Today in the Dauphin Herald – April 24, 1919

Boys Plead Guilty to Robbery

On Sunday night, April 6th, the Clothes Shop, Mr. Benedickson’s store, was entered and a quantity of goods stolen. The matter was placed in Chief Bridle’s hands and he at once got busy with the result that two boys, about 17 years of age, were arrested at Wadena, Sask. The boys’ names are Fred Beach and Norman Clubb, and hail from Winnipeg. They were brought from Wadena on Tuesday and appeared before P.M. Hawkins on Wednesday, and pleaded guilty to the charge. They were remanded till Friday for sentence. The boys are known to the city police and their previous history is to be investigated. The most of the stolen goods were recovered.

G.W.V.A. Notes

A meeting of the above association was held on Thursday, April 17th, some 40 members being in attendance.
The question of a memorial for the fallen comrades was discussed by the comrades, and it was suggested that the memorial should take the shape of a home for the returned men, and that a committee be formed to confer with the memorial committee organized by the town.
It was moved by Comrade Armstrong, seconded by Comrade H. Harvey, “that this branch of the G.W.V.A. endorse the Imperial Veterans’ resolution, and request that the government take up the matter of insurance by the state for returned men who, owing to injuries received whilst in action, are at the present time unable to get insurance, or who have to pay excessive rates for such.
Moved by Comrade H. Harvey, seconded by Comrade Oliphant, that this branch endorse the resolution of the G.W.V.A. Winnipeg, and protest against the sect known as ‘Hutterites’ from being allowed to settle in this country.
A delegation was received from the Ladies’ Auxiliary, and arrangements made as to taking care of soldiers’ widows, who come to this town in connection with land, etc. It was decided that the auxiliary should provide rooms, as it was not considered that the G.W.V.A. rooms were suitable accommodation for ladies, and that they would be more comfortable in a separate house.

Mossey River Council

The council met at Winnipegosis on April 7th, all the members being present. The minutes of the previous meeting wee read and adopted.
Communications were read from the Children’s Hospital, Winnipeg; the solicitor, re passing of social legislation; R. Flett, re reduction of taxes; The Red Triangle Fund, R. Cruise, M.P., re Hudson’s Bay Railway; copies of letters from the weed commission, C.B. Martin, re seed grain, and Sawinski Bros., re car of plank.
Hunt-Reid – That in consideration of the large amount of money that has been expended in the buildings of the Hudson’s Bay railroad, and, further, very large amounts in construction of harbor accommodation on the bay, and, whereas, a comparatively small amount will be required to finish the railway and thus render the large expenditure useful; this council is therefore, of the opinion and most empathically recommends that the Hudson’s Bay railroad be completed as soon as possible, thus giving to Western Canada the benefits to be derived from it and for which it has waited so long. That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Thomas White.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the council of the rural municipality of Mossey River hereby makes formal application to the Good Roads Board of the Province of Manitoba that the following roads within the municipality be brought under the provisions of “The Good Roads Act, 1914,” and amendments thereto;
Road from south boundary of the municipality, making connection with the Dauphin good road system; due north to the village of Fork River, and from that point north and easterly to the village of Winnipegosis.
Road from the village of Fork River due west to the western boundary of the municipality road from corner on Fork River-Winnipegosis road to west side of range 19, along township line between tps. 29 and 30. Also from corner on same road westerly two miles between tps. 30 and 31.
Road from n.w. corner 12-29-19, easterly six miles, thence south to Lake Dauphin and then following lake shore to south boundary of the municipality.
Road from Winnipegosis north-westerly through tp. 31, rge. 18, and continuing into tp. 31, rge. 19.
Road from Winnipegosis south-easterly through tp. 3, rge. 18, and continuing easterly across tp. rge. 17.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. Paddock and Marcroft be a committee to inspect road northwest of Winnipegosis, and report what can be done in the matter of making it passable at net meeting.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the municipal bank account be moved from the Bank of Ottawa, Dauphin, to the Winnipegosis branch of the same bank.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That the clerk write the rural municipality of Dauphin and ask its council of it is prepared to pass a bylaw similar to those passed for the last two years covering work on the boundary road between the two municipalities.
By laws authorizing a line of credit of $15,000, amending the collector’s bylaw by reducing the salary to $125 pre month, and a bylaw authorizing a vote of the ratepayers of the Mossey River School district to issue expenditures for the borrowing of $12,000 to purchase grounds and build and equip a school. The vote to be taken June 14th.
The council adjourned to meet at Fork River at the call of the reeve.

Winnipegosis

The regular monthly meeting of the Home Economic Society was held on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8 p.m., in the Union Church. It being Good Friday the musical part of the programme consisted of Easter hymns. Mrs. J.E. McArthur gave an excellent paper on “Ventilation and Well-Lighted Rooms,” and Mr. Hook spoke in his usual pleasing manner on the subject, “Associates for the Young,” bringing foremost in his speech the necessity of child training. Ten cent tea was served, proceeds in aid of the library fund, when the meeting was brought to a close by singing he National anthem.
The Home Economics Society library is open every Saturday from 3 o 5 p.m., in Mrs. Honchin’s ice cream parlor.
Mr. D.G. McAulay and family have moved from the farm into town and taken up residence in the house formerly owned by J. Alexander.
The executive of the Order of the Needle wish to thank all those who helped to make the bazaar on the evening of Monday, the 21st, so successful. Mr. J.R. Burrell and her assistants, Mrs. K. McAuley and Mrs. Thomas, are especially to be lauded for the efficient way in which they handled the tea room, which was very popular. Mr. Hamilton very kindly gave his time in arranging the booths, which were very prettily decorated by Mrs. Steele, Mrs. St. Amour, Mrs. J.E. McArthur and Mrs. J.A. Campbell. A number of ladies and gentlemen assisted on the programme of music for dancing after the booth closed. Mr. Ketchison acted as floor manager and as usual made things go. The receipts for the evening were $119.10. Paid out for working material $3.75, for decorations $1.40, cartage 75 cents, rent of hall $6; total $11.90. To be divided between Red Cross and Belgian Fund, $107.20.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 10 – 1914

1914 Dec 10 – Military Notes

The address of the Dauphin soldiers with the Second Contingent at Winnipeg is care of “H Company, 32nd Battalion.”
Troopers Barker, Alguire and Leigh are now attached to the machine gun detachment.
H. Wade has been promoted to sergeant and S. Ellis to corporal.
All the boys are reported in good health and enjoying themselves.

1914 Dec 10 – Bad Accident

Thos. Free, a yard brakeman at Kamsack, met with a bad accident on Saturday morning last. He was standing on the rear platform of a freight train, which was being closely followed by a yard engine. The air brake was set in such a way that it brought the train suddenly to a standstill, the result being that the engine following crashed into the caboose and Free had his legs crushed. The injured man was rushed to Dauphin on a special, which made the trip in record time. On examination of his injuries it was found necessary to amputate his left leg above the knee. He is now reported doing nicely.

1914 Dec 10 – Fork River

The post office inspector was a recent visitor to our burg.
Mr. S. Bailey has returned from a business trip to Dauphin.
Those who have been out hunting the monarchs of the forest report the big game scarce. The weather, too, has been unfavourable. At the present rate the deer are being shot we must expect them to become fewer each year.
D. Kennedy is on the sick list.
Dr. Medd’s pleasant countenance was in our midst of late. The Dr. is popular here and when our village grows larger, as it is sure to do, and passes Winnipegosis and becomes a rival to Dauphin, it is more than probable the doctor will take up his residence in our midst. At least, he likes our climate and the optimism of our people.
The people are all looking forward to the Christmas entertainments in the schools. We all grow young again joining with the children in the Christmas festivities. Happy childhood.
Unless the snow comes soon the usual quantity of wood marketed here will be less than usual.
Santa Claus will have the time of his life this year in choosing a reeve. There are three aspirants for the position, viz., Wm. King, our present representative; Fred. Lacey and Frank Hechter. If dear old Santy gets down the right chimney he will place the plum in “Billy’s” sock.
The municipal nominations took place on the 1st inst. It was a surprise to many that there was opposition to the reeve as it was generally felt he should have a second term. He has worked hard and did well for the municipality. Let the people remember this when they cast their ballots on the 15th.
There will be a meeting of the council on the 18th inst. at Winnipegosis.
Mrs. D. Kennedy and two daughters, have returned from a visit with friends in Dauphin.
Among the parties out deer hunting are the following: M. Venables, F. Hafenbrak, J. Richardson and F. King. These fellows travelled west. Another party went east. It is composed of D. Briggs, of Brandon; Ed. Briggs, of Hartney, and several others.
Tom Briggs was the first to capture a moose, having had him rounded up all summer. You have to go some to get ahead of friend Tom.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, left for her home after a week’s visit at Mr. Kennedy’s.
Mr. O’Caliaghan, auditor and Mr. John Seiffert, of Winnipegosis, are paying this burgh a visit.

1914 Dec 10 – Sifton

Mr. Robert Brewer shipped a carload of stock from here on Monday.
Mrs. P. McArthur was a visitor in town last week on her way home from the Pas, where she had been visiting her daughter.
The Sifton boys have been very busy rehearsing the play they are going to give at the Grain Growers’ patriotic concert, at the schoolhouse in Sifton on Friday, the 11th inst. Don’t forget to come it will be a crackerjack.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt are away to Winnipeg to inspect a well drilling outfit. We all hope to see them busy drilling wells in the near future.
Mr. James McAulay, the Massey-Harris agent, was in town this week and reports business slow.
Doctor Gilbart made a flying visit here on Monday from Ethelbert.
Mr. A.J. Henderson, has been a visitor in the town the last few days. Everyone trusts he will be easy on them these hard times.
We are all proud to know that we have one lady in our midst who has volunteered her services to the Red Cross Society. We learn that she is leaving here this weekend we all wish her the best of success.
Messrs. Walters, Baker and Kitt made a business trip to Winnipegosis last week, returning same day.
Mr. Wm. Barry, the manager of the milling Co. at Ethelbert, made a flying visit on Sunday and reports business with him very good.
Don’t forget to come to the Patriotic concert on Friday. After the concert supper will be served then dancing until daylight.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 4 – 1913, 1919

1913 Dec 4 – Fork River

The fowl supper and concert held in the Orange Hall on Friday night last, by the Methodist Church was a success. There was a large turnout and the ladies are to be congratulated on the way they handled the supper. A number came from Winnipegosis. After the concert the young folks hired the hall and a good time was spent the remainder of the night, all leaving for home in the wee small hours of the morning.
There was a fair turnout to the horse breeders meeting on Saturday night last. Much business was done. The choice of the horse went to the Shire breed, the choice being closely contested by admirers of the Punch Everything passed off in a very pleasant manner, after which the meeting adjourned to be called later on by the president. Those who wish to join should call on Secretary Wilson as soon convenient and help on the horse breeding industry of this district, as only members of the association are eligible for use of the horse. Fee for membership is one dollar per annum. Anyone can become a member.
Freddie Storrar is home after spending the summer in the west. He reports a very good time.
Mrs. George Tilt left for Dauphin, having spent a month among her relatives on the Mossey.
Mr. Rogy, collector for the Sawyer-Massey Co., has been here a few days on business.
Mrs. Watson, of Dauphin, is the guest of Mrs. Fred Cooper for a few days on the Fork River.
A. Hunt, F.B. Lacey and D.F. Wilson returned from attending he Municipal convention and report not only a good time but a profitable one.
Mr. Rowe, of Harding, left with his third shipment of cattle and hogs. The cattle business has been very brisk at this point of late, there being more stock shipped than in any other previous year.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove has left for a few days visit among friends at Dauphin.
Mr. and Mrs. Brewer, of Gilbert Plains, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Wm. Armstrong.
Mr. Parser, surveyor, and men have left for Winnipeg after spending a week adjusting lines east of Lake Dauphin.
Wm. Davis and T.N. Briggs returned on the Fork River local, having spent a few days in Dauphin on business.
Garnet Lacey has returned home, having spent the summer in the west. He is looking fine.
Most of the male members of this burgh are hiking for the bush to get their annual share of big game. We hope the boys will have good luck.

1913 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

Bennie Hechter returned from Winnipeg on Monday looking very jubilant.
Dugald McAulay dispatched a carload of cattle and pigs to Winnipeg on Wednesday, himself travelling by the same train.
Mr. and Mrs. Watson have departed for a well-earned holiday and the dancing folk will greatly miss them as they were the mainstay in the musical line.
Messrs. Hechter and Ford returned from Winnipeg on Wednesday, most important business having called them there. They report that the city is a bit quitter than even Winnipegosis.
“Professor” Sutton has been recuperating his health here for a few days and greatly admires the salubrity of the atmosphere to this winter sanatorium. He made no public appearance to the regret of everyone and consequently sold none of his well-known concoctions.
Archie McKerchar arranged a small dance in the Victoria Hall on Tuesday evening but your correspondent not having been invited, no details are to hand.
Mr. McGinnis of the Winnipegosis hotel (nearest the lake) is having an addition made to his livery barn which will accommodate six more teams, or is it to be a store house for the game he has gone out to shoot in company Doctor Medd and Mr. Whale.
The first consignment of fish, consisting of ten loads, arrived on Friday from up the lake, so things should new commence to be busy, although up to the present it is not apparent, there still being some individuals in the town waiting for a job.
It is observed with extreme satisfaction to most people in town that Mr. Frank Hechter is standing as councilor for Ward 4, Mossey River municipality, in the forthcoming election, in opposition to Mr. Billy Walmsley, caused by the retirement of Mr. Seiffert, whose tenure of the office has expired. It is time we had somebody with Mr. Hechter’s business acumen to look after the ward as according to all reports things have slightly got mixed up lately and the candidate being the head of a large trading concern in town, matters would no doubt straighten out at once. It is known to everyone the great interest Frank takes in the town and district generally, being the patron of every object tending to the welfare of same, his genial disposition, and is always approachable by anyone seeking aid or advice. It is up to all his adherents to get him right there on this occasion, thereby showing their appreciation of his worth.

1919 Dec 4 – Bicton Heath

It is a good thing we don’t feel the cold during these dips.
Fred. Wenger is holding an auction sale on the 12th inst. Dan Hamilton is the auctioneer.
Mr. Seal has purchased the Marantz farm in this district.
The basket social, which was held at the schoolhouse on Nov. 21st, for the purpose of raising funds to purchase an organ for the school, was a great success, $74.50 being realized. The ladies were out in force with many baskets, tastefully gotten up, which were auctioned off by Jack Haywood, who wielded the hammer with good results.
Fred Sharp is visiting friends at Fork River.
Mr. Pearson has removed to the old Snelgrove farm at Fork River.

1919 Dec 4 – Fork River

A meeting of farmers in Fork River on Monday resulted in the formation of a branch of the Grain Growers to be known as the Mossey River Grain Growers’ Association. President Marcroft, of the South Bay local, filled the chair, and gave a short but interesting address. The following officers were elected for 1920:
President – E.F. Hafenbrak
Vice – D.F. Wilson, Jr.
Sec.- treasurer – Fred J. Tilt
These officers, with M. Gealsky, J.D. Robertson, D. Briggs, Max King and A. Hunt form the board of directors. The meeting was not as large as hoped for on account of the severe weather, but a start has been made and we look for some development in the near future. The association is formed to benefit the district both socially and educationally. Every farmer, farmer’s wife and the young folks should join and help the movement. Membership fee $2 annually.

1919 Dec 4 – Winnipegosis

The date for the Union Sunday school Christmas tree and entertainment has been changed from the 22nd to Friday the 19th December.
Seven carloads of fish have already been shipped. Fishing is reported good from all parts of the lake.
Archie McDonell’s snowplow and 20 teams left on Tuesday morning for the north end of the lake. They will be away about ten days.
The telephone system in the village is now in full working order. About fifty residents are connected. Hello, central! What’s the news?
H. Loire has sold his butcher business to J. Angus. Former customers of Mr. Loire will be welcomed with a broad grin at the one and only meat market.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Dec 2 – 1915

1915 Dec 2 – Enlisting Continues Active

Enlisting is now progressing actively and there are some 32 on the roll at present. Col. Gillespie is expected back from Winnipeg at the end of the week with his staff of officers.
The following is a list of those who have enlisted together with the places they hail from.
F. Crowe, Dauphin. (Frederick Crowe, 1870, 1000002)
R. Tarzwill, Dauphin. (Hugh Robert Tarzwell, 1884, 1000026)
J.N. Meader, Dauphin. (James Henry Meader, 1875, 1000019)
R. Marrell, Dauphin. (Robert Stanley Merrell, 1892, 1000020)
J. Henwood, Gilbert Plains. (John Charles Henwood, 1895, 1000011)
Trevor Jones, Dauphin. (Trevor Morgan Jones, 1876, 1000013)
R. Courier, Dauphin. (???)
F. Kilborn, Ochre River. (Frank Kilborn, 1875, 1000015)
J.R. Smith, Dauphin. (James Russell Smith, 1880, 1000025)
H. Gardiner, Gilbert Plains. (Henry Gardiner, 1891, 1000008)
A.G. Peers, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur George Peers, 1878, 1000023)
J. Hooper, Dauphin. (Joseph Edgar Hooper, 1872, 1000012)
W. McClernon, Dauphin. (William McClernon, 1887, 1000021)
J.W. Demery, Winnipegosis. (William James Demery, 1890, 1000005)
J.H. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (James Henry Kylne, 1893, 1000017)
J.E. Bickel, Winnipegosis. (James Edward Bickel, 1881, 1000001)
M. Jacobson, Winnipegosis. (Martin Jacobson, 1881, 1000014)
C. Klyne, Winnipegosis. (Charles Klyne, 1886, 1000016)
J. Gough, Laurier. (John Gough, 1874, 1000007)
C.W. Elliott, Gilbert Plains. (Charles William Elliott, 1891, 1000006)
Wm. Hatt, Portage la Prairie. (Wilfred Hatt, 1888, 1000010)
P. Harrigan, New Brunswick. (Patrick Harrigan, 1883, 1000009)
R. Pollard, Dauphin. (Robert Pollard, 1871, 1000022)
A. Tigg, Gilbert Plains. (Arthur Frank Tigg, 1892, 1000028)
J. Hickie, Gilbert Plains. (James Hickie, 1895, 1000027)
T. Kirk, Ochre River. (Thomas George Kirk, 1882, 1000029)
A. Douglas, Dauphin. (Arthur Douglas, 1897, 1000004)
– Donnelly, Gilbert Plains. (John Edward Donnelly, 1878, 1000030)
G. Montgomery, Dauphin. (George Albert Clash Montgomery, 1898, 1000032)
W. Greenshields, Gilbert Plains. (William Greenshields, ???, 1000031)
W.J. Crittenden, Dauphin. (William James Crittenden, 1896, 1000058)
E. Sandgrew, Dauphin. (Earnest Sandgrew, 1893, 1000024)

1915 Dec 2 – Had Foot Amputated

John Prefonowski had his left foot run over by a train at Ashville on Wednesday. He was brought to the hospital, where the foot was amputated.

1915 Dec 2 – Mossey River Council

Mossey River Council meeting was held a Fork River, Saturday Nov. 18th, all members present.
The new member, (D.G. McAulay), for Ward III was sworn in.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Communications were read from the Highway Commissioner; the Red Cross Society; St. Joseph’s Orphanage; Canadian Ingot Iron Co.; J.L. Bowman re Standard Lumber Co., account; J.N. McFadden; the Solicitor, re Shannon Road Judgement; the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin; the Secretary of the Union of Manitoba Municipalities; the Patriotic Fund; J. Bickle, Jr.; C.H. Bickle; Ethelbert Municipality, re Isolation Hospital; a petition asking for the formation of a new Union School District to be called Ferley and a communication re the proposed new School District of Don.
Hunt-Reid – That the plans of subdivisions of N.W. 3-13-18 submitted by J.N. McFadden be approved.
Yakavanka-Reid – That Mrs. J. Mylanchanka of N.E. 23-29-70 be given rebate of fifty percent off her taxes.
Hunt-Reid – That the Orange Hall at Fork River be charged only the same amount of taxes as in 1914.
Hechter-Reid – That the clerk write the Department of Public Works and ask that an engineer be sent to give estimates of a bridge across Fishing River between sections 1 and 2, Tp. 29, Rge. 19.
[1 line missing] son be appointed arbitrator in the matter of the establishment of the proposed Union School District of Ferley.
Hunt-Reid – That work done by Fred Cooper on the road allowance between sections 22 and 23 in Tp. 29, Rge. 19 be inspected and measured and paid for by Ward I as soon as the ward has money to its credit.
Hechter-Yakavanka – That the Reeve and Councillors Hunt and Reid be delegates to the Union of Manitoba Municipalities Convention to be held at Stonewall and that they be allowed $20, for expenses.
Hunt-Reid – That Coun. McAulay be appointed to take the positions on the different committee left vacant by the resignation of Mr. Bickle.
Hechter-McAulay – That the declarations of the Reeve $12.00. Coun. Hunt 24.40 and Coun. Reid 26.20 for letting and inspecting work he paid.
A by-law establishing the School District of Don in Tp. 30, Rge. 17 was passed, also a by-law amending the license by-law by putting a license fee of $1.00 per head on all horses brought into the municipality for sale.
Hechter-Hunt – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the Reeve.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert Wedding

Mr. Kenneth McLean, of the town of Ethelbert, was on Oct. 27th, united in the bonds of matrimony with Miss E. Wray, who was head nurse at the Ethelbert Mission Hospital. The ceremony was performed at the home of her parents in Toronto where the young couple were the recipients of many valuable presents. After the marriage they went on a tour through the States visiting friends in Chicago and stopping at other important points. On returning to Ethelbert they were met by their many friends and in spite of their endeavours to evade the crowd, they came in contact with the usual shower of rice. They were afterwards escorted to the Mission house for tea. On Tuesday following a large reception was given the bride and groom at the town hall, where they were presented with a beautiful writing desk and bookcase combined; also a jardiniere stand. Beside this they were presented with other costly presents. The bride and groom both responded to the address and presentation in a very touching manner. After a well rendered programme, which was heartily enjoyed by all, the guest partook of refreshments provided by the ladies.

1915 Dec 2 – Ethelbert

All here were glad to know old Jack Oshoost received his deserts in the court at Dauphin on Tuesday. It was a cowardly set to throw a bottle, which might have killed Finegold.
Wood is coming in only in small quantities so far.
Considerable quantities of wheat have been marked at this point this fall.
The new Presbyterian hospital is nearly completed. Mr. Josh Law, of Dauphin, is doing the painting.
Mr. Ben Brachman was a passenger to Dauphin on Tuesday to give evidence at the Finegold-Oshoost trial.
Mr. W.H. White is ??? ??? the year. [1 line missing] a term.

1915 Dec 2 – Fork River

Mr. Sam Reid is a visitor to Winnipeg for the week on business.
Mr. Cameron left for his home at Neepawa after having spent a week with friends at the point.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Hyde, of California, left for Carnduff, Sask., having spent two weeks with Mr. and Mrs. W. King. Mr. Hyde thinks this part of the country is all right, and he is sure right in his judgment.
Mr. Fred Cooper took a few days’ vacation at Dauphin last week.
Misses Bessie and Pearl Wilson paid Winnipegosis a short visit between trains.
“Main” street is quite lively with teams coming in with wheat to the elevator from all parts of the district, some coming 30 miles out. It gives us a glimpse of what the thriving village of Fork River will be when the district settled up and all the land [1 line missing] several elevators as well as many more business places. We have the land from which prosperous homes can be established once the right kind of men are in our midst.
Mr. Glandfield, lay reader, is paying Sifton a visit on his velocipede. Don’t you know it’s good healthy weather for wheeling.
The thresherman’s ball on Friday night was quite a success. Team loads from all parts came and a very pleasant night was spent.
A large number of the boys are busy cleaning their rifles and grinding up their butcher knives to do execution to the big game when the season opens.
Mr. Peach, of Swan River, school inspector, is visiting the several schools in this district this week.
We are sure in the banana belt when peaches are out on the street not frozen this time of year.

1915 Dec 2 – Winnipegosis

The Hon. Hugh Armstrong was a visitor in town for a few days last week.
The Cosmopolitan Club held a whist drive before their weekly dance last Friday evening.
Fish are coming in new and the town is livening up.
F. Hechter left for Waterhen Saturday.
Don’t forget the skating carnival on the rink on Monday next.
The rink opened for the season on Monday last and there was a good attendance.
Mr. Jas. McInnes and party left for a hunting trip Saturday.
G.L. Irwin, of Dauphin, is spending a few days hunting.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 30 – 1914

1914 Jul 30 – Mossey River Council

Council met in the municipal office, July 18th. Coun. Richardson absent.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted.
Communications were read from W. Murray, re Children’s Aid society of Dauphin, and Davidson & McRae, re continuation of 3rd Ave., Fork River.
Hunt-Hechter – That’s grant of $25 be made to the Children’s Aid Society of Dauphin.
Hechter-Toye – That the offer of the townsite department of the C.N.R., of the continuation of 3rd Ave. to the northwest corner of the Fork River townsite for the consideration of $1 be accepted.
Toye-Robertson – That the accounts of T. Burns, $24 and D. Stephenson $11.25, for work on the German Bridge be paid.
Bickle-Hunt – That the Public Works committee inspect the Williams Bridge and if satisfactory to report to the clerk who is then authorized to pay the contractor.
Toye-Robertson – The W. King be allowed to do his statue labour between sections 34 and 35, tp. 29, rge. 19, for the year 1914.
Hunt-Bickle – That the accounts of the reeve, $27.30; Coun. Hunt, $22.90; Coun. Toye $22.90, and Coun. Robertson $25.65 for letting and inspecting work be passed.
Coun. Robertson being about to leave the municipality for an indefinite time tendered his resignation as councillor to ward 6.
Hunt-Bickle – That Coun. Robertson resignation be accepted and that it take effect July 22nd, 1914.
Hunt-Toye – That the council tender Mr. J.D. Robertson a vote of thanks for the manner in which he has handled the affairs of the municipality while councillor for ward 6.
Robertson-Toye – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee passed.
A by-law was passed placing the standard width of the road grades at 21 feet.
Toye-Bickle – That the council now adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1914 Jul 30 – Fork River

Sam Bailey has returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Mrs. Frank Chase and family returned to Dauphin after spending a week with friends on the Mossey.
Mrs. John Phycola is building a dwelling house south of the Fork River.
Nat Little is putting in a foundation for a livery stable.
Mrs. Sam Reid and family have returned from a week’s holiday in Winnipeg with friends.
One of our Mowat farmers stated it was ninety-one in the shade, which no doubt accounts for ravings of Fork River and Oak Brae Ex.-P.M.’s in the Press, which have been disgusting and not worthy of further notice on our part.
Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, paid this burgh a short visit lately.
Robert Hunt, of Dauphin, Government timber inspector, was here in connection with the Williams Lumber Co.
A band of horses got into a garden the other night and the owner of the garden asked the horsemen to after his stock and was told they would get nothing as they were only squatters thereby adding insult to injury. While, the said party, at the same time, has his fence and gates and part of his buildings on the road, and has been a squatter for years; he must not kick if he gets a dose of his own medicine for unneighbourly actions.
Can the ex-p.m. of Oak Brae, show where the present p.m. of Fork River ever received anything at an election campaign, and can he tell us whose bills the money he received at an election a few years ago went to pay. If he cannot, ask the ex-p.m. of Fork River, who told us at the time where this money went. The present p.m. at Fork River can speak the Ruthenian language and his many customers come to him and ask explanations around election time regarding the political questions and I am sure he does his best to explain them to them.
When the time comes for the present p.m. at Fork River to sign the papers answering the questions asked, he will be right there, Mr. Lacey, and will be able to decide whether to sign or not.
Billy King and his friends are still looking after the Conservative interests here and do not require imported assistance from Saskatchewan and Alberta. We have opinions of our own and are able to express same.

1914 Jul 30 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. Cunliffe left Monday for the Pas, where they will take up their residence.
The Manitou started out on her first trip of the season this week. She will stop at various points to make docks prior to the opening of the fishing season.
The fishermen are making active preparation for the opening of the summer fishing season.
The Rex Theatre is now completed and was formally opened with a dance on Friday night. The theatre is one of the best in northern Manitoba. Manager Coffey is up-to-date and is installing an electric dynamic and waterworks.
The municipal officers have given 20 days’ notice that persons keeping pigs in town will have to remove them outside of the village limited it is time but why 20 days’ notice? One man was heard to remark that it was to give the little pigs a chance to grow.
Miss Hazel Coffey, of Dauphin, is visiting with friends in town.
Miss Woodard, a recent graduate nurse of the Dauphin General Hospital, spent a few days in town the guest of nurse Marcroft. She left for her home at Neepawa on Monday.
Mrs. W.D. King and Nurse Cummings, of Dauphin, where guests at the home of the former’s mother, Mrs. Theo. Johnson. They returned to Dauphin on Monday’s local.
Mrs. Hall Burrell returned the latter end of the week, from spending a few days in Dauphin, the guest of Mrs. A.V. Benoit.
The dredgemen completed the work of making a channel at Snake Island on Saturday and leave this week to commence dredging at Pine Creek.
Mrs. Cranage and two daughters, left Monday for Prince Albert, where they will spend a few days visiting with friends.
Mrs. Schaldemose, who was visiting at the home of Mrs. J.W. McAulay, Dauphin, returned to town Monday.
Frank Hechter left for the Pas on Saturday. It wouldn’t do for Frank not to be in the swim when an election is on.
J.P. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Tuesday. He reports that he and Capt. Coffey had a breakdown in the Cap.’s automobile after they had left Dauphin to make the trip by road.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jul 2 – 1914

1914 Jul 2 – Damage by Hail Storm

A heavy ran storm accompanied by hail visited the Mountview district on Tuesday afternoon. The strip touched by the hail was a narrow one and only two farms were struck.
W.G. Lock last 45 acres of wheat and 15 of oats. Crop insured.
Jas. Scarff last 40 acres wheat and 20 oats. Not insured.
Mr. Lock had only insured his crop a few days before the storm and only received his policy from Winnipeg on Wednesday.

1914 Jul 2 – Latest From Sewell Camp

Sewell Camp, June 30.
The Sergeant-Trumpeter mounted a new steed on Tuesday and we were treated to a great display of fireworks from the horse’s heels, the sergeant’s tongue and also eventually from the part of his pants which struck the ground after a while. For a minute or so he was hear saying, “Going up! Going up!” When he struck the ground, Sergeant-Major Fletcher was heard to say, “Coming down, I fiddler.” Highfield after four days’ rest has still a stiff neck.
The boys look very smart in their new Indian service helmets, which were presented to us alone (the 32nd) as a distinction for our work last year. The boys are proud of them as they should be.
Someone caused an uproar on Sunday. He said the camp was being attacked by Suffragettes. On closer examination they proved to be Cameron Highlanders.
Our shoeing smith thought he would ride the Sergeant-Trooper’s broncho, but changed his mind at the same time as the broncho.
It takes Dave Cox to ride the bronchos and round-up the runaways.
We will leave here on Friday morning arriving at Dauphin in the evening.
Our regiment was inspected on Saturday by the honourary colonel, Dr. Roche.
We turned out on Saturday morning at 4.30 a.m. for shooting on the range. Major Walker very conveniently was absent having a blister on his heel, so stayed in bed.
The Ashville boys are a first-class bunch of rifle shots.
The Dauphin squadron has been nicknamed “The Devil’s Own,” and they are worthy of it.
Red noses are the fashion. It is the fault of the occasional sunshine, not the grog.
On galloping off the field two regiments collided, resulting in a bad smash, one man getting his collarbone broken and two others disabled.
Our boy troopers, Gordon Walker, Gordon Batty and Roy Wade, are constantly being court-martialled by Squad Sergeant-Major, for unsoldierly conduct; not being on parade at 5.30 a.m., catching gophers before cleaning up their tent, etc.
Our cook put up some fine apple pies, things which are comparatively unknown here. We have an idea that Frank Beyette can have his job every year if he likes.
We have had a number of lady visitors up to now, among whom was Mrs. Walker and little daughters.
We wonder what it is that makes the boys sit down so slowly and gently. Having had some ourselves they have our sympathy.
H.H. Allan, the photographer, came down here this year and he is doing roaring business.

1914 Jul 2 – Fork River

A. Cameron and F.B. Lacey, of Mowat, have returned from a trip to Dauphin.
Vote for Sam Hughes, the farmer, and you won’t make a mistake.
Miss Gertrude Cooper has returned from Dauphin and is with her parents on the Fork.
Mrs. Attwood, of Towell, Indiana, and her mother, are spending the summer months with Mrs. W. Davis on the farm.
Mrs. Fleming Wilson, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of D.F. Wilson on the Mossey.
Messrs. J. Robinson and H. Hunter have put a three-horse power gasoline engine in their new boat. The water should fly now.
Several of the electors from her attended the Conservative meeting at Winnipegosis on Wednesday night. The speakers were Mr. Shears, and Mr. Grenon. The meeting was well attended. We hope to go again in the near future.
The Orangemen of Fork River have arranged for a grand celebration here on Monday, July 13th, when they will be a good programme of sports. The hall will be free to the public in the evening for a dance. All are cordially invited to come and have a good time. There will be a church parade at 3 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, the 12th.
On Saturday afternoon a Conservative meeting was held in the Orange Hall. W. King, president, presided, Mr. Sam Hughes have an account of his four years stewardship as member for Gilbert Plains, which was very satisfactory and well received. Hon. Hugh Armstrong, Provincial Treasurer, followed and gave a very satisfactory account of the financial standing of the province, which showed that the business was in good hands under the Roblin government.
Mr. Clopeck, of Winnipeg, addressed the Ruthenians for a short time and was well received. The hall was crowded and he gallery was taken possession of by a large number of ladies. Everything passed off quietly. It was a most successful meeting of the kind ever held in Fork River.
Mr. Green, late Liberal member for North Winnipeg, was here a short time Monday and later left for Winnipegosis accompanied by N. Little.
H. Woods, of Dublin Bay, was a visitor here on Saturday night attending the committee which is arranging for the Orange picnic.

1914 Jul 2 – Winnipegosis

Coun. Frank Hechter went to Winnipeg on Monday in connection with the good roads movement. He was joined by some of the delegates from the other municipalities at Dauphin.
Mrs. Kenneth McAulay, and children, and her sister, Miss Smith, left for Kamsack on Monday.
The big political guns, Hugh Armstrong and Sam Hughes left for Dauphin on Sunday.
Capt. Coffey returned on Sunday to Dauphin with his automobile, taking with him several of the politicians.
R. Morrison has finished the foundation for the new school.
Mrs. T. Johnston returned on Monday from a visit to Dauphin.
Mrs. W. Johnson and Mrs. McIntosh, of Fort William, are visiting with Mrs. Johnston.
The big political meeting on Saturday night was held in the new Rex Theatre. This building seats over 300 and a great many were obliged to stand during the speaking.
The weather has been rather on the cool side for boating and the usual umber of crafts are not seen on the lake. With the warm weather of July many will seek cool breezes of the water.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Jun 30 – 1910

1910 Jun 30 – Drowned at Winnipegosis

Disa Brown, aged 12 years, daughter of Goodman Brown, was drowned in the mouth of the Mossey River, Winnipegosis this week. She was bathing with several others, when one of her schoolmates, Miss Myrtle Parker got into deep water. Miss Brown went to her rescue. The bed of the river at this point is of treacherous soft mud and Miss Brown in trying to release her, sank in the mud, going over her head. Mr. Neil McAulay who happened to be near at hand rescued Miss Parker and then went for Miss Brown, but when her body was brought to the surface life was extinct.

1910 Jun 30 – Fork River

H. Nicholson from Dauphin came up here Wednesday and sold off the stock of Mr. Stonehouse who sold his farm some time ago.
Mr. Hughes, Conservative candidate for Gilbert Plains constituency is up here visiting the district and a meeting of the party will be held Thursday night when Hugh Armstrong, M.P.P. and Glen Campbell M.P., also Mr. Hughes will address the people.
Miss Alice Finch, teacher of the Mossey River School left here for her vacation to her home at Carman.
W. King came back from Gilbert Plains last week.
The Armstrong Trading Co. have bought out T.H. Whale’s business here and will open on the 1st of July with an up-to-date stock.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – May 28 – 1914

1914 May 28 – Accident on the Lake Road

A bad accident occurred on Monday evening to a party coming home from the lake. A culvert, just east of Caldwell’s old farm, has a plank broken out, and some one had stood a piece of cordwood in the hole; this the team shied at and swerved off the road throwing the while party into the ditch, the vehicle coming on top of them. Miss Nellie Whitmore, one of those in the rig. was badly hurt in the foot, and it will probably be a few days before she will be able to be around again. Several others were badly scratched and shaken up. This culvert has been broken for some days and should certainly have been repaired before now, being a road so frequently used.

1914 May 28 – Sad Death of Baby

Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Smith, who reside a few miles southwest of town, came in Thursday night last to attend the baseball match. They brought their four months’ old baby boy with them. After the match they started for home and reached the house of Mr. Wm. B. Miller, which is just two miles from their farm. They spent a short time at Mr. Miller’s and left for home. At this period the baby was alright, and was on the mother’s breast for a short time afterwards. On reaching home, Mr. and Mrs. Smith discovered, to their horror, that the baby was dead. The child was healthy and there can be but two explanations for its death. One is that it had partaken heartily and choked to death, or, that it was smothered.

1914 May 28 – Winnipegosis

Capt. Dugald McAulay attended the liberal convention at Gilbert Plains last week. He says he heard more about gas and oil than he did about politics while at the western village.
The Standard Lumber Co. will have a task gathering up the logs that drifted about when one of its rafts broke up some time ago. Under the new regulations of the department it is now necessary to pick up timber which is cast about in this way.
J.P. Grenon and Frank Hechter were Dauphin visitors this week.
Petitions are being circulated for signatures to have our little burg incorporated. The move is in the right direction as it is time we cast off our swaddling clothes, that is, if we are ever going to do it.
A meeting was held on the 23rd inst. for the purpose of organizing a lacrosse club, the following officers being elected.
Hon. President – James McGinnis
President – J.P. Grenon
Vice – Jos. Mossington.
Captain – Ned McAulay.
Committee – Harvey Watson, Archie McKerchie Alex Bickle, W. Denby, Sid Coffey, J. Lariviere.
It is understood that Winnipegosis will be represented with a team in the Northern League

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 16 – 1914

1914 Apr 16 – Chas. Best Hanged Himself

Charles Best, aged 47, and one of the first settlers on the Gilbert Plains, committed suicide on Friday by hanging himself to a brace in the granary. Deceased has been of unsound mind for the past two years, only having come home from the asylum about two weeks ago. He leaves a wife, six sons and three daughters, the eldest about 18 years old.
Deceased was well-known in Dauphin, having hauled grain to the market for several years in the early days.

1914 Apr 16 – Fork River

C. Clark of Paswegan, Sask., after spending a few days among his numerous friends at this point left for home. He was one of the old-timers, living here for ten years. He says he would rather live in Manitoba.
Professor Robinson is busy these days and intends trying farming for a little recreation as he states the bottom has fallen out of the fishing “biz”. The other fellow, he says, gets the wad. Try mushrooms, Jack.
J.G. Lockhart has returned from a trip to the east and intends investing heavily in real estate, etc.
Our Scotch friends seem to be taking alternate trips to the Lake Town. What will be the outcome we are not sure, as it’s neither sleighing or wheeling and there is too much wind for wings. Still, where there is a will there is always a way.
The Rev. Canon Jeffery, of Winnipeg, will hold Communion and baptismal service in All Saints’ Church on Sunday, April 10th at 3 p.m.
Mrs. J.D. McAulay, of Dauphin, is a visitor at the home of Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Frank Bailey, of Winnipeg, arrived with his bride and is spending the Easter holidays with his parents on the Mossey. Frank is one of the boys we are always pleased to see and we with him much happiness and prosperity.
At a meeting of the Horse Breeders’ Association on the 7th it was decided to disband the majority being of the opinion it was cheaper to breed scrubs for another year. We don’t hesitate to say the farmers have made the mistake of their lives. It takes backbone and money, sure, but it has to be undertaken sooner or later. We will have to let the groomers set back if we ever intend raising saleable horses, or, for that matter, any other kind of good stock.
Mrs. J. Rice is off to Dauphin for a few days holidays.
Miss Weatherhead, teacher of Mossey River School is spending the Easter holidays at her home in Dauphin.
Mrs. Humphreys has returned from a visit to Dauphin.

1914 Apr 16 – Winnipegosis

We are all turning our thought to spring when the lake will be open and the beats skinning the water.
The river is open.
R. Burrell has opened a restaurant in the Cohen block.
Dwellings are scarce and rooming quarters hard to get. This would indicate our little burgh is fording ahead.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley are spending a few days in Dauphin this week.
Sid Coffey, our moving picture man, visited Dauphin this week. Once Sid completes his new hall the moving picture business will become a permanent feature of the town.
Thorn Johnson has broken his arm again. This is the fourth fracture he has suffered.
John Rogelson is busy overhauling boats.
A number of mink have been added to the animal ranch here.
There was a large delegation from here on Monday to attend the Conservative convention at Gilbert Plains. Among the party were J.P. Grenon, C.I. White, J. Denby, J. Dewhurst, Ed. Morris, Thos. Toye, W. Hunkings, K. McAulay, W. Ketcheson, F.H. Hjaluarson, R. Harrison, Rod Burrell.
Four delegates were also along from Pine River: J. Klyne, W. Gobson, G. Pangman, and W. Campbell.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Apr 1 – 1915

1915 Apr 1 – Boy Run Over

Robert, the 11-year-old son of Mr. Alf. Coombos, whose farm is seven miles north-east of town, was run over by a heavy wagon containing about a ton of hay on Saturday afternoon last. The wheels of the wagon passed over the boy’s body in the region of his stomach, and strange to relate, the little fellow suffered no serious internal injury and is recovering.

1915 Apr 1 – Fork River

Archie McDonell and family, of Winnipegosis, have arrived and are intending to put the summer in on the A.T.Co. farm.
Mr. F.O. Murphy held a successful sale at Sifton on Monday.
Mr. McFadden, solicitor of Dauphin, spent a short time at this point lately. He will attend to professional business on Wednesday of each week.
D.F. Wilson has returned from spending a few days at Sifton and Dauphin on business.
Captain Lyons, of Winnipegosis, collector for the Municipality, is on his rounds and paid a visit to D.F. Wilson, clerk, this week.
Harry Hunter has the contract for finishing the Lacey Bridge.
It is rumoured that there has been more deaths lately in the Weiden district and that the people are running from house to house at their own sweet will. Where’s the health officer?
Mr. Timewell has arrived here and is spending a few days in this vicinity looking for a farm to settle his family if one can be got suitable. It should not be a difficult matter as there is plenty of vacant land here waiting for settlers.
W. King is building a house on his lot east of Main Street.
Mr. Lane, government engineer, was up taking levels in the vicinity of Mr. Wilson’s farm.
Miss R. Armstrong has returned from a few days visit at her home in Dauphin and the school is running again.

1915 Apr 1 – Winnipegosis

Mud Scrow No. 2 was lowered on to the skids Saturday, and was slid on to the ice where she wills stay till the river opens.
Mrs. John McAulay, of Dauphin, is visiting in town this week.
Mr. Gunar Fredrickson and family have moved out to their old home at the point and are fitting it up for the summer.
Mrs. D. Kennedy arrived from Dauphin Friday.
Mrs. A. Johnson and her son Kari have left for North Dakota to visit friends there.
Mr. J.P. Grenon arrived home Friday from an eastern trip.
Mrs. Thos. Needham, of Dauphin, is visiting with Mrs. C. White this week.
Mr. Wm. Mapes and family are back to town from their winter camp.
Miss Grace Saunders left for Winnipeg on Friday.
The Winnipegosis Football Club held their first meeting last week when officers were elected, and it was decided to have two teams on the field this year, with Glen Burrell and Bert Arrowsmith as captains. We expect to see some fast football here this summer as the boys are already chasing the ball.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 18 – 1915

1915 Mar 18 – Fork River

The Armstrong Trading Co. has closed their store here. Manager Seiffert has left to take charge of the company’s farm at South Bay. We have been informed that the store and buildings are for sale. There is a good opening for the right man.
Our friend “Scotty” is still in our midst and is in no hurry to leave for Winnipegosis. “Scotty” has made a lot of friends during his stay here and we wish him prosperity.
A large quantity of tamarac plank has been received by the municipality.
The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bailey are pleased to see them around again after their spell of sickness.
Two of our worthy citizens went on a hunting expedition in the east township and came back without their game. Better luck next time.
Mr. W. Williams is a busy man these days trying to do two months work in one now the snow has disappeared. That’s always the way, Billy. The trouble is our winters are so sort.
Our friend, Professor Storrar, of Weiden, was in town last Monday, renewing acquaintances. He has become a frequent visitor of late.

1915 Mar 18 – Winnipegosis

The ladies of South Bay gave a ball and concert in aid of the Patriotic fund. They made $17.50. About forty of the Winnipegosis people attended.
Miss Lillian McAulay, of South Bay, is visiting in Dauphin with Mrs. J.W. McAulay.
Mrs. D. Kennedy is visiting in Dauphin with her sister, Mrs. Wm. D. King.
Mr. Barber was a Snake Island visitor on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. McInnes are giving their third annual ball in the hotel on St. Patrick’s night, March 17th.
Sidney Coffey is a Dauphin visitor this week.
Harold Bradley returned from the city on Tuesday after spending a two weeks holiday.
Mr. and Mrs. John McArthur are Dauphin visitors this week.
Mr. Stonehouse, of Fork River, accompanied Harold Shannon to Dauphin.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Mar 10 – 1910

1910 Mar 10 – Find Baby in Bundle

At Mr. Mark Cardiff’s home about 11 o’clock Tuesday night there came two sharp rings at the front door bell. Mr. Cardiff happened to be in the backyard at the time and Dr. Beauchamp who was in the house, went to the door and discovered a bundle on the veranda. He brought it in and when Mr. Cardiff came in they at once examined the bundle and to their surprise found it contained a well-developed baby boy about two weeks old. The baby was wrapped in an old shawl with note attached. “Please look after baby – mother in trouble.” Chief Hillman was notified, but except the shawl and note there is no clue to its identity. Mr. Cardiff has had several offers from persons wishing to adopt the little stranger but those a home seem loth to part with it.

1910 Mar 10 – Former Dauphinite Suicides

Harry Smith, residing 15 miles south of Tisdale, met a tragic death Thursdays. He was found by a neighbour suspended to a beam in his stable and quite dead. No reason can be assigned for the act. His financial standing was good and nothing strange was noted in his demeanour.
Smith left Dauphin last spring for Tisdale to take up homestead duties. He sold his farm here, which was situated on the Vermillion River, three miles south of town.
He leaves a young widow and child and our months old.

1910 Mar 10 – Ethelbert

A very pretty wedding took place in the Methodist Church on Wednesday evening, March 2nd, before a crowded church of interested spectators, guests and relations. The bride was Miss Annie Eastman, youngest daughter of Allan Eastman of Garland. The bridegroom was Frank A. Hoare of Pine River. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Mr. Greig of Minitonas. Kenneth Eastman acted as best man, and was supported by Miss Pearl Mills as bridesmaid. The bridge was attired in pale blue silk, trimmed with white lace, and wore a wreath of orange blossoms and a net veil. The bridesmaid was dressed in pale pink silk and white lace.
After the marriage the guests, numbering 150, adjourned to the pool-room where a sumptuous repast had been prepared by Mrs. Neil Mills, to which ample justice was done. The room was then cleared for dancing, the music being provided by the McMurray Orchestra of Dauphin. Dancing continued to the wee sma’ hours of the morning, with just an interval at midnight for the refreshments. The presents were both numerous and valuable.
There was a nice gathering of young people at the manse on Thursday evening, the 3rd inst. to give a farewell to Miss M. McCauley, who is leaving the mission for a time owning to ill health. There were about fifty persons present, including a few families, amongst whom were Mr. and Mrs. Leander Hill, the sec.-treas., Mr. and Mrs. Skaife, postmaster, and Mr. A. McPhedrian, station agent. During the evening a testimonial of appreciation was read by Gordon Hill to Miss McAulay, and a present is to be forthcoming shortly as a token of the esteem in which Miss McCauley is held by the “Conquerors Club” of young people. After joining hands to the tune of Auld Lang Syne, the meeting broke up, some singing “She’s a jolly young fellow.”
Ethelbert is busy these days shipping cordwood, lumber and cattle. Donald McLean, brother of John McLean, is loading two cars of lumber, stock, etc. for his farm out west.

1910 Mar 10 – Fork River

After the general routine of business the Orangemen of this district last Thursday held a supper at Mrs. Clarke’s in honour of Mr. and Mrs. Northam, old timers.
Dr. Ross, from Dauphin, was up here last Friday.
The Williams’ Bridge, across the Mossey River, is now finished. This will open the district out East, and should be a great help to the farmers there.
S. McClean has been visiting this district of late.
D.F. Wilson is visiting Brandon Fair this week.
Mrs. Rowe and child are at Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Wilson and Miss Bessie Wilson are visiting Dauphin this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 25 – 1915

1915 Feb 25 – Interesting Letter from England

Private Kenneth Cates, formerly of the Bank of Commerce staff here, but who recently enlisted with the Scots Guards, writes interestingly of soldier life in England:
“L” Company, Scots Guard, Hut 11, Caterham, Surrey, England.

I have been thinking that possibly you might like to know that the famous “Dauphin Life Guards” are represented in Kitchener’s army in the person of your humble servant. I shook off the dust of the C.B. of C. some two months ago and returned to my native land, much to the surprise of my mother and sister who supposed me safely in Canada, until I walked in on them.
I enlisted in Liverpool when I landed and only had two days at home after being absent seven years! I asked to join the Devonshire Regiment but they were not recruiting for them in Liverpool and as I was tall enough the recruiting officer said I could join the Scot Guards if I like, which I accordingly did and am now in receipt of the princely sum of 1s. 1d. a day, just about what I used to spend on Bordeaux at the “Kandy King’s.”

This is the depot for all the Guards regiments, viz., Grenadiers, Coldstreams, Irish and Scots Guards. The barracks are full up of course so we are quartered in corrugated iron huts (or shacks) which hold about 34 men each, each hut being in charge o a trained soldier, mostly from the reserve. Our beds consist of three planks raised six inches from the floor, straw mattress, pillow and 3 blankets. We get four drills a day of an hour each. It does not sound very much, but believe me, it’s all you want. They are pretty strenuous hours while they last. Reveille is at 6 a.m., breakfast 7 a.m., dinner at noon, tea at 4.15, lights out 10 p.m. We are allowed out of barracks each evening for 6.30 to 915 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday we get out at 2 p.m. We can also get weekend leave for 12 noon Saturday till 1 a.m. Monday morning.

The training here lasts from 10 to 12 weeks. My squad has passed in foot drill and were issued rifles today. I hope to get to the front some time about April. We get a finishing touch at Wellington Barracks, London, after leaving here which lasts from a few days to perhaps four weeks, it all depends how often drafts are being sent to the front. Both the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the Scot Guards are at the front and they are kept up to strength from the 3rd Battalion to which we belong. There are only six men left out of the original 1st Battalion which went out in August, so you can imagine how they have been cut up.

It is raining here everyday and the mud is something awful, pretty nearly knee deep, but apart from the weather there is nothing whatever to complain of in the barracks and huts here. There are about 8000 men here altogether and practically every one of them is suffering from a bad cold. You cannot get rid of them, what with getting wet, always wearing wet boots, etc. my squad was inoculated for typhoid yesterday. It is rather painful for a short while, but the effect as a rule passes off in two days. We are allowed forty-eight hours off from all drill and fatigue duty to recover in. We are to be vaccinated tomorrow.

We get a bath once a week (boiling hot), but one lot of water has to do for three men!

I got a complete outfit of shirt, socks, underwear, boots razor, brushes, towels, etc., overcoat and cap, on joining, but the supplies of khaki trousers and jackets are hopelessly in arrears, so you have to wear your own suit of clothes; needless to say we are a somewhat ragged and nondescript looking crowd in consequence and the weather ruins a suit in a week.

I sailed from St. John and our passage was quite uneventful. The boat, however, was painted gray all over and all the portholes were pasted over with brown paper so as to show no lights. We were challenged by a cruiser when off the Irish coast and several trawlers, taken over by the Admiralty, came up close to look us over and coming up the Mersey serachlights were playing on us all the time. I got into London at 8 o’clock in the evening and found it in darkness, hardly any street lights all. The theatres were all running, however, but getting very poor houses at night. Everyone goes to matinees now instead.

Everything seems to be the same as usual; no excitement. You would hardly think the war was on, except that the place seems to be swarming with fellows in uniforms. It struck me that there were not so many young men to be seen in the city and in Liverpool. Nearly everybody you meet has several friends in the army somewhere. I have two cousins at the front; one is in the Flying Corps attached to General Paget’s Division and the other came over from India recently with a native regiment and my brother-in-law has quite a good job in the Army service corps and is travelling all over the place buying forage, etc., and all the eligible young men in my native village in Devonshire seem to have joined.

Although I had been away seven years, I have only managed to get two days at home so far. I hope to get a weekend shortly and seven days later on.

1915 Feb 25 – War is Hell

German prisoners recently taken tell a horrible story, and confirm Gen. Sherman’s statement that “War is Hell.” They declared that men in trenches both officers and privates had gone violently insane from exposure, the strain of constant fighting and horrible sights which continually greet their eyes.

1915 Feb 25 – Fork River

Miss Rose Canber has returned to her home after spending a short time with her parents.
Mr. E. Black and Mr. Wm. Hankings, bailiff of Winnipegosis, were here on business last week.
Several of our farmers are putting up ice for the summer on the Mossey River. It is quite a contract as the ice is over four feet thick. It is of good quality.
Mr. John Seiffert, P.M., seems to have his hands full these days smoothing out things here and at Winnipegosis. Johnny keeps smiling and gets there all the same.
T.N. Briggs is making his pile this winter cutting and shipping cordwood. With tamarac selling at $2 a cord and seasoned poplar at $1 there is not the least doubt but what there will be a number of retired farmers around this burgh by the time another year rolls round.
Aubury King represented this patriotic corner of the globe at the Red Cross ball at Winnipegosis last week. He reports a swell time.
Mr. Sid Coffey and Jack Angus, of Winnipegosis, were visitors at this burgh last week on important business. Jack was just taking the lay of the land after being absent at Mafeking all winter. He expects to be a frequent visitor in the near future. That’s all right, Scotty does not object. There’s lots of room here for everybody as Sid’s moving picture show is coming on Wednesday night.
It is rumoured that there has been quite a number of deaths among the Ruthenians east of here during the last two months from diphtheria. Some of those who had the disease have been allowed to run at large and thus it spread. We trust this disregard for health and law will be dealt with by the proper authorities. The majority of these people have lived here long enough to know the law in this respect and should be made to suffer for their carelessness, which is little short of criminal
Wm. King is attending the session of the orange Grand Lodge at Winnipegosis this week.
It is too bad the way timber is being cut through these parts without permits. Much of the timber cut is ruined. We understand an inspector is shortly to visit these parts and there will be something doing then.
Alex Cameron was a Dauphin visitor on Monday, returning on Wednesday.

1915 Feb 25 – Winnipegosis

Mrs. N. McAulay and Mrs. J. Denby arrived home from Dauphin on Friday’s train.
Frank Hechter left for Winnipeg on Monday.
Mrs. J. Seiffert is visiting her parents at Fork River.
Mr. and Mrs. Hallie Burrell arrived home from Dauphin on Monday and brought with them their new arrival. “Watch Winnipegosis grow.”
The government tug, “Mossey River” is off the cars, and will lay on the ice till the river opens, when she will be taken out on her trial trip.
Jim McInnes and Archie McDonald returned on Monday from Winnipeg, where they had been “seeing the elephant.” Just what this means has not been fully explained but Archie keeps on smiling.
Mrs. J.P. Grenon returned from Dauphin on Monday’s train.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 22 – 1912

1912 Feb 22 – Sentenced to Three Months

The case of John Genik, committed on the charge of unlawfully wounding and causing bodily harm o Anthony Genik, of the Riding Mountain settlement, was tried before Judge Ryan here the latter end of last week. The defendant was found guilty, and sentenced to three months in jail. The judge remarked, however, that he should have three years instead of three months. In a quarrel with his cousin, Anthony, John severed part of the former’s ear with his teeth.

1912 Feb 22 – Fork River

Mr. Fulkernson, of Dauphin, representing the Northern Lumber Co., was here on a business trip lately.
Miss Peal Cooper has returned from Dauphin, where she has been visiting friends.
W. William’s sawmill is idle for a few days waiting for repairs.
Wm. Hunking and R. Harrison were visitors from Winnipegosis last week.
D.N. Cooper, agent for the Stimpson scale firm was here last week installing an up-to-date computing scale in the Armstrong Trading Co.s store.
Nat Little, agent for the Crescent Cream Co., of Winnipeg, is paying thirty-two cents per pound for butterfat. There is money in cows at that price. The other fellows will new have to go some to keep in line.
Some one was “dear” stalking about the 14th. This is excusable at that date.
Don’t get inquisitive but keep quiet as we are busy dodging the cordwood piled on West Main Street when we come into town. The stores will soon have to be moved to make room for traffic.
Captain D. McLean and Mr. Ellis and son were visitors to Winnipeg last week, taking in the bonspiel.

1912 Feb 22 – Winnipegosis

Capt. D.G. McAulay has gone to Southern Manitoba to purchase cattle.
T.H. Whale was a visitor to Dauphin on Tuesday. It is understood he will open in business here again.
Mrs. J.N. McAulay is visiting at Dauphin this week.
Mrs. G.O. Bellamy and two children went to Dauphin on Saturday for a short visit.
The fishermen are about all down from the north end of the lake.
Peter McArthur returned from a trip to Dauphin on Saturday.
The Standard Lumber Co. will take out about three million feet this winter.
Already it is mooted that several new buildings, will go up here in the spring.
Copies of the herald were in demand last week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 19 – 1914

1914 Feb 19 – Fight with Mad Cat

Joshua Law was the proud owner of a large Russian cat last week. This week the cat is in the happy hunting grounds. The cat was the pet of the family and most affectionate. Three days ago it became suddenly mad and without warning whatever jumped on Norman, Mr. L’s 4 year old son, and commenced biting and scratching him. The screams of the child brought Mrs. Law to the rescue. She knocked the cat from the child with a chair. She had no sooner done this than the animal attacked Neta, the 14 year old daughter, and the fight was renewed with vigour. Finding the fight a little too hot with Mrs. Law battering the cat with a chair, the feline turned its attention to Mrs. Law, and Mr. Law, who was brought to the scene by the commotion at this time, says that it was the liveliest scrimmage that ever took place in Dauphin. Quickly grabbing a nearby axe Mr. Law, by a couple of well directed blows, dispatched the cat.
While the little boy is pretty badly bitten and scratched it is not thought any of the wounds are dangerous. Had Mrs. Law not been right at hand there is no doubt but the cat would have torn the child’s eyes out and likely killed him.

1914 Feb 19 – Mossey River Council

The council met in the council chamber, Winnipegosis on Thursday, Feb. 12th, 1914. All the members present.
Communications were read from the Children’s Aid Society, S. Hughes M.P.P., J.A. Gorby, clerk of Dauphin municipality; Reeve Collins of McCreary, Dominion Land office, Home for Incurables, the solicitors, department of Public Works, Manitoba Gypsum Co., Land Titles office and P. Robertson.
Hechter-Robertson – That the treasurer be authorized to pay the Lands Titles office $60.24, being the amount required to redeem the south of S.E. 28, 29, 20.
Richardson-Toye – That the Reeve and Councillor Hechter be a committee to inspect the roadway alongside sec. 365, 30, 19, and report as to the waterway being blocked.
Richardson-Robertson – The council of the municipality of Mossey River is of the opinion that the services of the bailiff in regards to seizure in the interests of the municipality was most unsatisfactory and that a copy of this resolution be sent to our solicitors.
Hechter-Hunt – That Mrs. Spence’s hospital account be not charged against the property.
Richardson-Bickle – That the assessment roll prepared by W.H. Hunking be accepted for 1914.
Hunt-Hechter – That Councillors Richardson and Robertson be committee to inspect the Fishing River Bridge and let the work for necessary repairs.
Bickle-Toye – That the account of P. Robertson be paid to the extent of $327.
Hechter-Hunt – That In amendment. That P. Robertson be paid in full for work on the bridge, $337, provided that the Public Works Committee see that the railing is completed.
Motion Carried.
Richardson-Bickle – That the reeve and councillors receive their fees after every meeting throughout the year.
Toye-Robertson – That the reeve be authorized to go to Winnipeg and interview the minister of public works with a view to obtaining a grant from the Provincial government for public works in the municipality.
By-laws were passed appointing Dr. Medd health officer at the usual salary; re-establishing the statute labour system; appointing weed inspectors and authorizing a loan from the Bank of Ottawa.

1914 Feb 19 – Fork River

Mr. J. Clawson, of Dauphin, spent a short time here visiting friends.
Mr. McAulay, collector for the Massey-Harris Implement Company, spent a few days here among the farmers.
Mrs. Beck has left for the south to visit.
Dr. Medd, health officer, paid his official visit and found scarlet fever prevalent. As a consequence quite a number are quarantined and the school closed for a time.
Mike says there is nothing like nipping things in the bud. We trust the fellow that carried the little medicine bag will not take offence.
Mr. J. Frost returned from the fish hauling up the lake and has accepted a position with the Williams’ Lumber Co. on Lake Dauphin.
Mrs. Wm. Davis has returned from short visit to Dauphin on business.
We believe it would be to the interest of the public if our health officer would visit the Mowat correspondent, as Mike says its coming on towards spring and he generally has them turns about that time. For instance, last week he made some very drastic statement about the P.O ??? We do not think he here came here and was unable to get attended ??? if he knew what he wanted. Another thing we don’t remember seeing him at the P.O. only once during the ??? As for the little peanut stand of ??? place, “two by twice” as he call it, we do not agree with him as it is one of the largest buildings in the place and is no more crowded on mail days than it was before the change, considering the mail is heavier than it ??? to be on account of the parcel post.
Mrs. R.M. Snelgrove is a visitor to Dauphin this week.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston, of Winnipegosis, is a visitor at the home of her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
There was no Sunday school or ??? at All Saints’ on Sunday and the concert for the 20th has been postponed.
Nurse Tilt, of Dauphin, was a visitor her home on the Mossey River.

1914 Feb 19 – Winnipegosis

Here has certainly been something doing at the curling rink this past week, both sheets going every night and some very close and exciting games. In one night Walmsley and McNichol, Medd and Dennett had to play an extra end to break the tie, McNichol and Dennett won. The following night Watson and Medd had to play an extra end, Medd winning. The same night McDonald certainly put it all over McNichol, the latter not seeding the chalk until the last end Friday night. Walmsley showed Watson the road 13 to 3. The game of the season was played between McDonald and Dennett. As they were late in getting started they were only to play ten ends. At the ninth end the game stood 11-6 in favour of Dennett; but would you believe it? McDonald scored 6 on the last end, winning by one. How did you do it Mac? Monday night the Doc rink was up against Walmsley. The Doc. not being able to be there, his third man, John Black, a new curler, trimmed Walmsley in good style Watson beat McNichol. Tuesday night McDonald trimmed Walmsley and McNichol beat Dennett.
The boys are in good trim for the Dauphin bonspiel and are looking forward to showing the Dauphin boys where the game started.
Council meeting was held in the council chamber, Winnipegosis, on Thursday. Councillors all present; some of them arriving to do with that.
The Hotel Winnipegosis is certainly doing a great business now. So many fishermen are coming in it keeps them busy trying to furnish them with accommodation. Mine Host McInnis has added a few more rooms to the hotel and says, “Come on boys, there is always room for one more.”
Wm. Ford and wife left on Wednesday for Winnipeg. We were very sorry to see them go as they were well liked by everybody here.
Dr. Medd was called to Fork River last Friday. There is an outbreak of scarlet fever and a large number have been quarantined.
Wm. Christinson has bought John Seiffert’s residence and will be moving there in a short time.
C.L. White is remodelling the house he brought from John Spencer, of Brandon. When finished it will certainly be a fine place as Charley knows how to go about it.
Frank Hechter left on Monday for Winnipeg. Frank is a great sport and be ??? had to take in the ???
The snowplough arrived from up the lake with an outfit of fish and fishermen on Tuesday. It was a sight worth seeing, sleighs with seventy-five boxes of fish, a caboose on the top with a family living in it. They were six days on the trip. Now, that’s an outing for your life. That will be the last trip for the snowplough this ??? All the fish are in and the [missing section].

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 18 – 1915

1915 Feb 18 – Card of Thanks

We desire to thank the many friends and the members of the various lodges for their kindness and assistance tendered at the death of our sister.
G.H. ALLAN
W.E. ALLAN

1915 Feb 18 – Commemoration Window

Particular attention was centre this week on one of the large show windows of H.C. Purdy & Co., a window of Union jacks and Stars and Stripes, commemorating the one hundred years of peace enjoyed between England, United States and Canada, 1815 to 1915. The designing and dressing of the window was cleverly arranged by Mr. Donald E. Bankhart.

1915 Feb 18 – Vital Statistics

The vital statistics for the town for the year are as follows: Births 150; marriages 48, and deaths 57.

1915 Feb 18 – Fork River

Mr. John Nowsad and family left for Aberdeen, Sask., to take up his duties as school teacher. He spent a month with his parents here.
Mrs. J.W. Lockhart returned from a business trip to Dauphin and is visiting with friends here.
Peter Ellis returned to Kamsack after spending a week with his family here.
Professor J.A. Storrar, of Weiden School, returned to take up his duties, after spending a week with friends.
There was a ball held in the Orange Hall, Friday night, by the young people. It was a very pleasant affair. Everything was tastefully arranged and up-to-date.
Mrs. R.M. McEachern and son, are spending the week with friends at Winnipeg.

1915 Feb 18 – Winnipegosis

The ball under the auspices of the Red Cross society on Monday night netted the fund $40. The average ‘Gosis citizen is ready to pay if he or she is allowed to dance.
The new government tug, the “Mossey River” has arrived and will be used in dredging work.
The fish companies are heavily stocked at present.
Capt. D. McAulay has gone to Chicago.
Mrs. K. McAulay and Mrs. Chas. Denby are Winnipeg visitors this week.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 13 – 1913

1913 Feb 13 – Baran Committed For Murder

The adjourned preliminary trial of John Baran, under arrest for the murder of Constable Rooke, was concluded on Saturday. Magistrate Munson remanded the prisoner to Portage la Prairie, to stand his trial at the next criminal court on a charge of murder.
The court was called to order at eleven o’clock, the court house being crowded by a throng who were anxious to hear the outcome of the trial.
The prisoner had to be assisted into the court by two officers and appeared in a very weak condition. Later he fell from his chair to the floor, where he was allowed to lie during the trial.
Dr. Harrington gave evidence as to his attendance on Constable Rooke, and stated death to have been caused by the bullet wound, and resultant weakness.
When the charge was read the prisoner declined to make any statement. Bertram Ryan, for the defence, admitted that Baran had fired the shot which killed Constable Rooke, but pleaded justification on a plea of provocation, claiming Baran could not have known it was an officer of the law who was demanding entrance and then breaking in the door of his house, and that Baran had a right to defend his home and had fired the shot with the intention only of frightening away whoever was forcing his door. He asked to have the charge at least modified to one of manslaughter.
In passing sentence, Magistrate Munson severely criticized the past character of the prisoner and had no hesitation in committing him on a charge of murder to stand his trial at the Portage spring assizes.

1913 Feb 13 – Salt Wells to be Worked

That there is abundance of salt in the Lake Winnipegosis region is well known. For years the springs there have been running freely with brine and thousands of tons of the best salt going to waste each year. It is now proposed to tap the springs and install machinery to reduce the brine and manufacture the output into salt for various uses. The quality of the salt, after it has gone through a purifying process is reported by those who have made experiments with it, to be of the highest grade. It is probable that a salt reducing plant will be built at Winnipegosis town. The salt can be brought down the lake in its raw state and later manufactured into various grades to suit the market demand. During the past three months three entries were made at the Dominion Lands office here for mines and as the capital to develop them is already assured the enterprise will undoubtedly be established.

1913 Feb 13 – Section Foreman Loses His Life

Harry Mushynski, section foreman for the C.N.R. at Pine River lost his life on Saturday in a peculiar manner. The pipes at the water tank froze up and Mushynski and another man descended into the well with a pot of live coals to thaw them out. When the two men got down the well the gas from the pot became too strong for them and Mushynski was overcome and fell into the water and was drowned. His companion managed to get out of the well. Coroner Harrington held an inquest on Mushynski on Sunday and the jury rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.
Mushynski was highly spoken of by Supt. Irwin as a faithful employee of the company. He was 28 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.

1913 Feb 13 – Fork River

Howard Armstrong left for a trip up the lake teaming.
Herman Godkin, one of Dauphin’s energetic real estate agents, is spending the weekend at W. Williams.
C.E. Bailey and Wm. King returned from attending the county L.O.L. meeting at Dauphin.
Pat Powers, who has been running a threshing outfit at Winnipegosis, returned and is renewing acquaintances.
Henry Benner left here with a car of cows and young cattle for his ranch at Lloydminster.
Professor G. Weaver of East Bay, passed through here en route to the North Pole to lecture on diversified farming, etc.
Mr. and Mrs. C. White, of Winnipegosis, were visitors at D. Kennedy’s on Sunday.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson is visiting her daughter, Mrs. D. Kennedy.
Mr. and Mrs. Cameron, of Neepawa, returned home after spending a few weeks with A. Cameron at Mowat Centre.
Mrs. Rice, teacher of North Lake School, was in town on business lately.
Sid Howlett and family have returned from the north end of the lake, where he spent the winter fishing and reports fishing good. He is going out on his homestead at Million.
“Say, Pat, it seems too bad the Mowat correspondent cant’s get his proper rest lately.” “What’s the matter now Mike?” “Well, he says the blooming politicians at Ottawa will keep haggling over the $35,000,000 Borden is sending to the dear old mother country after the assistance she has given us financially and otherwise for years. You remember a short time ago in the Press the M.C. wanted and howled for an all-Canadian navy. Now he turns around and poses for peace and spend the money in P.O. and roads.” Pat, “Well, I prefer it in Dreadnoughts as we have had enough of the sort of roads he has been instrumental in dishing up to us the last two or three years. I wonder which way he will jump next.” Mike, “Don’t be too hard on him, chure you know he handled the Liberal cheque book for years and there is a few blank forms left and our friend expected to be Admiral of Sir Wilfy’s dinky navy, but the election knocked that into a cocked hat and the blank cheques are no use now and the P.O. is like the elevator he twitted us about some time ago lost, strayed or stolen. When dear T.A. got licked we lost our telegraph office here and now we are getting the peace racket put up to us. Now someone has got to the end of their rope.” “Say, Pat, did yees notice divil a word does our Liberal friends print or say regarding the dredge contract let by the late Liberal government and that is being looked into by Borden.” “Oh, that’s a horse of another color.” M.C. stop grouching.
Wm. Amos, of Deloraine, travelling agent for the Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., was a visitor at Wm. King’s.
Miss Lizzie Clark paid a short visit to her parents here.
J. McAulay, traveller for the Massey-Harris Co., stopped over to see D. Kennedy on business for that firm.
Service will be held in All Saints’ Anglican Church every Thursday evening at 8 o’clock during Lent and next Sunday, Feb. 16, at 3 o’clock, D.D. at 2 o’clock.
Geo. Dickason, of Dauphin, is around soliciting patronage for the Laurentia Milk Co., at Neepawa, and offers these prices till Mar 1st. $2.50 per hundred lbs, of sour cream; thirty-seven cents per pound of butter fat; sweet cream; forty-two cents per pound butter fat.
Our genial friend, Andrew Powers, is wearing a broad smile these days owning to the arrival of a new baby girl and Bob Rowe is also the happy father of a little baby girl. We wish them both the best of luck.
We notice in the correspondence from our Mowat friend in the Press of last week’s issue some very sensational items, more especially the one referring to so much grouching at outside points on account of the high cost of living and would like to say the prices quoted are far from correct. We always were under the impression that our Mowat friend was at all times ready to advertise this district at its truth worth and endeavor to get more land settled up, but by the remarks referred to we are at a loss to know just what is meant by this sarcasm and would refer him to some time ago and his remarks regarding the loss of the late P.O. at Oak Brae to the district and the damage it would do to this part of Manitoba in the way of getting this land settled up. For the benefit of our Mowat friends and the public in general we would like to give the correct prices of the products of the farm and forest at Fork River today. He quotes wheat 50c to 60c, barley 25c, potatoes 35c, pork 9c, beef 6c, seasoned wood $1.65, greed wood, $1.25. Now the correct prices of these are as follows: (Elevator prices), wheat 89c, 88c, ble, according to grades. Barley 32c and 40c being offered by outside parties and refused. Green pole wood $1.75 a cord and season poplar $1.75; butter 30c, eggs 30c, pork 10c, beef 7c and 7 ½ in trade.
Council meets at Winnipegosis on Thursday, the 20th inst.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 11 – 1915

1915 Feb 11 – Death Under Suspicious Circumstance

Coroner Culbertson held an inquest on the remains of Pawlo Jura, which were found in the Duck Mountain, at Ethelbert on Wednesday. The verdict of the jury was that Jura came to his death under suspicious circumstances, and the jury request that further investigation be made. Wm. Barrie was foreman of the jury.

1915 Feb 11 – Selected to Fill Vacancies

The following twenty-five volunteers left on Friday for Winnipeg, where they will fill vacancies on the corps there caused by illness and death:
A. Wilson, R.D. Reeve, J.E. Welsh, T.M. Ray, J. Armstrong, W.C. Miltchell, R. Smith, P.E. Millard, W. Donaldson, W.E. Ridley, W.J. Hill, W. Miller, J.S. Blundell, W. McDonald, J. Nochol, W.J. Wallace, A. Baldwin, T.L. Rodway, I. Osman, B. Dilworth, R.E. Richards, P. Cowley, P. Boam, I. McGlashin, W. Munro.

1915 Feb 11 – “Winged Animals” at Ashville

R.J. Avison, the well-known farmer of Ashville district, was in town on Wednesday. He report people seeing aeroplanes and other “winged animals” in that part. From what we know of the people of that thriving district they would not be content to let other places get ahead of them in “seein’ balloons,” or anything else.

1915 Feb 11 – Mossey River Council

Meeting of the council held at Fork River, Monday, Feb. 1st, 1915. Councillor Hechter absent.
The clerk swore in the newly elected councillor for Ward 6, li. S.B. Reid.
The minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted as read.
Hunt-Yakavanka – Confirming by laws No. 107, sec.-treas. by-law.
Bickle-Yakavanka – Confirming by-laws 21 and 196, councillors’ fees and mileage.
A by-law appointing Dr. Medd health officer, at a salary of $50.00 was passed.
Hunt-Reid – That the councillors be instructed not to expend Ward appropriations or other funds on the municipal boundary roads without consulting the council.
Reid-Yakavanka – That the councillors Hunt, Bickle and Hechter be finance committee for 1915 and the Coun. Hunt be chairman.
Hunt-Bickle – That Councillors Reid, Yakavanka and Namaka be Public Works committee and the Coun. Reid be chairman.
Yakavanka-Namaka – That Councillors Reid, Hunt and Bickle be bridge committee and that Councillor Reid be chairman.
Communications were read from the Deputy Municipal Commissioner, the Red Cross Society, S. Hughes, M.P.P., Professor Black, the solicitor, the Rural Municipality of Dauphin and Ochre River municipality.
Hunt-Reid – That the secretary write the Municipality of Ochre River and express this council’s willingness to cooperate in the matter of a convention of the Northern Municipalities and that the reeve and Councillor Hechter be a committee to take up the matter.
Bickle-Reid – That a grant of ten sacks of flour be made to Siefat Mcushka and that the clerk purchase the flour where it can be obtained at the lowest price.
Namaka-Reid – That the accounts as recommended by the finance committee be passed.
Hunt-Reid – That if material and work can be obtained at a few months time the bridge committee be authorized to finish the boundary bridge between sections 5 and 6, tp. 29 rge. 18.
Bickle-Yakavanka – That the key of the council chamber at Winnipegosis be delivered to W.H. Hunking and that he keep the place in good condition and be responsible for the same.
Bickle-Hunt – That the reeve be appointed to go to Winnipeg and interview Mr. Hughes, M.P.P., and the Minister of Public Works regarding a grant to the Municipality for 1915.
Hunt – Reid – That W.H. Hunking be authorized to purchase two padlock and two pairs of blankets for use in the Winnipegosis lock-up.
A by-law was passed cancelling certain taxes.
Hunt-Namaka – That the council adjourn to meet at Winnipegosis at the call of the reeve.

1915 Feb 11 – Fork River

Mr. Shannon and daughter arrived from the east and are visiting at the home of Mr. Thos. Shannon, son of Mrs. Shannon.
Mr. Nat Little has returned from a trip to Brandon.
Mrs. Geo. Tilt is spending a few days on the homestead.
Mr. Wm. Russell has returned from Kamsack and is visiting at the house of his parents.
Ed. Morris and Max King have returned from their winter’s fishing up the lake and report a good season’s work.
L.E. Bailey, county secretary, and W. King, C.M., have returned from attending the L.O.L. annual meeting at Dauphin. Mr. King has filled the county master’s chair for five years and retired from that position satisfied that the order in the country is in a good healthy position.
There was a surprise party Friday night, the neighbours taking possession of the home of Mr. C.S. Bailey on the Mossey River. The visitors had a good time judging by the time they got home in the morning.
Mr. Steele, of Bradwardine, arrived here and has taken over this mission and will hold service on February 14th at Winnipegosis at 11 a.m., Fork River at 3 p.m. and Sifton at 8 p.m.
Mr. Green, lay reader of All Saints’ Anglican Church, Fork River, leaves for Winnipeg this week. He has been pining for the Sunny South and we wish him a pleasant journey to a warm climate.
A very pleasant time was spent by the young folks the other night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Reid.
Mr. Wm. Howitson has been under the weather for the last week. We trust he will soon recover as this burgh will sure go broke without “Scott” to stir us up.
Mrs. K. McAulay and children, of Winnipegosis are visiting at the home of Mrs. P. Ellis.

1915 Feb 11 – Sifton

Jas. McAuley, the Massey-Harris collector, was in our midst last week.
Messrs. Baker and Kitt were visitors in town last week from Ethelbert, where they are drilling a well for the grist mill, and report that they are 105 feet down and no water, but we trust that by this time they have struck good supply of water.
The Catholic mission held a sacred concert on Sunday evening, which proved a great success.
The grist mill is running very steady these times.
Mr. Paul Wood received a carload of oats on Monday, which he is offering for sale, so there should not be a shortage of feed for a time now.
William Ashmore’s team took a jolly party of Siftonites out to a dance at West Bay School given by Mr. J. Adams. All report having a good time.
Business has been very quiet of late but we are looking forward to brighter times.

1915 Feb 11 – Winnipegosis

Mr. and Mrs. A. Meston returned last Friday from Minnesota.
Miss Jane Paddock, returned home from the west and says, “there is no place like the old burgh.”
James Fleming, from the Pas, spent the weekend with friend at South Bay.
Mammie Bickle entertained a few of her little friends at a birthday party.
Mrs. T. Morton, of Quill Lake, Sask., is visiting her son. Will, who has been very ill. We wish him a speedy recovery.
Tom Sanderson returned from the north last week.
Frank Hechter is a visitor to Mafeking this week.
Mrs. Theo. Johnston entertained ten of the pioneer ladies of Winnipegosis at a delightful tea in honour of Mrs. F. Morton, of Quill Lake.
Curling is the order of the day. A grand bonspiel is on. “Stoop her up,” is the by-word.

Today in the Dauphin Herald – Feb 4 – 1915

1915 Feb 4 – Remains Found

Some time last fall Paulo Jura, a one-armed young Ruthenian, disappeared at Ethelbert. An investigation was held but no trace of the young man could be found. He went out shooting with another young man named Timothy Nakonectiny, and at the time and considerable money on his person. Recently his remains were found in the Duck Mountain, but the flesh had just about all disappeared from the bones. His clothes, however, were identified. No trace of the money could be found.
Detectives are now again investigating the case.
Nakonectiny, Jura’s companion, has disappeared from the district.

1915 Feb 4 – Third Contingent Complete

The 110 men allotted to the Dauphin district to be raised for the Third Contingent has just about been enrolled, the number now reaching 106. Taken altogether the men are a fine lot and compare favourably with the first that enlisted here. The following is a summary of the nationality of the men:

Canadian 37
English 43
Scotch 20
Welsh 1
American 3
South Africa 1
Danish 1

CANADIAN.
J.D. Munson, single. (Jack Devereux Munson, 1895, 424039)
G. Prieur, single. (Gabriel Prieur, 1896, 425219)
A.A. Day, single. (Arthur Archibald Day, 1896, 424013)
J.E. Welch, single. (John Edward Welch, 1891-1916, 74199)
C.W. Shaw, single. (Charles Wallace Shaw, 1875-1916, 424037 or A/24015)
W.C. Mitchell, single. (William Charles Mitchell, 1885, 74202)
I. Zufelt, single. (Isaac Zufelt, 1891, 425518)
H.W. Gardiner, single. (Hugh William Gardiner, 1894-1916, 424020)
J. Gallant, single. (Joseph Gallant, 1892-1916, 424019 or A/24019)
B.A. Whitmore, single. (Burton Alfred Whitmore, 1890, A/24250)
H.L. Pearson, single. (Harry Lindley Pearson, 1896, 425194)
J. Payne, single. (John Payne, 1892, 424066)
F.W. Clark, single. (Francis William Clark, 1890, 424671)
C.J. Ivens, single. (Charles John, xxx-1917, 424952)
G. Wildfong, single. (Gordon Wildfong, 1892, 424079)
S. Day, single.
J. Hicks, single. (John Hicks, 1895, 154745)
A.E. Arnold, single. (Albert Edward Arnold, 1895-1916, 424002 or A/24002)
P.E. Chard, single. (Percy Edwin Chard, 1896, 424657)
J.A. Justice, single. (James Amos Justice, 1896, 424028)
H.W. Minish, single. (Herbert Whitfield Minish, 1893, 424061)
G. Stewart, single. (Garfield Stewart, 1895-1916, 425364)
H. Bidak, single.
C.C. Stacey, single. (Clarence Crozier Stacey, 1896-1916, 425349)
J.E. Wells, single. (Joseph Edward Wells, 1889, 424076)
J.E. May, married.
J.J. Troyer, single. (Joseph James Troyer, 1887, 425428)
J.A. McLean, single.
J.S. Willis, single.
Jas. E. Cain, single. (James Edward Cain, 1894, 154744)
John Ball, single. (John Ball, 1895, 424539)
Edward Gordon, single. (Edward Gordon, 1893, 425870)
J.M. Crossland, single. (John Marshall Crossland, 1887, 154737)
Victor Lavalle, single.
John R. Levins, married. (John Richard Levins, 1880, 424033)
L.A. Campbell, single. (Lorne Alexander Campbell, 1879-1916, 460743 or A/60743)
Henry C. Batty, single. (Henry Charles Batty, xxx-1916, 424320)

ENGLISH.
A. Grove, single.
W.F. Percy, single. (William Freeman Percy, 1886, 425202)
P.E. Millard, single. (Percy Edward Millard, 18781916, 74190)
A.H.G. Whittaker, married. (Albert Henry Guilym Whittaker, 1891-1916, 424077 or 424245)
A.G. Sanderson, married.
Wm. Coleman, single. (William Coleman, 1876, 424688)
R. Smith, single. (Richard Smith, 1889, 74196)
F. Clark, married. (Frank Clark, 1883, 424009)
J.S. Blundell, single. (James Stuart Blundell, 1893-1916, 74201)
A.J. Middleditch, married. (Albert John Middleditch, 1892, 425078)
J.W. Thompson, single. (John Walter Thompson, 1891, 424072)
Ivo Osman, single. (Ivo Isman, 1892, 74204)
T.L. Radway, single.
H. Marchant, single. (Harry Marchant, 1891, 424194)
G.J. Dickason, single. (George James Dickason, 1887, 424035)
P. Cowley, married. (Paul Cowley, 1886, 74186)
G. Burkett, married. (George Burkett, 1870, 154735)
J.A. Hurst, married. (J Arnold Hurst, xxx, 424339)
T.W. Swannell, single. (Frank Walton Swannell, 1893-1918, 425389)
C. Recknell, single. (Cuthbert Bradshaw Recknell, 1890, 425232)
F. Pexton, single. (Fred Pexton, 1887, 424067)
A. Wood, single. (Arthur Wood, 1897, 424375)
A.E. Weeks, single. (Arthur Edward Weeks, 1880-1917, 425472)
C.P. Webb, single. (Charles Peter Webb, 1895, 424374)
W. Weeds, single. (Walter Weeds, 1894, 424371)
A. Baldwin, single. (Andrew Baldwin, 1889, 74184)
W.E. Ridley, single. (William Ernest Ridley, 1891, 74205)
R.E. Richards, single. (Robert Edmond Richards, xxx, 74207)
R.W. Watson, single. (Robert William Watson, 1891-1917, 424075 or 24229)
F. Pickup, single. (Frederick Pickup, 1893, 424068 or A/24068)
T. Pedley, married. (Thomas Pedley, 1878-1918, 425197)
A. Spence, married.
J. Gomme, single. (John Gomme, 1890, 424021)
C. Heather, single. (Charles Robert Heather, 1887, 424896)
B. Cheesmore, single. (Benjamin Cheesmore, 1887-1916, 424327)
W.J. Hill, single. (William James Hill, 1880, 74189)
P. Boam, single. (Percy Boam, 1883-1916, 74185)
T. Brown, single.
Herbert Townson, single. (Herbert Townson, 1896, 425426)
R.C. Crowe, single. (Roland Charles Crowe, 1897, 424012 or A/24066)
H.F.B. Percival, single.
Wm. J. Hickman, married. (William James, 1881, 424910)
F.L. Pearce, single.
Benj Dilworth, married. (Benjamin Dilworth, 1884-1916, 74187)

SCOTCH.
T.M. Ray, single. (T.M. Ray, xxx, 74206)
W.J. Wallace, single. (William John Wallace, 1895, 74200)
W. McDonald, single. (John Elliott McDonald, 1882, 424064)
Wm. Donaldson, married. (William Donaldson, 1885, 74188)
J. Nicol, married. (James Nicol, 1884, 74194)
J. Armstrong, married.
T. Latta, single. (Thomas Latta, xxx, 424031 or A/24136)
J.A. Craig, married.
A. Wilson, single. (Allan Wilson, 1895, 74198)
I. MacGlashan, single. (Isaac MacGlashan, 1885, 74193)
Wm. Miller, single. (William Miller, 1883-1916, 74191)
J. Alexander, single. (John Alexander, 1890, 425896)
R. Morrice, single. (Robert Morrice, 1892, 424343)
J.A. Whyte, single. (Joseph Alexander Whyte, 1893, 424078)
Wm. Lyon, single. (William Lyon, 1883, 424034)
R.L. Adams, single. (Robert Lawson Adams, 1896, 424001)
Wm. Munro, single. (William Munro, xxx, 74192)
Thos. Martin, single. (Thomas Martin, 1892, 424046)
N. McLeod, single.
T. Woodhouse, single. (Thomas Woodhouse, xxx, 425906)

WELSH.
E. Burnett, single. (Edwin Burnett, 1896, 424323)

U.S.A.
E. Engebretson, single. (Elmer Rudolph Engebretson, 1890-1918, 424015)
Wm. Madden, single. (William Madden, 1878, 424341)
C.B. Shales, single. (Chester Berdell Shales, 1896, 622436)

TRANSVAAL S. A.
H.E. Lys, married. (Hugh Ernest Lys, 1875-1876, Capt.)

DENMARK.
A. Peterson, single.

1915 Feb 4 – Fork River

Mr. Nat Little and daughter, Miss Grace, have returned from a two weeks’ trip to Rochester, Minn.
Mr. W. Walmsley was in town last week.
Archdeacon Green spent a few days in Dauphin on church business last week.
W. King county Orange master, is away on his annual tour among the various lodges and expects to return to Dauphin in time for the annual county meeting to arrange business for the coming term.
Wm. Northam, one of the standby subscribers of the Herald at Fork River, sends in the following verse when remitting his subscription. We take it that Mr. Northam intends the lines as a warning to delinquents:
He who doth the printer pay
Will go to Heaven sure some day;
But he who meanly cheats the printer
Will go where there is never winter.

1915 Feb 4 – Winnipegosis

Five men are working on the dredge fitting her out for the summer.
A large number of the fishermen are back in town again, and things are moving a little faster than usual.
J.W. McAulay was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday to attend the trainmen’s ball.
Dancing is one of the chief pastimes in this town. Lately, hardly a week goes by without one or two dances being held. A surprise dance was given at the home of Hos. Grenon on Friday last and another dance on Tuesday night in the Rex Hall.
Will Morton, station agent, whose life was despaired of, is getting better.
Mr. and Mrs. Ravelli, left on Wednesday for Portage la Prairie, where they will enter the employ of Hugh Armstrong.
Mrs. Theo. Johnson was a visitor to Dauphin on Wednesday.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Litwyn on the 28th ult., a son.
Mrs. (Dr.) Medd returned on Monday from a visit to Winnipeg.