Today in the Dauphin Herald – October 30, 1919

Can a Doctor Sell Liquor?

Dr. Wilmot, of Roblin, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Monday, on several charges preferred by the inspector for selling liquor contrary to the provisions of the act. One charge was dismissed and decision reserved in the others.

Chief Little Issues Warning

Young men and boys would be well advised to take warning as regards their conduct on Hallowe’en. Annually there has been a wanton destruction of the citizens’ property by the gangs of organized rowdies. This year steps have been taken by Chief Little and staff to put an end to this class of amusement. All damage done will have to be paid for, as well as the appearance of the parties in court.

Daughters of Empire Rally

The rally of the Daughters of the Empire here on Tuesday, the 28th inst., was largely attended, every Chapter being represented, which included the Pas, Grandview and Gilbert Plains. The meeting was held in the town hall and was presided over by the Rev. J.A. Cormie.
Mrs. Aldridge was the first speaker and she spoke in the interest of the establishment of a hospital for the people of Servia. She related in a pathetic and impressive manner the great sufferings of these people and the heroic way in which they had faced and overcome every difficulty. Mrs. Aldridge spent much time in Servia during the war and incidents she related were from personal experience.

Details of War Memorial

In explaining the war memorial, Mrs. G.H. Smith, National Educational secretary of the order, told the meeting that in detail the plan of the I.O.D.E. is to establish ideals of patriotism and give the children in the schools a truly British education by acquainting them with the ideals, the traditions and the institutions of Britain. Illustrated lectures on the history and geography of the Empire will be given in schools. All non-English will be supplied with one of I.O.D.E. British historical libraries within the next few years. A lecture fund for the teaching and study of British history will be established and some eminent lecturer brought to Canada at least once a year. Pictures of Canada’s part in the war will be given to 1000 schools, 100 schools in Manitoba to be among the number. Travelling scholarships to the extent of $1200 to university graduates in history will be awarded to each province. A second scholarship of greater value may then be established for these nine scholarship winners. An endowment fund of $500,000 is being collected for this purpose.
On rising to speak, Ms. Colin H. Campbell, provincial president, was warmly greeted. After expressing her great pleasure at having the privilege of again speaking to a Dauphin audience, se made a strong appeal on behalf of the Victory Loan. She pointed out that it was the duty of everyone to the best of their ability to assist the country at this time by subscribing what they could. Mrs. Campbell also spoke for a few minutes on the war memorial.
During the evening Mrs. Rogers sang a solo and miss Pear M. Tucker and Miss Irma Struthers contributed instrumentals.
At the conclusion of the meeting the visitors and the members of the chapter repaired to the rest room, where refreshments were served, and a couple of hours spent in social intercourse.

Bicton Heath

Winnipegosis, Oct. 27.
Mrs. Sharp has left for Winnipeg and will shortly cross the ocean to visit London.
Mr. Slater, of the Salvation Army, has returned from Brandon, and will conduct meetings at different points in our district. Some of the methods of the Army may be open to criticism but there is much to commend them. They hit out straight from the shoulder every time.
The rally meeting of the Grain Growers, recently held at the house of Thos. Toye, was well attended. Mr. Dixon, barrister, of Winnipegosis, was the sparker. The farmers’ platform and other issues were clearly explained.
The Ontario elections have given the farmers a big boost. The west is awaiting its opportunity.
Mr. Frank Sharp and bride arrived home from Winnipeg a few days ago. We wish the bride and groom every happiness and when their troubles come, may they be nothing worse than “little Sharps.”
Tom Toye grew a potato this season which weighted 4 lbs. The late Capt. Coffey brought the seed of these potatoes to Canada from the United States. There has bot been anything in the potato line to equal them for heavy yielding or excellent flavor.
An October cold dip is not common, but during the last few days the thermometer has been hovering round the zero mark.

Fork River

J. Shuchitt has opened a pool room and barber shop on Main Street.
Misses L. and K. Briggs are attending the wedding of one of their sisters at Hartney. Mr. Russell is teaching the Fork River School during their absence.
Don’t forget the returned soldiers’ banquet in the Orange Hall, Friday night, Oct. 31st. Supper will be served at 6.30. Tickets, $1.00.
Jim Parker returned from a two weeks’ trip to Saskatchewan points.
It begins to look as if winter has come to stay.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – July 31, 1919

Charged with Rape

Robt. Lambert, aged 17, of Minitonas, appeared before P.M. Hawkins on the 25th inst., charged with rape. The girl is 16 years of age. He was remanded for trial.

Notes of the Fair

It is now only a week until the Dauphin fair will be in full swing. A large number of entries have already been made in vegetable and other hall exhibits. The early harvest is not interfering to any great extent with the entries in other classes so much as was at one time feared. They are assured of some good entries in cattle and horses as entries have already been received from J.D. McGregor, Brandon; John Graham, Carberry; C. Moffatt and J.I. Turner, Carroll. J.C. Crowe, Gilbert Plains, and W.H. Devine are expected with exhibits of Pereherons.
The unfortunate accident to Lieut. Kerr’s aeroplane at Portage la Prairie will prevent his appearance, but Lieut. Casewell, of Brandon, will fly in his stead. The public are thus assured of a threat in aeronautice.
The 4rd Cameron Highlanders band, of Winnipeg, will be in attendance.
It is understood that Thursday and Friday afternoons will be declared civic holidays in town.
See the Farmerette girls. They are the latest sensation.
It is almost certain Col. Barker, V.C., will be among the visitors.
Cheap rates are offered on the railway. A fare and one-third for return tickets.
All the leading baseball teams of the district are entered in the tournament. $450 are offered in prizes.
The entries for the horses races are large, and the speeding contest will be the [missing] in Dauphin.
Lieut. Casewell and Lieut. Bennett will make flights in their airplane and do the latest stunts.
Prospects for the Poultry Department are very bright. Entries are coming in from many outside points.
All entries for the Poultry section, including eggs, must be in by Aug. 2nd, and other sections by Aug 5th.
Racing Program
Thursday, Aug. 7th
2.30 pace, 2.25 trot, purse $500
Half-mile running race, purse $200
Friday, Aug. 8th
2.12 pace, 2.07 trot, purse $700
5-8ths mile running race, purse $200
2.20 trot, purse $700

In Memoriam

Meston—In loving memory of Pte. Walter Russell Meston, 1st Depot Batt., who died at Winnipeg, July 22nd, 1918, aged 23 years.
We miss thee from thy place, dear;
We miss thee from our home;
But thou art called to better things,
The whyfor should we mourn.
Inserted by his parents, sisters and brothers.

Sent Up for Trial for Incest

Henry Bracher, a farmer from the Minitonas district, was before the police magistrate on the charge of incest. The evidence warranted his being remanded for trial.

Fork River

Wm. Northam has moved out of town on to his farm a mile south where he has had a considerable amount of land broken this summer.
Fred Cooper, A. Hunt and Sam Reed, who have had a two weeks’ vacation in the west, returned home this week satisfied that there are worse places to farm than Fork River.
George Shannon has purchased a Happy Farmer tractor.
The annual meeting of the Mossey River School district was held on the 22nd. W. King, sen., was elected trustee for the coming term, Mrs. A. Rowe retiring.
Geo. Tilt has sold his farm to Mr. Steffesen.
Fork River residents are always well represented at the Dauphin fair and the attendance will be increased this year. When you have a good car and good roads the trip is only a jaunt.
Flying machine stunts will attract us all. Looping the loop and all the rest is new to the people of the north.

Winnipegosis

The municipality of Mossey River has a powerful new grader, which is at work building the road from Fork River to Winnipegosis.
Geo. Klyne, the teacher engaged by the School District of Don, who died suddenly last week, was buried on the 26th inst. F.B. Lacey the government representative, attended the funeral. The deceased came from North Dakota.
The ladies’ baseball team from Dauphin played the Winnipegosis team on Friday last. The Dauphin team won out.
The J.J. Crowe Lumber Co., Ltd., has bought out A.C. Bradley and is erecting a large lumber yard here.
Mr. Shaunnessey, general manager of the Booth fisheries, was a visitor last week and inspected the company’s property here.
Quite a number of our citizens, will leave on Thursday next to attend the Dauphin fair.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Aug 15 – 1912

1912 Aug 15 – Appointed Manager of Fish Hatchery

Joseph Grenon, one of the oldest fishermen on Lake Winnipegosis, has been appointed manager of the fish hatchery, which is located on Snake Island. Mr. Grenon’s appointment dates from August first.

1912 Aug 15 – Damage at Gilbert Plains

A hail storm passed over Gilbert Plains on Sunday night and did much damage in the vicinity of the town and covered about two miles in width by eight in length.

1912 Aug 15 – Gypsies For Dauphin

A dispatch from Gretna, Man., states that a large party of Syrian gypsies crossed the international boundary at that point from the United States Saturday, and continued their journey northward at noon. They were heading for the Dauphin district. There were seven caravans, 25 people, and a large number of horses. The gypsies had no difficulty in passing the immigration officials, as they were plentifully supplied with money and goods.
From what can be learned the party will locate on the east side of the lake where they will take up homesteads. They are expected to reach town by the latter end of the week.

1912 Aug 15 – Fork River

Miss Alice and Herman Godkin left the early part of the week on a trip to Saskatchewan.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Williams were visitors to the Dauphin fair.
S. Bailey, F. Cooper, and W.R. Bell returned Saturday from attending the Dauphin exhibition.
Bishop McCartney of All Saints’, and Prof. T. Biggs of Mowat Academy, took a trip south on business.
Mrs. N. Little and daughter Grace, are taking a short vacation.
Mr. Maxim of Winnipeg, spent a week looking over the district. He is well pleased with this part and intends returning shortly with his family. There is plenty of good land within a short distance of the village waiting for settlers.
John O’Neil and family, of Rainy River, returned home after spending a week with Postmaster Lacey of Oak Brae.
Mrs. Peter Robinson spent a few days with Mr. and Mrs. D. Robinson on the Mossey River.
Mr. McAuley, traveller for the Massey Co., was here a few days on business.
A remark was overheard the other day that our Municipality was run rather loose. On July 5th, our health officer’s attention was drawn to the rubbish dumped a few yards from the Orange Hall. We were promised it would be attended to at once, but we are sorry to say nothing has been done as yet. Ten days after a ratepayer notified the council and they instructed the clerk to notify the health officer. A month has passed and nothing has been done. At the same meeting a by-law was passed presenting the said gentleman with $600 a year. We don’t object doing a fair thing, but in the name of justice let’s have something for it and not be told gone to Winnipeg, Duck Bay or Hong Kong. There is also a by-law against bulls running at large all summer. On numerous occasions complaints have been made. The head beadle remarked that they will have to erect a stable, but at the present rate of going probably nothing will be done. Great Caeasar this is comforting to men who look after their animals. Not long ago Government engineers were up here to lay out roads and make profiles which cost the Municipality a handsome sum of money. Our commissioners instead of following engineers’ instructions make roads so narrow that a man with a wheelbarrow had to wait at cross roads to let a buggy by coming in the opposite direction. Say they dog by-laws are peaches. Have one for every month in the year. What’s the matter Winnipegosis?

Re. the writeup of the Mowat picnic in last week’s Herald and Press. The remarks re certain individuals in Fork River wishing the picnic to be a failure were certainly very uncharitable whoever the writer was as for there being a shortage of lemons that was up to the general manager. Concerning freezers they could have been had as usual for the asking. This is supposed to be a free country and surely people can suit themselves about going to such places without being called to account by some evil thinking person like the writer of the Mowat article.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 6 – 1911

1911 Jul 6 – Leg Amputated

T. Lee, a young farmer, who resides south of Gilbert Plains in the Glenlyon district met with a serious accident the early past of the week. He was endeavouring to stop a runaway team attached to a mower, when his left leg came in contact with the knives which badly cut it. He was brought to the hospital here on Tuesday, where upon examination it was found necessary to amputate it below the knee. The young man is doing as well as can be expected.

1911 Jul 6 – Fork River

Miss Burrell of Winnipegosis, was a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kennedy a few days last week.
Miss Pearl Wilson is visiting her sister, Mrs. Ivor Humphreys at Dauphin.
Mrs. Snelgrove was a visitor to Dauphin Saturday to the home of her daughter, Mrs. F.F. Chase.
H. Chute of Dauphin, is busy with his gasoline engine and plows turning over the soil on Messrs. Chase and Lockhart’s farms.
H. Falconer, Government Weed Inspector, was here this week giving instructions to municipal inspectors Bailey and King.
The Orangemen of Fork River will hold their 10th annual bask picnic on July 11th. A program of sports is being arranged and they day’s fun will be wound up in the evening with a ball.
Coronation service was held in All Saints’ Church on the 24th ult. The members of L.O.L. No. 1765 attended in a body and the church was filled to the doors. Mr. G.M. Littler B.A., preached a very appropriate sermon which was much appreciated.
Wm. King, returned Saturday from attending the Orange Lodge convention in Winnipeg. He reports being entertained in royal manner and also getting a number of ideas which ought to stir the local brethren to greater enthusiasm.
Mrs. Duncan Kennedy entertained at her home last Monday in honour of her sister, Miss Bertha Johnston, who is a nurse on the Dauphin Hospital staff. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by all present. Miss Johnston visited several days in their neighbourhood.
Mrs. N. Little and daughters, while out driving last week met with an accident caused by the team running away. The ladies were thrown from the buggy, Mrs. Little receiving a serve shaking up and a number of cuts and viruses. A nurse was called and Mrs. Little was soon made comfortable. Miss Grace and Miss Lulu escaped unhurt.
The school will remain where it is at present, is the decision given by Chairman Hunt, who held the deciding ballot at the ratepayers meeting Monday. A meeting of the ratepayers was called from the purpose of taking a vote whether the school should be moved to town or remain where it is. The vote resulted in a tie and Chairman Hunt was called on to make the decision.

1911 Jul 6 – Sifton

Miss M. O’Donnell who has been teaching school here for the past year; left on Tuesday of last week for a visit to her home in Carleton Place, Ont.
Our local baseball team went to Ethelbert and played a friendly match on Saturday. The honours were about even.
Miss Eva Zlebita of Toulon, who has been attending school here for the past term, returned to her home in Toulon on Tuesday.
Miss Marion Flemming of Winnipeg, is spending her holidays at the Presbyterian mission the guest of Nurses Gofoth and Reid.
Miss Scott of Neepawa, is a visitor at Sifton.
Mr. Emanuel Michaliuk returned to Winnipeg on Saturday, after having completed a successful term as junior school (bilingual) teach here.
The Presbyterian Sunday School held their annual picnic on Dominion day, which was indeed a success. The Ethelbert football team came down and played off a return match. The Ethelbert boys proved a little too heavy for us however, winning the game one to nothing in the last half.
During this week to Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Jones at Sifton a daughter and to Mr. and Mrs. F. Marantz at Dauphin a daughter.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 11 – 1914

1914 Jun 11 – Bad Fire at Ochre River

A disastrous fire occurred at Ochre River on Sunday morning last about 2 o’clock, when the store of the Ochre River Trading Co., together with most of the stock, was destroyed. The fire, when discovered had made considerable headway and the building being a frame one, was soon consumed. Willing hands did what they could to save the contents of the store and keep the fire from spreading.
The building was valued at $4000 and was insured for $2000.
The stock was insured for $12000 and its value placed at a sum in the neighbourhood of $15000 or $16000.
The origin of the fire is a mystery. It is probably that an investigation will be made.

1914 Jun 11 – House Burned

For the second time Mr. Gillies’ house at Sifton, was burned on Saturday night. The structure was a two-story frame building and nearly finished. Some time ago Mr. Gillies’ partly constructed dwelling was burned also. Incendiarism is suspected and the cause of the fire will be investigated.

1914 Jun 11 – Three Killed in Collision

One of the worst accidents that has happened for some time past on the C.N.R. took place just east of Cote, a small station six miles from Kamsack, on Friday night last. It was a head-on collision between No. 2 eastbound and No. 201, speed freight. There is a curve at this point in the road and the two trains were running at a good rate of speed and were right together before the engineers had time to reverse. No. 2 was in charge of Engineer J.H. Arnold and No. 201 Engineer R.T. Perkins, Jas. Clyde was firing for No. 2. and F.J. Smith for No. 201. All four were from this point. Perkins, Clyde and Smith all managed to jump and not one of them received any serious injury. Arnold stuck to his post and was so badly scalded and otherwise inured that he dead a few hours afterwards at the Kamsack Hospital.
F.J. Faiji, mail clerk, and Ross Donaldson, express messenger, were instantly killed. Both ran out of Winnipeg.
Geo. Gougeon, brakeman, of Dauphin was slightly injured.
W.H. Messier and J.A. McVicar were the conductors of the respective trains, the passage and freight. Both escaped unhurt.
None of the passengers on the train were injured, but nearly all received a bad shaking up.

1914 Jun 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Winnipegosis on May 30th.
The minutes of the previous meeting were adopted as read.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now sit as a court of revision.
The clerk reported that no protests had been filled since the court of revision had adjourned.
Hechter-Toye – That the court of revision new adjourn.
Hunt-Bickle – That the council now take up the usual municipal matters.
Communications were then read from Prof. Black, the Deputy Minister of Public Works; the Land Commissioner of the Hudson’s Bay Co,; Judge Ryan; J. Irwin; the solicitors for the C.N.R.; the Municipal Solicitor; H. Rustad and a petition from certain ratepayers asking for a bridge.
Hechter-Bickle – That the plan of subdivision of block G and part of block F, village of Winnipegosis, plan being numbered 251, submitted by Munson & Allan, be approved.
Hunt-Bickle – That the secretary write the superintendent of the C.N.R. Dauphin, regarding the putting in of a culvert through the railway at pole No. 22, north of mile board No. 12.
Toye-Hunt – That W. Vincent be paid $13 for his service in securing the title to the roadway through the Champion farm.
Toye-Hechter – That plank be supplied to cover a bridge 20 feet long over Icelandic Creek, on the township line, between 29 and 30, the settlers agreeing to do the work.
Hunt-Bickle – in amendment – That Coun. Robertson and Toye deal with the matter of a bridge across Icelandic Creek and that the coasts be borne by ward 5 and 6. Amendment carried.
Messrs. Macneill and Reid, the delegates from Dauphin, were head regarding the building of a road from Winnipegosis to Dauphin.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks be tendered the delegates from Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the council now decide to come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act, a road from Fork River south to the boundary of the municipality and connecting with the proposed road to be built by the Dauphin municipality, between section 35 and 36 in township 28, range 19.
Bickle-Richardson – That the reeve and Coun. Hechter and Hunt be a committee to select the main roads and prepare the preliminary steps required t come under the provisions of The Good Roads Act.
Hechter-Richardson – That a grant of ten bags of flour be made to Seifat Michtka and that the flour by bought from whoever will supply it at the lowest price.
Hunt-Bickle – That in the matter of a petition of certain ratepayers of ward 6 regarding statute labour, the reeve by authorized to ??? in the absence of Coun. Robertson.
Robinson-Hechter – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and see the Minister of Public Works with a view to getting a grant for the biding of public roads in the municipality.
Hechter-Hunt – That the public works committee be authorized to begin work and if the weather permits complete the Fork River and Winnipegosis road; the work to be done in accordance with the profile of the Government engineer.
Richardson-Hechter – That on complaint to the clerk and the production of the necessary proof by the complainant, the clerk is hereby instructed to prosecute the owners of animals running at large contrary to the provision of the by laws.
Richardson-Hechter – That the clerk notify parties who have had interments made in the municipal cemeteries to apply at the office of the municipality for their cemetery deeds.
Toye-Richardson – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee be passed.
Toye-Bickle – That Coun. Hechter be authorized to rent two tents to be used by the men on road constructions.
A by-law was passed making an appropriation to the wards on a basis of six mills in the assessment.
Bickle-Toye – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jun 11 – Fork River

Mrs. Chas. Denby, of Winnipegosis, returned home, having spent a week among friends.
Mrs. Kennedy and family have returned from Winnipegosis having spent the weekend there.
W. Williams’ planning mill is running full blast these days and “Billy” is busy shipping lumber.
W. Howiston spent a few days at Winnipegosis and while away we are informed, invested in a schooner. That’s all right “Scotty.”
Mr. Secord, homestead inspector, is spending a few days inspecting work performed by homesteaders.
Peter Ellis, of Kamsack, is visiting here.
Jack Robson and Harry Hunter have returned from a two months trapping and hunting trip and they report a good catch.
E. Williams, lay reader, has returned from attending the Synod at Winnipeg last week. He reports a very busy time.
The mail these days contains many copies of the speech on free wheat by our friend “Bob” Cruise, member for Dauphin. The wheat question does not cut any ice here at present. Its roads and bridges we went. We would be delighted to hear our friend “Bob” converting the Senate and his friends to vote for Borden’s good roads policy which was thrown out last session.
The seeding is over and the crop has been put in good shape, it being one of the finest seasons we have seen for years.
The captain of our fire brigade has prophesized a dry season and is seriously thinking of going into growing watermelons in case of fire. The only thing we can do is to keep smiling as the crops are looking good.
Feming Wilson, of Dauphin, was a visitor here between trains the latter end of the week.
“Joe” Lockhart is filling a car with settlers’ effects and is off for the banana belt. Ta, ta, “Joe” we wish you good luck.
There will be a court of revision at Ethelbert on June 17th. It’s the last chance for getting on the list for the electoral division of Gilbert Plains.
W. King has returned after a two weeks’ trip north. He had a good time, tanks to his two Liberal friends who stuck to him closer than a brother, and “Billy” always appreciates a good thing.
Mrs. Curtis and Mrs. Morrisain, of Texas, U.S., are visiting their friend, Mrs. Nat Little, for a few weeks.
Miss F. Sanderson left for Winnipegosis to take charge of a large diary business started by G. Sanderson, of that burgh.
W. Hunkins and “Jimmy” Bickle passed through here recently at a 2-40 gait.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 6 – 1913

1913 Jun 6 – Peculiar Accident

While looking after a brood mare one day last week, Duncan Cameron, ex-M.P.P., and a leading merchant and farmer of Gilbert Plains, met with a peculiar accident. He was in close proximity to the horse’s head at the time, and as is often the case at this season of the year with brood mares, the animal was vicious, and with a quick swing of her head towards Mr. Cameron’s face, she grabbed a portion of his lower lip in her mouth and bit the piece right off. The wound is an aggravating one and it will be some time before it is healed up. It was a first thought his speech would be affected by the wound, but it is now believed this will not be the case.