Today in the Dauphin Herald – January 8, 1920

Fork River

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bailey, of Bowsman, spent the holidays with Mr. and Mrs. S. Bailey.
Stanley King, of Togo, was home for Christmas dinner. It was a happy gathering of the King family on the old farm, with the four sons at home who had been at the war.
The Unity Christmas tree and concert was held in the Orange hall on the 22nd, was a decided success. The entertainment part of the program was in the hands of the teachers of the school districts of Mowat, Mossey River and Fork River, was a very well rendered and showed that the teachers were alive to the splendid talent in their several districts. Mr. Venables moved a vote of thanks and complimented the different committees on the success of their work. After lunch was served, the children enjoyed games, and later the older ones a dance.
The Grain Growers’ first annual ball will be held in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, Jan. 16th. This will be a masquerade but not necessarily a fancy dress one. Prizes will be given.
I have been informed that the next debate of the Literary Society will be “Horses vs. Tractors for Farm Work”, to be held on Wednesday, Jan. 17th. This should prove an interesting debate. The society is to be congratulated upon the success of their efforts.
The Women’s Institute held a meeting in the Orange Hall, Jan. 3rd, in conjunction with the Grain Growers’ to discuss the engagement of a district nurse or a doctor for the district. There was a fair attendance and after a speech by Dr. Medd, of Winnipegosis, it was decided to take the matter up with the council. A committee from each organization will be appointed for the purpose and we look for results in the near future.
The Grain Growers’ appointed T.B. Venables, Mrs. D.F. Wilson, Jr., and Duncan Briggs as delegates to the Grain Growers’ convention at Brandon. Their report will be given to the public on the night of the ball, Jan. 16th.
Rev. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, will hold service in All Saints’ Church on Jan. 11th, at 3 p.m.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – June 12, 1919

Aged Man Commits Suicide

Peter Kozsowski, who resided 16 miles southwest of town in the Ruthenian settlement in the Riding Mountain, committed suicide on Tuesday. He retired to the stable, laid down and placed the muzzle of a shotgun under his chin, and then touched off the trigger. The charge nearly blew the top of his head off.
Deceased had been in poor health for some time and also had trouble with some of his neighbors which no doubt preyed on his mind. He was 57 years of age, leaves a wife and four children. One son is at the front.
Coroner Rogers visited the scene of the tragedy on Wednesday, and after enquiring into the particulars, decided an inquest was unnecessary.

Fair Notes

The new horse barn being erected at the fair grounds by F. Neely, is nearing completion. It provides accommodation for seventy-five head of horses.
It is the intention of the directors to proceed immediately with the construction of additions to the grand stand, cow barn and poultry house.
The race track and the baseball diamond have been put in good shape and will be available for the sports of July 1st.

Police Court Cases

Justyn Baran appeared before Police Magistrate Hawkins on the charge of theft of harrows, valued at $15. He pleaded guilty and was released on suspended sentence and ordered to pay the costs of court, amounting to $22.50.
Chief Bridle laid information against Frank Crowder for allowing cattle to run at large on the streets. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted and fined $5 and costs of court amounting to $7.
O.Kaczar was convicted on the charge of common assault. He was assessed the costs of court, amounting $20.50.
Edward Rsesnowski was fined $2 for riding a bicycle on the sidewalk.
Herbert Brown was fined $2 and costs for allowing his children on the streets after 10 p.m.

The Strike Situation

The strike situation remains practically unchanged. In some quarters the belief prevails that the chances for a settlement are improving.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, June 10th.
The crops are looking well.
Pte. D.C. Sanderson has returned home from overseas.
A cow belonging to W. Cooper gave birth to a calf with five legs.
A Grain Growers’ meeting was held on Friday, the 6th. Several important matters were brought up. The Famers platform was heartily endorsed by all.
Word has been received that the Bicton Heath School will be returned to the control of the ratepayers at an early date. We will then select our own trustees.
Sunday school is held every Sunday at 3 o’clock at the old Sieffert farm. Service is held at 7 o’clock every Sunday evening at the house of Thos. Toye.

Fork River

Mr. Geo. H. Scriven arrived last week to take charge of the Anglican services during the summer at Fork River, Winnipegosis, Sifton and Mowat. Service will be held in All Saints’, Fork River, on the 15th, at 3 o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Wick and Mrs. Farrell, of Dauphin, were visitors on Sunday at farm of Mr. W. King.
Rec. H.P. Barrett, of Dauphin, took the services on Sabbath. There was a large congregation. Several children were baptized.
Jack Schuchett has gone to Winnipeg to end the strike.
Willie Tuck has returned home after an extended trip to Ontario to recuperate.
W. Northam has a tractor at work breaking up his quarter section south of the town.
J. Richardson, F. Hafenbrak and W. King interviewed the council in behalf of the Agricultural Society for a grant. The council acted generously and voted $250.

Winnipegosis

On Sunday last a large congregation attended the Methodist Church to welcome the Rev. H.P. Barrett, the rector of Dauphin, and Mr. G.B. Scriven, the new Anglican student in charge of this mission. By the courtesy of the Methodist body here, Mr. Scriven will hold divine service in the Methodist Church next Sunday evening, June 15th, at 7:30 p.m. It is to be hoped that as large a congregation will gather as at last Sunday’s service and give Mr. Scriven all the encouragement possible in the work to which he is called here.
Much local interest is in evidence as to the outcome of the King’s Bench court case, Armstrong Trading Co. vs. Grenon and McInnes, which comes up before Judge Curran at Dauphin next week. Commanding legal talent has been engaged by both parties.

Mowat Pioneers Update

Well, it’s been another couple of months since my previous post in May. I was successful in finding my grand uncle’s grave within ‘St. Michael’s Cemetery’ at SW-14-29-18-W1.

st michael's cemetery

Unfortunately, the cemetery was overgrown and I don’t know how many other graves were suppose to be in there. Where I thought the graves would be located was just grass, unless the headstones have been buried, while the rest of the graves were found in the trees/brush.

Anton Masiowski's headstone

There were a handful of other headstones that I was able to take pictures of but I was unable to get all sides.

st michael's grave 01

st michael's grave 02

st michael's grave 03

st michael's grave 04

st michael's grave 05

A surprising find was the grave of Peter Demczyszyn (1909-1930) who was murdered in a case of mistaken identity. You can read more in the previous blog post here.

Peter Demczyszyn headstone

Another interesting find was this mysterious grave at the crossroads of Road 170 North and Road 105 West.

mystery grave 1

mystery grave 2

This is what I have been able to decipher from the headstone.

В. чесьт
славу най Сь
Серцю Г.Н.Ю
Христа

Памятка Се

триць з рок 1921
фундаторка

Анна Чорнобай

From what I can understand it is related to the Chornoboy family, specifically, Anna Chornoboy (1904-). If this is correct then Anna was only 17 years old when she died. Historically, burial at a crossroads was the method for persons who have committed suicide. Was this the case for poor Anna? I am going to do some more investigation in this case.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 5 – 1914

1914 Nov 5 – Had Face and Arms Badly Burned

Mrs. Bradley and her young daughter, Charlotte, of Winnipegosis, were badly burned on Hallowe’en night by the explosion of a spirit lamp. With a number of others they were seated in a locked room around the lamp telling ghost stories. The lamp had been filled to overflowing and when ignited exploded, burning Mrs. Bradley severely about the face and hands. In the excitement the key to unlock the door could not be found and the door had to be broken open before medical aid could be sent for.

1914 Nov 5 – Ethelbert

Arthur Whish is wearing a broad smile these days. It’s a bouncing girl.
John Dolinsky’s two boys are being tried at Portage la Prairie this week for shopbreaking.
K.F. Slipetz is a busy man these days making out marriage licenses and taking in taxes.
Wm. Murray, truant officer, paid our school a visit last week and rounded up a few delinquents. One man was brought before F.M. Skaife for refusing to send his two girls to school and was fined $50 and costs, sentence being suspended. The two girls are now attending school.
Financially, Ethelbert district is as well of as any part of the country. The wood industry is one of our chief resources. The farmers are getting in better shape all the time. It is true we have gone a little slower than some other parts, but we are not feeling the “stringency” quite so bad either.
“How are collections?” Henry Brackman, our merchant prince, says they are good.

1914 Nov 5 – Fork River

Mrs. Sam Reid and daughters, have returned from a two weeks’ visit to Winnipeg.
Willis Miller, of Mowat, is nursing a broken arm caused by coming in contact with a separator belt in motion. Hard luck Willis.
D.F. Wilson has returned from a few days’ visit to Dauphin. He is still a member of the cane brigade.
Coun. Lacey had a tussle the other day with a fire set out by some careless person. The department has promised to appoint a fire guardian here next season, as one or two of these fire fiends around in this neighbourhood want making an example of.
Mrs. F. Cooper and daughter have returned from a week’s visit with friends in Dauphin.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a frequent visitor here of late.
Some one the other day was asking for a remedy to keep ponies from destroying flour and other articles left on the station platform. We would suggest either a herd law or dynamite.
Aubrey King, who was laid up a week from a kick from a horse, is able to follow the plough again.
The tax sale here was a tame affair.
Quite a consignment of firearms and ammunition arrived here lately and the Fork River brigade are practicing hard, some with tin and others with glass targets don’t you know.
The Winnipegosis orator and Coun. Toye attended the council meeting in this burgh on Thursday. Nothing serious happened other than a sort of weary feeling after such a display of talent.
Nurse Tilt is home on the farm for [1 line missing].
Hallowe’en has passed and the mischief-makers surely did the grand. They had a surprise in store for the warden of All Saints’ Church on Sunday. He found the church had been broken open and a large roll of page wire fencing standing up inside the alter rails and before the bell could be used for service he had to climb into the belfry and left an iron gate off and unwind a few yards of sacking. The Methodist Church received a similar visit. Are we living in a Christian land? The minister’s gigger at Winnipegosis was pulled to pieces and carried away so a team had to be hired so the services at other points could be held. Can anyone show us where the fun is in tampering with our churches? Is nothing sacred?

1914 Nov 5 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. McInnes and son went to Dauphin in Monday.
J.P. Grenon left on Monday for Port Arthur.
Mrs. Bradley was quite badly burnt by a gasoline explosion at her home a few days since.
Our bustling little town by the unsalted sea is generally noted for something. I think we hold the record for the number of police magistrates hat have been appointed during the past few years. A good second is the number of police constables. The latest is the appointment of Donald Hattie, our genial blacksmith, to the position of constable. Whose arm, I would like to ask, is stronger and grasp firmer than the brave Donald’s. Offenders beware, arouse not the sleeping lion as you will find a strong combination in the law and Donald when they go together.
Dan Hamilton, auctioneer, was here on Wednesday and sol the effects of the estate of the late Richard Harrison. Truly the voluble Dan is some auctioneer, and can get the last dollar out of an article. It is as good as a side show to hear the running comments of Dan. I heard the running comments of Dan. I heard one fellow remark he should have been a preacher.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Sep 22 – 1910

1910 Sep 22 – Serious Accident

Scaffold Collapses With Three Men – Arthur Milner Has Back Broken
While engaged Wednesday afternoon in shingling the first rows of Engineer R.T. Perkin’s new residence on 3rd Ave. S.W. the scaffold from which they were working suddenly collapsed with A. Milner, Wesley and Wallace Cleaver, throwing the former two to the ground 20 feet below. Wallace Cleaver managed to catch on to a window sill and saved himself. The crash of the falling scaffolding was heard some distance and brought several neighbours to the spot at once. The unfortunate men where extricated from the fallen timbers and carried to the home of Mr. Geo. Sergant and on the arrival of Dr. Bottomley taken to hospital. On examination of the two men it was found that Cleaver had several ribs broken, while Milner was more seriously injured, his spine being broken between the shoulders, and it is feared he has slim chances of recovery.
Milner is a young Englishman and came to Dauphin from Gladstone two years ago. He has taken an active art in he town band as solo cornet player. His father resides in the north of England and is being communicated with.

1910 Sep 22 – Fork River

The funeral of Mrs. S. Lowry took place last Saturday. Quite a large number of friends came to pay their respects, the service was conducted by Rev. W. Rowan.
Mrs. W. Stonehouse who has been away in Ontario for some time returned last Saturday.
Threshing is in full swing and crops are turning out well.
Mr. A.B. Hodgson who has been here for some time left last Saturday for Winnipegosis to enter the employ of the Armstrong Trading Co.
W. Stonehouse is building a house for himself in this village.
Mrs. Northam of Weyburn came here last Wednesday and intends to stay here.
Harvest Festival will be held at Mowat on Sunday, Sept. 25 at 11 o’clock, preacher Rev. H.H. Scrase.

1910 Sep 22 – North Lake

Messrs Hunter and Glendenning have commenced threshing and report wheat turning out good.
Settlers of this district tender their sympathy to Mr. Sam Lowry in his bereavement.
Councillor Lacey is now getting ready to ditch some of the main roads leading to Fork River and Winnipegosis.
Rev. H.H. Scrase preached an impressive sermon at Mowat last Sunday, touching on the death of Mrs. Sam Lowry. Quite a number were present.

1910 Sep 22 – Sifton

Fine weather prevails and is greatly appreciated by every one just now, at this time of the year, as it will either 3 northern or 1 northern. Threshers are busy everywhere about.
W. Kyscyzks new outfit was considerably disabled for a couple of days. Some culprit carefully distributed old iron, taking great pains to well place it in the centre of the sheaves in many of the stooks on Paul Wood’s farm. The separator was somewhat crippled a number of times and had to undergo repairs.
H.L. Troyer, Secretary of the Toronto Bible training school, Toronto and Miss E. Spargue, who have been visiting the mission house for a couple of days left for the east on Tuesday last.
Rev. Sabourin returned last week from Montreal where he has been attending the Eucharistic Congress.
A Mr. White of Winnipeg has been viewing the district in search of land to buy. There’s plenty of land to be had if you’ve got the money. Certainly a good locality for mixed farming.
The Manitoba Government telephone gang have unloaded a couple of cars of telephone poles and other material. We can certainly appreciate such things in sight.
To Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Gillis, a bouncing boy. “Be it ever so humble there’s no place like home.”
Soapy looks as happy and pleasant as ever as he gracefully strides down the street. Who said he was married four times to one woman?

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 15 – 1912

1912 Aug 15 – Appointed Manager of Fish Hatchery

Joseph Grenon, one of the oldest fishermen on Lake Winnipegosis, has been appointed manager of the fish hatchery, which is located on Snake Island. Mr. Grenon’s appointment dates from August first.

1912 Aug 15 – Damage at Gilbert Plains

A hail storm passed over Gilbert Plains on Sunday night and did much damage in the vicinity of the town and covered about two miles in width by eight in length.

1912 Aug 15 – Gypsies For Dauphin

A dispatch from Gretna, Man., states that a large party of Syrian gypsies crossed the international boundary at that point from the United States Saturday, and continued their journey northward at noon. They were heading for the Dauphin district. There were seven caravans, 25 people, and a large number of horses. The gypsies had no difficulty in passing the immigration officials, as they were plentifully supplied with money and goods.
From what can be learned the party will locate on the east side of the lake where they will take up homesteads. They are expected to reach town by the latter end of the week.

1912 Aug 15 – Fork River

Miss Alice and Herman Godkin left the early part of the week on a trip to Saskatchewan.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams were visitors to the Dauphin fair.
S. Bailey, F. Cooper, and W.R. Bell returned Saturday from attending the Dauphin exhibition.
Bishop McCartney of All Saints’, and Prof. T. Biggs of Mowat Academy, took a trip south on business.
Mrs. N. Little and daughter Grace, are taking a short vacation.
Mr. Maxim of Winnipeg, spent a week looking over the district. He is well pleased with this part and intends returning shortly with his family. There is plenty of good land within a short distance of the village waiting for settlers.
John O’Neil and family, of Rainy River, returned home after spending a week with Postmaster Lacey of Oak Brae.
Mrs. Peter Robinson spent a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Robinson on the Mossey River.
Mr. McAuley, traveller for the Massey Co., was here a few days on business.
A remark was overheard the other day that our Municipality was run rather loose. On July 5th, our health officer’s attention was drawn to the rubbish dumped a few yards from the Orange Hall. We were promised it would be attended to at once, but we are sorry to say nothing has been done as yet. Ten days after a ratepayer notified the council and they instructed the clerk to notify the health officer. A month has passed and nothing has been done. At the same meeting a by-law was passed presenting the said gentleman with $600 a year. We don’t object doing a fair thing, but in the name of justice let’s have something for it and not be told gone to Winnipeg, Duck Bay or Hong Kong. There is also a by-law against bulls running at large all summer. On numerous occasions complaints have been made. The head beadle remarked that they will have to erect a stable, but at the present rate of going probably nothing will be done. Great Caeasar this is comforting to men who look after their animals. Not long ago Government engineers were up here to lay out roads and make profiles which cost the Municipality a handsome sum of money. Our commissioners instead of following engineers’ instructions make roads so narrow that a man with a wheelbarrow had to wait at cross roads to let a buggy by coming in the opposite direction. Say they dog by-laws are peaches. Have one for every month in the year. What’s the matter Winnipegosis?

Re. the writeup of the Mowat picnic in last week’s Herald and Press. The remarks re certain individuals in Fork River wishing the picnic to be a failure were certainly very uncharitable whoever the writer was as for there being a shortage of lemons that was up to the general manager. Concerning freezers they could have been had as usual for the asking. This is supposed to be a free country and surely people can suit themselves about going to such places without being called to account by some evil thinking person like the writer of the Mowat article.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 8 – 1912

1912 Aug 8 – Thos. Spence Drowned

Thos. Spence, a half-breed, fell out of a boat he was crossing the Mossey River in at Winnipegosis a few days ago and was drowned. His body was recovered shortly after the accident.
Spence was formerly a resident of Dauphin and was about 35 years of age. He leaves a wife and several children.

1912 Aug 8 – Ethelbert

James Miles and family have gone to Stenan, Sask., to live. He is going into business there.
Kenneth McLean is seriously ill at the home of his brother, L.M. McLean. He is very sick and fears are entertained for his recovery. He expressed a wish to see his beloved niece, Cassie, who is at Arran and she came done on Sunday evening.
The new bridge entering the town is finished, and is a fair specimen of local work.
Police Magistrate R. Skaife had several cases before him on Saturday afternoon. Vonella Kuzzett, for threatening his brother-in-law, John Malyszyk, was bound over to keep the peace and he of good behaviour for twelve months. Also Vonella Kuzsyk was fined ten dollars and costs for shooting prairie chickens out of season, or in defaulting month. Nikola Kulchyski was also fined ten dollars and costs for an unprovoked assault on Audrian Skelkuoski, of Fork River, or in default one month.

1912 Aug 8 – Fork River

Professor J. Spearing, of Valley River, spent some time here renewing old acquaintances.
Mr. Stevenson, government engineer, inspected the work done by the dredge and we have been informed that A. Munro has been appointed dredge master for the present and his work so far is satisfactory.
Miss Joyce Sergant returned home after spending a week’s stay with Mrs. W. Coultas in Fork River.
Gorden Weaver has accepted a position of master mechanic at the Armstrong Trading Co. store.
Miss Grant arrived and will wield the rod of correction at the Pine View School for the coming term.
Miss Cameron who was been spending her holidays at her uncle’s, A. Cameron, of Mowat, returned to Neepawa.
We were pleased to see the Rev. H.H. Scrase walking around town with W. King, warden, the other day and hope that he will be able to take up his work this fall.
Mr. Moxam and family, of Winnipeg, are having a week’s vacation with Noah Johnston, at Mowat Centre.
H. Armstrong has branched out in the contracting and building line and is building an addition to Mr. Nowsade’s residence.
The ratepayers are of the opine that it is time that an itemized statement of accounts of all ward appropriations and general expenditures, as demanded by the status, be got out in pamphlet form.
Mr. Tubath and family are enjoying their vacation at S. Reid’s on the Mossey River.
Mrs. Chapman and daughter are visiting with W. Coultas.
A very pleasant evening was spent in Orange Hall on Friday. Dancing was indulged till daylight.
The Misses Tindall, of Rathwell, are having a pleasant time at their uncle’s, Me. T.N. Briggs, on the Mossey.
The stores are doing a rushing business these days in raspberries and blueberries.
The postponed picnic at Lake Dauphin was held on the 30th. It was a fine day. Although there was not as large a turnout as usual a very pleasant time was spent in sports and boating.

1912 Aug 8 – Mowat Picnic

Those who chanced their luck at the Mowat picnic, which took place at Dauphin Lake on Mr. T. Briggs’ land, by his kind permission on Tuesday, July 30th were not sorry they put in an appearance. The rain, which came the previous Tuesday no doubt dampened the spirits of some, otherwise we should have had a much larger turnout; despite the fact that one or two of our Fork River worthies would have liked it to be a failure. Dame nature smiled upon us and we had a roaring good time. Nat Little’s oranges and candies were in good demand. Fortunately everyone’s ice cream freezers are not so easily broken and Mrs. C. Clark’s came in fine and handy. Even the lemons were made to “spin out,” no doubt much to the annoyance of some individuals. Hard lines, some of the folks had to leave early and therefor missed most of the sport. The Fairville boys enjoyed themselves immensely to say nothing of the ladies. We tender our hearty thanks to them for their cooperation and sympathy. They came off well in the sports, except in the football match. Keep smiling, better luck in this line next time. Our best thanks are extended to all who tried to make it a success, especially to the Lacey family, Briggs family and Sandy and Mrs. Cameron. Need I add some of the boys did not forget to look sheep’s eyes at the girls. It’s a habit handed down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 23 – 1914

1914 Jul 23 – Successful Ethelbert Students

The following students from Ethelbert School were successful in passing:
Entrance – Honours – Ben Brackman and Nessie McNullan
Grade IX – Maggie Hagar and William Mastiuck
Grade X – Waldmar Mastiuck

1914 Jul 23 – Fork River

The Orangemen of Fork River held their 12th annual basket picnic on July 13. The weather was fine for the occasion and there was a large turnout many coming from Winnipegosis, Mowat, Sifton and Melton. There was a parade after dinner. Speeches were made by the Rev. E. Williams and Rev. Brother Clixby, and the chairman Brother William King country master. The sports commenced with a football match between Fork River and Mowat which resulted in two goals to nothing in favour of Fork River. Foot racing and other sports were also indulged in till supper. After supper a football match was played off between Winnipegosis and Fork River teams which ended in favour of Fork River, one goal to nothing. The Winnipegosis automobile was busy all night carrying passengers. There was a good dance at night. Thanks due our Winnipegosis friends for furnishing the music, which was much appreciated.
S, Nowosad and family are away for a short time visiting at Vonda, Sask., where John, the son resides.
Edwin King has returned to Saskatchewan after a week’s visit at his home here.
Milton Cooper has returned from a trip to the Winnipeg exhibition.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, spent last week with Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. Brewer, of Ashville, spent a few days here and took a carload of stock south. The man who is raising stock is the one who is making money these days.
Road building is the order of the day.
W. Lockhart, from Ontario, is spending a few days here on business.
Coun. Robertson, of Ward 6, has resigned as he is leaving for the north for a year. Here will be an election to select his successor.
Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Venables both lost valuable clots last week.
There was considerable discussion at the last council meeting by the ratepayers regarding stock running at large and it was decided to enforce the by-law passed. Owners of stock must take care of them during the night or get into trouble.
On Sunday parties driving along Main Street to church had to pass between young men paying baseball, which is dangerous to horse and driver. We would kindly draw the players attention to the last part of clause 3 in by-law No. 5.

1914 Jul 23 – Mr. King replies.

To Editor of the Herald.
Sir – On Friday my attention was drawn to an article in the Press reporting Dr. Shortreed’s meeting at Fork River, said to be written by F.B. Lacey, who presided at that meeting. Personally I have nothing but pity for a man who will write such an untruthful report and makes such uncharitable statements. The meeting was held out on Main Street in front of Mr. Nat Little’s store. Dr. Shortreed was given a good hearing. The doctor quoted some figures he could not prove and Mr. Grenon politely took off his hat to the doctor and asked that a Conservative be allowed to speak. The request was flatly refused. Mr. Little shouted, “Go back to Winnipegosis. What in h-ll did you come here for?” This is the language our friend used in front of his own doorstep to persons who were quietly listening to Dr. Shortreed. When later the doctor repeatedly stated that the Roblin government was kept in power by the rattle his statement was objected to. There was no one there under the influence of liquor unless our Liberal friends. To judge from their pugilistic attitude at times it would lead people to believe they were under the influence of something. Perhaps it was fright, as the 10th was close at hand. At the close of the meeting, the Conservatives offered to pay for the hall and invited Dr. Shortreed and his friends to go there and discuss the matter as long as they liked. The offer was declined. If there was any rowdyism it was not the Conservatives who indulged in it. There were several other misstatements in the article worthy of the man who wrote them. But they are not worthy noticing. We have the greatest respect for a great number of our Liberal friends in Fork River and their opinions are always treated with the consideration they merit and we are sure they do not endorse such tactics.

W. King, President of Conservative Association of Fork River.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 18 – 1914

1914 Jun 18 – Off for Camp Sunday

The 32nd Manitoba Horse leave on Sunday night for camp at Sewell. The Dauphin troop will go ?? strong this year. There are expected to be 2000 men all told at the camp. Moving pictures will be one of the sources of entertainment.
The officers of the Dauphin troop are as follows:
Major G.C.J. Walker
Captain H.K. Newcombe
Lieutenants E. Manby, M.F. Wilson, L. Shand, E.P. Millward
Regiment S.M., A.C. Goodall
Squadron S.M., Fistches
Sergeants T. Coghlan, G. Fraser, T.D. Massy, Alguire
Corporals W. Cede, H. Wade, Alguire, Chard
The ??? party consisting of C.N.S. Wade, Frank ???, cook, and Private W. ??? have on Thursday night for the camp.

1914 Jun 18 – Ethelbert

Court of revision will be held here Wednesday, 17th inst., with Judge Ryan presiding.
The old McLean flourmill is being overhauled and rebuilt. Another story will be added. The Kennedy Mercantile Co. now own the mill.
The school accommodation is now over taxed, the outcome of this will be that a new building will have to be erected, or an addition built. How would it do to have a consolidated school, and build an up-to-date building. Ethelbert is going to grow, let us anticipate the future.
Principal White is in Dauphin this week with five scholars writing on entrance, grade IX and grade X. The following are the pupils: Entrance, Jessie McMillian and Ben Brachman; grade 9, Maggie Wager and Willie Masticub; grade 10, Wsldmar Masticub.
The crops are looking well, but rain is now needed.
F.K. Slipets, our municipal clerk, is building a new house.
On Thursday night last there was a baseball match between the married and single men. The benedicts won by a nice margin. Ethelbert has some good ball material and will be heard of during the summer when they get more practice.
A petition is in circulation with the object of having the C.N.R. move their station at this point. The location of the building is such that it makes it very inconvenient for passengers and the public to reach it, having to cross the sliding to reach it. It is expected that the company will comply with this reasonable request.
N.A. Hryhorenznk, general agent for the International Harvester Co., went to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Jun 18 – Fork River

Frank Hafenbrak spent a few days in Dauphin last week. While away he purchased a team of mares with foals at foot.
D. Kennedy was a visitor to Dauphin last week.
Wm. Murray, of Dauphin, provincial auditor, is staying with Clerk Wilson while auditing the municipal books.
W. King has returned from a trip to Winnipeg on municipal affairs. He reports the crops are looking well along the line.
Nat Little was unfortunate in losing one of his valuable brood mares last week.
A. McDonald is busy these days on the road from the A.T. Co. Ltd.
Cap. Coffey, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a visit in his automobile last week.
The boys got busy last week and organized a football club. The first game of the season was played on Saturday night between Mowat and Fork River, which ended in a draw.
John Angus, of Winnipegosis, spent the weekend here and is of the opinion this is the most restful place he has stuck in his travels. There are several others believe so, too.
Mr. Atkinson, of Prince Albert, has rented the Chase farm and is busy seeding it with barley.
Gen. Neil, of Rainy River, has returned to Mowat experimental duck farm for the summer.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 14 – 1914

1914 May 14 – Bailiff Reported to Judge

The Fork River council has a grievance against the county court bailiff, and passed the following resolution at its last meeting:
Moved by Coun. Richardson, seconded by Coun. Toye. “That the clerk write to Judge Ryan as to the way in which Bailiff McLean handled the seizure made by him in the interests of the municipality, making a full explanation.”

1914 May 14 – Bullet in Head

A lamentable accident occurred at Ethelbert on Tuesday which may be attended with fatal results. Mary Bolinski, aged nine years, and her brother, aged 7, were about to start for school when the boy picked up a .22 rifle and accidentally discharged it, the bullet entering the back of the girl’s head. The girl was at once brought to the hospital here and is still alive with a possible chance of recovery.

1914 May 14 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred on Tuesday three miles north of Sclater by which Joseph Slobodigian lost his life. It appears that Slobodigian took his gun out for the purpose of shooting a dog. When the dog saw Slobodigian approaching he ran away and the man followed the animal. Shortly after this his wife heard the report of a gun, but paid no attention to it, thinking that her husband had fired at the dog. The man not returning after the lapse of a short time the woman went to hunt for him. She discovered him about 200 yards from the house lying helpless, with his right leg shattered from the contents of the gun, which had been accidentally discharged. The woman immediately went for help, but when she returned with a neighbour her husband was expiring, having bled to death.
The poor woman is left with two small children and without any means of support. Here is a case worthy of assistance. Any contributions sent to Mr. W.P. Hrusgowy, Sclater, will be duty, acknowledged, and the woman and children provided for.

1914 May 14 – Thrilling Rescue from River

One Thursday of last week a young man named LaCharite and Archie McDonald, son of John McDonald, livery stable keeper of Ochre River, had a thrilling experience and a narrow escape from drowning. The boys had gone to the river for a barrel of water with a team and desmocrat, which was one of their daily duties, and on account of the high water in the river, occasioned by the recent heavy rains they either mistook the place where they usually drove in or else the bank caved in, and let the horses into the deep water. The horses and rig were swept down the river and the animals in their struggle soon got entangled in the harness. In the meantime the two men were struggling in the torrent and were carried down the stream and would undoubtedly have been drowned but for some men who happened to be on the town bridge with pike poles, keeping the brushwood from the bridge, and who caught the boys as they came along and held them until help arrived and they were rescued.
The horses were carried downs stream about half a mile and caught up on a tree in the river. The rig and harness were recovered some days after.
Mr. McDonald was away at Plumes when the accident occurred and was appalled of his loss by telephone.

1914 May 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Theodore Miles, of Kamsack, was a visitor for a few days at the home of Mrs. Fred Cooper, on the Fork River.
Joe Lockhart and Commodore F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
F. Cooper was a visitor to Dauphin for a few days last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor to the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River on Friday.
Nurse Tilt was a visitor at the homestead on the Mossey for a few days lately.
Professor Brown, who was a slave for 23 years, gave a very interesting lecture lately in the Methodist Church on “Slavery.”
The wet weather last week put a stop to seeding for a few days. Work will go a head now with a rush.
Mrs. McEachern has returned from a visit to Winnipeg.
The annual vestry meeting was held in All Saints’ Church with E. Williams, lay reader, in the chair. The annual report was read by W. King, secretary and adopted as read. The following officers were elected for the coming year: W. King, minister’s warden; C.E. Bailey, people’s warden of Fork River; C. Bradley, warden, Winnipegosis; W. King, secretary-treasurer for the missions; John Reid, warden, Sifton. Delegate to Synod, W. King, organist, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Sam Hughes, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, passed through here from a trip to Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and son spent the weekend with Mrs. W.D. King at Dauphin.

1914 May 14 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Lawson and Mr. Pilgrim, of Dauphin, were here last week doing some cement work on the fox ranch.
The school by-law, voted on last week, was carried by a substantial majority. We should be glad of this, for no money can be spent by the people to better advantage than that which we put into schools. More than a few of us are of the opinion that more money should have been voted and a better class of school built. It is now up to us to make the best of it.
With the continued cool weather the ice in the lake is liable to remain firm for some time to come. The late rain pelted into it considerably, however.
Chas. Denby returned from Dauphin on Monday. He has been to Kamsack helping some of the government officials to stock the lake there with ???. They took about 150 fish from here in tanks. Charlie, you know is quite a ???, and [1 line missing] each fist cost the government $3. If they live and thrive even this sum is not too much.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 7 – 1914

1914 May 7 – Escaped in Male Attire

Woman at station on Tuesday Night Dressed in a Man’s Suit – Who was the Woman?
When court was called on Wednesday morning there was a surprise when Chief Bridle gave out that Mrs. Murphy had left town and would not appear to answer the charge of attempting to commit suicide.
How the woman managed to get away is now what is puzzling the police as she was supposed to be in bed at home sick and the trains were being closely watched.
But there is a possible explanation of how the escape was effected. On Tuesday night a woman dressed in a man’s suit was observed on the station platform by several who were there. So sure was the conductor of the train that the supposed man was a woman that he offered to be the cigars with an acquaintance that such was the case. The disguise was very good but the woman, whoever she was, evidently forgot one essential in her make-up, which was a source of much amusement to the bystanders.

MRS. MURPHY HEARD FROM.

This (Thursdays) morning the Herald received a little from Mrs. Murphy, the postmark being Winnipeg, May 6th. In this letter she says that “she has to thank the liars of Dauphin for the trouble they have caused her.” She further remarks that after it is too late she has had her eyes opened and warms other women to beware and not believe liars as she did until it is too late to mend the damage done.

1914 May 7 – Met Instant Death

Maurice Frobisher and his brother arrived a short time ago from St. Norbert, Man., and took up homesteads at Asham Point, in the Ste. Rose district. On Saturday last the two brothers were going by ox team to Ste. Rose. Maurice was sitting in the back end of the wagon holding a rifle, when it accidently discharged, the bullet entering his arm, passing to his jaw and came out at the back of his head. Death was instantaneous.
Dr. Harrington was telephoned for and went to Ste. Rose. After learning the circumstances be decided that an inquest was not necessary.
Deceased was 40 years of age and unmarried.

1914 May 7 – Prairie Fire Does Damage

Prairie fires were running southwest of the town in the Mayflower and Spruce Bluff districts on Friday and Saturday. A dwelling on the farm of Arthur Bule, near the Mayflower School, was burned. A. Maynard lost a quantity of hay and other settlers suffered minor losses.

1914 May 7 – Ethelbert

Seeding has been going ahead actively and much of the wheat has been ???. The recent rain held things up for sure.
Very little wood is now being shipped out, still there are always a few cars moving.
Business is a little on the quiet side of late. Our burgh is becoming quite an egg expecting centre, many cases being shipped out weekly.
Wm. Morray, truancy officer, is visiting schools in our municipality. He is very busy going from one farmer to another making them send their children to school. On account of his visit the school trustees of Ethelbert S.D. have to provide more accommodation for the children that are of school age and who must attend. The people are satisfied with the action of the government in this move and will assist the officer in every way in enforcing the law.

1914 May 7 – Fork River

R. Corbett and his assistant returned to Winnipeg after taking the levels for draining a township and a half and laying out the road to Winnipegosis.
The English Church concert held in the Orange Hall, May 1st, was a very successful one. Our critic here admits it the best. A large number came from Sifton and put on a dialogue, which, to say the least was a laugh maker from start to finish. It pleased everyone. Our Winnipegosis friends were out in force and helped materially and that with the help of Fork River contingent a good evening’s entertainment was enjoyed. An excellent super was provided by the ladies. After supper several hired the hall for a dance and splendid music was supplied by Mr. Russell and sons.
Contractor Briggs is busy these days trying to make Main Street passable. Next thing we know Councilor Richardson will be putting down the balance of the sidewalk and all will be rosy.
John Clemens and family have left for McCreary, where they will reside in the future.
W. King has been appointed registration clerk for the northern portion of Gilbert Plains constituency. He starts in on the 12th of May at Winnipegosis.
Richard Harrison and E. Bickle, of South Bay, were visitors here at the council meeting during court of revision.
The dwelling house of J. McDonald caught fire last week. Captain Wilson and the fire brigade were soon on the ground. There was very little damage done.
Mr. McMillian, of Cyprus River, is a visitor at the home of A. Cameron of Mowat.
Our Mowat friend states they have put a bell and tower on the Mowat School house and yet they forgot to put a foundation under it. Of course, our friend usually does things different from others, which accounts for his being in a kicking frame of mind. He goes on to state the folks he sends to take his mail out, take all the way from one day to a week and the sometimes longer before he gets his mail back. What a shame. We trust he got the paper which contained the write up of how his pet government let the contractors mulet the people out of forty million dollars in building the Transcontinental Railway. Say, F.B. don’t get sore over our convention at Gilbert Plains. Have you forgotten the fuss you made with your friends here and up north because they wanted a share of the swag when you carried the chequebook and had to take a holiday for a few weeks in Winnipeg. You were not missed a bit. Have the common decency to keep in your own backyard, as we believe the glass in our house is of better material than yours and as in the past you can’t afford to indulge in stone throwing.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 23 – 1914

1914 Apr 23 – Strange Accident

An unusual accident occurred at Gilbert Plains when Howard Bobcock, aged 13, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Bobcock, who reside about 4 miles out, hanged himself. The youth had been playing with his little sister and had asked her to come to the barn with him, where he would show her how Charles Best, who committed suicide last week, had hanged himself. The girl started toward the barn, but was called to the home by her mothers. When she retuned to the barn 15 minutes later she found Howard hanging from a rafter with a strap around his neck.

1914 Apr 23 – Fork River

Mrs. J. Rice, having spent the holidays at Dauphin, has returned to her duties at North Lake School.
E. Humphreys, Geo. Briggs, and Capt. F. Storrar spent Easter week in Dauphin.
Mr. Corbett, government engineer, arrived from Winnipeg a few days ago.
D. Kennedy and W. King have returned from attending the Conservative convention at Gilbert Plains. They report a large gathering rom all parts of the constituency.
T.N. Briggs has left for Hartney to bring in a card-load of horses for his farm.
F.F. Hafenbrak and J. Richardson, of Mowat, were recent visitors to Dauphin.
T. Lockhart arrived from the west and is spending a few days with his brother, Joe, on the Mossey River.
W. Williams has started sawing in town and is busy making lumber for the farmers.
The Methodist “at home” in the Orange hall on Friday was well attended. A large number from Winnipegosis were at the dance.
We notice our Mowat friend is sore as ever over his defeat and wants to know where the drainage agitators are. He was told, he says, that on the advent of “new blood” into the council.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 3 – 1913

1913 Apr 3 – Nellie McClung Recitals

Mrs. Nellie L. McClung, the popular Manitoba novelist, favoured Dauphin with her first visit this week. She came under the auspices of the Presbyterian Ladies’ Aid, and gave two recitals in the town hall on Monday and Tuesday evenings, respectively. Mrs. McClung gave all her numbers from her own books, “Sowing Seeds in Danny,” The Second Chance,” “The Black Creek Stopping House.” The selections contained variety of wholesome humour and pathos. The splendid character of the author is reflected in her works. Each reading had many lessons to teach. One might go as far as to say some of them were sugar coated sermons. The entertainer was assisted by some of our best local talent including Miss Harvely, the ladies’ quartette, Misses Johnston, Gunne, Coutts, and Cadman; the male quartette, Messrs. Park, Argue, Johnston and Stelck; Mrs. Jewsbury, Miss Astley and Mr. Main. On Tuesday evening the McMurray orchestra was in attendance.

1913 Apr 3 – Ethelbert

Mr. Finch, of Minitonas, took the services at the Methodist Church on Easter Sunday, to full congregation. He gave two very instructive sermons, and was very much appreciated.
We had a novel and spirited debate at the church on Friday night, when six debaters dealt with the subject of “Should women be allowed to vote?” Mr. McPhedran, Mrs. Munro and H. Brackman took the affirmative and Mr. Brown, teacher, Cyril Skaife and N. Booth took the negative.
Two men were arrested on Friday night for a savage attack upon one of the councillors named Mandryk. A preliminary trial was held and upon taking the evidence a fresh summon was taken out and the case will be dealt with Thursday, the 3rd inst.
The council intend putting two cells into the lock up of a substantial and safe character like those at Dauphin. We need a good man as constable.

1913 Apr 3 – Fork River

C. Bradley and family, were visitors from the Lake tow at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mrs. McQuigge and family, of Dauphin, returned home from visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cooper on the Fork.
Miss Alice Godkin and Katie Williams have returned from a short visit to Dauphin.
A car load of young stock were shipped from here by a farmer for his ranch at Lloydminster, Sask.
The elevator has closed down for the season and John Clemens and family left for Dauphin, where they will reside.
Dave Shinks, general manager for the Williams Lumber Co., east of Lake Dauphin, is renewing acquaintances around town this week.
Mrs. Scrase and Mrs. Kennedy and family spent the weekend at Winnipegosis with friends.
Harcourt Benner returned to his duties at Dauphin and his many friends are pleased to hear his vacation here has been beneficial to him. Come again Harcourt.
Mrs. R. McEacheron and son, Donny, returned from a two months visit to friends in Nova Scotia.
The Woman’s Auxiliary of All Saints’ Church held their annual meeting in the church on Wednesday, March 26th. Quite a number were present. The secretary’s and treasurer’s report were received, showing a good year’s work with a cash balance on hand. The officers elected for the coming year are president, Mrs. W. King; vice. Mrs. Lacey, Mowat; secretary, Mrs. H. Scrase; treasurer, Wm. King.
F.B. Lacey, of Oak Brae, who has been under the weather for some time, is getting around again.
Mr. Gordon and family, of Mowat, have left for North Dakota for a change of climate.
Dunk Kennedy paid the lake town a visit on Sunday.
“Say, Mike, some one’s wife got sick, I am told, and they phoned for a doctor and by the time he arrived the baby had grown bald headed and was crying with the toothache.”
“Well, Pat, that shows we are not paying $600 a year for speed. If we are it got miscarried that time.”
“Now, Mike, don’t put your foot into it again. You know that unless you can yell like “Hell-o” they don’t catch on. It’s the fellow at the other end. Wow.”
“Say, Mike, did yees catch on to the way the members of parliament from the different provinces voted on the proposal of the government to build three Dreadnoughts, to be added to the British fleet, pending the formation of Canada’s permanent naval policy? It’s instructive.”
Our readers should note whence came the opposition. The vote against the government’s proposal as the division recorded in Hansard, was made up thus:

Against
Quebec (with 65 members) 44
Prince Edward Island (with 4 members) 2
Nova Scotia (with 18 members) 9
New Brunswick (with 13 members) 5
Saskatchewan (with 10 members) 6
Alberta (with 7 members) 6
Manitoba (with 10 members) 2
British Columbia (with 7 members) 0
Ontario (with 66 members) 11
Total opposition 85

It is not significant that 75 out of 85 members from the province of the United Empire Loyalist (Ontario) supported the measure, while 44 out of 65 from Quebec opposed it? Besides the 44 members from Quebec, at least 9 members from other provinces who voted against the proposal represented French ridings, making a total of 53, so that at the very outside figure only 32 coming from English speaking ridings, out of a total 221 members, tried to force the government to the country. If time were taken to go further into details it could be shown that one-half of these 32 members represented ridings in which there was a considerable sprinkling of French-Canadian and foreigners. So there is every reason for the assertion that the British people of Canada are well content with Borden’s naval.

1913 Apr 3 – Winnipegosis

The Armstrong Trading Co. has purchased and received a car load of horses from Winnipeg which they have deposited on their farm. A chance is open for any one wishing to purchase a good team. The company is preparing to build an addition to their store, also a house on the farm.
Mr. McArthur and daughters are again residents of their home here. We hope Mr. McArthur will soon join hem, fully recovered.
Mr. Scrase and Master Archer visited in town last week, and were the guests of Mrs. Bradley.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and children, of Fork River, are visiting her mother for the week past. Mr. Kennedy joined her on Sunday to avail themselves of a trip to Snake Island with Inspector and Mrs. White.
Mrs. Langlois and sons have gone on a trip to Le Pas to visit friends there.
The Anglican Church entertainment had to be postponed owing to the interest taken in the moving pictures exhibited here the past week and contined this one, which will make it difficult to satisfactorily produce the playette, “When Greek meets Greek” on the 4th as intended. An interesting competition is being held to raise extra church funds. The cigarette quilt won by Mr. Bradley at a raffle recently being the reward.
Messrs. Coffey, Whale, Ketcheson, White and others are attending a meeting of the masonic order this week in Dauphin.
The spring, though tardy, is likely to prove a delightful one at the Lake.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 26 – 1914

1914 Mar 26 – Fined $60

Nicola Brattiko, who accidentally shot Mike Kuzyk several weeks ago south of Winnipegosis, was fined $60 and costs a few days ago, for hunting out of season. W.H. Joyce, deputy provincial game guardian of Dauphin, was the prosecutor.

1914 Mar 26 – Fork River

Colin Inkster, of Dauphin, one of the old-timers, was a visitor here renewing acquaintances for a short time.
Sam Reid left for a week’s holiday in the south.
Coun. F. Hechter, of Winnipegosis, stayed over after the council meeting, the guest of Mr. Kennedy. Frank is contemplating using an aeroplane next time as the “automobilly” got stuck in the snow and he had to do a little sprinting to get here but he arrived smiling.
W. Bell returned from spending the winter with his friends at Russell. He is looking hale and hearty.
Reuben Coombers returned from a month’s visit at Selkirk and reports a pleasant time.
A. Shinks, who has been working all winter with the Williams Lumber Co. Ltd., arrived in town and has left for his homestead at Vonda, Sask.
Dr. Medd visited a family out west that was said to have the fever, which rumour upon investigation was found to be incorrect. This is too bad as the doctor had a long trip for nothing.
The Lake Dauphin fishermen’s ball proved a success, the hall being well filled. Several from Winnipegosis attended and all report a good time, although it was stormy.
Sid Coffey, of Winnipegosis, put on his moving picture show on Saturday. Judging from the crowd it had, there being hardly standing room, it was satisfactory to all when attended.
While it is a delicate subject we can’t help noticing the contrast of these turnouts in comparison with the congregations attending the two churches. Any excuse is made for not attending divine service. It is poor encouragement to young students who give their services to these [1 line missing] existence.
We notice our Mowat friend is still grinding out his imaginary P.O. troubles. He ought to take to the woods now.
James Gunness has received a 3 horse power gasoline engine for his track car. It certainly can go some when Jim and Conductor Sid get behind it.
Frank Hafenbrak has returned from Rochester, Minn., with his farther, I. Hafenbrak. We are sorry to hear he is not improving as fast as expected.
John Clements was in town for a short time Monday on business.
Nat Little is busy drawing stone for foundation for a new stable.

1914 Mar 26 – Fork River

J.T. Wiggins representative of the Steel Granary & Culvert Co., of St. Boniface, interviewed some members of the council regarding graders and road machines. Before leaving he appointed D. Kennedy, of the A.T. Co., their local agent.
Mrs. D. Robinson, of Mowat, returned from spending the winter months among friends in Eastern Ontario.
Nurse Tilt arrived fro Dauphin and intends spending some time on the farm.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is staying a short time with her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Hafenbrak received a telegram on Friday from his father’s doctor that he was wanted at once at Rochester, Minnesota, where Mr. Hafenbrak is receiving treatment. He left at once for the south.
The Shetland pony, Hamlet, was shipped to Cypress River by express, the little fellow being a trifle too heavy for parcel post. Romeo and Juliet are left behind. Mr. Little has plenty more to pick from.
Mrs. McWilliams has left for the south to recuperate after her illness. We trust she will be benefited by her trip.
Joseph Lockhart is off on a visit and will no doubt take in the Kerfanko trial as a variety during his absence. Joe likes to be up-to-date.
C.O. Allen, Dominion Land Survey or, is back in these parts in connection with water power or the town of Dauphin.
Don’t forget the Lake Dauphin Fishermen’s Ball in the Orange Hall on Friday evening, the 27th March, or you will miss a good time.
The weather is mild again and if this continues we will soon be on the land ploughing.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is visiting at Dauphin.

1914 Mar 26 – Winnipegosis

About one hundred couples attended the St. Patrick’s Ball, given by Mr. and Mrs. McInnis, in the Hotel Winnipegosis, and all had a very enjoyable time. The ballroom was beautifully decorated for the occasion and the guests tripped the light fantastic until the wee small hours of the morn. We haven’t space here to give a description of all the beautiful dressers worn by the ladies, so will just say they were the best dressed lot of ladies that ever graced a ball room in Winnipegosis. Mr. and Mrs. McInnis are ideal entertainers.
The fishermen’s ball was held Tuesday night, March 24th, in Victoria Hall.
It is reported another hotel will be built here this spring on the corner where the Lake View was burned.
There is talk of a bank being opened up here this spring and we hope he report is true. A bank is very much needed.
Frank Hechter has returned from Winnipeg. We understand he engaged a teacher for the third room that is to be opened up.
A party of surveyors arrived on arrived on Monday. They are leaving on Wednesday to inspect the work done by J.E. Jackson this winter.
A meeting of Conservative Association was held in Cohen’s hall on Monday might for the purpose of electing officers and appointing delegates to attend the convention at Gilbert Plains. A very large number were in attendance and the great interest taken in the meeting shows that the Conservatives are anxiously awaiting the coming election. J.P. Grenon was elected president.
Miss Phoebe Denby, who has been visiting friends in Winnipeg and Selkirk, returned last Monday. Her sister Ethel stopped in Winnipeg to attend college.
Coun. Hechter motored to Fork River on Tuesday morning to attend the council meeting
Mr. Finlayson, inspector of Dominion fish hatcheries paid our Sake Island hatchery a visit this week and reports everything in a very satisfactory condition.
Geo. Cunliffe has returned from spending a few days in Winnipeg.
Archie McDonnell has the gold fever and is going to the Pas to seek his fortune. If Archie makes good we will all get a piece of it.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 20 – 1910

1910 Jan 20 – Jammed to Death

Thos. Michael a teamster at one of Barrows lumber camps at Grandview, was jammed Tuesday between two sleigh loads of logs on a runway and crushed so badly that he died shortly after the accident. Dr. Shortreed brought him to the hospital here Wednesday morning and he expired shortly after arriving. He is an American and his home is in Wisconsin.

1910 Jan 20 – Fork River

The Rev. H.H. and Mrs. Scrase and Mrs. King visited Mowat and Oak Brae district last week.
Services are held at Mowat schoolhouse fortnightly by the Rev. H.H. Scrase regularly at 11 o’clock. The missioner welcomes everybody in the district to these services.
The Englishman’s rest at Fishing River is now opened with Mr. A.B. Hodgson in charge.
We are sorry to hear that Mr. W. Benner is down with typhoid fever. We hope to hear that he will soon be around again.
Some of our ratepayers would like to ask our Mossey River Council if the December meeting has been published or was it of so little importance being the wind up of the year we have not seen it yet.
Another matter under the old Reeve and council a yearly report was published and distributed to the ratepayers showing the amount awarded to each ward and how it was spent, the amount of salary and mileage to each councillor and the amount paid to each road commissioner for letting work and mileage in each ward. If such a report of 1909 were published it would prove interesting reading for the ratepayers. The auditors report printed on a piece of paper four inches square is not enough for the amount of taxes raised. E should have a fuller report gotten out by the Sec.-Treas. at the end of each year.

1910 Jan 20 – To the Editor of the Herald

SIR: – We notice in last week’s press our genial friend the Mowat correspondent, is on the war-path again after a couple of months rest. It is the ministers this time. He must be short of material when he says he seldom sees a minister now days. Where does the fault lie when a man attends divine worship only once or twice a year at most?
The English church ministers stationed here have held fortnightly services for ears at the Mowat schoolhouse, about two miles from our Mowat friend, except when roads were impassable to walk or drive. The majority of the people have been visited three or more times a year considering he has to walk unless come friend drives him occasionally. I consider our minister has done his duty well and if there is any kick coming it is from the ministers for the indifference a great many people show regarding church matters and as to the way they are carried on and how the ministers of bot denominations get around to the different stations they are expected to preach and visit in fair or stormy weather, in a large field like ours, comprising Fork River, Mowat, Winnipegosis and Sifton. Let us put ourselves in these men’s places. Would we put up with the same hardship on the small salary we dole out to them? I say no, we would not. Then let us help them instead of grousing. The great secret of help is encouragement.

Wm. King.
Minister’s Warden and Fin. Sec.