Today in the Dauphin Herald – Oct 6 – 1910

1910 Oct 6 – First Automobile Accident

The first automobile accident in town to write of happened Friday evening. Eric Nicholson driving his father’s (H.P. Nicholson) horse on Vermillion Street, collided with J.W. Johnston’s automobile just as it was coming over the crossing at his lane on the ave, N.W., Mr. Johnston immediately put on the emergency break but the machine struck the horse before it was stopped. On examination for casualties it was found that the animal had received a broken leg. The two veterinary, Dr. Bryant, was telephoned for to dispatch the animal.

1910 Oct 6 – Thresher Fatally Injured

Gilbert Plains, Man., Oct. 1 – Mike Genik, who was working on the threshing machine of Frank Morris, on the farm of Fred Manns, was run over by the front wheel of the engine last night, receiving internal injuries which, it is said, will prove fatal.

1910 Oct 6 – Fork River

A meeting of the Council was held here last week, when some important business was done.
Miss Hansford of Winnipegosis, paid us a visit was done.
Rev. H.H. and Scrase visited Mr. and Mrs. Lacey at Oak Brae last week.
Mowat School house was prettily decorated last Sunday on the occasion of their Harvest Festival. A nice congregation attended.
We are all wondering if the Fork River and Winnipegosis road will be ready for use this coming winter. Slow progress seemed to be made on account of scarcity of teams and men.
A spark from the engine was the cause of a load of wheat being burned up in the wagon owned by Mr. W. King was badly damaged.
Mrs. Tilt from Dauphin, came up last week.
The Rev. H.H. Scrase preached a very eloquent sermon to the congregation of All Saints Church which was greatly appreciated. His subject was “The Holy Eucharist Congress at Montreal” and replied to Father Vaughan, who said that Protestantism is a soulless religion and that Canadian public schools are Godless schools. Mr. Scrase handled the subject well.

1910 Oct 6 – To the Herald:

SIR – I notice in the press an article dated September 17th, from a Mowat correspondent, re Government Elevator, which he thinks is lost, strayed or stolen. If either of these three things have happened it, the people of this vicinity would not be surprised to hear of it dropping out of the Mowat mail bag some day as it is remarkable what that mail bag will consume – tacks, sugar and other things too numerous to mention.
I have never heard of such a thing happening an elevator but we have had an experience like that in post offices up here. Fishing River being mentioned in the Mowat article reminds me what happened a few years ago, the settlers of Fishing River petitioned the Ottawa Government for a post office. Did they get the post-office at Fishing River? Not your life! It was lost, strayed or stolen as a new post office was located shortly after, not a hundred miles from Fishing River. If our Oak Brae P.M. would put the same energy behind the mail cart as he uses on his pen, knocking at the Provincial Government, the Winnipegosis mail it carries would get here before the train leaves and not have to lay over and the people would appreciate it very much.

A Fork River Correspondent

1910 Oct 6 – North Lake

Councillor Lacey has let quite a few contracts for road work lately, which will help the Galicians to get around easier.
John Bolinski is erecting a dwelling and stable on his farm on the lake shore.
Rev. H.H. Scrase conducted harvest thanksgiving service at Mowat School house last week. His text was very appropriate. The school house was tastefully decorated by Misses Charlotte and Harriet Lacey.
If any person comes in contract with a threshing outfit looking for work, be so kind as to show them the way here in case they get lost.

1910 Oct 6 – Sifton

Fine weather continues. Threshing progressing very nicely.
Mr. Carruthers and gentlemen friend from Valley River, paid our village a visit on Tuesday evening. “Me thinks” a fair inducement.
The Rev. Sabourin is moving the R.C. Church to a property across the road from the present location.
The Rev. Archbishop of Lemburg, Galicia accompanied by Archbishop Langevin, St. Boniface, is expected at Sifton in the near future, in the interests of the Greek rite of the R.C. Church.
A number of our villagers went out to Lake Dauphin on Saturday for the day’s shooting.
The Sifton village mock council met on Wednesday of last week. After the minutes of the previous meeting were read and several very important communications were brought up and read before the council after which some heated discussions followed.
The matter of the excessive use of the Comfort Soap miniature wagons on the sidewalks of the village, was brought to the attention of the council, that the practice be immediately stopped, thus lessen the dangers to pedestrians exceeding the speed limit by law. After due discussion the motion was seconded by Alderman Dneufre, that the constable be ordered to put the by-law in force respecting this and in failure of that recommended that the family production be curtailed.
A complaint was also read from some residing in the farther wards east, of a nuisance of late in that locality. The west winds of late are heavily laden with the smell of carrion. The constable was ordered to investigate and see that all dead mosquitos, horses or horse flies, be buried at once by or at the expense of the parties responsible.
Alderman Pantoline thought that the nuisance ground was being moved too near the centre of the town anyway and wanted to know of the constable what was being done re the manure heaps which were called to his attention some time ago and demanded to know why he was not taking action. Alderman Dneufre thought the constable very dilatory in the performance of the duties of his position and said that he could produce a more competent party at less salary to take the place of the present policeman. Some charged graft repeatedly in the way of that officer’s position, others demanded investigation.
It was then moved by Alderman Dneufre and seconded by Pinkas that the matter of graft in the police commissioner’s office be investigated and reported to the council at the next meeting. Council then adjourned to again meet at the usual date.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 2 – 1910

1910 Jun 2 – Fork River

Percy Gentleman arrived from England last week and paid several friends here a visit. He intends to homestead in this country.
Wm. King is busy these days looking after the registration.
Miss Collins from McCreary is visiting her sister here.
Tag-day caused a bit of excitement and a fair sum was realized.
A meeting of the Women’s Auxiliary was held at the home of Mrs. Ballard’s Winnipegosis, and it was decided to send a delegate to attend the annual meeting in Winnipeg in June. Mrs. Ballard, vice-president, was the choice of the meeting.
The Methodist concert held last week was very well attended considering the busy time. The chair was occupied by the Rev. Mr. Rowan and this programme started with a chorus entitled Welcome; recitation, Ray Ellis; solo by Mrs. Clawson; play entitled “An Interrupted Proposal”; song by Mrs. Clawson and Mr. Snelgrove; dialog, Out All Around; recitation by Miss Tyndall and the play “My Turn Next” was very well done; chorus, “Good Night.” The evening came to a close about midnight. Refreshments and ice cream were served, dancing was kept up till early morning.
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. T. Shannon died last week. The funeral service was taken at the home by the Rev. H.H. Scrase. Quite a number came and showed their sympathy and proceeded to the cemetery when the committal service was held.
A social and dance is to be held at the home of Mrs. W. King on Tuesday evening, June 7th at 8:30. Admission 10 cents. Proceeds for the Women’s Auxiliary.

1910 Jun 2 – North Lake

John Bolinski made a trip to Dauphin last week. Our roads are now in fairly good shape for travelling.
F.B. Lacey has been instrumental in starting another school in this district.
The grain around here is looking good.
Mr. Bell of Fork River has purchased the Mazurink Farm.
Jacob Strasdin has four colts this year.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 14 – 1914

1914 May 14 – Bailiff Reported to Judge

The Fork River council has a grievance against the county court bailiff, and passed the following resolution at its last meeting:
Moved by Coun. Richardson, seconded by Coun. Toye. “That the clerk write to Judge Ryan as to the way in which Bailiff McLean handled the seizure made by him in the interests of the municipality, making a full explanation.”

1914 May 14 – Bullet in Head

A lamentable accident occurred at Ethelbert on Tuesday which may be attended with fatal results. Mary Bolinski, aged nine years, and her brother, aged 7, were about to start for school when the boy picked up a .22 rifle and accidentally discharged it, the bullet entering the back of the girl’s head. The girl was at once brought to the hospital here and is still alive with a possible chance of recovery.

1914 May 14 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred on Tuesday three miles north of Sclater by which Joseph Slobodigian lost his life. It appears that Slobodigian took his gun out for the purpose of shooting a dog. When the dog saw Slobodigian approaching he ran away and the man followed the animal. Shortly after this his wife heard the report of a gun, but paid no attention to it, thinking that her husband had fired at the dog. The man not returning after the lapse of a short time the woman went to hunt for him. She discovered him about 200 yards from the house lying helpless, with his right leg shattered from the contents of the gun, which had been accidentally discharged. The woman immediately went for help, but when she returned with a neighbour her husband was expiring, having bled to death.
The poor woman is left with two small children and without any means of support. Here is a case worthy of assistance. Any contributions sent to Mr. W.P. Hrusgowy, Sclater, will be duty, acknowledged, and the woman and children provided for.

1914 May 14 – Thrilling Rescue from River

One Thursday of last week a young man named LaCharite and Archie McDonald, son of John McDonald, livery stable keeper of Ochre River, had a thrilling experience and a narrow escape from drowning. The boys had gone to the river for a barrel of water with a team and desmocrat, which was one of their daily duties, and on account of the high water in the river, occasioned by the recent heavy rains they either mistook the place where they usually drove in or else the bank caved in, and let the horses into the deep water. The horses and rig were swept down the river and the animals in their struggle soon got entangled in the harness. In the meantime the two men were struggling in the torrent and were carried down the stream and would undoubtedly have been drowned but for some men who happened to be on the town bridge with pike poles, keeping the brushwood from the bridge, and who caught the boys as they came along and held them until help arrived and they were rescued.
The horses were carried downs stream about half a mile and caught up on a tree in the river. The rig and harness were recovered some days after.
Mr. McDonald was away at Plumes when the accident occurred and was appalled of his loss by telephone.

1914 May 14 – Fork River

Mrs. Theodore Miles, of Kamsack, was a visitor for a few days at the home of Mrs. Fred Cooper, on the Fork River.
Joe Lockhart and Commodore F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
F. Cooper was a visitor to Dauphin for a few days last week.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor to the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey River on Friday.
Nurse Tilt was a visitor at the homestead on the Mossey for a few days lately.
Professor Brown, who was a slave for 23 years, gave a very interesting lecture lately in the Methodist Church on “Slavery.”
The wet weather last week put a stop to seeding for a few days. Work will go a head now with a rush.
Mrs. McEachern has returned from a visit to Winnipeg.
The annual vestry meeting was held in All Saints’ Church with E. Williams, lay reader, in the chair. The annual report was read by W. King, secretary and adopted as read. The following officers were elected for the coming year: W. King, minister’s warden; C.E. Bailey, people’s warden of Fork River; C. Bradley, warden, Winnipegosis; W. King, secretary-treasurer for the missions; John Reid, warden, Sifton. Delegate to Synod, W. King, organist, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Sam Hughes, M.P.P. for Gilbert Plains, passed through here from a trip to Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and son spent the weekend with Mrs. W.D. King at Dauphin.

1914 May 14 – Winnipegosis

Mr. Lawson and Mr. Pilgrim, of Dauphin, were here last week doing some cement work on the fox ranch.
The school by-law, voted on last week, was carried by a substantial majority. We should be glad of this, for no money can be spent by the people to better advantage than that which we put into schools. More than a few of us are of the opinion that more money should have been voted and a better class of school built. It is now up to us to make the best of it.
With the continued cool weather the ice in the lake is liable to remain firm for some time to come. The late rain pelted into it considerably, however.
Chas. Denby returned from Dauphin on Monday. He has been to Kamsack helping some of the government officials to stock the lake there with ???. They took about 150 fish from here in tanks. Charlie, you know is quite a ???, and [1 line missing] each fist cost the government $3. If they live and thrive even this sum is not too much.