipal hall to somewhere.
Mrs. J.E. Morris and family returned to Winnipegosis after spending a few days at the home of Wm. King.
Mrs. William Coultas and wee daughter have returned from Dauphin.
The Orangemen attended divine service at All Saints’ Church on Sunday.
Fred Storrar has retired as walking boss from the A.T. Co., having made his pal. Good for you Fred. He had better put it into municipal roads.
Miss Nellie Williams is visiting her friends in Dauphin for a week.
Mr. Lusher returned to the farm – ????

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 20 – 1912

1912 Jun 20 – Mossey River Council Minutes

Meeting of the Council held in the Council Chamber, Winnipegosis, Tuesday, June 4, 1912. All members present, Reeve Lacey and Councillor Nicholson arriving late.
Coun. Hunt was appointed chairman of the meeting in the absence of the reeve.
The minutes of previous meeting were adopted as read.
Sieffert – McAuley – That R.E. Broadfoot be allowed penalty off his 1911 taxes owing to his cheque to Municipality having been lost in transit. Carried.
Seiffert – Robertson – That Paul Wood be asked to pay taxes on sec. 21-31-18 up to and including the year 1910. Carried.
Seiffert – Robertson – That J.W. McAuley and Thos. Toye be appointed to investigate conditions in Cork Cliff S.D. with a view to constructing a road there; the cost of said road to remain within the bounds of Ward 5 appropriation for the year 1912. Carried.
Robertson – Nicholson – That arrears of taxes due on N.E. 10-29-18 and N.E. 14-29-18, be cancelled. Carried.
McAuley – Seiffert – That arrears of taxes on S.E. 28-31-19 be cancelled. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That the clerk notify C. Humphreys that arrears of taxes due on N.W. 16-29-18 must be paid forthwith. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That all bridges of 20ft. or over be built, kept in repair, and generally looked after by Municipality. Carried.
Sieffert – Hunt – That the Armstrong Trading Co. be allowed the use of two wheel-scrapers, to be used in removing earth from their cellar and putting same on the streets of Winnipegosis, as directed by the Councillor; scrapers to be returned when required in good order. Carried.
McAuley – Hunt – That the Council secure, as soon as possible, the services the of government engineer to take the levels and estimate the cost of constructing ditches throughout the Municipality, with a view to borrowing money for the same. Carried.
Hunt – Robertson – That J.W. McAuley and J.S. Seiffert be appointed a committee to look after the fencing Winnipegosis cemetery. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That Councillor for Ward 4 be allowed to accept Peter McArthur’s proposition regarding the sidewalk on block 7, all material to be chargeable to Ward 4, appropriation for the year 1913. Carried.
Nicholson – McAuley – That each road commissioner be authorized to spend his ward appropriations in such work and by what means he considers most advisable. Carried.
McAuley – Robertson – That statute labour be abolished, and that the amount of money represented by the statute labour commutation in each ward at $4.50 per quarter section, be added respectively to the ward’s appropriation. Carried.
McAuley – Nicholson – That clerk state the case regarding Gensor lands to municipal solicitors and ask that action be taken at once to enforce the payment of arrears of taxes on the same. Carried.
Hunt – Seiffert – That F.B. Lacey, G.E. Nicholson and J.D. Robertson be a committee to inspect Fishing River bridge and decide what is best to be done with same. Carried.
Toye – Robertson – That Frank Slywoski’s taxes on S.W. 18-30-17 be reduced to $17. Carried.
Wm. Paddock was appointed fence viewer for Ward 4, and George Shannon for Ward 6 for the year 1912.
Hunt – Seiffert – That all buildings and other obstructions be removed from the streets of Winnipegosis within 30 days. Carried.
Seiffer – McAuley – That arrears of taxes on the N.E. portion of the S.E. quarter of section 10-31-18 be cancelled up to the year 1910. Carried.
Nicholson – Robertson – That the Council new adjoin to meet again at the call of the reeve. Carried.

1912 Jun 20 – Fork River

J. McKie of the Iowa Dairy Separator Co., Fargo, was here on business.
F.B. Venables returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Councillor J. Robinson, of Ward six is spending a few days at Dauphin.
We hear the buzz of the plairey once more. Mr. Williams having put in a new plant, is turning out some very good stuff in that line. Give him a trial oiler.
Mrs. Wm. Coultas let for a few days visit to her numerous friends in Dauphin.
The government dredge in charge of Capt. McLean is making good progress on the Mossey River.
Mr. Malley, Methodist student, will be absent a week or ten days attending conference in Winnipeg.
A. Cooper left for a trip to Lloydminster, Sask.
S. Gower left for the south to take a long earned vacation.
Panko Solomon of Mowat, returning from a trip to Dauphin on the Swan River train, undertook to get off at Sifton Junction while the train was running and had to misfortune to break his ankle and is laid off work for some time.
We asked “Billy” if anything unusual had happened. He remarked with a smile. “Don’t you know the Good Shepherds have gone to Winnipeg as we are in for a whole week of rest, which is very acceptable after the corpedo launched at Sifton, Fork River and Winnipegosis, which places were specially mentioned on Sunday regarding party politics, as it’s like football, one is one is apt to get a crack when you are not looking for it. Cut when you are not looking for it. Cut it out friend and be satisfied with the achievements of the 17th of March, as after such fusillades, singing “Peace, perfect peace, seems out of place.”
Mr. Darroch, Dominion homestead inspector, paid a visit to Fork River in the interest of homesteaders apply for their patents.
We were informed that one of the leading farmers of the south part of this district is in search of a hired man and we were asked if we could tell of one. The qualifications are he must be well up in cow, pig and horse logy; preference will be given to one who had been used to a “Jackass” as there is one on the farm and it usually starts braying about four o’clock in the morning, when not on a visit to the summer resort. The said braying means get up and milk the “keys.” Salary will be the same as given to his predecessors. Five dollars per annum; half cash and half in patent medicines and lots of fresh air exercise and the promise of a further rise in salary of five dollars per annum when the Liberals get in power again. So be good as this is the chance of your life if accepted.
Mr. Clements of Dauphin who is farming on a large scale at Fork River, is spending a few day overseeing the work on the farms.

1912 Jun 20 – Winnipegosis

Arrangements are being made for the reception of the Oddfellows excursion here from Grandview on the 28th.
Mike Whotan cut his knee while working up the lake. He was brought to town by boat by Dr. Medd and T. Whale and was taken to Dauphin Hospital on Wednesday.
Thos. Whale, Dr. Medd and F.R. McDonald were visitors to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Dugald McAuley shipped a carload of cattle to Winnipeg on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Archie Stewart left on Wednesday for a trip to Dauphin and Minitonas.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 9 – 1912

1912 May 9 – Girl Made Good Escape

A young Galician girl who has been employed in several Dauphin homes lately, seems to have a kleptomania habit of purloining articles which takes her fancy. From one home she carried off a suitcase, from another a couple of dresses and at her last place of employment a roll of bills. Her home is in the Valley River district and the police have been watching trains for her to come back. Tuesday morning night police Levins captured her, though not without considerable resistance as she got off the Prince Albert flyer. Steel cells are being innovated at the station and for the time being the firemen’s bathroom was used for the accommodation of the prisoner. About an hour after Levins and another young man had occasion to go to the proviso cell, only to find that the bird had vanished. It did not take long to find out her mode of escape. The young woman had broken a pane of glass out of the fanlight and crawled through the aperture. She evidently cut herself in doing so from evidence of blood left.
It has since been learned that she was met two miles from town and driven to her home at Valley River. A constable will be sent up to bring her back.

1912 May 9 – Fork River

Thomas Shannon one of out enterprising farmers is taking a trip west to Saskatchewan on business.
Nat Little is a busy man on train days shipping cream for a Winnipeg firm.
Wm. King is on a trip north posting registration posters. registration commences on May 21st at Winnipegosis.
Frank Merritt one of Winnipegosis old-timers, passed through here on his way west. He bid his numerous friends here good-bye. We are sorry to see Fran go as he was a good sport. We wish him and his family the best of luck in their new home.
John Seale, Dominion timber inspector, was here last week on business at the mill.
The new chairs arrived for the council chamber without cushions. Some one will get concussion of the brain if the sittings are anyway lengthy. Get cushions boys.
Roland King left for Togo, Sask., on a visit to his brother at that point. He intends having a look around this summer.
Rev. S. Wilkinson of the Methodist Church, Dauphin, held communion service in the church on Sunday. He was assisted by Mr. Malley of Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and Mrs. C. Clark, returned from a trip to the Lake Town Saturday.
Mrs. John Richardson and family of Winnipegosis, are visiting for a few days at her brothers, Mr. F.F. Hafenbrak.
Professor Robinson, a prominent leader of the town band, is contemplating a visit to his old home at Pittsburg, U.S.A.
The rainy weather last week seems to have put on the usual display of fireworks in the Press. The scribe is still doing business at the old stand.

1912 May 9 – Reply to Fork River Scribe

In reply to the scribe’s thrust in the Herald of May 2nd, the “Parrot” (unwisely so-called by the scribe) wishes to state that he now sees his mistake and regrets it, though no detriment was meant to the church. The leaders referred to should, as he says, be allowed to manage their own affairs also to fight their own battles.
To “Wellwisher” the Parrot has nothing whatsoever to say, for in him he recognizes one of the flock and is proud to own him as such. “Wellwisher” is to be complimented on his masterly representation of facts, and the “Management” (which in this instance has apparently developed itself to a membership of one) may justly feel proud in the possession of a bird of such excellent qualities and one that has so aptly learned the virtue of obedience.
THE PARROT.
Fork River, May 7th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 9 – 1913

1913 Jan 9 – Engineer Wm. Bowman Killed

Engineer Wm. Bowman, who was running for Engineer Wm. Graham on No. 4 train was killed in the Winnipeg yard on Saturday afternoon last. The train reached Winnipeg safely from Dauphin and Mr. Bowman was running to the roundhouse light when another engine ran into the tender, smashing it and driving the tender into the cab with such force that the boiler was injured in such a way that the steam escaped and scalded Bowman so badly that he expired on the spot.
Jack Cobb, the fireman, escaped through the cab window without suffering any injury.
Engineer Bowman was well-known in Dauphin and sympathy is felt for the family in their great sorrow.

1913 Jan 9 – Frozen to Death

Tuesday was Christmas according to the Galician custom and there was the usual festivities on that day and the following two days. John Kuruk, a Galician about 45 years of age, imbibed freely on Tuesday and Wednesday and on the later day he lay down at the C.N.R. tool house near the bridge and (Thursday) morning was found there frozen to death.
Deceased came from Austria about three years ago and has been working on the railway as a section man. He leaves a wife and two grown-up sons.

1913 Jan 9 – Suffered Bad Cut

Mrs. E.H. Walker was carrying a crock in her hands on Tuesday at the farm three miles south of the town when she slipped and fell. The crock broke and one of the pieces cut a bad gash on her left wrist. An artery was severed and she bled freely for quite a time. A phone message hurriedly brought Dr. Culbertson to the scene when the wound was dressed and Mrs. Walker brought to the hospital. It is expected she will be out in the course of a day or two.

1913 Jan 9 – Fork River

Mr. French, of Grandview, is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. J. Clemens.
W. Williams has taken his outfit out to his limits east of Lake Dauphin.
Frank Bailey left for Winnipeg after spending his New Year’s holidays with his parents on the Mossey.
Miss M. Nixon left for Findlay, having accepted the position of teacher in that district.
Miss Bessie and Miss Pearl Wilson left on a visit to friends at Sifton.
Professor S. Biggs returned to Dauphin after spending Xmas week among friends.
M. Sturdy, assistant manager of the A.T.Co. store, left on a short vacation. We wish him a good time.
Edwin King, who if with the C.N.R., was a visitor at the home of his parents lately.
Mrs. Willis Miller, of Mowat, who has been under the doctor’s care at Winnipegosis, has returned home.
The C.N.R. surveyor paid a visit and took the measurement of the elevator here.
Mr. Howatson, from Winnipegosis, is relieving Mr. Sturdy at the Armstrong Trading Co. for a few days while Mr. Sturdy is on holiday.
The annual meeting of Purple Star, 1775 was held on Tuesday, Dec 31st. The auditors’ report was most satisfactory, showing a balance in hand, after meeting all expenses for 1912.
The following officers were elected for 1913.
W.M. – Bro F.F. Hafenbrak
D.M. – Bro. W.J. King
Chaplain – Bro. H.H. Scarse, re-elected
Recording Secretary – Bro. W. King, re-elected
Financial Secretary – Bro. C.E. Bailey, re-elected
Treasurer – Bro. C. Bailey, re-elected
D. of C. – Bro. F. Cooper, re-elected
Lecturer – Bro. A Hunt
Dept. Lecturer – S.B. Reid
1st Committeemen – Edwin King, re-elected; C. Clark
Committeemen – J. Frost, Joe Bickle, J.E. Morriss, S.B. Munro, J.C. Bickle
Installation of officers at next regular meeting.

1913 Jan 9 – Winnipegosis

The Standard Lumber Co.’s mill is closed for the season.
The Armstrong Trading Co. has started their snow-plow with ten teams on its first trip up the lake to haul down fish.
Alex McArthur’s steam engine invention is also on a trip for the same purpose.
J.P. Grenon made a trip to Winnipeg on Saturday on business.
There was no Anglican Church service last Sunday owing to the recent storms impeding velocipede transition.
The Christian League held their social evening at the home of Mrs. J.J. Burrell last week. A very enjoyable time is reported.
Mr. Noble has returned to Dauphin to continue his studies after spending a week here visiting his adherents.
Mr. Malley returned on Saturday to Winnipeg.
The school was opened on Friday by Miss Hayes on account of Mr. Hulme not returning till Saturday.
Inspector Charles White has been away to Waterhen.
Miss Bradley has returned to Winnipeg to pursue her studies at St. Mary’s Academy.
Mrs. Bradley last Saturday received a letter from a Greek lady of Athens giving an account of the war raging in the Balkans. The letter was dated Dec 12th.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 7 – 1915

1915 Jan 7 – Engineer Jas. McLeod Scalded

Jas. McLeod, the well-known engineer, badly scalded his right arm a few days ago by tipping over a kettle of boiling water. He is now confined to his bed.

1915 Jan 7 – Card of Thanks

I wish to thank the people of Ethelbert and vicinity for their kindness and help in extinguishing the fire at my house recently.
K.F. SLIPETZ

1915 Jan 7 – Purchased 16 Horses

Mr. Boyd and Dr. McGillivary, V.S., of the Army Remount, spent Wednesday in town buying horses. They succeeded in purchasing 16. Many of those having animals for sale considered the prices offered too low. Among those selling were A.V. Thomas, H. Harkness, Ed. Wellman and J.L. Rose.

1915 Jan 7 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on Friday, Dec. 18th, Coun. Richardson absent. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted as read.
Communications were read from J.A. Seiffert, the Dept. of Public Works, Winnipeg; D.N. Benner, N. Yaraway, the Western Municipal News, certain ratepayers of Ward 5 – re diphtheria cases, Belgian relief, the solicitor and the Department of the Interior.
A petition was also read praying for a bridge to be built across Fork River between ranges 19 and 20.
Hechter – Lacey – That the matter of a bridge across Fork River be left for the council of 1915 to deal with.
Hunt – Hechter – That the municipality donate $200 to the Patriotic fund.
Hunt – Toye – That owing to the financial stringency the clerk be instructed to allow a discount on taxes up to Dec. 31st.
Hechter – Lacey – That any lands that may have been sold for taxes by mistake be redeemed.
Toye – Hechter – That the work on the road built through the Gruber swamp be charged to the public works account.
Bickle – Lacey – That the following accounts for letting and inspecting work be passed: A. Hunt, $13.20, Thos. Toye, $19.70, W. King, $24.15, J.H. Richardson, $29.60 and F. Hechter, $30.50.
Bickle – Hunt – That the resignation of F.B. Lacey as councillor for Ward 6 be accepted.
Toye – Lacey – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committed be passed.
Five by-laws were passed, viz: providing for the enforcement of by-laws repealing certain license by-laws, hotel license, billiard and pool room licenses and auctioneer and transient traders licenses.
Bickle – Toye – That the council adjourn.

1915 Jan 7 – Fork River

The Venerable Archdeacon Greth spent Christmas and New Year’s with his friends at Winnipegosis. Mr. Williams, of St. John’s, took charge of All Saints’ during the holidays.
The Rev. Mr. Malley spent his New Years’ holidays with Mr. James Parker on the Mossey River.
Mr. Cavers, of Rock Lake, is a visitor with Mr. W.J. Williams.
Mr. Harold Bradley, of Winnipegosis held a moving picture show in the Orange Hall last week.
The Anglican S.S. Christmas tree was held in the Orange Hall on Dec. 23rd. There was a crowded house and it was a grand success. All those who took part in the singing and recitations did very well. Great credit is due to Miss Bradley, Mr. Green and others for the programme provided. Later the Sunday school prizes were given to the children by Mr. F. Williams. Supt. W. King presented the teachers with suitable prayer books, while Mr. K was the recipient of a fine box of stationary from the children. The Russell orchestra provided some good music. During the evening Santa Claus and his wife arrived from Pine Creek and a happy time was spent stripping and distributing presents to the 80 kiddies in attendance. Mr. Hunt and Mrs. Green made a famous couple for the occasion. The hall was tastefully decorated with flags, bunting and mottos. W. King, warden, acted as chairman. After supper the hall was cleared and turned over to the young people to trip the light fantastic.
The New Year’s ball under the auspices of the Orangemen, was a success in every way. Fine night, a good attendance, splendid music and the ladies provided a good supper.
Mr. E. Williams, of St. John’s College, who was the guest of W. King, warden, during the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, has returned to Winnipeg. His numerous friends wish him a Happy New Year.
Your correspondent wishes the Herald and staff “A Happy and Prosperous New Year.”

1915 Jan 7 – Sifton

Business here has been better this last week as everybody has been buying for New Years. The Galicians are now busy preparing for their Christmas which comes on the 7th inst.
Mr. and Mrs. W. George, of Verigin, Sask., spent Christmas here amongst their many friends.
“Bill” Barry, of Ethelbert, spent Christmas and New Year’s with his old friends here.
Mr. Hiram Reid, together with his brother and sister, Ivan and Violet, have been spending Christmas and New Year’s with their relations and friends, returning Monday. Hiram, we understand, is busy studying law in Winnipeg and we all trust his ambitions will prove successful.
There have been several card parties around this burgh of late and it seems that Bill and Jack are still the champions.
The grist mill has been running steady this last week.
Mr. Fred. Kitt made a business trip to Dauphin on Monday.
Some of the women folks here are now scared to hang out their washing as there is a few cattle around here that make a speciality of eating anything in the dry goods line. Up till now when clothes were missed off the line the women would say there were thieves around, but a different tune is now.
It is said that several horses will be taken from here to Dauphin to be inspected by government men for war purposes.
The children around here seemed very disappointed at their not being a Christmas tree at the Presbyterian Church. This is the first year it has been omitted. We will try and amend it next year. Cheer up, children.
Peter Farion, eldest son of Fred Farion, general merchant of this burgh, has returned home after being away for some time. We understand that he travelled all through the Southern States, but he say “there is no place like Sifton.”

1915 Jan 7 – Winnipegosis

Large quantities of fish are being brought down from the north. The fishing is reported very good.
Mr. Murray, truancy-officer, was in our midst last week. He came here to look after a Galician family which were in destitute circumstances. The family were located several miles from town and the condition Mr. Murray found them in is past description. He brought the children to town and the ladies here went to work in earnest to assist in putting the little ones in presentable shape, such as giving them a bath and finding clothes for them. They also raised $23 for the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin. Mr. Murray speaks highly of the assistance the ladies gave him. The children were taken to the Children’s Home in Winnipeg on New Year’s day. The father, who is believed to be insane, was committed to jail for two months, during which time it is proposed to have him examined as to his sanity
Capt. Coffey returned from Dauphin on Monday.
Coun. Roy Johnstone, his wife and family, spent a couple of weeks in town visiting with relatives. They returned to Minitonas New Year’s day.
Walter Johnson, a former ‘Gosis boy but who for the past five years has been a resident of Fort William, is again in our midst to spend the winter months. Walter says the burgh looks as familiar as ever.
The skating rink is very well patronized.
Mrs. D. Walker, of Dauphin, and Miss M. Johnston, of Brandon, were visitors here last week. They were royally entertained by their friends.
Fred McDonald has been in unusually good humour of late. Lady visitors nearly always put our young eligible bachelors in a flutter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 2 – 1913

1913 Jan 2 – Fred Nex Killed

Fred. Nex, formerly publisher of the Dauphin News, and who afterwards kept a store at Sifton, was killed near Whitemouth, Man., not long since. He and two other parties were riding on the C.P.R. on a gasoline motor, when it collided with a train. All three were killed. Deceased of recent years held the position of secretary-treasurer for the Municipality of Whitemouth. He leaves a widow and several small children.

1913 Jan 2 – Fork River

John Chipla and family returned from Canora, Sask., for the holidays.
Bert Williams left for Moose Jaw to see his brother, who resides there.
Miss Olive and Alice Clark are visiting friends at Laird, Sask., during the holidays.
Miss Muriel Alterton, who taught the Mossey River School the last three years, has left for Winnipeg.
Miss Grant, teacher of Pine View School, has gone home for the holidays.
A. Hunt has gone to Ottawa to spend the holidays with his parents.
There was quite a family re-union at the homestead of D.F. Wilson last week. Paul Wood and family, of Sifton; Fleming Wilson and family of Dauphin and others. It was cheering to see so many familiar faces at Christmas Tide.
Miss Bertha Johnston, of Dauphin, Mrs. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, were the guests of D. Kennedy during the holiday.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is home on a two weeks’ vacation.
Abe Shinks returned from his homestead in Sask., and intends to remain the rest of the winter at Fork River.
The Christmas tree and concert in the hall on Christmas Eve, under the auspices of All Saints’ W.A. and S.S. was a success. It being a nice evening there was a large turnout. Wm. King, warden, was chairman. A good programme of songs, recitations, and drills by the children, after which Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus arrived and distributed the gifts among the children. We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus on the able manner they filled the position. We take this opportunity of thanking all those who took part in the concert and tree. It is encouraging to see everyone turn out on Christmas Eve to give the little folks a good time.
We wish all a Happy New Year.
Rev. H.H. Scrase held service on Christmas morning at Winnipegosis, and at All Saints, Fork River, in the evening.
In the Press we notice our Mowat friend twitting Mr. Borden and his followers for opposing the Transcontinental Railway when they were in opposition. Do you remember Laurier’s election cry in 1904? A national Transcontinental Railway for thirteen million dollars. What do we now find? The National Transcontinental Railway is going to cost us, including interest and charges, payable by the people, nearly eighty million and a cash outlay of close on three hundred million by the time we are through with it. Is it any wonder it was opposed at the time considering the unbusinesslike method adopted by the Laurier government. Our M.C. objects to Borden’s scheme of giving thirty-five millions to England for Dreadnaughts to be manned by Englishmen instead of Canadians. We consider Borden’s scheme the only possible one under the circumstances and far superior to the one Laurier has being playing with for years. What did his amount to? He, Laurier, wanted a strictly Canadian fleet, part on the Atlantic coast, the other half on the Pacific coast. That’s just what he handed down to Borden when he went out of power. The Niobe in the east and the Rainbow in the west. The boats are so powerful you have to take a magnifying glass to see them on a fine day. As for manning our warships with Canadians our friend is talking through his hat. The Marine Department at Ottawa could not find recruits enough in Canada to run those two little steamboats, the Niobe and the Rainbow. They had to be tied up for want of men. Finally they had to import them. Take a rest friend, you must be tired of jumping the fence so often.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

The W.A. entertainment last Friday evening was a success and though the proceeds, were small, more was not anticipated. The orchestra selections render by the Messrs. McArthur, Mrs. A. McArthur, and Mr. Shears were most appropriate, and the representation of Mr. and Mrs. Candle was amusing, while the comedy “Box the Cox” demonstrated the fact that theatrical talent is not lacking amongst us.
If a young “Lochinvar” appears in our midst let no one say they were fully warned.
Mr. Malley, lately from college, addressed the Christian Endeavor League last week.
Harry Parker had the misfortune to sprain his ankle while coming down the lake freighting fish. Hope he will soon be about again.
J.P. Grenon’s youngest son, also sustained an injury from an accident, the nature of which has not been learned.
Mrs. Johnston, of Minitonas, is visiting her friends, the Stuarts. A little one made the festive season.
We are pleased to hear Mrs. Graff has recovered from her illness under Mrs. Johnstone’s efficient nursing.
A.C. Bardley’s late indisposition was the result of cold.
The card circle last Wednesday evening was a pleasing character. Mrs. Burrell now possesses a good time-keeper and we trust Mrs. Crannage may find her work basket useful considering her aptitude with the meddle which was effectively displayed in the doll dressed for the W.A. competition, and won by Miss Hansford. See “Whilimina”.
Mr. Seaforth made a business trip to Dauphin on Saturday.
Miss Browne also made a trip to meet a friend from Winnipeg.
The Presbyterian S.S. entertainment on the 27th (the most anticipated event of the season), was very successful owing to Santa Claus’ generosity, whom the children admirably presented in a Cantata. It was regretted that Mr. Malley was unable to perform the duties of chairman, but Mr. Noble very kindly filled the place.
The Anglican Christmas service was harmonious. Rev. H.H. Scrase delivered a fine sermon.
This weather might inspire a spring song, considering the gulls are circling up the lake, but undoubtedly the storm that follows such illusive calm is liable to occur any time.
We wonder what the presence of pure white partridges may prognosticate. It is easy to obtain them, and they should look very pretty mounted.
The Armstrong Trading Co. lost a valuable team in the lake last week, and a horse dropped dead the week before. Fortunately they are not likely to feel the loss.
Mr. Ruthledge, formerly of Winnipegosis, spent Christmas in town.
The Misses Bradley spent Christmas here with their parents, and Mr. and Mrs. Saunders enjoyed the company of their sons with a friend from Winnipeg. A dance was given by the latter in Victoria Hall on Thursday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, of the Lake View hotel, returned from Winnipeg on Christmas Eve, where they spent a week on business and visiting.
Mrs. Bradley spent a delightful week-end in Dauphin, and attended the Anglican S.S. entertainment, of which he “Washing Day Cantata” was a particularly enjoyable feature. The trip from their home was suggestive of wedding bells resulting in poetic effusion.
Miss Johnston returned home for the Christmas holidays.

1913 Jan 2 – A REVERIE.

Ye children of the heavenly king,
Imagine that the angels sing,
Send peace on earth for men and driven
To doubt that women have earned a heaven.

As everyone of us should hold,
The truth that’s better far tan gold’
Let dissension meet a final doom,
And perversity by refused a room.

Then trust the Savour’s power to do
All that he said, which well he knew
Would be doubted by impatient men,
Though women believe faithfully till – when!

The world shall be forced to cry, “well done”!
In Him we live, the kingdom’s won!
To exercise faith within the soul
Makes humanity’s love perfectly whole.

1913 Jan 2 – Winnipegosis

James McNicholl passed quietly away on Friday afternoon last Dec. 27th, after a lingering illness, having been tended faithfully by his wife for whom he showed much affection. The funeral rites were performed by Father Derome on Monday morning. Deceased’s wife, two sons and two daughters were among the mourners.
Miss Clara Bradley is away on a visit to her aunt in Portage la Prairie. Miss Dolly having returned with her.
Miss Shannon has returned from Fork River where she spent the Christmas holidays visiting her parents.
Mr. Scott is leaving on Thursday for Mafeking on business for the Standard Lumber Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Shears are wished joy of their young daughter, born to them on the 28th inst., at the home of Mrs. Johnstone.

1913 Jan 2 – Gulls at Lake Winnipegosis

Numerous sea gulls have, of late, made their appearance at Lake Winnipegosis. It is not known that those birds have ever appeared here at so late a date in any year in the past.