Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Mowat Pioneers Update

Well, it’s been another couple of months since my previous post in May. I was successful in finding my grand uncle’s grave within ‘St. Michael’s Cemetery’ at SW-14-29-18-W1.

st michael's cemetery

Unfortunately, the cemetery was overgrown and I don’t know how many other graves were suppose to be in there. Where I thought the graves would be located was just grass, unless the headstones have been buried, while the rest of the graves were found in the trees/brush.

Anton Masiowski's headstone

There were a handful of other headstones that I was able to take pictures of but I was unable to get all sides.

st michael's grave 01

st michael's grave 02

st michael's grave 03

st michael's grave 04

st michael's grave 05

A surprising find was the grave of Peter Demczyszyn (1909-1930) who was murdered in a case of mistaken identity. You can read more in the previous blog post here.

Peter Demczyszyn headstone

Another interesting find was this mysterious grave at the crossroads of Road 170 North and Road 105 West.

mystery grave 1

mystery grave 2

This is what I have been able to decipher from the headstone.

В. чесьт
славу най Сь
Серцю Г.Н.Ю
Христа

Памятка Се

триць з рок 1921
фундаторка

Анна Чорнобай

From what I can understand it is related to the Chornoboy family, specifically, Anna Chornoboy (1904-). If this is correct then Anna was only 17 years old when she died. Historically, burial at a crossroads was the method for persons who have committed suicide. Was this the case for poor Anna? I am going to do some more investigation in this case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 22 – 1910

1910 Sep 22 – Serious Accident

Scaffold Collapses With Three Men – Arthur Milner Has Back Broken
While engaged Wednesday afternoon in shingling the first rows of Engineer R.T. Perkin’s new residence on 3rd Ave. S.W. the scaffold from which they were working suddenly collapsed with A. Milner, Wesley and Wallace Cleaver, throwing the former two to the ground 20 feet below. Wallace Cleaver managed to catch on to a window sill and saved himself. The crash of the falling scaffolding was heard some distance and brought several neighbours to the spot at once. The unfortunate men where extricated from the fallen timbers and carried to the home of Mr. Geo. Sergant and on the arrival of Dr. Bottomley taken to hospital. On examination of the two men it was found that Cleaver had several ribs broken, while Milner was more seriously injured, his spine being broken between the shoulders, and it is feared he has slim chances of recovery.
Milner is a young Englishman and came to Dauphin from Gladstone two years ago. He has taken an active art in he town band as solo cornet player. His father resides in the north of England and is being communicated with.

1910 Sep 22 – Fork River

The funeral of Mrs. S. Lowry took place last Saturday. Quite a large number of friends came to pay their respects, the service was conducted by Rev. W. Rowan.
Mrs. W. Stonehouse who has been away in Ontario for some time returned last Saturday.
Threshing is in full swing and crops are turning out well.
Mr. A.B. Hodgson who has been here for some time left last Saturday for Winnipegosis to enter the employ of the Armstrong Trading Co.
W. Stonehouse is building a house for himself in this village.
Mrs. Northam of Weyburn came here last Wednesday and intends to stay here.
Harvest Festival will be held at Mowat on Sunday, Sept. 25 at 11 o’clock, preacher Rev. H.H. Scrase.

1910 Sep 22 – North Lake

Messrs Hunter and Glendenning have commenced threshing and report wheat turning out good.
Settlers of this district tender their sympathy to Mr. Sam Lowry in his bereavement.
Councillor Lacey is now getting ready to ditch some of the main roads leading to Fork River and Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase preached an impressive sermon at Mowat last Sunday, touching on the death of Mrs. Sam Lowry. Quite a number were present.

1910 Sep 22 – Sifton

Fine weather prevails and is greatly appreciated by every one just now, at this time of the year, as it will either 3 northern or 1 northern. Threshers are busy everywhere about.
W. Kyscyzks new outfit was considerably disabled for a couple of days. Some culprit carefully distributed old iron, taking great pains to well place it in the centre of the sheaves in many of the stooks on Paul Wood’s farm. The separator was somewhat crippled a number of times and had to undergo repairs.
H.L. Troyer, Secretary of the Toronto Bible training school, Toronto and Miss E. Spargue, who have been visiting the mission house for a couple of days left for the east on Tuesday last.
Rev. Sabourin returned last week from Montreal where he has been attending the Eucharistic Congress.
A Mr. White of Winnipeg has been viewing the district in search of land to buy. There’s plenty of land to be had if you’ve got the money. Certainly a good locality for mixed farming.
The Manitoba Government telephone gang have unloaded a couple of cars of telephone poles and other material. We can certainly appreciate such things in sight.
To Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Gillis, a bouncing boy. “Be it ever so humble there’s no place like home.”
Soapy looks as happy and pleasant as ever as he gracefully strides down the street. Who said he was married four times to one woman?

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 15 – 1912

1912 Aug 15 – Appointed Manager of Fish Hatchery

Joseph Grenon, one of the oldest fishermen on Lake Winnipegosis, has been appointed manager of the fish hatchery, which is located on Snake Island. Mr. Grenon’s appointment dates from August first.

1912 Aug 15 – Damage at Gilbert Plains

A hail storm passed over Gilbert Plains on Sunday night and did much damage in the vicinity of the town and covered about two miles in width by eight in length.

1912 Aug 15 – Gypsies For Dauphin

A dispatch from Gretna, Man., states that a large party of Syrian gypsies crossed the international boundary at that point from the United States Saturday, and continued their journey northward at noon. They were heading for the Dauphin district. There were seven caravans, 25 people, and a large number of horses. The gypsies had no difficulty in passing the immigration officials, as they were plentifully supplied with money and goods.
From what can be learned the party will locate on the east side of the lake where they will take up homesteads. They are expected to reach town by the latter end of the week.

1912 Aug 15 – Fork River

Miss Alice and Herman Godkin left the early part of the week on a trip to Saskatchewan.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams were visitors to the Dauphin fair.
S. Bailey, F. Cooper, and W.R. Bell returned Saturday from attending the Dauphin exhibition.
Bishop McCartney of All Saints’, and Prof. T. Biggs of Mowat Academy, took a trip south on business.
Mrs. N. Little and daughter Grace, are taking a short vacation.
Mr. Maxim of Winnipeg, spent a week looking over the district. He is well pleased with this part and intends returning shortly with his family. There is plenty of good land within a short distance of the village waiting for settlers.
John O’Neil and family, of Rainy River, returned home after spending a week with Postmaster Lacey of Oak Brae.
Mrs. Peter Robinson spent a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Robinson on the Mossey River.
Mr. McAuley, traveller for the Massey Co., was here a few days on business.
A remark was overheard the other day that our Municipality was run rather loose. On July 5th, our health officer’s attention was drawn to the rubbish dumped a few yards from the Orange Hall. We were promised it would be attended to at once, but we are sorry to say nothing has been done as yet. Ten days after a ratepayer notified the council and they instructed the clerk to notify the health officer. A month has passed and nothing has been done. At the same meeting a by-law was passed presenting the said gentleman with $600 a year. We don’t object doing a fair thing, but in the name of justice let’s have something for it and not be told gone to Winnipeg, Duck Bay or Hong Kong. There is also a by-law against bulls running at large all summer. On numerous occasions complaints have been made. The head beadle remarked that they will have to erect a stable, but at the present rate of going probably nothing will be done. Great Caeasar this is comforting to men who look after their animals. Not long ago Government engineers were up here to lay out roads and make profiles which cost the Municipality a handsome sum of money. Our commissioners instead of following engineers’ instructions make roads so narrow that a man with a wheelbarrow had to wait at cross roads to let a buggy by coming in the opposite direction. Say they dog by-laws are peaches. Have one for every month in the year. What’s the matter Winnipegosis?

Re. the writeup of the Mowat picnic in last week’s Herald and Press. The remarks re certain individuals in Fork River wishing the picnic to be a failure were certainly very uncharitable whoever the writer was as for there being a shortage of lemons that was up to the general manager. Concerning freezers they could have been had as usual for the asking. This is supposed to be a free country and surely people can suit themselves about going to such places without being called to account by some evil thinking person like the writer of the Mowat article.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1912

1912 Aug 8 – Thos. Spence Drowned

Thos. Spence, a half-breed, fell out of a boat he was crossing the Mossey River in at Winnipegosis a few days ago and was drowned. His body was recovered shortly after the accident.
Spence was formerly a resident of Dauphin and was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and several children.

1912 Aug 8 – Ethelbert

James Miles and family have gone to Stenan, Sask., to live. He is going into business there.
Kenneth McLean is seriously ill at the home of his brother, L.M. McLean. He is very sick and fears are entertained for his recovery. He expressed a wish to see his beloved niece, Cassie, who is at Arran and she came done on Sunday evening.
The new bridge entering the town is finished, and is a fair specimen of local work.
Police Magistrate R. Skaife had several cases before him on Saturday afternoon. Vonella Kuzzett, for threatening his brother-in-law, John Malyszyk, was bound over to keep the peace and he of good behaviour for twelve months. Also Vonella Kuzsyk was fined ten dollars and costs for shooting prairie chickens out of season, or in defaulting month. Nikola Kulchyski was also fined ten dollars and costs for an unprovoked assault on Audrian Skelkuoski, of Fork River, or in default one month.

1912 Aug 8 – Fork River

Professor J. Spearing, of Valley River, spent some time here renewing old acquaintances.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, inspected the work done by the dredge and we have been informed that A. Munro has been appointed dredge master for the present and his work so far is satisfactory.
Miss Joyce Sergant returned home after spending a week’s stay with Mrs. W. Coultas in Fork River.
Gorden Weaver has accepted a position of master mechanic at the Armstrong Trading Co. store.
Miss Grant arrived and will wield the rod of correction at the Pine View School for the coming term.
Miss Cameron who was been spending her holidays at her uncle’s, A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned to Neepawa.
We were pleased to see the Rev. H.H. Scrase walking around town with W. King, warden, the other day and hope that he will be able to take up his work this fall.
Mr. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are having a week’s vacation with Noah Johnston, at Mowat Centre.
H. Armstrong has branched out in the contracting and building line and is building an addition to Mr. Nowsade’s residence.
The ratepayers are of the opine that it is time that an itemized statement of accounts of all ward appropriations and general expenditures, as demanded by the status, be got out in pamphlet form.
Mr. Tubath and family are enjoying their vacation at S. Reid’s on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter are visiting with W. Coultas.
A very pleasant evening was spent in Orange Hall on Friday. Dancing was indulged till daylight.
The Misses Tindall, of Rathwell, are having a pleasant time at their uncle’s, Me. T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey.
The stores are doing a rushing business these days in raspberries and blueberries.
The postponed picnic at Lake Dauphin was held on the 30th. It was a fine day. Although there was not as large a turnout as usual a very pleasant time was spent in sports and boating.

1912 Aug 8 – Mowat Picnic

Those who chanced their luck at the Mowat picnic, which took place at Dauphin Lake on Mr. T. Briggs’ land, by his kind permission on Tuesday, July 30th were not sorry they put in an appearance. The rain, which came the previous Tuesday no doubt dampened the spirits of some, otherwise we should have had a much larger turnout; despite the fact that one or two of our Fork River worthies would have liked it to be a failure. Dame nature smiled upon us and we had a roaring good time. Nat Little’s oranges and candies were in good demand. Fortunately everyone’s ice cream freezers are not so easily broken and Mrs. C. Clark’s came in fine and handy. Even the lemons were made to “spin out,” no doubt much to the annoyance of some individuals. Hard lines, some of the folks had to leave early and therefor missed most of the sport. The Fairville boys enjoyed themselves immensely to say nothing of the ladies. We tender our hearty thanks to them for their cooperation and sympathy. They came off well in the sports, except in the football match. Keep smiling, better luck in this line next time. Our best thanks are extended to all who tried to make it a success, especially to the Lacey family, Briggs family and Sandy and Mrs. Cameron. Need I add some of the boys did not forget to look sheep’s eyes at the girls. It’s a habit handed down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 23 – 1914

1914 Jul 23 – Successful Ethelbert Students

The following students from Ethelbert School were successful in passing:
Entrance – Honours – Ben Brackman and Nessie McNullan
Grade IX – Maggie Hagar and William Mastiuck
Grade X – Waldmar Mastiuck

1914 Jul 23 – Fork River

The Orangemen of Fork River held their 12th annual basket picnic on July 13. The weather was fine for the occasion and there was a large turnout many coming from Winnipegosis, Mowat, Sifton and Melton. There was a parade after dinner. Speeches were made by the Rev. E. Williams and Rev. Brother Clixby, and the chairman Brother William King country master. The sports commenced with a football match between Fork River and Mowat which resulted in two goals to nothing in favour of Fork River. Foot racing and other sports were also indulged in till supper. After supper a football match was played off between Winnipegosis and Fork River teams which ended in favour of Fork River, one goal to nothing. The Winnipegosis automobile was busy all night carrying passengers. There was a good dance at night. Thanks due our Winnipegosis friends for furnishing the music, which was much appreciated.
S, Nowosad and family are away for a short time visiting at Vonda, Sask., where John, the son resides.
Edwin King has returned to Saskatchewan after a week’s visit at his home here.
Milton Cooper has returned from a trip to the Winnipeg exhibition.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, spent last week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Brewer, of Ashville, spent a few days here and took a carload of stock south. The man who is raising stock is the one who is making money these days.
Road building is the order of the day.
W. Lockhart, from Ontario, is spending a few days here on business.
Coun. Robertson, of Ward 6, has resigned as he is leaving for the north for a year. Here will be an election to select his successor.
Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Venables both lost valuable clots last week.
There was considerable discussion at the last council meeting by the ratepayers regarding stock running at large and it was decided to enforce the by-law passed. Owners of stock must take care of them during the night or get into trouble.
On Sunday parties driving along Main Street to church had to pass between young men paying baseball, which is dangerous to horse and driver. We would kindly draw the players attention to the last part of clause 3 in by-law No. 5.

1914 Jul 23 – Mr. King replies.

To Editor of the Herald.
Sir – On Friday my attention was drawn to an article in the Press reporting Dr. Shortreed’s meeting at Fork River, said to be written by F.B. Lacey, who presided at that meeting. Personally I have nothing but pity for a man who will write such an untruthful report and makes such uncharitable statements. The meeting was held out on Main Street in front of Mr. Nat Little’s store. Dr. Shortreed was given a good hearing. The doctor quoted some figures he could not prove and Mr. Grenon politely took off his hat to the doctor and asked that a Conservative be allowed to speak. The request was flatly refused. Mr. Little shouted, “Go back to Winnipegosis. What in h-ll did you come here for?” This is the language our friend used in front of his own doorstep to persons who were quietly listening to Dr. Shortreed. When later the doctor repeatedly stated that the Roblin government was kept in power by the rattle his statement was objected to. There was no one there under the influence of liquor unless our Liberal friends. To judge from their pugilistic attitude at times it would lead people to believe they were under the influence of something. Perhaps it was fright, as the 10th was close at hand. At the close of the meeting, the Conservatives offered to pay for the hall and invited Dr. Shortreed and his friends to go there and discuss the matter as long as they liked. The offer was declined. If there was any rowdyism it was not the Conservatives who indulged in it. There were several other misstatements in the article worthy of the man who wrote them. But they are not worthy noticing. We have the greatest respect for a great number of our Liberal friends in Fork River and their opinions are always treated with the consideration they merit and we are sure they do not endorse such tactics.

W. King, President of Conservative Association of Fork River.