Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 14 – 1914

1914 May 14 – Bailiff Reported to Judge

The Fork River council has a grievance against the county court bailiff, and passed the following resolution at its last meeting:
Moved by Coun. Richardson, seconded by Coun. Toye. “That the clerk write to Judge Ryan as to the way in which Bailiff McLean handled the seizure made by him in the interests of the municipality, making a full explanation.”

1914 May 14 – Bullet in Head

A lamentable accident occurred at Ethelbert on Tuesday which may be attended with fatal results. Mary Bolinski, aged nine years, and her brother, aged 7, were about to start for school when the boy picked up a .22 rifle and accidentally discharged it, the bullet entering the back of the girl’s head. The girl was at once brought to the hospital here and is still alive with a possible chance of recovery.

1914 May 14 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred on Tuesday three miles north of Sclater by which Joseph Slobodigian lost his life. It appears that Slobodigian took his gun out for the purpose of shooting a dog. When the dog saw Slobodigian approaching he ran away and the man followed the animal. Shortly after this his wife heard the report of a gun, but paid no attention to it, thinking that her husband had fired at the dog. The man not returning after the lapse of a short time the woman went to hunt for him. She discovered him about 200 yards from the house lying helpless, with his right leg shattered from the contents of the gun, which had been accidentally discharged. The woman immediately went for help, but when she returned with a neighbour her husband was expiring, having bled to death.
The poor woman is left with two small children and without any means of support. Here is a case worthy of assistance. Any contributions sent to Mr. W.P. Hrusgowy, Sclater, will be duty, acknowledged, and the woman and children provided for.

1914 May 14 – Thrilling Rescue from River

One Thursday of last week a young man named LaCharite and Archie McDonald, son of John McDonald, livery stable keeper of Ochre River, had a thrilling experience and a narrow escape from drowning. The boys had gone to the river for a barrel of water with a team and desmocrat, which was one of their daily duties, and on account of the high water in the river, occasioned by the recent heavy rains they either mistook the place where they usually drove in or else the bank caved in, and let the horses into the deep water. The horses and rig were swept down the river and the animals in their struggle soon got entangled in the harness. In the meantime the two men were struggling in the torrent and were carried down the stream and would undoubtedly have been drowned but for some men who happened to be on the town bridge with pike poles, keeping the brushwood from the bridge, and who caught the boys as they came along and held them until help arrived and they were rescued.
The horses were carried downs stream about half a mile and caught up on a tree in the river. The rig and harness were recovered some days after.
Mr. McDonald was away at Plumes when the accident occurred and was appalled of his loss by telephone.

1914 May 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Theodore Miles, of Kamsack, was a visitor for a few days at the home of Mrs. Fred Cooper, on the Fork River.
Joe Lockhart and Commodore F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
F. Cooper was a visitor to Dauphin for a few days last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor to the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River on Friday.
Nurse Tilt was a visitor at the homestead on the Mossey for a few days lately.
Professor Brown, who was a slave for 23 years, gave a very interesting lecture lately in the Methodist Church on “Slavery.”
The wet weather last week put a stop to seeding for a few days. Work will go a head now with a rush.
Mrs. McEachern has returned from a visit to Winnipeg.
The annual vestry meeting was held in All Saints’ Church with E. Williams, lay reader, in the chair. The annual report was read by W. King, secretary and adopted as read. The following officers were elected for the coming year: W. King, minister’s warden; C.E. Bailey, people’s warden of Fork River; C. Bradley, warden, Winnipegosis; W. King, secretary-treasurer for the missions; John Reid, warden, Sifton. Delegate to Synod, W. King, organist, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Sam Hughes, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, passed through here from a trip to Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and son spent the weekend with Mrs. W.D. King at Dauphin.

1914 May 14 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Lawson and Mr. Pilgrim, of Dauphin, were here last week doing some cement work on the fox ranch.
The school by-law, voted on last week, was carried by a substantial majority. We should be glad of this, for no money can be spent by the people to better advantage than that which we put into schools. More than a few of us are of the opinion that more money should have been voted and a better class of school built. It is now up to us to make the best of it.
With the continued cool weather the ice in the lake is liable to remain firm for some time to come. The late rain pelted into it considerably, however.
Chas. Denby returned from Dauphin on Monday. He has been to Kamsack helping some of the government officials to stock the lake there with ???. They took about 150 fish from here in tanks. Charlie, you know is quite a ???, and [1 line missing] each fist cost the government $3. If they live and thrive even this sum is not too much.

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