Today in the Dauphin Herald – Nov 19 – 1914

1914 Nov 19 – Fatal Shooting Accident

A fatal shooting accident occurred five miles west of Sifton on the 18th, when Joseph Thomashewski, aged 30 years, lost his life. He was out hunting rabbits at the time. He wounded one and as the little animal started to run away he raised the gun and struck at struck at it. The gun was discharged by the act and the contents lodged in his stomach. The unfortunate man died on the spot.

1914 Nov 19 – Fire at Mossey River

Thos. Glendenning, whose farm is at the mouth of the Mossey River at Lake Dauphin, had his stables destroyed by fire on Friday last, the 13th isn’t. All the contents of the stables were burned. There was no insurance.

1914 Nov 19 – Had Hand Taken Off

Leslie Nash, a boy 14 years of age, was brought from Roblin on Tuesday and placed in the hospital here. He was out hunting rabbits at Roblin, when his gun was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his left arm. The wound was a bad one and was found necessary to amputate the hand. The boy is doing as well as could be expected.

1914 Nov 19 – Little Girl Smothered

A sad fatality happened at Gilbert Plains on Wednesday, when Thos. Poole’s two-year-old daughter was smothered. The little girl, 2 years old and her brother, 4 years, were left in the home, while Mrs. Poole was absent for a short time. In the meantime fire started with the result that the little girl was smothered. The boy will recover.

1914 Nov 19 – Ethelbert

The sleighing is fine. Farmers are bringing in wood now.
The Ethelbert mill is running all right now. This is what is wanted, a good mill.
Henry Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Monday.

1914 Nov 19 – Fork River

Mr. Geo. Lyons, of Winnipegosis, municipal tax collector, spent a short time here on business lately.
Mr. Fleming, of the Northern Elevator has returned from a few days visit to his old home in Veregin, Sask.
Mr. D. Kennedy, manager of the A.T. Co., returned from a short vacation south and reports having enjoyed his outing.
Mrs. C. Clark’s friends will be pleased to hear she has arrived safely at her home in Paswegan, Sask.
The threshermen’s annual ball came off on Friday night and proved an enjoyable affair. Everyone enjoyed the outing. “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary” and we trust all arrived safe.
The Rev. A.S. Wiley, rural dean of Dauphin, took the service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Sid Gower, who has been spending the summer at Winnipeg, is renewing acquaintances here.
Mr. Green has returned from Dauphin, having taken Mr. Wiley’s place at St. Paul’s on Sunday.

1914 Nov 19 – Winnipegosis

Miss Bernice Walker, of Dauphin, who has been visiting her cousin, Miss Ross, returned home by Monday’s train.
Hon. Hugh and Mrs. Armstrong are visiting at the home of Mrs. Bradley.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Steele arrived in town on Saturday’s train from Warroad, en route to Mafeking. They are visiting at the home of Mrs. J.P. Grenon.
A number of young folks took this season’s first sleigh ride to Fork River to the Threshermen’s ball. All report having a good time.
The curling and skating rinks are fast getting into shape. E.R. Black has the contract for making the ice.
The bachelor apartments were the scene of an enjoyable evening last week. A whist drive and any oyster supper finished a very pleasant evening.
Ed. Cartwright and family left on Monday’s train for Mafeking, where Mr. Cartwright looks after the interests of the Canadian Lakes Fishing Co.
Ben Hechter has been laid up trough sickness for the past few days.
When are we going to have the formal opening of the new school?
Jos. Grenon, manager of the Winnipegosis hatchery, left on Monday’s train for Fort Qu’Appelle, with sixteen million whitefish eggs, for the new government hatchery there.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 16 – 1914

1914 Jul 16 – Both Drew Gun

There was a lively time at Ashville on Monday and it looked like a shooting bee at one stage. John Burnison, a section man, has been acting strange of late and among other things was threatening to shoot residents. He drive his wife and family from the house and shot a cow belonging to Fred Kemp, the storekeeper. He services of Constable Levins, of the town force, were called into requisition and in company with John Campbell, son of Glen, he went to the house. Burnison told the men to get out and to enforce his order moved emphatically reached for his gun. As he raised the weapon Levins flashed out his revolver and Burnison wilted, dropped the gun. He was then placed under arrest and brought to Dauphin by automobile.

JOHNNY SPRINTED.

When Burnison raised the gun, Johnny Campbell, who was in the room, waited for no further display of hostility, but bolted out the door, dashed through the potato patch and over the back fence. As far as known at Ashville he holds all records for this kind of a sprint up to the present.

1914 Jul 16 – Cadets at Sewell Camp

For the first time in cadets history of this province a camp has been conducted and found to be a success, the boys coming from all parts of the province. The days were given over to drills and training in the various branches of cadet work. Reveille call for rising at 6:30, breakfast at 7:00, cleaning up lines to 8:30, when Divine service was conducted, making it impressive with the boys taking part in the singing and responsive reading; 9 to 11 inspection in drills, musketry signalling, first aid, physical training. 12:00, noon dinner; 1:00 to 2:15, rest; 2:30 to 4:00, drilling and general training work; from 4:00 to 5:00, rest, shower bath, etc.; 6:00 p.m., tea; 7 to 9 games and sports; lights out at 9.45. The above makes up the daily routine of camp life, and for the men in charge there were not many idle moments.

SPORTS CURTAILED

It was planned to have Saturday given over entirely to games and sports, but owning to the great storm that passed over the camp this programme was greatly curtailed, only eleven events being run off. Dauphin won five firsts and one second in these events. Our boys, however, kicked because they could not make it an even six firsts. This was a very creditable showing, however, hen you consider tat there were over 20 contingents of cadets in camp, most of who entered teams for the sports.

SUNDAY ROUTINE

Sunday was given over to drying clothes and blankets after the washing of Saturday’ storm, we were able, however, to have our church parade on Sunday afternoon, when the boys made a fine showing in the march past Col. S.B. Steele, Camp Commandant.

GIMLI NEXT YEAR

The camp this year has been largely in the nature of an experiment, and both officers and men profited by the experience gained, which will be conductive to better results in next year’s camp, which we are informed, on good authority, will be held at Gimli, making a more interesting camp for the boys.

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES

Presentation of prizes won by the Dauphin Cadets will take place as soon as the prizes active from Winnipeg, when both Messers. Manby and Batty will express their appreciation of the boys in camp.

PRIZES WON

The following were won by the Dauphin cadets:
Seniors – 220 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st. 440 yard race – P. Lowes, 1st.
Juniors – Standing broad jump – C. Bossons, 1st.
Horse and rider – C. Bossons and E. Struthers, 1st.
Relay Race – Struthers, Bossons, Dunstan and C, Dickerson, 2nd.

1914 Jul 16 – Notes From the Firing Line

Our boys were seldom late for the Knife and Fork Parade.
Some boys were sick, but after one visit to the hospital tent and a taste of the medicine, were able to appear again at the dining tent.
It was a surprise to the officers in charge what a lot of food the boys could consume.
Sammy Dunstan only had seven eggs, three cups of coffee and five slices of bread and butter for breakfast on Friday morning.
It took a special dish to hold the porridge for the Tierney Bros.
2nd Lieut. Lowes’ tent was the quietest one in the whole came at 6.30 a.m.
After dinner on Wednesday G. White could hardly see and had o be taken to the hospital.
Who stole the pies from the cook’s tent on Friday, July 10th?
Instructors Manby and Batty were on duty from 6 a.m. to 11.45 p.m.; everybody here sleeps with one eye open.
The Dauphin Mouth Organ Band and Quartette, consisting of Messrs. Lowes, C. Batty, Gougeon, C. Fickerson, Dunstan and Murphy, made night horrible after hours.
Sammy Dunstan, with his long blue shirt, was the star of the baseball diamond.
Our four boys, who attended the ambulance class, passed with such high honours, that they have decided to stand practice here. The charge will be moderate.
With the aid of our expect signallers, Dauphin Cadets won the sham fight on Friday night.
We wonder by whose order the mixture was put into the tea on Friday night.
Instructors Manby and Batty had their beds made every day by the cadets. We don’t think.
Gougeon and Kuryk are open to give lessons in wrestling. Charges very moderate.
Our boys were always the first in the grub tent and the last out.
Mr. Campbell, of Souris (late of Dauphin), took some interesting group photos of our boys.
The mud fight a 8.30 p.m. Saturday night was a sight never to be forgotten.
The thanks of the boys are due to Mr. Moor and Mrs. Smithers, of the Winnipeg Y.M.C.A., for the assistance rendered us in various ways.

1914 Jul 16 – Fork River

Mr. Sinstiski, who has been here the last two weeks, took great interest of the Liberal party. He is said to be a cattle buyer but no stock has been shipped up to date. All the bests are off. Nuff said.
Hurrah for Sam Hughes! This northern county knows a good man when we have him, and what we have we will hold, as Scotty says.
Edwin King, of Kinistimo, Sask., is spending his holidays at his home here.
The members of L.O.L., No. 1765, attended the Methodist Church on Sunday, the 12th. Rev. Bro. Clixby, of Winnipegosis, preached the sermon. There was a fair turn out considering the hot weather.
Miss Chase, of Dauphin, is spending her holidays with her grandmother. Mrs. W.R. Snelgrove, on the Mossey.
Walter Clark, of Paswegan, Sask., has returned home after spending a few days among friends here.
Mr. Runny, of Saskatchewan, liberal representative, has returned home with an enlarge cranium, as an election souvenir in remembrance of Fork River.
The Misses Briggs, of Brandon, are visiting at their aunt’s Mrs. T.N. Briggs.
Dr. Shortreed, at his meeting here, stated that the Roblin government was supported by the rabble. As the people here did not agree with these sentiments they did their best on the 10 h to leave him at home to think over the errors of speech, trusting that in future he will have respect for the opinion of others.
Mrs. R. McEachern and son returned from a week’s visit with friends at Million.
Mr. Sam Lowery returned to Winnipeg after a week’s visit here in connection with his farm.

1914 Jul 16 – Winnipegosis

Progress is being made with the new four rooms brick school. The building promises to be adequate to our needs for the present.
Contractor Neely returned on Monday from Dauphin.
Several new residences are going up in town. Among those building are Donald Hattie, Capt. Mapes and Steven Bros.
Coun. Hechter and J.P. Grenon are taking in the exhibition at Winnipeg this week.
The steamer Manitou will commence making trips to the north end of the lake this week.
Capt. Coffey and Jos. Grenon, Sr., are building a boat with a 65 foot keel. The boat will be operated by steam power.
The elections are over and a feeling of goodwill towards all pervades us. The stress of battle is often trying and during the heat of it we are prone to lose our tempers. But this we are glad to say is only a temporary lapse. Misrepresentation should never be resorted to even in the heat of battle. In the report sent the Press of the meting at Fork River, Mr. Lacey went far out of his way to misrepresent sent Mr. Grenon and others. There was no disturbance at the meeting as Dr. Shortreed will readily admit if appealed to. The truth should be the first consideration in sending out newspaper reports.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 16 – 1914

1914 Apr 16 – Chas. Best Hanged Himself

Charles Best, aged 47, and one of the first settlers on the Gilbert Plains, committed suicide on Friday by hanging himself to a brace in the granary. Deceased has been of unsound mind for the past two years, only having come home from the asylum about two weeks ago. He leaves a wife, six sons and three daughters, the eldest about 18 years old.
Deceased was well-known in Dauphin, having hauled grain to the market for several years in the early days.

1914 Apr 16 – Fork River

C. Clark of Paswegan, Sask., after spending a few days among his numerous friends at this point left for home. He was one of the old-timers, living here for ten years. He says he would rather live in Manitoba.
Professor Robinson is busy these days and intends trying farming for a little recreation as he states the bottom has fallen out of the fishing “biz”. The other fellow, he says, gets the wad. Try mushrooms, Jack.
J.G. Lockhart has returned from a trip to the east and intends investing heavily in real estate, etc.
Our Scotch friends seem to be taking alternate trips to the Lake Town. What will be the outcome we are not sure, as it’s neither sleighing or wheeling and there is too much wind for wings. Still, where there is a will there is always a way.
The Rev. Canon Jeffery, of Winnipeg, will hold Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, April 10th at 3 p.m.
Mrs. J.D. McAulay, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, arrived with his bride and is spending the Easter holidays with his parents on the Mossey. Frank is one of the boys we are always pleased to see and we with him much happiness and prosperity.
At a meeting of the Horse Breeders’ Association on the 7th it was decided to disband the majority being of the opinion it was cheaper to breed scrubs for another year. We don’t hesitate to say the farmers have made the mistake of their lives. It takes backbone and money, sure, but it has to be undertaken sooner or later. We will have to let the groomers set back if we ever intend raising saleable horses, or, for that matter, any other kind of good stock.
Mrs. J. Rice is off to Dauphin for a few days holidays.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending the Easter holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mrs. Humphreys has returned from a visit to Dauphin.

1914 Apr 16 – Winnipegosis

We are all turning our thought to spring when the lake will be open and the beats skinning the water.
The river is open.
R. Burrell has opened a restaurant in the Cohen block.
Dwellings are scarce and rooming quarters hard to get. This would indicate our little burgh is fording ahead.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley are spending a few days in Dauphin this week.
Sid Coffey, our moving picture man, visited Dauphin this week. Once Sid completes his new hall the moving picture business will become a permanent feature of the town.
Thorn Johnson has broken his arm again. This is the fourth fracture he has suffered.
John Rogelson is busy overhauling boats.
A number of mink have been added to the animal ranch here.
There was a large delegation from here on Monday to attend the Conservative convention at Gilbert Plains. Among the party were J.P. Grenon, C.I. White, J. Denby, J. Dewhurst, Ed. Morris, Thos. Toye, W. Hunkings, K. McAulay, W. Ketcheson, F.H. Hjaluarson, R. Harrison, Rod Burrell.
Four delegates were also along from Pine River: J. Klyne, W. Gobson, G. Pangman, and W. Campbell.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 12 – 1914

1914 Feb 12 – Lake View Hotel Winnipegosis Destroyed By Fire

Early Sunday morning Winnipegosis was given a bad fire scare. With a high wind blowing it seemed that the greater part of the Main Street was doomed. A call was sent to the Dauphin Fire Brigade to be in readiness, in case the fire spread.
The fire started though the collapsing of the furnace about 9 a.m., in the basement of the Lake View Hotel, and in less than two hours the building was a complete wreck.
The fire gained such headway before a general alarm was given, that two of the female staff were compelled to jump from the second storey windows and received a severe shaking up.
The citizens of the town turned out in force and formed a bucket brigade. It is due to their strenuous efforts that the fire was confirmed to the one place. Several times adjacent property appeared to be doomed.
Hotel Winnipegosis, which is just across the street was given a bad scorching on the one side. All the window glass being broken by the heat.
The contents of Walmsley’s poolroom, Whale’s general store and Paddock’s butcher shop were cleared out.
Part of the contents of the hotel were saved, but the boarders and staff practically lost all their property.
The hotel was managed by Wm. Ford and owned by The Brewer’s Syndicate. The loss is partially covered by insurance.
The burned building was one of the first hotels in the district on the advent of the railway some fifteen years ago.

Fork River

The funeral service of the late W. Davis was conducted by Mr. Williams, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church on Tuesday, February 3rd, at the house of the deceased. The remains were interned in the Fork River Cemetery followed by a very large crowd from the surrounding vicinity.
J. Robinson, of Mowat, has shipped over 60 boxes of fish caught in Lake Dauphin.
C.E. Bailey, Fred Cooper and W. King, C.M., returned from the annual meeting of the Country Orange Lodge in Dauphin. They report a good time.
Mrs. Gunness and two children have returned from a week’s visit with friends at Paswegan, Sask.
John Richardson had the misfortune to loose a valuable mare this week when he entered the stable in the morning the beast was found dead.
Mrs. Russell and children, of Kamsack, arrived and intend making their home with Captain Russell, teacher of the Beacon Heath School.
W. Hunkings, assessor, paid Clerk Wilson a visit on municipal business.
John Angus, of Winnipeg, pays frequent visits to this burgh. It’s all right John, Kitty’s busy these days catching owls.
W. King had a number of sheep killed by dogs ??? ??? making short work of any animal looking for mutton on his ??? in the future.
Don’t forge to [1 line missing] and fancy basket social under the auspices of the W.A. of All Saints’ Church. The ladies will furnish the baskets. There will be a short programme of songs, recitations, etc. [1 line missing] to come and have a good time. Admission 20 cents. On Friday night, Feb. 20th , at 9 o’clock sharp.

Winnipegosis

Fire completely destroyed the Lake View Hotel here Sunday morning. The fire originated in the basement, and gained such headway before being discovered that some of the guests had to escape through the upper story windows, not being able to save any of their personal effects. The citizens responded very quickly as soon as the alarm was given, and through hard work managed to confine the fire to the one building. Walmsley’s poolroom had a narrow escape. It being on fire several times but the bucket brigade never gave up, and the building only received a bad scorching. Hotel Winnipegosis looked at one time as if nothing could save it. The heat was so intense that all the windows were broken on the one side, but with a cost of paint and new windows the appearance of the fire will be gone. Had it burned, a number of us would be living in tents today.
Dr. Medd is certainly getting even with the boys now for what they did to him at the beginning of the curling season. He was a little unfortunate then, not having Ben Hechter and Jack Duhurst trained to get the broom instead of the fence. But now look out for the Doc. Why McDonald and his scouts only beat him by a very small margin Monday night. The Dr. and Watson had a good game Friday night only Watson had no use for the chalk. Dennett and Walmsley played a good game the same night, Dennett winning by 3 points. Watson’s rink won from Dennett Monday night 13-9. Jack Angus was the skip.
Mrs. Paddock left on Wednesday for Brandon, where she will remain a few days vising friends.
Sid Craighill, who has been confined to his bed through sickness, we are glad to report is around once more.
J.E. Morris arrived in town from his fishing camp last Thursday. He says the fishing is light.
It is rumoured there is likely to be a telephone line extended to South Bay this spring. It would be a grand thing for the farmers in that district. There will be a good number of phones put in here this spring.
Harvey Watson left on Monday for Dauphin on a business trip.
Wm. Christinson, wife and child arrived in town Monday from their fishing camp.
Willie McNichol and Gillis Johannesson got in on Saturday. It won’t be all down, then there will be something doing.
We are certainly getting a taste of cold weather now. The thermometer at the post office on Tuesday morning registered 32 below zero. One thermometer in town registered 54 below. Wednesday morning 53 below and still going down.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jan 22 – 1914

1914 Jan 22 – Killed His Companion

A fatal shooting accident occurred in the Riding Mountain near Laurier on Friday last. Charles Jolivet and Frank Turpot were out shooting, when an animal suddenly came in sight and in the excitement of adjusting his gun. Jolivet shot Turpot through the head, killing him instantly.
Coroner Harrington went to Laurier and after investigating the circumstances surrounding the shooting decided that an inquest was not necessary.

1914 Jan 22 – Mossey River Council

The council met at Fork River on Tuesday, Jan. 6th; all members present.
The reeve and three newly-elected councillors were sworn in by the clerk.
Hechter-Hunt – That a vote of thanks to tendered the retiring reeve for the good services given to the municipality throughout his term of office.
Hunt-Toye – That the minutes of the last meeting be adopted as read.
By Laws No. 106, councillors fens and mileage; No. 107, secretary-treasurer, and by-law No. 24, solicitor, were confirmed for 1914.
Hechter-Bickle – That Dr. Medd be engaged as health officer for 1914 at a salary of $600.
Toye-Richardson – in amendment – That Dr. Medd be appointed health officer with a salary at the rate of $600 per year for the year of 1914. Should the village of Winnipegosis be incorporated before the end of the year his term of office to expire on the date of the first meeting of the council of that village and that during the time he remains health officer of this municipality, he to visit Fork River one day each week. Amendment carried.
Hunt-Hechter – That the Clark pay the balance, $20, required to make up the price in full, $100, for lots 15 and 16, bloc 4, in Fork River.
Hechter-Hunt – That we subscribe for eight copies of the Western Municipal News for the use of the members of the council.
Richardson-Toye – That Coun. Hunt, Bickle and Hechter be the Finance Committee for 1914, and that the first named be chairman.
Bickle-Hechter – That Coun. Toye, Richardson and Robertson be the Public Works Committee for 1914, and that the first named be chairman.
Toye-Hunt – That the declarations of Councillors Robertson, $49.30, and Richardson, $25.20 he passed.
Robertson-Richardson – That the councillors’ fees and mileage be paid to date.
Robertson-Toye – That the accounts as recommended by the Finance committee he paid.
Hechter-Hunt – That the secretary put up notices requesting all persons who have municipal scrapers in their possession to notify the clerk within thirty days from date of notice.
A by-law was passed cancelling a little over $2000 of taxes.
Bickle-Hechter – That the Council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jan 22 – Ethelbert

Wood is coming in freely since the snow came. Quotations are weaker if anything. Prices per cord on track are $3 to $3.25 for tamarac, according to quality.
Business is very good considering the money stringency.
It is reported that John McLean is disposing of his grist mill at this point.
Robt. Wilson has purchased Leander Hill’s farm. We hope this don’t mean the departure of Mr. Hill from the neighbourhood as he is one of the old timers and has been with us from the first.
Wm. Stevenson, a former resident here, but now of [1 line missing] renewing acquaintances in town.
Harry Brachman returned on Monday from a short trip to Dauphin. He says the whole excitement at the place was the arrest of Krafchenko. [1 line missing] these dull days to keep us from hibernating.

1914 Jan 22 – Fork River

Elliott Brandon bought a carload of cattle here and shipped some to Lloydminster on Friday.
A well-attended surprise party took place at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey and a good time is reported.
Country Master W. King is out on his annual visit of inspection to all Orange Lodges in his jurisdiction.
J.S. Nowosad and wife, from Aberdeen, Sask., are visiting at the home of the former’s parents.
J.D. Clements is in Dauphin on business.
J. Reid and Mrs. Wood were visitors here on Sunday.
W. Coultis is busy these days break-in a nice colt.
There will be no services in All Saints’ Church next Sunday, the 25th, owing to Mr. Williams being called to Dauphin to attended the opening of the New Anglican Church at that point. Sunday school will be held as usual at 2 o’clock.
Mr. Fergus, inspector of Quebec Fire insurance Co., was a visitor at D. Kennedy’s on Wednesday.
Wood is coming in briskly now and the A.T. Company’s store is kept busy; but Scotty and Dunc can handle lots of this, the more the better.
We are glad to hear that I. Hafenbrak is at home again and improving in health daily.
Fred King is busy these days sawing wood with his gasoline outfit.
W. Williams has a number of teams drawing lumber from his limits to town these days.
The A.T.C. shipped a nice bunch of dressed hogs to their Winnipegosis store on Monday
Sam Reid and J.W. Lockhart are up the lake hauling fish again and we hope no ill luck with happen this time.
What is the matter with the C.N.R.? Our tri-weekly train arrived here ahead of time.
Mrs. Gunners is leaving on Monday for a two weeks’ visit with friends in Paswegan, Sask.